Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!

The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st)

NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

******************************************************
To subscribe to a monthly email of this schedule, please visit http://www.HistoryChannel.com/mailinglist
******************************************************

Meet The History Channel's Featured Historians!
Go to: HistoryChannel.com/historians

History Channel Primetime Listings


05/01/2003

  8:00  Hitler: The Tyrant of Terror.   Story of Hitler's consolidation  of
power,  from the waning days of the Weimar Republic to his seizure  of  the
government  in  1933,  and his total command of the armed  forces  in  '38.
Features rare extracts from speeches, eyewitness accounts, and film footage
from  international  archives. Also explored: Hitler's macabre  philosophy,
from  the  birth  of  his  anti-Semitic views to his state-sanctioned  mass
murder.  Previously unpublished documents and startling  new  film  footage
create a shocking psychological portrait.  [TV PG]

  10:00   Machine  Guns.   The history of the machine gun  from  the  first
Gatlings  in  the Civil War to today's high-speed automatic  rifles.     CC
[TV G]

 11:00  Russia: A Closer Look.   A firsthand look at the stories behind our
upcoming  4-hour series "Russia Land of the Tsars", which takes a
 look  at
the Russian Empire spanning a thousand years--from the birth of the Russian
nation and the Orthodox Church in the 10th century to the fall of the  last
Tsar,  Nicholas II, and the Russian Revolution of 1917. Viewers  go  behind
the  scenes  and  see how the producers put together such a miniseries.  CC
[TV G]

  11:30   Infamous Murders.  Stalking the Innocent. When murderers  strike,
usually  the  inn
ocents  pay the ultimate price. We  study  3  cases  where
killers  selected victims randomly. Beginning with the Son of Sam, we  move
to  Scotland to examine the case of Peter Manuel in the 1950s.  A  burglar,
who killed the owners' of the houses he burglarized, Manuel chose to defend
himself  when  on trial for the murder of 8 victims. Back in the  U.S.,  we
meet  Charlene and Gerald Gallego, who chose young girls to  be  their  sex
slaves before murdering them. CC  [TV PG]


 05/02/2003

 8:00  Ivan the Terrible: Might and Madness.   The life of the bloodthirsty
first  Tsar of Russia. Ivan killed his own son and had several of his wives
murdered. [TV PG]

  9:00   Caligula: Reign of Madness.   Profile of the Roman  Emperor  whose
reign was a legendary frenzy of lunacy, murder, and perverse sexuality.  CC
[TV PG]

  10:00  Forts.   Fortification evolved along with man's need to defend his
territory from attack. From hills surrounded by fences to walled cities  to
impenetrable  castles, these strongholds of the past echo  the  history  of
battles for territorial control. Join us as we learn how, as weaponry  grew
in sophistication, those walls came tumbling down. CC  [TV G]

 11:00  Silent Service: TWIH.   Josh Binswanger boards a WWII submarine for
an  hour  devoted to "silent service". We join a search for a ship
sunk  by
the  German U-151 that terrorized U.S. shores in WWI; discover what  secret
cargo  the  German  U-234 was carrying and how WWII's  outcome  might  have
changed  had it completed its mission; examine the USS Nautilus, the  first
nuclear  sub; see how robotic subs searched for the Titanic; and learn  how
the Civil Air Patrol, an airforce of U.S. civilians, helped defeat the Nazi
U-boat threat. CC  [TV G]


 05/03/2003

 8:00  Save Our History.  Yellowstone National Park. Our first and foremost
national  park, Yellowstone was established in 1872 by Congress. Today,  it
encompasses 2.2-million acres and draws over 3-million visitors yearly. But
it's under constant threat from pollution, urban enc
roachment, and the same
tourists that have made it so valuable. We join ecologists, as well as  the
National  Parks Service, in their search for ways to preserve this  vitally
important  ecosystem, while keeping it available to visitors for  years  to
come. CC  [TV G]

  9:00   The  Louisiana  Purchase.   On April 30,  1803,  President  Thomas
Jefferson  completed one of the greatest real estate deals in history  when
he  signed  the Louisiana Purchase, buying more than 900,000  square  miles
west  of  the  Mississippi from France for $15 million. The product  of  an
unlikely chain of events born of mishap, backroom bargaining, and the whims
of  a  few colorful personalities, this monumental deal heralded Napoleon's
downfall and the twilight of European dominance in North America,  and  the
U.S. rise in power. CC  [TV G]

  10:00   The  Technology of Lewis and Clark.   Explore the technology  and
survival  techniques used by the men of Lewis and Clark on  their  landmark
journey to the Pacific. From their 15-ton supply ship to the 193 pounds  of
dehydrated  soup they carried to Lewis's prototype airgun and  experimental
iron  boat,  take  a  close-up  look at  the  guns  and  gear  behind  this
combination  of  19th  century high-tech and  pioneering  grit.  Filmed  on
location along the Lewis and Clark Trail, the program features an interview
with William Clark's great-great-great grandson. CC  [TV G]

  11:00   Hoover Dam.   The task was monumental: Build the world's  largest
dam  in the middle of the desert, and tame the river that carved the  Grand
Canyon--all in seven years! When the Hoover Dam was completed in  1935,  it
was  the largest dam in the world. We'll reveal how this engineering wonder
of the world was conceived and built. CC  [TV G]


 05/04/2003

  8:00   The  Horrors  of Hussein.   Everyone knows Saddam  Hussein  was  a
tyrant,  but the invasion of Iraq by coalition forces in 2003 revealed  the
full  extent of the terror apparatus Saddam used to maintain power. In this
gripping  hour, we examin
e the roots of this dictator madman--how  he  used
violence beginning in his teens to achieve his ends--and talk to victims of
his  terror. We also see how his ministry of terror became a family affair:
his two sons, Ouday and Qusay, intended to establish a reign of terror that
would last generations [TV 14]


  9:00   Saddam Hussein: Butcher of Baghdad.   Profile of the Iraqi leader,
despised  in  the West but a hero to many in the Mideast.  Focuses  on  his
bloody  rise to power and includes an interview with the man who  "doubled"
for Saddam's brutal son and defected. CC  [TV PG]

 10:00  Mail Call.  Mortar/WWII GI's Personal Items/Native-American Arrows.
R.  Lee  Ermey, who portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket",
 applies
his  gruff  sense  of humor in this half-hour series that answers  viewers'
mail  about  what  the armed forces were, and really  are,  like!  Shot  on
location,  Ermey  reads the questions on air and then  sends  them  out  to
military  experts in the field for answers and brief demonstrations.  Emery
learns how to aim an 81mm mortar; what personal items GIs carried in  WWII;
and how Native Americans made arrows. CC  [TV PG]

 10:30  Tales of the Gun.  Guns of Remington. The Remington Arms Company is
America's oldest gun manufacturer. Since 1816, Remington has produced  over
35 million firearms, including pocket-sized derringers, shotguns, and long-
range rifles. See how Remington firearms helped tame the Old West, win wars
in Europe and Asia, and earn medals in Olympic shooting competitions. (Half-
hour version) CC  [TV G]

