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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st)

NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings


01/01/2003 
  
 8:00 The Bible's Greatest Secrets.   In the Holy Land, specialized 
archaeologists sift through the living sands of time to uncover vanished 
civilizations. We trace biblical archaeology's history and profile some of
its prominent figures like the eccentric professor who had his head 
preserved for posterity, and a husband and wife team who have spent 
their lives digging the sands of Israel. We also explore the future of 
biblical archaeology and examine the high-tech tools that will someday 
make digging with pick and shovel obsolete. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 Apocalypse.   A look at the prophesies and symbolism in the 
Book of Revelation, the last book of the New Testament, which 
contains the futuristic final showdown between God and Satan. Filled 
with fiery visions, cryptic numbers, and strange beasts, it's perhaps the 
Scripture's most puzzling book. With the ancient city of Megiddo as a 
backdrop--thought to be the site of the Battle of Armageddon--the 
program explores the Seven Seals, the Four Horsemen, and asks why 
only 144,000 souls will reach the Kingdom of God. CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 Love and Sex in the Hebrew Bible.   On the sixth day of 
Creation, God pronounced the sexual union between husband and 
wife "very good." The Hebrew Bible is rich in tales of love and 
marriage, as well as rape, prostitution, adultery, and polygamy. 
Sometimes the Bible reads more like a tabloid than a holy book. What 
are the messages in these stories? Are there lessons to be learned 
from Solomon's excesses and David's adultery? We turn back the 
pages of time to see if these lusty yarns of the ancients are relevant to 
today's society. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 A Violent God.   Why are there so many tales of personal rage, 
bloodshed, murder, and war in the Bible--a book with a message of 
peace and love? This revealing program takes a look
 at scholars' 
views on the role of violence in both biblical times and the modern 
Middle East, a volatile region to this day. CC  [TV G] 
 

 01/02/2003 
  
 8:00 Engineering Disasters.   Throughout history, the builders and 
engineers who paved our way out of the caves and into the modern 
world have also caused some of our worst disasters. What happens 
when their calculations prove wrong and it all comes tumbling down? 
>From Hammurabi's days, when the first building laws were instituted, to

today's potential nuclear or chemical disasters that can spell death for 
thousands, we'll take a harrowingtour through some of history's 
greatest engineering mistakes. (1-hour version) CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 More Engineering Disasters.   Throughout history the same 
builders and engineers that paved man's path out of the caves and into 
the modern world also caused some of mankind's worst disasters. 
Often a huge calamity is traced back to a tiny cause, insignificant in 
itself, but triggering a domino effect. We'll revisit notable disasters and

search for probable causes. CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 Engineering Disasters 3.   When design flaws fell projects the 
cost is often exacted in lives as we see in this look at engineering 
disasters. Why did the Tower of Pisa begin to lean by as much as 17 
feet; what caused the first nuclear accident in 1961 in Idaho; what 
killed the three Soyuz 11 cosmonauts aboard the world's first orbiting 
space station; how did a winter storm destroy the Air Force's Texas 
Tower Radar Station, killing 28; and what errors led to NASA's loss of 
the Mars Climate Orbiter and the Mars Polar Lander? CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 Halsey's Typhoons: Peril on the Sea.   In December 1944, 
Admiral "Bull" Halsey's Third Fleet was confronted by a killer typhoon

in the South Pacific. Despite the courage of the "tin can" sailors
battling 
100-mile-an-hour winds and torrential rain, three destroyers capsized. 
Unbelievably, six months later, the Fleet encountered another typhoon. 
We investigate these intrepid force
s of nature that nearly sunk Halsey's 
career when an official court of inquiry recommended that he be 
relieved of his duties. CC  [TV G] 
 

 01/03/2003 
 
 8:00 The Great Ships: High Tech, High Seas.  Armament. Join us 
for some of the most dramatic naval battles of the past as we explore 
the evolution of maritime weaponry--from brutal hand-to-hand clashes 
in combat at sea's early days to thundering broadsides of the 18th 
century to 20th century battleships, warplanes, and missiles. See how 
innovations in weaponry changed the evolution of ships. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 The Great Ships: High Tech, High Seas.  Design and 
Construction. From the simplest canoes of antiquity to today's most 
advanced nuclear submarines, we trace the innovations of ship design 
and construction through the centuries. Profiling some of history's most 
famous ships of war and commerce, we meet the most brilliant 
designers of all time and chart ship design from art to science. CC  [TV 
G] 
 
 10:00 The Great Ships: High Tech, High Seas.  Propulsion. In this 
exploration of man's eternal quest to move ships faster and more 
efficiently, we'll see how advances in propulsion have inspired 
innovations in ship design--from crude oars and paddles, through sails 
and steam engines, to the gas turbines and nuclear reactors that 
power today's superships and submarines. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 The Great Ships: High Tech, High Seas.  Navigation. Ahoy, 
landlubbers! Join us for the fascinating story of how man has charted 
his way across the boundless sea through the ages--from the dead-
reckoning of Viking navigators like Leif Erikson, to the Age of 
Discovery's lodestone compasses and astrolabes, to the Global 
Positioning System's sophisticated satellites. CC  [TV G] 
 

 01/04/2003 
  
 8:00 Big Deals: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly.  Microsoft Targets 
DOS (1980)/Lucy & Desi Battle CBS for "I Love Lucy" (1951). When

IBM decided to build a personal computer, it turned to Microsoft, a 
software company near Seattle. The fateful partnership tran
sformed 
the small company into a corporate powerhouse. Microsoft provided 
the operating system DOS--which 24-year-old founder Bill Gates 
shrewdly acquired from another small company, Seattle Computer! 
Then, we look at the 1951 Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz deal with CBS, which 
redefined how TV was made and broadcast, and established the 
groundwork for TV syndication. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 Big Deals: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly.  Seagram Circles 
MCA (1993-1995)/Ray Kroc Chases the McDonald Brothers (1954). 
With his family's legacy and fortune on the line, Seagram CEO Edgar 
Bronfman Jr. decided to move the company into the entertainment 
business. Bronfman tells all about the personal and corporate 
dynamics of Seagram's $5.7-billion investment in MCA Entertainment. 
Then, we see how McDonald's became the most successful restaurant 
in history, and why the deal visionary restaurant equipment salesman 
Ray Kroc struck with Dick and Mac McDonald eventually turned ugly 
for both parties. CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 World's Biggest Machines.   Join us for a look at the biggest, 
heaviest, tallest, longest, meanest machines on the planet! We'll see 
what these monsters do and how they operate, and how they're 
designed and assembled. Machines investigated include the largest 
draglines, excavators used in mining; the biggest dump truck; a front-
end loader with an 80-ton bucket and the largest tires of any vehicle; 
the cruise ship, The Voyager of the Seas; a 240-foot tall wind 
generator; and a fusion reaction machine the size of a football field. CC 