  11:00   The Color of War.  Why We Fight. After all of their training  and
discipline, the fighting soldiers of WWII were not simply cogs  in  a  huge
war  machine. They were men whose thoughts and actions revealed their  true
attitudes about their experiences in the armed forces. In this episode,  we
examine  why  the men fought on, sometimes against their better  instincts.
Peter Coyote narrates this compelling journey into WWII through the eyes of
those  who 
 lived  it,  using  color film and  photographs  unearthed  from
archives and personal collections. CC  [TV PG]


 05/05/2003

  8:00  Mail Call.  Refueling a Fighter Jet/Naval Signal Flags/GI Chow.  R.
Lee  Ermey, who portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies
 his
gruff  sense  of humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers'  mail
about  what the armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on  location,
Ermey  reads  the  questions on air and then sends  them  out  to  military
experts in the field for answers and brief demonstrations. Find out how  to
refuel a fighter jet in midair, how ships send messages using signal flags,
and what soldiers eat on the battlefield. CC  [TV PG]

  8:30   Conquest.  Urban Ops. Peter Woodward and his team  learn  what  it
takes  to be in a police SWAT team at the Direct Action Resource Center  in
Little  Rock,  Arkansas. They're put through the paces by  FBI  instructors
John  Hickman and Tim Williams and drilled in using all the special weapons
and tactics employed by America's best hostage rescuers. Peter's challenge-
-lead  his  team down a rope from a helicopter, maneuver into an enemy-held
building,  breach  the doors, clear the rooms, subdue  the  bad  guys,  and
rescue the hostage! CC  [TV PG]

  9:00   The Last Mission.   Meet Jim Smith, radio operator on a B-29  that
flew WWII's final mission. On August 14,1945, on a bombing run to the Akita
oil  refinery, Smith's plane flew over Tokyo, causing a blackout. That same
night, rebellious Japanese troops arrested Emperor Hirohito and were trying
to  find  and  destroy a recording scheduled to broadcast  the  next  day--
Hirohito  announcing surrender. Aided by historians, see how the  B-29  air
strike unwittingly collapsed the coup, saved Tokyo from nuclear strike, and
ended WWII. CC  [TV PG]

  11:00   Halsey's Typhoons: Peril on the Sea.   In December 1944,  Admiral
"Bull" Halsey's Third Fleet was confronted by a killer typhoon in
the South
Pacific. Despite the courage of the "tin can" sailors battli
ng 100-mile-an-
hour  winds  and torrential rain, three destroyers capsized.  Unbelievably,
six  months  later, the Fleet encountered another typhoon.  We  investigate
these  intrepid forces of nature that nearly sunk Halsey's career  when  an
official court of inquiry recommended that he be relieved of his duties. CC
[TV G]


 05/06/2003

  8:00  Deep Sea Detectives.  Raise the Monitor! A 4-pronged anchor, a 138-
year-old  propeller, and a 36-ton steam engine. The ironclad  USS  Monitor,
the  Civil War's most advanced warship, is being recovered piece  by  piece
from  a  watery  grave  16  miles off the coast  of  Cape  Hatteras,  North
Carolina.  Join  us  for a voyage of discovery as we trace  the  incredible
efforts to save this historical treasure on the verge of collapse--from its
1973 rediscovery to the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration and
Navy's efforts to save the engine. CC  [TV G]

  10:00   Cannons.    Cannons have fired balls of iron  and  atomic  bombs,
changed  the way wars are fought, and now come equipped with smart weapons.
Beginning  with 13th-century cannons that were designed to penetrate  forts
of  the  day,  we'll see how cannons were first cast and later forged,  and
show  how large cannons terrorized civilians and soldiers in WWI and  WWII.
Moving  to the present, we feature the 40-ton self-propelled Crusader  that
launches 100-pound steel artillery shells more than 33 miles. CC  [TV G]

  11:00   The  Horrors of Hussein.   Everyone knows Saddam  Hussein  was  a
tyrant,  but the invasion of Iraq by coalition forces in 2003 revealed  the
full  extent of the terror apparatus Saddam used to maintain power. In this
gripping  hour, we examine the roots of this dictator madman--how  he  used
violence beginning in his teens to achieve his ends--and talk to victims of
his  terror. We also see how his ministry of terror became a family affair:
his two sons, Ouday and Qusay, intended to establish a reign of terror that
would last generations [TV 14]


 05/07/2003

  8:00   Uprising! 
 Afghanistan's Deadliest  Battle.    Firsthand  accounts
highlight  a moment-by-moment look at the deadliest battle in  the  war  in
Afghanistan--the revolt at Mazar-e-Sharif, where CIA Agent Mike Spann  lost
his  life  and American Taliban fighter John Walker Lindh was captured.  We
see  how  Taliban soldiers were trucked to a massive 18th-century fortress,
interrogated, and held in the dungeon, and witness the chaos  that  erupted
when   some  of  the  400  prisoners  revolted.  Includes  interviews  with
journalists trapped inside the fortress. CC  [TV PG]

  9:00  Snipers.  One Shot--One Kill. Statistics prove it's damned hard  to
kill  an enemy soldier on the battlefield. That's why the U.S. Marine Corps
urges its best marksmen to become snipers--human machines, inhuman patience
and  precision. From distances up to 3 miles, tomorrow's Marines  train  to
neutralize  enemies with one shot from their rifles--a shot that  can  mean
the  difference between peaceful surrender and bloody assault.  We  journey
from  Vietnam  to  Africa  and  Eastern Europe  to  observe  these  snipers
watching...waiting...firing. CC  [TV PG]

 10:00  Hardware Stores.   Join us for a nuts-and-bolts look at the history
and  evolution of those places that hold our world together. From the local
blacksmith to Home Depot, it's the story of nails, screws, mollybolts, duct
tape, and superglue. We visit one of the oldest hardware stores in America,
Placerville  True  Value, and wander the aisles of the mega-giants.  As  we
chronicle the rise of the hardware "Big Box" superstores, we also
 see  how
the mom-and-pop local hardware stores still manage to survive. CC  [TV G]

 11:00  Sex in the Real West.   Called easy women, shady ladies, and soiled
doves,  the women who went west to practice the oldest profession were  the
first  ladies  of the American frontier. Arriving ahead of  their  "decent"
sisters,  prostitutes  flocked to the boom towns and mining  camps,  facing
ostracism and abuse as they sought a piece of the American Dream.  CC   
[TV
PG]


 05/08/2003

  8:00   America's Stonehenge.   Mystery Hill, called America's Stonehenge,
is  a  gigantic  confusion of walls, caves, and tunnels running  across  30
acres  of  hillside  in  rural Salem, New Hampshire.  This  arrangement  of
ancient stones is believed to be astronomically aligned to solar and  lunar
events.  Carbon  dating  places the site as being 4,000  years  old--before
Columbus! What culture was advanced enough to move 11-ton pieces of  stone?
Who  constructed  this  sophisticated labyrinth of stones  to  measure  the
summer and winter solstices? CC  [TV G]

  9:00   Snipers.  World's Deadliest Snipers. Among the world's  best,  the
British  Royal Marines build on their noble traditions and the  lessons  of
history  to  hone the skills of snipers and place them in  a  proud  global
lineage.  The daring British Commandos, perfecting their use of  camouflage
and  stalking,  cleared the hedgerows at Normandy.  The  Russian  Red  Army
snipers,  known  for  patience and stealth, helped to break  the  siege  of
Stalingrad.  We  also look at a little-known force--the Red  Army's  deadly
women snipers, who fought alongside the men. CC  [TV PG]