[TV G] 
 
 11:00 Sex in Wars.  The Vietnam War. The Vietnam War affected 
social change and sexual behavior more than any previous war. After a 
decade of Cold War hysteria, Americans wanted to have fun, and the 
introduction of the birth control pill in 1960 meant they could. At the 
same time U.S. servicemen stationed in Vietnam were lured into the 
den of Asian eroticism. We talk to men and women from both sides 
who lived through the conflict and interweave sexual behavio
r in 
Vietnam during the war with the sexual revolution evolving in the U.S. 
CC  [TV 14] 
 

 01/05/2003 
 
 8:00 Greatest Raids.  The Entebbe Raid, 1976. A look back at the 
daring 1976 raid by Israeli commandos to rescue 105 Jews and 
Israelis who were being held hostage at the Entebbe airport in Uganda. 
The Israelis were traveling aboard an Air France flight from Athens 
when militants hijacked the plane. As it turned out, the Ugandan 
dictator Idi Amin was aiding the Palestinians. We'll see how the force of 
less than 500 Israelis penetrated Uganda, perpetrated the raid, and 
lost only one man in the encounter. [TV PG] 
 
 9:00 Revenge!   After the murder of 11 Israeli athletes by Palestinian 
terrorists at the 1972 Munich Olympics, Israeli Prime Minister Golda 
Meir and her cabinet decided they'd had enough. In a precedent-
shattering move, she directed the Israeli secret service to carry out 
covert assassinations of those Palestinians directly or indirectly 
responsible for the attack. This is the story of how the Mossad tracked 
down the leaders of the terror group Black September over the next 8 
years with deadly success. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 10:00 Mail Call.  Mortar/WWII GI's Personal Items/Native-American 
Arrows. R. Lee Ermey, who portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal 
Jacket", applies his gruff sense of humor in this half-hour series that

answers viewers' mail about what the armed forces were, and really 
are, like! Shot on location, Ermey reads the questions on air and then 
sends them out to military experts in the field for answers and brief 
demonstrations. Emery learns how to aim an 81mm mortar; what 
personal items GIs carried in WWII; and how Native Americans made 
arrows. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 10:30 Conquest.  Weird Weapons of the Middle Ages. Actor and fight 
master Peter Woodward searches museums and private collections for 
weird and unlikely weapons, then introduces them to our combat team 
to find out how they were used. We try out a Francisca, the throwing 
axe that gave the Franks their name;
 see how armored knights used a 
ball and chain; and learn the uses of the gruesome awl-pike, bizarre 
military fork, and the Guisarme, an extremely popular polearm. We 
also test strange axes like the Lochaber, Doloire, and Waggoner's Axe. 
CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 The Color of War.  Thunderbolts: The Conquest of the Reich. 
In the last months of WWII, General Hap Arnold, head of the U.S. 
Army Air Force, ordered the making of a color film on his forward strike 
crews, particularly the P-47 Thunderbolts fighter groups flying close air 
support to the army's infantry and armor units. From March 1 to May 8, 
1945, 16 camera crews shot 86 hours of film. But after the war, 
General Arnold decided not to release the footage. We tracked down 
four original pilots from the 362nd Fighter Group who narrate the story 
we see on the screen. CC  [TV G] 
 

 01/06/2003 
 
 
 
 8:00 Mail Call.  Re-Fueling a Fighter Jet/Naval Signal Flags/GI Chow. 
R. Lee Ermey, who portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket",

applies his gruff sense of humor in this half-hour series that answers 
viewers' mail about what the armed forces were, and really are, like! 
Shot on location, Ermey reads the questions on air and then sends 
them out to military experts in the field for answers and brief 
demonstrations. Find out how to re-fuel a fighter jet in mid-air, how 
ships send messages using signal flags, and what soldiers eat on the 
battlefield. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 8:30 Mail Call.  Revolutionary War Musket/Jousting/Foxholes. R. Lee 
Ermey, who portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies
his 
gruff sense of humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail 
about what the armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on 
location, Ermey reads the questions on air and then sends them out to 
military experts in the field for answers and brief demonstrations. Find 
out how fast a Revolutionary War soldier could fire a musket, the ins 
and outs of jousting, and how to dig a foxhole. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 9:00 Harem.   In the 16th centur
y, Istanbul was the capital of the 
Ottoman Turks whose conquests stretched from Baghdad to Budapest 
and included hundreds of women brought as slaves to the imperial 
harem at Topkapi Palace. But at the imperial palace, sex could equal 
power, and one woman was about to prove it--Aleksandra Lisowska, or 
Hurrem, the Laughing One. This is her story and of the closed world of 
the Ottoman harem and the century-long Sultanate of Women who 
followed in her footsteps. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 Prostitution: Sex in the City.   Once upon a time, being a 
prostitute carried no stigma--in ancient Sumeria and Babylon, that is. 
And in certain cities in ancient Greece, harlots were associated with 
sacred activities at temples. Even in the American Wild West, there 
was a degree of tolerance. So what happened through the years? We'll 
investigate innumerable stories about the changing social position of 
the "ladies of the night" throughout history, and find out why 
prostitution is called the oldest profession! CC  [TV PG-S] 
 

 01/07/2003 
  
 8:00 Airship Disasters.   For a dozen turbulent years between WWI 
and WWII, the U.S. Navy poured millions of dollars into an audacious 
dream: to rule the skies with a fleet of massive airships. Armed with 
squadrons of scout planes, these "Battleships of the Skies" could
travel 
far over the horizon to detect enemy approach. Journey into a lost 
chapter of military history to discover how the airships USS 
Shenandoah, USS Akron, and USS Macon were lost in a series of 
aviation disasters that altered the evolution of aerial warfare. CC  [TV 
PG] 
 