  10:00   U.S.  Guns of World War II.   An examination of the weapons  that
battled through surf and snow, dense jungle and choking dust...the guns  of
the  American GI. Though WWII introduced instruments that pierced the  dark
and  weapons  that  released the power of the atom, the infantryman's  guns
were designed decades before; but in dependability they were unequaled.  CC
[TV G]

  11:00   Infamous Murders.  Horror on the Highways. The anonymity  of  the
highway and the speed with which its patrons pass through makes it an ideal
hunting  and dumping ground for murderers who prey on vulnerable travelers.
We examine three American killers who haunted the highways: the unrepentant
Henry Lee Lucas, who claimed to have murdered 240 people; William Bonin,  a
Vietnam  War veteran who led a group of friends in random killing of  young
boys;  and Joseph 
Paul Franklin, a White Supremacist who killed  up  to  20
people. CC  [TV PG]

  11:30   Infamous  Murders.   The Cannibals. A disturbing  look  into  the
ultimate  taboo. We examine the cases of three murderers who ate the  flesh
of  their victims: Jeffrey Dahmer, a loner who killed up to 17 young men in
Milwaukee,  Wisconsin;  Andrei  Chikatilo,  Russia's  worst  serial  killer
responsible  for killing at least 53 people; and Ed Gein, another  murderer
from Wisconsin, whose horrible crimes inspired Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho",
as well as "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and "The Silence of
the Lambs". CC
[TV PG]


 05/09/2003

  8:00  Ghost Plane of the Desert: "Lady Be Good".   April 4, 1943--25
B-24
Liberators take off from their base in Libya on a bombing mission to Italy,
but  only 24 return. In 1959, a British survey team discovers a plane, deep
in  the  desert. Using the diary of two crewmembers, along with the  crew's
remains,  we learn of their struggle to cross 100 miles of desert,  without
food or water. CC  [TV G]

 9:00  Snipers.  Stalk and Kill. Meet the ultimate hunters in a deadly game
where  the  quarry shoots back--U.S. Army snipers. Experts of  stealth  and
stalking,  they  can kill with a single shot from nearly a mile,  or  creep
within  yards  of  an enemy target remaining virtually invisible.  Starting
with American snipers in the Revolutionary War and ending with 21st century
snipers and the latest technology at the U.S. Army Sniper School, we review
the  history of these marksmen who train to become the "most hated  men
 on
the battlefield." CC  [TV PG]

  10:00  Trucks.   Icons of the open road, trucks form the backbone of  the
construction  and transportation industries. The facility to handle  nearly
any  load  and  the  ability to deliver goods almost anywhere  make  trucks
integral  to  modern  life.  From 18th-century steam-powered  carriages  to
tomorrow's computerized trucks, it's a long haul you'll enjoy! CC  [TV G]

  11:00   Invasions:  TWIH.   At the New Orleans' D-Day Museum,  
we  review
history's invasions--including a Union general's controversial invasion  of
the  South,  D-Day, the Bay of Pigs, and beyond. See how a deadly  training
mishap nearly cancelled D-Day; decide whether Union General Sherman  was  a
war  hero or a war criminal; take a look at how U.S. Special Forces tracked
down  Panama dictator Manuel Noriega in the 1989 campaign; hear  how  Cuban
exiles took place in the ill-fated, CIA-sponsored Bay of Pigs Invasion.  CC
[TV G]


 05/10/2003

  8:00   Angels:  Good or Evil.   Winged messengers have mesmerized  humans
since the dawn of civilization. Isis, Hermes, Mercury, and Asmodeus set the
stage  for  monotheism's  angels--Gabriel,  Michael,  and  Satan.  Hebraic,
Christian,  and Muslim scripture all describe angels and demons  that  were
invoked  in  magic spells, immortalized in art, trivialized  as  decorative
accessories,  and  dismissed by science. We see how their  legacies  shaped
religion  and  art and hear from those who testify to firsthand  encounters
with these curious creatures. CC  [TV G]

  10:00   Golden  Gate Bridge.   More than 50 years after its construction,
the  Golden  Gate remains one of the world's great engineering marvels.  It
took  25-million man-hours and 80,000 miles of cable to complete.  But  the
cost in human life proved even greater. CC  [TV G]

  11:00  Marquis de Sade: The Depraved Aristocrat.   Portrait of the  18th-
century  French writer and connoisseur of sex, whose name would  enter  the
language  as  a  synonym  for  sexual cruelty.  The  Marquis  de  Sade  was
imprisoned  numerous times for his scandalous novels and  plays  that  were
filled with perversion, torture, and murder. But because de Sade challenged
every aspect of civilized society--church, government, and social restraint-
-some  consider him a pioneering thinker. Interviewees include Count Xavier
de Sade and Camille Paglia. CC  [TV 14]


 05/11/2003

 8:00  Mummies: Tales from the Egyptian Crypts.  Pt. 3. Part 3 examines the
poetic  "sacred  carvings" that ancient E
gyptians believed  could  actually
come to life. CC  [TV G]

  9:00   Mummies: Tales from the Egyptian Crypts.  Pt. 4. Part 4  concludes
this  extensive  look at mummies, ancient Egyptian religious  beliefs,  the
pyramids, and well-known pharaohs. CC  [TV G]

  10:00   Mail  Call.  Revolutionary War Musket/Jousting/Foxholes.  R.  Lee
Ermey, who portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies
his gruff
sense  of  humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail  about
what  the armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on location,  Ermey
reads  the questions on air and then sends them out to military experts  in
the  field  for  answers and brief demonstrations.  Find  out  how  fast  a
Revolutionary  War  soldier  could fire a  musket,  the  ins  and  outs  of
jousting, and how to dig a foxhole. CC  [TV PG]

  10:30  Tales of the Gun.  Japanese Guns of WWII. As Japan bombed its  way
into  the Pacific during WWII, Imperial soldiers carried pride, a sense  of
invincibility,  and  an arsenal of clumsy and outdated  weapons.  Convinced
that  the tactics and tools that led to victory over colonial enemies would
be  just as effective against the Allies, Japan would see its weaponry lead
to defeat. (Half-hour version) CC  [TV G]

  11:00   The Color of War.  Fueling the Fire. During WWII, the leaders  of
the  U.S. military challenged themselves to create the most advanced supply
system in the history of warfare. The servicemen who fought the supply  war
played  a  critical,  and  under-appreciated, role  in  achieving  victory.
Without  them  the Allied war machine would have ground to  a  halt.  Peter
Coyote narrates this compelling journey into WWII through the eyes of those
who  lived it, using color film and photographs unearthed from archives and
personal collections. CC  [TV PG]


 05/12/2003

  8:00  Mail Call.  The Pilum/WWII Radios/First Rockets. R. Lee Ermey,  the
sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies his gruff sense of humor
 in  this
half-hour series that answers viewers' mail about t
he armed forces. Shot on
location,  Ermey  reads the questions on air and then  sends  them  out  to
military  experts  in  the  field  for  answers.  Ermey  demonstrates   the
effectiveness of the ancient Roman pilum, designed to penetrate  armor  and
punch  through shields; handles WWII army radios; and reviews  how  rockets
were first used on battlefields. CC  [TV PG]