 9:00 Henry VIII.  Pt. 1. Henry VIII had six wives, broke from the 
Catholic Church, and was fat. But how much more do we know about 
this crucially important figure in British history? In a 3-part History 
International Special Presentation, historian and broadcaster David 
Starkey provides a refreshingly offbeat look at England's most 
enigmatic king. Part 1 traces the rise of Henry VII's second son from 
spare heir to king by age 17, hu
sband to his dead brother's wife, 
Catherine of Aragon, and prize pugilist of European politics. CC  [TV 
G] 
 
 10:00 Castles & Dungeons.   Some of the most imposing structures 
ever built, medieval castles withstood both bloody assaults and the test 
of time. Designed like machines with nearly every architectural detail 
devoted to defense, castles represented the perfect fusion of form and 
function. Journey back to that unruly era as we examine the complexity 
of their construction and the multi-purposes they served--homes to 
kings and nobles, economic centers, courthouses, treasuries, prisons, 
and torture chambers. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 Infamous Murders.  Red Light Murders. Almost every major 
city in the world has a red-light district, where the life of a prostitute
can 
be brutal and short. We examine three cases of prostitutes who 
became victims of murder. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:30 Infamous Murders.  Hollywood Murders. In the heyday of 
Hollywood, police investigate several bizarre tangles of murder, 
intrigue, and vice. In 1932, movie producer Paul Bern, who had 
married Jean Harlow just two months earlier, was found dead with a 
suicide note nearby, but circumstances were suspicious...In 1935, top 
stars and studio bosses are implicated when screen idol Thelma Todd 
becomes an "apparent" suicide...In 1958, 14-year-old Cheryl Crane,

daughter of Lana Turner, is charged with the murder of her mother's 
boyfriend. CC  [TV PG] 
 

 01/08/2003 
  
 8:00 The Bloody Tower of London.   We'll go inside the Tower of 
London, actually 20 towers, and see how this microcosm of nine 
centuries of history struck fear into the hearts Englishmen. Built on the 
site of ancient Roman ruins, William the Conqueror began construction 
in 1067, and subsequent monarchs added their own touch. Built to 
subdue the turbulent citizenry of London, the Tower claimed the lives 
of many until the mid-18th century. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 9:00 Henry VIII.  Pt. 2. Henry lacked a legitimate son and heir, had 
fallen in love with Anne Boleyn, and h
atched a plot to be rid of 
Catherine on the grounds that the alliance could be incestuous. What 
followed was the famous trial at Blackfriars that ultimately led to Henry 
declaring himself supreme leader of the Church of England and 
breaking with the Catholic Church. But when Anne, like Catherine, 
failed to produce a son, she was arrested for adultery and incest and 
beheaded. A History International Special Presentation. CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 Axes, Swords and Knives.   Blade implements have been a 
part of civilized man's arsenal since the Paleolithic Age, when sharp 
tools were chipped off of flint or obsidian. But with the discovery of 
metallurgy, people were able to forge stronger, more versatile blade 
implements. We visit an axe-throwing contest in Wisconsin for an 
introduction to the least subtle of the blade tools. Then we visit a 
swordsmith and an experienced swordfighter who work in traditional 
methods from ancient sources, and review the history of knives. CC  
[TV G] 
 
 11:00 The Hunt for Jack the Ripper.   Many serial killers were more 
brutal. Others slaughtered more often. But Jack the Ripper remains the 
world's most infamous murderer. In 1888, he slashed his way across 
London and into the annals of crime when he murdered and mutilated 
at least five women. His ghastly rampage remains one of history's 
great mysteries. Who was this butcher that baffled Scotland Yard's 
best minds? Today's foremost Ripper experts offer insights into the 
madman's mind and theories of who he really was. CC  [TV PG] 
 
  
 01/09/2003 
 
 8:00 The Enduring Mystery of Stonehenge.   For 5,000 years, the 
sacred site of Stonehenge has stood on the plain of Salisbury, 
England, silent witness to a myriad of mysteries. Who built the 
prehistoric stone circle? Druids? Merlin the Magician? Was it an altar 
for human sacrifice, or landing pad for UFOs? Experts, 
anthropologists, and astronomers assess the mystery. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 Henry VIII.  Pt. 3. In Part 3, we enter the brutal age of Henry's 
monarchy. Jane Se
ymour bore a son and died soon after. Henry's 
ardor for and marriage to Anne of Cleves was short-lived. Catherine 
Howard, more to his taste as well as others, ended on the 
executioner's block. Only Catherine Parr survived him. But the 
avaricious Henry's most lasting legacy was the dissolution of the 
monasteries--an act that cost many lives while making him the richest 
monarch in Christendom. A History International Special Presentation. 
CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 Siege Machines.   A look at siege machines--a machine that 
converts energy into mechanical force to go over, under, or through 
fortified or fixed defenses too strong for conventional force. These 
engines range from man's first long-range missile weapon, the 
slingshot, to the laser cannons and satellite-destroying robots of the 
21st century. All of these machines are designed to breach barriers--
castle walls, entrenched troops, even outer space. When the going 
gets tough, the tough get siege machines. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 Infamous Murders.  New York Mafia Murders. In the 1920s, 
New York City's streets became a battleground for the Mafia, and the 
murderous disputes raged until the 1990s. Join us for a riveting look at 
how the struggle for mob leadership led to an endless cycle of murder 
and blood feuds. We look at the murders of Salvatore Maranzano in 
1931 and the infamous murder of Albert Anastasia. Finally, we 
examine New York's long battle with "Teflon Don" John Gotti, who

nevertheless died "peacefully" of cancer in a federal penitentiary.
CC  
[TV PG] 
 
 11:30 Infamous Murders.  Model Murders. Many young women 
yearn to be models, seeing it as an easy and glamorous route to fame 
and fortune; but tragically, that dream is often cut short. We examine 
three cases in which dreams of stardom led to murder: the deaths of 
19-year-old Judy Ann Dull in 1958, the 1983 murder of Vicki Morgan, 
and the 1996 murder of Linda Sobek. CC  [TV PG] 
 
  
 01/10/2003 
  
 8:00 Third Reich: TWIH.   "This Week in History" uncovers one of
the 
darkest chap
ters in world history: the rise and fall of Nazi Germany. 
>From a plot by Nazi terrorists to sabotage targets in the United States,

to a doomed voyage of Jewish refugees, to an eyewitness account of 
Adolf Hitler's final hours in his underground bunker, it's an in-depth 
look at the "Reich" that was supposed to last for a thousand years.