  8:30  Mail Call.  Ninja Weapons/Flamethrower/Military Dogs. R. Lee Ermey,
who  portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies his gruff
sense
of humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail about what the
armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on location, Ermey reads  the
questions  on air and then sends them out to military experts in the  field
for answers and brief demonstrations. Ermey learns about the weapons of the
Japanese  Ninja, used since the 12th century; how flamethrowers  work;  and
what military dogs are trained to do. CC  [TV PG]

  9:00  The True Story of Black Hawk Down.   The Battle of Mogadishu  is  a
largely  forgotten, yet extremely important event in U.S. military history.
When  18  American  soldiers  were killed and images  broadcast  of  bodies
dragged through the streets of an enigmatic African city, it was a horrible
blow  to  the national psyche. In a 2-hour review of the battle,  based  on
Mark  Bowden's bestseller "Black Hawk Down", we see how we got there,
 what
went  wrong, and explore the legacy. Includes interviews with Bowden,  U.S.
Rangers, and Somali militiamen. CC  [TV 14]

  11:00   The  Bataan Death March.   An oral history of the shocking  abuse
inflicted on U.S. and Filipino POWs as their Japanese captors marched  them
day  and  night, without food or medicine, for over 50 miles. Many died  en
route  to  the  camp, but many more were shot, bayoneted,  or  beheaded  by
prison guards. We follow one survivor as he returns to Bataan for the first
time. CC  [TV PG]


 05/13/2003

 8:00  Deep Sea Detectives.  USS Indianapolis Resurfaced. In 1945, when the
USS  Indianapolis was su
nk by a Japanese submarine, 300 men went down  with
the ship, while some 900 survived in shark-infested waters. Finally spotted
four  days  later,  only  316 men remained alive.  The  sinking  ignited  a
firestorm. Captain Charles B. McVay III was eventually court-martialed, but
did  the  Navy  fail to warn him about the enemy sub? In 1999,  the  Senate
Armed  Services Committee agreed to hear testimony. We see how  a  12-year-
old's school project helped exonerate McVay. CC  [TV G]

 9:00  The Color of War.  Covering the War. World War II was history's most
extensively documented conflict. But the stories of the men and  women  who
recorded  it  have often been overlooked. In this episode of our  all-color
series,  we detail the experiences of combat cameraman, war correspondents,
combat  artists,  radio  reporters, and others who  brought  to  life,  and
preserved  the tales, that later defined this epic era. Narrated  by  Peter
Coyote,  our award-winning series recounts stories unearthed from  archives
and personal collections. CC  [TV PG]

  10:00   Non-Lethal Weapons.   They stun, debilitate, and immobilize.  But
they  don't  kill--at  least  they're not  supposed  to.  From  sting  ball
grenades,  to  electrical shock devices, to heat-generating energy  beams--
these high-tech tools disperse angry crowds and take down criminals without
hurting  bystanders. From the caltrop--a multi-pointed, hand  grenade-sized
contraption  that ancient foot soldiers hurled into the path  of  onrushing
horsemen--to modern weapons of light and sound, we explore the  arsenal  of
non-lethal weapons. CC  [TV G]

 11:00  Infamous Murders.  Killing for Thrills. Some murderers live a shady
second  life  in  the midst of their communities, secretly satiating  their
desire  for power and transforming their homes into chambers of horror.  We
examine four such modern murderers who killed for thrills: Leonard Lake and
Charles  Ng, who raped and killed up to 25 people in California;  and  Fred
and  Rosemary  West,  who transformed their 
home at 25 Cromwell  Street  in
Gloucester, England into a slaughterhouse, even killing their own  16-year-
old daughter. CC  [TV PG]

 11:30  Infamous Murders.  Streets of Fear. An examination of three modern-
day  serial  killers who found their victims--usually lone females--on  the
streets  of  British and American cities. The Yorkshire Ripper  earned  his
nickname from his frenzied attacks on prostitutes and young girls in  Leeds
in  Northern  England. Joel Rifkin confessed to killing 17  women  and  was
convicted  of  murdering 10 prostitutes in New York. And  Arthur  Shawcross
picked  up prostitutes in New York City, then drove them to the surrounding
countryside, where he killed them. CC  [TV PG]


 05/14/2003

  8:00   B-25  Down:  Hunt for a Hero.   There are more missing  WWII  U.S.
planes  on  the  South Pacific mountain island of New Guinea than  anywhere
else  on  earth. This is the story of Alfred Hagen's 4-year quest,  braving
tropical diseases, jungle terrain, and native upset to search for signs  of
his  great uncle's B-25 bomber. His uncle, Major Bill Benn, was a hero  who
changed  the face of warfare in the Pacific when he perfected skip bombing.
His  plane,  Red-Headed Gal, crashed just as the tide of battle shifted  in
favor of the U.S. CC  [TV PG]

 9:00  The Color of War.  Dressed to Kill. Continuing the epic journey into
the  depths of WWII, our award-winning all-color series returns to  recount
stories  unearthed from archives and personal collections of the  "Greatest
Generation".  Narrated by Peter Coyote, this episode reveals  the  intimate
relationship between a soldier and the tools of his trade--everything  from
the  uniform  that  protected him from the elements  to  the  weapons  that
protected him from the enemy to the insignia and medals that differentiated
him from his comrades. CC  [TV PG]

  10:00   The F-14.   October 7, 2001: Missiles from lethal U.S. jets  rain
down  onto  Afghanistan. One powerful and deadly plane led the majority  of
the  assaults--the F-14 Tomcat, the 
world's most complete military fighter.
No  other fighter jet carries the F-14's unique combination of weapons. Its
state-of-the-art  system can spot an oncoming enemy  plane  at  almost  200
miles. Its radar can detect targets as low as 50 feet and as high as 80,000
feet  and  does  so three times faster than the radar of any other  fighter
jet. CC  [TV G]

  11:00  Area 51: Beyond Top Secret.   Born during the Cold War, Area 51 in
Nevada,  also  known as Groom Lake or Dreamland, became not  only  the  Air
Force's most strategic test site, but also a symbol of everything that  was
sneaky  about the U.S. military-industrial-intelligence complex. In  recent
years,  UFO  investigators claimed that the top-secret planes tested  there
were built with technology gleaned from captured alien aircraft. We uncover
the  secrets of the cryptic desert facility and look into mysterious deaths
of base workers. CC  [TV G]

05/15/2003

 8:00 The Holy Grail.   The Holy Grail...Christ's cup from the Last Supper.
Medieval poets sang its praises, and King Arthur's knights chased it to the
ends of the earth. Did Joseph of Arimathea really claim the cup after the
Last Supper and collect Jesus's blood in it at the Crucifixion? Why are
there so many Grail tales, no two of which fully agree? And why does the
scent of heresy linger about the sacred cup? Many treasures are bigger, but
none more precious or elusive as we discover in this quest for the
venerable vessel. CC  [TV G]

 9:00 The Color of War.  Clearing the Way. WWII's unsung heroes, combat
engineers paved the way to victory in every theater of operations. From
Navy Seabees who built airfields on remote coral outcroppings in the
Pacific, to Army Engineers who cleared minefields in Europe and threw
bridges across the Rhine in the teeth of enemy fire, to the men who dammed
and drained an entire bay in the Aleutians to make room for a landing strip-
-these men were essential to the war effort. Peter Coyote narrates our
award-winning, all-color series. CC  [TV PG]