Thankfully, it didn't. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 The Occult and the Third Reich.   Did Hitler's obsession with 
astrology, numerology, ancient runes, and German mythology enable 
his early brash moves and ultimately spell the Third Reich's doom? CC  
[TV PG] 
 
 10:00 Cannons.   Cannons have fired balls of iron and atomic bombs, 
changed the way wars are fought, and now come equipped with smart 
weapons. Beginning with 13th-century cannons that were designed to 
penetrate forts of the day, we'll see how cannons were first cast and 
later forged, and show how large cannons terrorized civilians and 
soldiers in WWI and WWII. Moving to the present, we feature the 40-
ton self-propelled Crusader that launches 100-pound steel artillery 
shells more than 33 miles. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 Gangster Guns.   During the 1920s and '30s in big cities and 
small towns alike, they earned a fierce reputation in a blaze of bullets. 
They were the best friends of criminals such as John Dillinger, Pretty 
Boy Floyd, Baby Face Nelson, Al Capone, and Bonnie and Clyde. 
Handle their Colt 45s and 38s, Tommy guns, Whippets, and Browning 
automatic rifles as we uncover the stories of gangster guns. CC  [TV 
G] 
 

 01/11/2003 
  
 8:00 Law & Order in the Real West.   It was a time of lawlessness 
and tin badges, gunfighters, desperadoes, and ladies of the night. 
Learn the true stories behind the myths of Jesse James, John Wesley 
Hardin, the Dalton Gang--and the men who would do anything to bring 
them down in this 2-hour special. [TV G] 
 
 10:00 Pyramids: Majesty and Mystery.   Standing majestically for 
centuries, the world's great pyramids have long inspired and mystified 
scholars. Leading experts and hi
storians explore the engineering 
genius that created some of the largest structures on the planet. From 
ancient Egypt to Central America, we visit these technological 
masterpieces. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 Secrets of Sex: Kama Sutra.   A visit to the fabled temples of 
India that celebrate the Kama Sutra, ancient Hindu texts that deal with 
all facets of sexual experience including exotic lovemaking and 
formulas for aphrodisiacs. CC  [TV 14-D] 
 

 01/12/2003 
 
 8:00 Greatest Raids.  Human Torpedo Raiders. During WWII, one- 
and two-man crews aboard dangerous and stealthy mini-weapons 
could threaten the largest battleships at anchor. We examine Italian 
human torpedoes--torpedoes outfitted with controls and a seat for their 
drivers--that crippled the British fleet at Alexandria and Gibraltar to 
Japanese mini-subs that unsuccessfully struck at Pearl Harbor and 
British mini-subs that attacked the German battleship Tirpitz.  [TV PG] 
 
 9:00 B26 Marauder!.   Bombing from altitudes of over 10,000 feet, the 
Marauder had the lowest loss rate of any Allied bomber during WWII--
less than one-half of one percent. By the end of the war, it had flown 
over 100,000 missions and dropped over 150,000 tons of bombs. Meet 
the designers, technicians, and soldiers who played integral roles in 
the Marauder's development. CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 Mail Call.  The Pilum/WWII Radios/First Rockets. R. Lee 
Ermey, the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies his gruff sense
of 
humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail about the 
armed forces. Shot on location, Ermey reads the questions on air and 
then sends them out to military experts in the field for answers. Ermey 
demonstrates the effectiveness of the ancient Roman pilum, designed 
to penetrate armor and punch through shields; handles WWII army 
radios; and reviews how rockets were first used on battlefields. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
 10:30 Conquest.  The Axman Cometh. Actor and fight master Peter 
Woodward guides viewers back to a time when knowing how to swing 
an ax m
eant the difference in life and death. Our experts practice with 
the Viking single- and double-headed types and learn that in the right 
hands these difficult and exhausting weapons had no equal. We also 
examine the berserker, an ax-wielding Viking warrior who worked 
himself into a state of concentrated fury. Finally, we look at the double-
headed Saxon ax that was nearly the size of a man. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 The Color of War.  Silent and Deep. As WWII raged across 
Europe and the Pacific, one branch of the U.S. military went quietly 
about its business, moving with such secrecy that it was dubbed the 
"Silent Service". The elite submarine sailors endured an unique type
of 
battle--with little chance of escape if disaster struck, the submarine 
itself often became a steel coffin. WWII comes alive through a moving 
tapestry of letters, diaries, color film and photographs unearthed from 
archives and personal collections. Peter Coyote narrates. CC  [TV PG] 
 

 01/13/2003 
 
 8:00 Mail Call.  Ninja Weapons/Flamethrower/Military Dogs. R. Lee 
Ermey, who portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies
his 
gruff sense of humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail 
about what the armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on 
location, Ermey reads the questions on air and then sends them out to 
military experts in the field for answers and brief demonstrations. 
Ermey learns about the weapons of the Japanese Ninja, used since 
the 12th century; how flamethrowers work; and what military dogs are 
trained to do. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 8:30 Conquest.  Bow & Arrow. One of man's earliest effective hunting 
weapons, we learn why the bow and arrow became so dominant in 
history. Our combat team is sent to the woods to make their own as we 
study the craft of the bowyer and fletcher. We learn about Egyptian 
bows and try to fire accurately from an Egyptian chariot, and 
experiment with North American Indian bows--composite bows of horn 
and wood. And re-enactors, using rubber-tipped arrows, recreate w
hat 
it was actually like to be subjected to a "cloud of arrows". CC 
[TV PG] 
 