 10:00 Tank Crews.   During WWII, American tank crews duked it out with
Nazi Panzers in a high-explosive duel to the death. The German tanks had
thicker armor and better guns than the mainstay of the U.S. armored forces,
the M-4 Sherman. For many crewmen, the Sherman lived up to its nickname as
a steel coffin. But what the tanks lacked in firepower and protection, the
crews made up for in guts and good old-fashioned Yankee ingenuity. We'll
meet some of these armored warriors from WWII. CC  [TV PG]

 11:00 Infamous Murders.  Intent on Murder. An examination of killers who
choose their victims by type, categorizing innocent people with their own
sick desires. Gary Heidnick kidnapped young black women in Philadelphia,
claiming he wanted to start a baby farm. John G
acy targeted teenage boys;
he was the worst serial killer in the U.S. at the time of his arrest. And
Kenneth Erskine chose frail and elderly people to strangle in London,
England. CC  [TV PG]

 11:30 Infamous Murders.  Trapped by Forensics. Highlights the history of
genetic fingerprinting and three cases cracked using this forensic tool.
When Janie Shepherd disappeared from West London in 1977 and her body was
found 10 weeks later, sex offender David Lashley was the prime suspect.
Advances in the use of DNA secured his conviction 11 years later. Then we
see how DNA aided police in the hunt for a serial rapist-murderer in
Richmond, Virginia, and how it helped British police finally track down the
"Railway Killer" John Duffy after 15 years. CC  [TV PG]


 05/16/2003

 8:00 The Odessa File.   After WWII, a handful of Nazis were tried for war
crimes at Nuremberg--but many seemingly disappeared. We'll study the
shadowy Odessa organization, rumored to have links to the S.S. and to have
ferried high-ranking Nazis out of Germany to new identities and lives. CC
[TV G]

 9:00 The Color of War.  Man and Machine. WWII was the first fully
mechanized war--with soldiers in tanks and other armored vehicles pounding
across a lethal, modern battlefield. But the very importance of these
vehicles to the new tactics of battle also made them vulnerable magnets for
enemy fire, often exposing their crews to even greater risks than those
faced by infantry soldiers. In this episode of our award-winning, all-color
series, we bring to life the experiences of soldiers who manned the
machines of war. Narrated by Peter Coyote. CC  [TV PG]

 10:00 The Manhattan Project.   At 5:30 a.m., July 16, 1945, scientists and
dignitaries awaited the detonation of the first atomic bomb in a desolate
area of the New Mexico desert aptly known as Jornada del Muerto--Journey of
Death. Dubbed the Manhattan Project, the top-secret undertaking was tackled
with unprecedented speed and expense--almost $30-billion in today's money.
Los Alamos scientists and engineer
s relate their trials, triumphs, and dark
doubts about building the ultimate weapon of war in the interest of peace.
CC  [TV G]

 11:00 Explorers: TWIH.   Behind closed doors at New York City's Explorer's
Club, Josh Binswanger reveals club trophies and examines stories,
including: the Vinland Map, proof that Vikings discovered the New World
before Columbus or maybe a forgery; how John Wesley Powell, a crippled
Civil War veteran, became the first white man to explore the Grand Canyon;
artifacts from Polar Explorer Robert Peary; modern-day explorers racing to
be first to build his own rocket and reach space, and a man who walked
around the world. CC  [TV G]


 05/17/2003

 8:00 Strategic Air Command.   Movie. Anthony Mann directed this flight
adventure about the bravery and commitment of bomber pilots who must remain
constantly on alert. Jimmy Stewart portrays a baseball star, once an ace
WWII bomber pilot, who is recalled to duty by the Strategic Air Command,
America's main nuclear strike force. With June Allyson as his wife. (1955)
CC  [TV PG]

 10:30 Strategic Air Command.   With the ironic motto, Peace is our
Profession, the Strategic Air Command was in charge of U.S. nuclear forces
from 1946 to 1992. SAC was the ultimate Cold War military machine, at its
height controlling thousands of nuclear weapons, planes, and missiles, and
boasting over a quarter-million personnel. We travel to the Strategic Air
and Space Museum, located 20 miles from SAC's old headquarters in Nebraska,
and walk through the cavernous bomb bay of SAC's workhorse, the B-52
Bomber. CC  [TV G]

 11:30 Russia: A Closer Look.   A firsthand look at the stories behind our
upcoming 4-hour series "Russia Land of the Tsars", which takes a
look at
the Russian Empire spanning a thousand years--from the birth of the Russian
nation and the Orthodox Church in the 10th century to the fall of the last
Tsar, Nicholas II, and the Russian Revolution of 1917. Viewers go behind
the scenes and see how the producers put together such a miniseries. CC
[TV G]


 05
/18/2003

 8:00 Rumrunners, Moonshiners and Bootleggers.   Heroes who fight tax
collectors and moral crusaders, or just common criminals? Like it or not,
America was built by rumrunners, moonshiners, and bootleggers--even
founding father John Hancock was a smuggler. In the 1920s, Prohibition
turned fishermen into rumrunners and two-bit gangsters into millionaires,
and moonshine haulers in their souped-up cars helped create NASCAR. Rare
archival footage and photos help weave the compelling tale of our nation's
love-hate relationship with illegal alcohol. CC  [TV PG]

 10:00 SARS and the New Plagues.  Why is SARS causing such fear when other
diseases, like malaria and the flu virus, kill many more people? How was
SARS first contracted? Was it through too close contact with animals?
Unsanitary conditions? Is it manmade or a freak of nature? In a
comprehensive hour on SARS and the new plagues affecting mankind today, we
review past plagues--how they were contracted and controlled--and see how
the lessons of history may apply to the current crisis. CC  [TV PG]

 11:00 Tales of the Gun.  The M-16. The most powerful assault rifle ever
used in combat, the M-16 became the symbol of our lost war--Vietnam--and
can easily be called America's most unloved gun. Yet, 30 years after its
introduction, it stands as a potent icon of U.S. military strength
worldwide. We'll explain how it almost ended up on the scrap heap! (Half-
hour version) CC  [TV G]

 11:30 Great Blunders in History.  The Failure of the Kamikaze.
Investigates the Japanese use of manned torpedoes, speedboats packed with
explosives, and midget submarines in WWII. Most were poorly designed and
badly piloted, failing to achieve any real success and costing many lives.
[TV G]


 05/19/2003

 8:00 Mail Call.  Grenades/Dog Tags/Dinner in a Pouch. R. Lee Ermey, who
portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies his gruff
sense of
humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail about what the
armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on location, Er
mey reads the
questions on air and then sends them out to military experts in the field
for answers and brief demonstrations. Ermey learns how a grenade works;
what purpose dog tags fulfill; and what our GIs eat in the field today
(Meals, Ready-to-Eat). CC  [TV PG]

 8:30 Mail Call.  The Jeep/HIMARS/Hurricanes. R. Lee Ermey, who portrayed
the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies his gruff sense of humor
in
this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail about what the armed
forces were, and really are, like! Shot on location, Ermey reads the
questions on air and then sends them out to military experts in the field
for answers and brief demonstrations. Ermey learns all about the Jeep; the
new rocket launcher called HIMARS; and how and why the military hunts down
hurricanes. CC  [TV PG]