 9:00 Operation Desert Storm.  The Air Campaign. A 3-part look at 
the Persian Gulf War with emphasis on technology. In August 1990, 
Iraq invaded and occupied Kuwait. In November, the UN Security 
Council passed a resolution to force Iraq from Kuwait if Iraq remained 
after January 15, 1991. On January 17, coalition forces began a 
massive air attack to take out Iraqi air defenses using Tomahawk 
Cruise Missiles, Stealth Bombers, F111 and F15 Bombers, as well as 
A10 Warthogs and Apache and Cobra helicopters to prepare for a 
ground assault. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 Guadalcanal Diary.   Explores the reality behind the WWII 
battle as depicted in the 20th Century Fox film, released just one year 
after the U.S. Marine Corps attack against the Japanese on 
Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands. "Guadalcanal Diary", produced
in 
1943 when the war's outcome was still uncertain, was based on the 
book by 25-year-old war correspondent Richard Tregaskis, who landed 
with the 1st Division Marines on the island. Highlights include 
interviews with Marines and correspondents who fought in the battle. 
CC  [TV PG] 
 
 
 01/14/2003 
  
 8:00 Operation Desert Storm.  The Air Campaign. A 3-part look at 
the Persian Gulf War with emphasis on technology. In August 1990, 
Iraq invaded and occupied Kuwait. In November, the UN Security 
Council passed a resolution to force Iraq from Kuwait if Iraq remained 
after January 15, 1991. On January 17, coalition forces began a 
massive air attack to take out Iraqi air defenses using Tomahawk 
Cruise Missiles, Stealth Bombers, F111 and F15 Bombers, as well as 
A10 Warthogs and Apache and Cobra helicopters to prepare for a 
ground assault. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 9:00 Operation Desert Storm.  The Ground War. On February 24, 
the U.S.-led coalition launched a long-anticipated land offensive. 
General Norman H. Schwarzkopf planned a "wide hook" maneuver 
using the Global Positioning System. The bulk of the attack was in 
sout
hwestern Iraq, where coalition forces first moved north, then 
turned east, surrounding Kuwait and encircling Iraqi forces there and in 
southern Iraq. The land war took only 4 days and saw use of a new 
generation of tanks and JStars (Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar 
System). CC  [TV PG] 
 
 10:00 Operation Desert Storm.  The Final Showdown. After coalition 
forces moved up the coast, took Kuwait City, and closed off the 
highway, some Iraqi units resisted. But the coalition offensive 
advanced more quickly than anticipated. We'll look at the tank fights 
between the Republican Guard and the U.S. 7th Cavalry, and the 
sabotaging by Iraq of Kuwaiti infrastructure and industry. On February 
28, with the collapse of Iraqi resistance, cease-fire was declared, but 
many issues remained unresolved, including the continuing threat of 
Saddam Hussein. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 Infamous Murders.  The Trunk Murders. Often a murderer's 
most problematic task is not the actual crime, but body disposal. A 
surprising number of murderers find that a large trunk is just the right 
size to hold a human corpse. We'll look at two murders in England, 
where female bodies were found in trunks, and the Ira Einhorn case, in 
which the body of his girlfriend, Holly Maddux, was found stuffed in a 
black steamer trunk in his Philadelphia apartment. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:30 Infamous Murders.  Lady Killers. An examination of several 
infamous 20th-century serial killers. First, we look at the case of John 
Christie, who murdered 6 women in London during the 1950s. One 
innocent man went to the gallows before Christie was finally caught. 
Next, we meet Richard Speck, who, in one night of horror, killed 8 
nurses in Chicago. Only one nurse lived to testify against Speck. 
Finally, we compare the 1945 case of another Chicago killer--William 
Heirens, a violent youth whose final victim was a 6-year-old girl. CC  
[TV PG] 
 

 01/15/2003 
 
 8:00 Why Can't They Kill Saddam?   When the Gulf War ended in 
1991, much of Iraq's defenses were left 
intact, nearly half of the 
Republican Guard escaped, and Saddam Hussein remained in power. 
His own people have tried to kill him; neighboring countries want him 
out of power; the U.S. has targeted him with laser-guided smart 
bombs. Yet Saddam Hussein still rules with an iron fist. How is this 
possible? We'll examine the trickery, the terror, and the political 
manipulation that sustains one of the world's most hated leaders. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
 9:00 Saddam's Arsenal.   On April 2, 1991, the UN Security Council 
laid out strict demands for ending sanctions: Iraq would have to accept 
liability for damages, destroy chemical and biological weapons and 
ballistic missiles, forego nuclear weapons programs, and accept 
international inspection to insure the conditions were met. We'll 
examine what chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons Saddam 
Hussein may still have, the history of UN inspections in Iraq, and use 
of weapons against the Kurds, Kuwait, Iran, and Israel. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 10:00 U.S. Weapons against Iraq.   When the U.S. talks about "a 
sophisticated bombing campaign different than 1991", what exactly 
does it mean? Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has stated that 
only 100,000 soldiers would be used in a campaign against Iraq. With 
so few troops, the military would be relying on the Air Force's crown 
jewels--the F117 Stealth Fighter and B2 Stealth Bomber. We also 
examine a microwave weapon that fries ground electronics, Unmanned 
Aerial Vehicles, and the new "Stryker" combat vehicles. CC  [TV PG]

 
 11:00 The True Story of the Untouchables.   Chicago, 1928. A 
ruthless gang of men is determined to wrest control of the city from Al 
Capone. They carry machine guns, rifles, and billy clubs. And we're not 
talking about a rival mob family. Meet Treasury Department Agent Eliot 
Ness and his 9-man team of "Untouchables", whose exploits would 
become legendary. CC  [TV G] 
 