 9:00 Killing Hitler.   Unearths the story of "Operation Foxley",
the top-
secret British plan hatched in June 1944 to assassinate Adolf Hitler, and
reviews the practicalities of such a mission. The plan outlined various
options for killing Hitler at his estate near the Bavarian town of
Berchtesgaden. In this 2-hour innovative mix of fact and dramatic
reconstruction, we find out if British agents could have succeeded if the
operation had been launched, or if it would have been a mission impossible.
CC  [TV PG]

 11:00 Hunting Hitler.   The target of a daring assassination plot by
members of his military, Hitler nearly died at Wolf's Lair, his main
wartime headquarters. It was one of 15 known attempts on his life. This is
the story of those diverse individuals who tried to alter history's course,
and of a top secret British plot to kill the most hated man on earth. CC
[TV G]


 05/20/2003

 8:00 Deep Sea Detectives.  The Scharnhorst Mystery. In December 1943,
during a mission to attack Allied arctic convoys to the Soviet Union, the
battle cruiser Scharnhorst, pride of the German Navy, was trapped and
destroyed by the British Navy. Only 36 of the 2,000 men onboard survived
the freezing waters north of Norway. We unravel the myst
ery of how the
"Lucky Scharnhorst" could have sunk so quickly and feature the Norwegian
Navy's quest to detect the wreck of the "unsinkable" battle cruiser,
using
the latest sonar and deep-sea diving equipment. CC  [TV G]

 9:00 Battle of the Atlantic. The Grey Wolves. The first TV documentary
series about the Battle of the Atlantic--the longest and most costly battle
of WWII. Over 30,000 merchant seamen lost their lives and 85 percent of the
U-boat crews were killed. These are some of their untold stories. In this
episode, we look at what Winston Churchill called "the U-boat peril",
when
Hitler's submarines threatened to do what his air force couldn't--starve
Britain into submission. Featuring interviews with British seamen and U-
boat men who hunted them down. CC  [TV G]

 10:00 Concrete.   Invented by the ancient Romans, concrete is a relatively
simple formula that changed the world. Concrete has been used to divide an
entire country, as in the Berlin Wall, and to unite nations, as in the
Chunnel. We'll review the history of this building block of civilization
and look at modern applications. CC  [TV G]

 11:00 Where Is Jimmy Hoffa?   On July 30, 1975, former Teamsters' kingpin
Jimmy Hoffa went to meet someone at a Detroit restaurant, then vanished
into thin air. It was widely held that the Mafia was behind Hoffa's
abduction. Though no body was ever found, rumors abound as to its final
resting place. We explore the theories and suspects behind Hoffa's
disappearance. CC  [TV PG]


 05/21/2003

 8:00 Hitler and WWI.   The story of the making of Adolf Hitler, covering
the German dictator's youth in Vienna and Munich, his traumatic experiences
as an army private during World War I, and his dubious role in the
revolutionary upheaval in postwar Munich--a period he later tried to cover
up.  Far from being a "Man of Destiny", as he claimed, we reveal
how he was
an opportunist as well as a product of the extraordinary circumstances
during and after World War I. CC  [TV PG]

 9:00 Battle of the Atlantic.  Keeping Secret
s. During WWII, Britain
depended on its lifeline to North America, but in the first 18 months of
war, German U-boats sank more than 3-million tons of shipping. It was a
battle for survival and Britain was losing it. But by the spring of 1941, a
new source of naval intelligence promised to transform the war in the
Atlantic and shape victory from defeat. Featuring new eyewitness accounts
from both sides, dramatic reconstructions, and a wealth of archival
material. CC  [TV G]

 10:00 The Magnum.   It's known as the most powerful handgun in the world,
made famous by Clint Eastwood in the "Dirty Harry" movies. But its
origins
stretch back more than a century to the Indian Wars of the American West
and African safaris, where hunters stalked big game. Join us for a review
of the history of the biggest, baddest gun available today--unlimited
firepower at the pull of a trigger! CC  [TV G]

 11:00 A Question of Conspiracy: The RFK Murder.   In June 1968, Senator
Robert Kennedy was gunned down in a California hotel pantry after winning a
primary that could have earned him the Democratic Presidential nomination.
Eerily reminiscent of brother JFK's murder, we follow the conspiracy trail
of RFK's death. Did Sirhan Sirhan act alone, and why didn't he get a full
trial? CC  [TV G]


 05/22/2003

 8:00 SARS and the New Plagues. Why is SARS causing such fear when other
diseases, like malaria and the flu virus, kill many more people? How was
SARS first contracted? Was it through too close contact with animals?
Unsanitary conditions? Is it manmade or a freak of nature? In a
comprehensive hour on SARS and the new plagues affecting mankind today, we
review past plagues--how they were contracted and controlled--and see how
the lessons of history may apply to the current crisis. CC  [TV PG]

 9:00 Battle of the Atlantic. The Hunted. By the spring of 1943, the tide
had turned and the hunter became the hunted. How in a matter of a few short
months did the Allies manage to master the German U-boat threat? We draw on
eyewitness accounts and 
use dramatic reconstructions and archive footage to
tell the remarkable story of the victories in the spring of 1943 and the
final destruction of the U-boat fleet. CC  [TV G]

 10:00 Torture Devices.   For more than 3,000 years, emperors and generals,
dictators and police, criminals, clerics, and even medical doctors have
created and used a vast array of torture devices--everything from the
ancient Greeks' Brazen Bull, which slowly barbecued the victim, to the
elaborate mechanical apparatuses of the Spanish Inquisition. A medical
doctor who specializes in victims of torture reveals how the human body
responds to their use--from the earliest devices to the more modern. CC
[TV 14]

 11:00 Infamous Murders.  Mass Murderers. Investigating the crime of mass
murder, we begin in Hungerford, a quiet English town. In 1987, Michael Ryan
went on a rampage, massacring 14 people--including a policeman and his
mother--before committing suicide. Then, we look at possible motives behind
Charles Whitman's 1966 shooting of his mother and wife before climbing the
university tower in Austin, Texas, where he killed at least a dozen. Next,
we examine the infamous Dean Corll/Wayne Henley murder of teenage boys in
Houston in the 1970s. CC  [TV PG]

 11:30 Infamous Murders.  The Poisoners. Examines the cases of three
doctors who abused their positions of trust to administer poison to their
helpless and hapless victims. In 1910, Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen led
Scotland Yard police halfway across the world when they tried to arrest him
for the murder of his wife. Fifty-five years later, Dr. Carl Coppolino was
accused of killing his wife and his ex-lover's husband with poison. And in
1916, New York City dentist Dr. Arthur Waite poisoned his wife's wealthy
parents with arsenic. CC  [TV PG]


 05/23/2003

 8:00 The Occult and the Third Reich.   Did Hitler's obsession with
astrology, numerology, ancient runes, and German mythology enable his early
brash moves and ultimately spell the Third Reich's doom? CC  [TV PG]

 9:00 Outlaw Biker Gangs.   A
 2-hour look back at the days when leather-
clad hoodlums turned the motorcycle into a symbol of violence and a Harley
meant mayhem. Profiles "Wino" Willie Forkner, who founded an outlaw
biker
gang called the Boozefighters, and the notorious Hell's Angels, who
terrorized towns across America. CC  [TV PG]

 11:00 War in the Pacific: TWIH.   Homeland Defense is not a new idea as we
see when host Josh Binswanger heads to Fort MacArthur, where 14-inch guns
protected the Port of Los Angeles from Japanese attack during WWII. Other
stories covered in this hour on the War in the Pacific include: Pearl
Harbor, Japanese internment in America, the Japanese-American 442nd
Regiment, balloon bombs that killed U.S. citizens, the Siege of Bataan, the
USS Indianapolis, and the Japanese soldier isolated in a jungle who kept
fighting until the late 1960s. CC  [TV G]


 05/24/2003

 8:00 American Eats: History on a Bun.   Join us for a 2-hour tasty tour of
the fascinating history of food, with a special focus on home-cooked
American treats. Find out if "Scorecard Harry" really invented the
hot dog,
the Earl of Sandwich's culinary contribution, and how an Italian immigrant
began the pizza craze. Get out your fork and knife and relish our fabulous
feast! CC  [TV G]

 10:00 Highway Hangouts: Celebrating America's Roadside Attractions.
Hitch a ride and travel America's byways to discover the wacky highway
attractions that formed a roadside culture that fed, housed, and amused us
for decades. Visit dinosaur theme parks, coffee pot-shaped diners, and
truck stops extraordinaire; and view a snapshot of who we are as a nation.
Based on John Margolies's books. [TV G]


 05/25/2003

 8:00 Operation Reunion.   The world is filled with people trying to find
others that at one time had a profound affect on their lives, and no
stories are more compelling than those connected to wartime. Aided by
private investigators, we assist veterans with a passion to reconnect and
bring closure to events and emotions, including Larry Kern, a helicopter
pilot w
ith the 101st Airborne in Vietnam, searching for his gunner "Mac"
MacFarland; and "Shorty" Estabrook, looking for Goya Mata, a fellow
Korean
War POW. CC  [TV G]

 9:00 Blackbird Stealth!   Designed in the late 1950s by aeronautical
genius Kelly Johnson at the mysterious Skunkworks, the SR-71 Blackbird was
the world's first stealthy aircraft, designed to over-fly enemy territory
with impunity while photographing 100,000 square miles in an hour. While
serving 6 presidents, it saw action on hot and cold war fronts alike.
Interviews with crews and commanders combined with unbelievable footage
puts viewers in the cockpit of this amazing spy plane, flying at speeds of
2,000 miles an hour. CC  [TV G]

 10:00 Mail Call.  Future Gear/Marine Camouflage/Army's New Armored
Vehicle. R. Lee Ermey, the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies
his
gruff sense of humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail
about what the armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on location,
Ermey reads questions on air and then sends them out to military experts in
the field for answers and brief demonstrations. Ermey looks at possible
gear for GIs on tomorrow's battlefields; how the Marines designed their new
camo pattern; and examines the Army's new armored vehicle, the Stryker. CC
[TV PG]

 10:30 Tales of the Gun.  Guns of the Russian Military. Forged in Europe's
shadow, Russian small arms were once dismissed as crude copies. Often
lacking the finish of Western counterparts, Russian guns have been battle-
proven worldwide, with their emphasis on robustness and simplicity of
design. Review the long history of Russian small arms--from Peter the Great
to the Cold War. (Half-hour version) CC  [TV G]

 11:00 Cosmodrome.   The story of Russia's "Crown Jewels", the finest
rocket engines in the world, built under conditions of absolute secrecy to
land a man on the moon. Learn how, at the height of Cold War rivalry, the
engineers of the Soviet Union's elite Design Bureau developed what have
become the most admired rocket engines mone
y can buy, and how in the
current climate, driven by commerce not conflict, those engines have found
their way into American rockets. CC  [TV G]


 05/26/2003

 8:00 Mail Call.  Grenade Launchers/.30 Caliber Machine Gun/Flyer
21/Shrapnel/D-Day Paratrooper Gear/Jetpack. Shot on location, R. Lee Ermey
reads viewers' questions about the armed forces on air and then sends them
out to military experts in the field for answers and brief demonstrations.
In this episode, we learn how grenade launchers work; how a .30 caliber
machine gun compares to a .50 cal; watch Ermey behind the wheel of a Flyer
21--part dune buggy and part heavily-armed Jeep; and discover the origin of
the word shrapnel, what gear was unique to D-Day paratroopers, and if the
military ever used jetpacks. CC  [TV PG]

 8:30 Mail Call.  Civil War Rifles/1st Missile Sub/Navy Divers' Gear/Field
Strip/Bowie Knife/Hedgechopper. R. Lee Ermey compares Civil War rifles from
both sides; learns about the first missile fired from the deck of a sub;
compares the Navy's Mark 21 deep-sea suit, used for depths as far as 300
feet below surface, to "crush-proof" suits used in extreme missions
that
can go almost 2,000 feet down; performs a field strip, breaking down a
weapon; finds out why the Bowie knife is so special; and explains the
evolution of a hedgechopper, used on tanks during D-Day. CC  [TV PG]

 9:00 Russia Land of the Tsars, Pt. 1.   Traces the rise and fall of one of
the world's greatest empires and weaves together the glittering and
tempestuous stories of the imperial rulers with the life of the Russian
people to explore historic trends and turning points that shaped the
nation's destiny. Part 1 begins with the founding of ancient "Rus"
by
Viking warlords, Russia's subjugation by Mongol hordes, the rise of Ivan
the Terrible, and transformation from isolated borderland to powerful
European state under Peter the Great. CC  [TV G]

 11:00 The True Story of Rasputin.   A Siberian peasant rises to power in
Tsarist Russia, becomes the close confidante and repute
d lover of Empress
Alexandra, scandalizes the country with his drinking and womanizing, and
after being poisoned, shot several times, and submerged in the Neva River's
freezing waters, finally dies from drowning! We reveal the truth about the
rise of the "Mad Monk" with the hypnotic gaze, using information
from the
newly uncovered "Rasputin File", a report originally prepared by
the
Russian secret police. CC  [TV PG]


 05/27/2003

 8:00 Soviet UFO Secrets Revealed.   In an investigation of some of the
most puzzling UFO sightings in Soviet history, we uncover the work of an
underground network of believers and reveal a clandestine 13-year
government investigation of UFOs. Many Russian UFO enthusiasts believe that
proof of alien encounters exists--but it's being hidden from them! We also
meet George Knapp, an American broadcast journalist who traveled to Russia
in the early 1990s and believes there's a treasure trove of KGB UFO files
that remain top-secret. CC  [TV G]

 9:00 Russia Land of the Tsars, Pt. 2.   A history of the Russian Empire
spanning 1,000 years--from birth of the nation and the Orthodox Church in
the 10th century to the fall of the last Tsar and the 1917 Russian
Revolution. Part 2 covers the Empire's zenith under Catherine the Great,
the 19th century struggle as the autocratic dynasty tried to cope with the
social and economic upheaval of the Industrial Revolution, and the social
chaos that brought Lenin and the Communists to power--and claimed the lives
of Nicholas II and his family. CC  [TV G]

 11:00 Infamous Murders.  Deadly Doctors. Examines three cases of deadly
doctors. In 1933, Chicago Dr. Alice Wynekoop was convicted of murdering her
daughter-in-law. Imprisoned for 25 years, a lie detector test later
suggested her innocence. Next, find out if Dr. John Bodkin Adams, accused
of benefiting from the deaths of 132 of his wealthy English patients, got
away with murder. Finally, we investigate Britain's greatest serial killer-
-Dr. Harold Shipman, who may have killed as many as 1,000 female pati
ents
between 1992 and 1999. CC  [TV PG]