  
 01/16/2003 
 
 8:00 Lessons from the Gulf War Leaders.   As the U.S. prepares 
once again to battle Iraq, Sir David Frost off
ers insights and warnings 
from leaders of the last conflict with Saddam Hussein. Former 
President George Bush, General Norman Schwarzkopf, Colin Powell, 
Margaret Thatcher, and John Major provide lessons and guidance in 
interviews conducted before and immediately after the war, when 
memories and emotions were fresh. For historical perspective, we 
include interviews from a few years later, when leaders spoke with the 
benefit of hindsight. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 9:00 Tracking Terror: The CIA in the Middle East.   The attacks on 
the World Trade Center and Pentagon on September 11, 2001 forever 
changed the way Americans view terrorism. No one claims to know it 
would happen, but at the time of the attack, a former CIA case officer, 
one of the few Arabic-speaking agents in the CIA, was saying that 
America was vulnerable. His name is Bob Baer, a CIA veteran of more 
than 20 years. Baer can't tells us everything that he knows, but viewers 
will find his insight into the new enemy--terrorism--enlightening. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
 10:00 Saddam's Bombmaker.   There's one important defector from 
Iraq who lived to tell his story--Dr. Khidir Hamza, who spent 20 years 
developing Iraq's atomic weapons program. Based on a book he co-
wrote with Jeff Stein, "Saddam's Bombmaker: The Terrifying Inside 
Story of the Iraqi Nuclear and Biological Weapons Agenda", Hamza 
paints an unprecedented portrait of Hussein--his women, drunken 
rages, murder of underlings, and unrivaled power--and talks of his 
harrowing escape and first encounter with skeptical CIA agents. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
 11:00 Infamous Murders.  Killing for Pleasure. An examination of 
murderers who perpetrate terrible crimes against women--hurting and 
killing their random and unknown victims. First, we travel back to 
England in the summer that followed WWII, when Neville Heath, an ex-
serviceman, brutally murdered two women. Then, we examine the 
infamous Hillside Stranglers--Kenneth Bianchi and his cousin Angelo 
Buono--who murdered 12 women in the hills surrounding Los Ang
eles. 
And finally, we look at the "Coed Slayer", who killed 7 women in

Michigan. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:30 Infamous Murders.  Terrorizing the Cities. In the second half of 
the 20th century, horrifying serial killers terrorized three American 
cities. We'll investigate and compare the crimes of the Boston 
Strangler (Albert DeSalvo, who confessed but was never tried for the 
murder of 13); the Night Stalker (Richard Ramirez, convicted of the 
brutal murders in Los Angeles); and the Trash Bag Murderers (Patrick 
Kearney and David Hill who confessed to the murders and 
dismemberment of 32 young men in LA's gay community). CC  [TV 
PG] 
 

 01/17/2003 
  
 8:00 Aerial Combat: TWIH.   This week, we take to the skies and tour 
the brand new Cradle of Aviation Museum on Long Island, New York. 
There, in the shadow of legendary warplanes from at least five different 
conflicts, we learn the fascinating story of aerial combat. It's a journey

that begins when the first U.S. air force deployed its primitive biplanes 
to hunt down an elusive bandit, and continues into the modern era of 
stealth technology. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 Inside the Mind of a Suicide Bomber.   A chilling examination 
of the psychology of the suicide bomber, from kamikaze pilots in WWII 
to recent bombings in Israel. As experts note, suicide terrorism is not a 
personal phenomenon, but a group one. We talk to an Israeli Army 
senior intelligence analyst, an attorney who defends suicide bombers, 
a failed kamikaze pilot, two failed suicide bombers from the Middle 
East, a military commander of Hamas, and bomb-makers. We also 
hear from a doctor who treats bombing victims and several survivors. 
CC  [TV PG] 
 
 10:00 Clouds of Death: The Scourge of Biochemical Warfare.   
Though nuclear weapons still threaten world security, the weapons 
most feared today are chemical and biological--drifting clouds of death 
that engulf victims, causing death too horrible to describe. We examine 
how terrorist states have circumvented the enormous cost of building 
nuclear
 weapons with biochemicals. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 Perfect Crimes?  Baumeister Killings/Gardner Museum Heist. 
In the early 1990s, young men in Indianapolis began disappearing. No 
one paid much attention until private investigator Virgil Vandagriff 
claimed that a serial killer stalked the streets. Eventually the 
investigation led to Herb Baumeister's estate, where police found 
thousands of bones buried in the backyard. With arrest imminent, 
Baumeister took his life. And, in a picture-perfect crime, thieves lift 
more than $300-million in rare masterpieces from Boston's Elizabeth 
Stewart Gardner Museum. CC  [TV PG] 
 

 01/18/2003 
 
 8:00 Death Valley Chronicles.   Walk in the footsteps of con men, 
entrepreneurs, and dreamers who tackled the seductively hellish Death 
Valley! In a sweeping tour from Badwater, the Western Hemisphere's 
lowest point, to Mount Whitney, the highest point in the contiguous 
U.S., we'll visit ghost towns built by crusty characters lured by the 
desert's desolate poetry. [TV G] 
 
 9:30 Custer's Last Stand.   A look at the life and military career of 
George Armstrong Custer who took his last stand at the Battle of Little 
Big Horn against Sitting Bull and the Sioux Nation. Did he foolishly lead 
the 7th Cavalry to certain death? Leading historians weigh his legend 
against fact in this 2-hour special. [TV G] 
 
 11:30 In Search of...  Jesse James. Probes one of the most intriguing 
questions of the Old West--was legendary gunman Jesse James shot 
in the back or did he live to a ripe old age? [TV G] 
  
 
 01/19/2003 
  
 8:00 U.S. Weapons against Iraq.   When the U.S. talks about "a 
sophisticated bombing campaign different than 1991", what exactly 
does it mean? Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has stated that 
only 100,000 soldiers would be used in a campaign against Iraq. With 
so few troops, the military would be relying on the Air Force's crown 
jewels--the F117 Stealth Fighter and B2 Stealth Bomber. We also 
examine a microwave weapon that fries ground electronics, Unmanne
d 
Aerial Vehicles, and the new "Stryker" combat vehicles. CC  [TV PG]

 
 9:00 Why Can't They Kill Saddam?   When the Gulf War ended in 
1991, much of Iraq's defenses were left intact, nearly half of the 
Republican Guard escaped, and Saddam Hussein remained in power. 
His own people have tried to kill him; neighboring countries want him 
out of power; the U.S. has targeted him with laser-guided smart 
bombs. Yet Saddam Hussein still rules with an iron fist. How is this 
possible? We'll examine the trickery, the terror, and the political 
manipulation that sustains one of the world's most hated leaders. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
 10:00 Mail Call.  Marine Weapons Training/Greek Phalanx/MiG-
29/Hellcat Tank Destroyer/Civil War Gear/Dazzle Paint. Host R. Lee 
Ermey travels to the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Training Center 
at Camp Pendleton, California, where Marines fire at a video screen 
with "virtual" versions of their normal weapons. Other topics include:

the ancient Greek phalanx, an almost invincible infantry formation; the 
Russian MiG-29, the fastest front-line jet; the U.S. M-18 Hellcat tank 
destroyer, the fastest WWII tracked vehicle; Civil War cavalrymen 
gear; and dazzle paint, a type of nautical camouflage. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 10:30 Conquest.  Tournament. One of the quintessential images of 
medieval life, the tournament lasted well into Tudor times. Actor and 
fight master Peter Woodward investigates the purpose of these 
extraordinary and colorful events and how its many forms--the foot 
tourney, joust on horseback, the melee--developed from the ancient 
trial of combat. Our team experiments with weapons and armor 
designed for tournament, examines the rules of combat and the notion 
of chivalry, and joins a medieval tournament team for a joust on 
horseback! CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 The Color of War.  Homefront. The millions of combatants in 
the various armed services of WWII bore the brunt of the devastating 
war, but the civilian populations of the countries involved also endured 
their share of hardship an
d sacrifice. We see how they bravely 
shouldered their duties and suffered overwhelming burdens as their 
homelands were embroiled in "total war". WWII comes alive through
a 
moving tapestry of letters, diaries, color film and photographs 
unearthed from archives and personal collections. Peter Coyote 
narrates. CC  [TV PG] 
 

 01/20/2003 
 
 8:00 Mail Call.  AVLB/Fulton Recovery System/Pilot Survival 
Kit/Trireme/Battleship Guns/Grape Shot. R. Lee Ermey applies his 
gruff sense of humor while answering viewers' mail about the armed 
forces. This week we find out about the Armored Vehicle Launched 
Bridge, used by combat engineers; the Fulton Recovery System, which 
allows fixed-wing aircraft to rescue downed pilots; a pilot's survival kit;

the ancient Greek warship, the Trireme; how to aim, load, and fire 
battleship guns; and how "grape shot", used in the Revolutionary
and 
Civil Wars, got its name. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 8:30 Conquest.  The Axman Cometh. Actor and fight master Peter 
Woodward guides viewers back to a time when knowing how to swing 
an ax meant the difference in life and death. Our experts practice with 
the Viking single- and double-headed types and learn that in the right 
hands these difficult and exhausting weapons had no equal. We also 
examine the berserker, an ax-wielding Viking warrior who worked 
himself into a state of concentrated fury. Finally, we look at the double-
headed Saxon ax that was nearly the size of a man. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 9:00 TR An American Lion.  Pt. 1. President George W. Bush 
provides the intro to this 2-part look at one of America's most beloved 
presidents, with Richard Dreyfuss as the voice of Theodore Roosevelt. 
We see a young TR overcome debilitating asthma through a strict 
regimen of athletic training, witness his Western adventures, rise as 
New York City Police Commissioner, heroics in the Spanish-American 
War, and selection as Vice President. With the assassination of 
President McKinley, 42-year-old TR became the youngest U.S. 
President. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00
 Patton: A Rebel Revisited.   Larger than life and brassier than 
the medals on his dress uniform, George S. Patton was one of 
America's most celebrated, and at times, vilified WWII combat 
generals. As played by George C. Scott in an Oscar-winning role, 
Patton was complex, heroic, and mad with passion and power. We'll 
contrast the real man with his on-screen counterpart aided by clips 
from family home movies, newsreels, and the film, and interviews with 
descendants and soldiers who served with him. Narrated by Burt 
Reynolds. CC  [TV PG] 
 

 01/21/2003 
 
 8:00 The Nazi Plan to Bomb New York.   Aviation historian David 
Myhra has been investigating secret German aircraft projects for more 
than 20 years, and has uncovered evidence of a diabolical Nazi plan to 
deliver a radioactive bomb to New York. In late 1944, the "Amerika 
Bomber" project was planned, and three aerospace designers--
Wernher von Braun, Eugen Sanger, and Reimar Horton--each had a 
different solution. Through vivid 3D animation, photos, and recreations, 
these unusual projects are finally revealed! CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 TR An American Lion.  Pt. 2. As president, Teddy Roosevelt 
tested and extended the limits of the White House like no other before 
him or since. On the homefront, he battled captains of industry and 
their corporate trusts, brought labor disputes to an end, and protected 
the environment. On the world stage, he was determined to make 
America a dominant power, and his efforts to mediate peace between 
Russia and Japan would win him the Nobel Peace Prize. Featuring the 
voice of Richard Dreyfuss as TR. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 Infamous Murders.  Stalking the Innocent. When murderers 
strike, usually the innocents pay the ultimate price. We study 3 cases 
where killers selected victims randomly. Beginning with the Son of 
Sam, we move to Scotland to examine the case of Peter Manuel in the 
1950s. A burglar, who killed the owners' of the houses he burglarized, 
Manuel chose to defend himself when on trial for the murder of 8 
vict
ims. Back in the U.S., we meet Charlene and Gerald Gallego, who 
chose young girls to be their sex slaves before murdering them. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
 11:30 Infamous Murders.  From Coast to Coast. Some killers roam 
the country in search of victims, and the U.S. is perfectly suited to 
these travelling murderers, who leave a trail of horror that crosses 
state borders and flummoxes local police departments. We examine 
the cases of Ted Bundy, a charming and intelligent man who preyed 
on university students; John Armstrong, a navy seaman suspected of 
having killed worldwide; and Australian-born Christopher Wilder, who 
had killed at least 7 women in the U.S. before committing suicide. CC  
[TV PG] 
 

 01/22/2003 
   
 8:00 Alaska's Bermuda Triangle.   There's something about Alaska 
that the tourist bureau doesn't want you to know. In Alaska, people, 
planes, and ships disappear. Suddenly, inexplicably, and permanently! 
Natives say that shape-shifting spirits kidnap lost travelers. Scientists 
tell of giant crevasses that swallow the unwary. Others tell of 
conspiracies to wreck aircraft. We take a detailed look at the 1972 
incident that confounded the U.S. military, when an airplane carrying 
two U.S. Congressmen vanished between Anchorage and Juneau. CC  
[TV G] 
 
 9:00 Outlaw Biker Gangs.   A 2-hour look back at the days when 
leather-clad hoodlums turned the motorcycle into a symbol of violence 
and a Harley meant mayhem. Profiles "Wino" Willie Forkner, who 
founded an outlaw biker gang called the Boozefighters, and the 
notorious Hell's Angels, who terrorized towns across America. CC  [TV 
PG] 
 