 11:30 Infamous Murders.  Cult Killings. Cult leaders exert huge power over
often-vulnerable members. We examine three cases where that power extended
to death: in 1978, Jim Jones forced almost 1,000 followers from his
People's Temple to commit suicide by ingesting cyanide; in 1995, 12 people
died and 5,000 were affected by the nerve gas Sarin, released by the Aum
Shinriyko cult in the Tokyo subway; and in 1994, 53 mysterious deaths of
members of an obscure cult, the Order of the Solar Temple, were discovered
in Switzerland and Canada. CC  [TV PG]


 05/28/2003

 8:00 The Real Spartacus.   Long before Stanley Kubrick's film starring
Kirk Douglas, Spartacus had unwittingly become a mythological icon of
resistance against oppression worldwide. We'll look at the real Spartacus,
focusing on his struggle against Roman forces, his time as a gladiator, and
his role in the infamous slave revolt against Rome in 73 BC, which
convulsed the great empire for two years before the uprising was put down
and 6,000 slave rebels were crucified along 150 miles of the Appian Way. CC
[TV PG]

 9:00 TR An American Lion, Pt. 1.   The story of one of America's most
beloved presidents. Richard Dreyfuss provides the voice of Theodore
Roosevelt in this 2-part special presentation of his life. We see the young
TR overcome debilitating asthma through a strict regimen of athletic
training, and witness his Western adventures, rise as New York City Police
Commissioner, heroics in the Spanish-American War, and selection as Vice
President. When President McKinley was assassinated, 42-year-old TR became
the youngest U.S. President. CC  [TV G]

 11:00 Patton: A Rebel Revisited.   Larger than life and brassier than the
medals on his dress uniform, George S. Patton was one of America's most
celebrated, and at times, vilified WWII combat generals. As played by
George C. Scott in an Oscar-winning role, Patton was complex, heroic, and
mad with passion and power. We'll contrast the real man with his on-screen
count
erpart aided by clips from family home movies, newsreels, and the
film, and interviews with descendants and soldiers who served with him.
Narrated by Burt Reynolds. CC  [TV PG]


 05/29/2003

 8:00 Ancient Inventions #1.   Was the concept for the computer invented in
the 20th century...or perhaps thousands of years ago? Scholars present
evidence indicating that our ancestors may have conceived such innovations
as flight, brain surgery, steam power, batteries, and the computer,
hundreds, and even thousands of years before their time. We test the truth
of the old saw "everything old is new again" in this salute to the
inventive spirit of mankind. CC  [TV G]

 9:00 TR An American Lion, Pt. 2.   As president, Teddy Roosevelt tested
and extended the limits of the White House like no other before him or
since. On the homefront, he battled captains of industry and their
corporate trusts, brought labor disputes to an end, and protected the
environment. On the world stage, he was determined to make America a
dominant power, and his efforts to mediate peace between Russia and Japan
would win him the Nobel Peace Prize. Featuring the voice of Richard
Dreyfuss as TR. CC  [TV G]

 11:00 The Big House.  Auburn. The State Penitentiary in Auburn, New York
is the centerpiece of a city and a monument to one of America's first
attempts at criminal rehabilitation. Its founders were liberal prison
reformers who believed their task could be accomplished through penitence,
hard work, and silence. The "Auburn System" was adopted by most U.S.
prisons in the early 1900s. Now, all that remains of that system is hard
work--and hard time--for the most violent offenders in New York State. CC
[TV PG]


 05/30/2003

 8:00 The Big House. Joliet Correctional Center. Known as one of the
toughest places where a man can do time, in 1924 the national spotlight
shone on Illinois' Joliet Prison with the arrival of the cold-blooded
college boys Leopold and Loeb, and its limestone walls housed other
gangsters like George "Baby Face" Nelson. Juxtaposing da
ily life in one of
America's harshest maximum-security facilities with its rich past, we learn
that the prison also served as backdrop for John Belushi's "Joliet Jake"
in
the movie "The Blues Brothers". CC  [TV PG]

 9:00 The Big House.  Montana State Prison. Herds of livestock roam here
under the big sky. Cowboys and wranglers watch over them. But these are not
ordinary ranch hands, and this no ordinary ranch. Welcome to the State
Prison in Deer Lodge, Montana. Today, it operates efficiently as both a
ranch and a modern high-security fortress. But its legacy is dark and its
history marked by violent uprisings, inhumane conditions, and brutality. We
also meet inmates who work on the farm and dairy, and violent offenders who
hold jobs as telemarketers. CC  [TV PG]

 10:00 The Big House.  Central Prison. Central Prison in Raleigh, is the
first stop for all of North Carolina's male felons with sentences of 20
years or longer. It's also the last stop for men and women sentenced to
death. Today, Central is a modern state-of-the-art prison, but it began as
a dark dungeon built nearly 120 years ago. CC  [TV PG]

 11:00 The Big House.  Parchman. State Prison, Parchman, Mississippi...a
land without visible boundaries. Originally a slave plantation ruled by the
whip, today its most important crop is neither food nor cotton, but
prisoners. And 75 percent of them are African American. During its long
history, Parchman has embodied the traditions and folk wisdom of the
American South in a way no other prison ever has. Though its legacy
includes brutal executions in the gas chamber, it also holds out conjugal
visits for the best-behaved convicts. CC  [TV PG]


 05/31/2003

 8:00 Russia Land of the Tsars, Pt. 1.   Traces the rise and fall of one of
the world's greatest empires and weaves together the glittering and
tempestuous stories of the imperial rulers with the life of the Russian
people to explore historic trends and turning points that shaped the
nation's destiny. Part 1 begins with the founding of ancient "Rus"
by
Vikin
g warlords, Russia's subjugation by Mongol hordes, the rise of Ivan
the Terrible, and transformation from isolated borderland to powerful
European state under Peter the Great. CC  [TV G]

 10:00 Russia Land of the Tsars, Pt. 2.   A history of the Russian Empire
spanning 1,000 years--from birth of the nation and the Orthodox Church in
the 10th century to the fall of the last Tsar and the 1917 Russian
Revolution. Part 2 covers the Empire's zenith under Catherine the Great,
the 19th century struggle as the autocratic dynasty tried to cope with the
social and economic upheaval of the Industrial Revolution, and the social
chaos that brought Lenin and the Communists to power--and claimed the lives
of Nicholas II and his family. CC  [TV G]
Previous History Channel primetime listings:
April 2003

March 2003

February 2003

January 2003

December 2002

November 2002

Official HistoryChannel.com Homepage
From the invention of the electric battery in 1800 to the murdered remains of missing Washington intern Chandra Levy being discovered in a Washington D.C. park*, find out what happened when with our exclusive History of the World Timeline!
GO TO: HistoryChannel.com/worldtimeline

A&E Prime Time listings for this month

Find out more about any topic any time, including this day in history (your choice of decade), with our Best Search in History: www.historychannel.com

Return to TV Listings at www.Scifans.com



* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

See if your favorite person, TV series or
motion picture is available on video:

Search:
Keywords:
In Association with Amazon.com