 11:00 Alcatraz.   A small island in San Francisco's icy waters, 
Alcatraz served as a military prison until 1934 when it became a 
federal maximum-security prison. Housing the "worst of the worst",
to 
"Machine Gun" Kelly and "The Birdman" Robert Stroud it
was home. 
Join us for the history of the "Rock", including the Native-American

occupation during the 1970s. CC  [TV PG] 
 

 01/23/2003 
  
 
 8:00 Cain and Ab
el: A Murder Mystery.   Biblical brothers' bonds are 
broken by murder in Eden in one of the most chilling accounts in the 
Old Testament. Journey back to the Land of Nod, where the guilt-
ridden fugitive was banished, and find out how Cain lived out his days. 
CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History.   Kneeling before a flaming 
cross, Klansmen and women take part in their sacred bonding, 
showing how secrecy and ritual aid the hooded order in a campaign for 
white supremacy. From its birth in 1866's Reconstruction South to a 
1996 rally, this chronicle of hate talks to Julian Bond, Morris Dees Jr., 
the Grand Dragon, and Imperial Wizard. CC  [TV PG-L] 
 
 11:00 Infamous Murders.  Spree Killings. The infamous villains 
Bonnie and Clyde were petty robbers who became serial killers. 
Common murder united them in history with 17-year-old Charlie 
Starkweather and his 14-year-old lover Caril Fugate, who murdered 10 
people in one week, and Paul Knowles, a misfit who crossed America 
and murdered at least 20 people. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:30 Infamous Murders.  Horror on the Highways. The anonymity of 
the highway and the speed with which its patrons pass through makes 
it an ideal hunting and dumping ground for murderers who prey on 
vulnerable travelers. We examine three American killers who haunted 
the highways: the unrepentant Henry Lee Lucas, who claimed to have 
murdered 240 people; William Bonin, a Vietnam War veteran who led a 
group of friends in random killing of young boys; and Joseph Paul 
Franklin, a White Supremacist who killed up to 20 people. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 
 01/24/2003 
 
 8:00 The Final Frontier of Space: TWIH.   New York's Rose Center 
is a fabulous destination for space enthusiasts. It features the world's 
most technologically advanced planetarium, and the Williamette 
Meteorite, which Native Americans revere as a gift from heaven. Here, 
"This Week in History" uncovers mankind's epic quest to explore the

final frontier of space--from the Kansas farm boy who discovered the 
planet Pluto,
 to the triumph of the Apollo program, to lingering 
questions about the Space Shuttle Challenger tragedy. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 The Little Big Horn: The Untold Story.   We'll look with fresh 
eyes at the infamous battle, using over two decades of research by Dr. 
Herman J. Viola, Curator Emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution, 
whose close friendship with Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow, grandson of 
one of Custer's six Crow scouts, afforded him unique access to the 
Native-American community's insights. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 Devil's Island: Hell on Earth.   In French Guiana, we unearth 
the hellish history of the penal colony Devil's Island, final stop for 
France's incorrigibles and political prisoners from 1852 to 1945. We 
interview an 82-year-old former prison secretary; actor Richard 
Dreyfuss, who claims descent from inmate Alfred Dreyfus; and island 
authority Alexander Miles. CC  [TV PG] 
 

 01/25/2003 
  
 8:00 TR An American Lion.  Pt. 1. The story of one of America's 
most beloved presidents. Richard Dreyfuss provides the voice of 
Theodore Roosevelt in this 2-hour special presentation of his life. We 
see the young TR overcome debilitating asthma through a strict 
regimen of athletic training, and witness his Western adventures, rise 
as New York City Police Commissioner, heroics in the Spanish-
American War, and selection as Vice President. When President 
McKinley was assassinated, 42-year-old TR became the youngest 
U.S. President. CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 TR An American Lion.  Pt. 1. The story of one of America's 
most beloved presidents. Richard Dreyfuss provides the voice of 
Theodore Roosevelt in this 2-hour special presentation of his life. We 
see the young TR overcome debilitating asthma through a strict 
regimen of athletic training, and witness his Western adventures, rise 
as New York City Police Commissioner, heroics in the Spanish-
American War, and selection as Vice President. When President 
McKinley was assassinated, 42-year-old TR became the youngest 
U.S. President. CC  [TV G] 
 

 01/26/200
3 
  
 8:00 Sex in the 20th Century.  The Century Turns On. The 20th 
century revealed changes in America's sexuality that no floor-length 
skirt could hide. We follow the rising hemlines and racing heartbeats as 
electricity lit our cities and love lives in this often amusing and always

fascinating history of shifting sexual values. British psychologist 
Havelock Ellis's groundbreaking research revealed that sex was 
"natural and pure and good," and Margaret Sanger began a 50-year

crusade to legalize birth control. CC  [TV 14-S] 
 
 9:00 Sex in the 20th Century.  Passion's Coming of Age. In his 1928 
book "Why We Misbehave", Dr. Samuel Schmalhausen described a 
new generation of Americans who were all too eager to sever ties with 
their Victorian predecessors. Goodbye floor-length dresses, 
chaperones, and stuffy mores. Hello petting parties, flappers, and 
Sigmund Freud! We'll cover the Roaring '20s, the Great Depression, 
and World War II, and see the radical effects they wrought on how 
Americans thought about sex. CC  [TV 14-S] 
 
 10:00 Mail Call.  Trebuchet/Troop Headcounts/BAR/Smart 
Bombs/Modern Parachutes/Boomerangs. R. Lee Ermey, the sergeant 
in "Full Metal Jacket", answers viewers' mail about what the armed

forces. In this episode, we learn how a trebuchet, or catapult, was used 
by medieval armies; how many troops are in a platoon, company, and 
division; the history of the Browning Automatic Rifle; how smart bombs 
work; the types of parachutes used by today's paratroopers; and how 
the weapon version of a boomerang was used. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 10:30 Conquest.  Knight in Armor. Actor and fight master Peter 
Woodward returns to the days of chivalry to find out why personal 
armor developed--from horn and linen to chain mail to full plate. We 
visit an armorer's workshop to see how it was made, and our expert 
team tries on various types, including the classic medieval plate armor, 
to assess their strengths and weaknesses, and tests fighting 
techniques with various knightly armor-piercing weapons. 
Then, we put 
the armored knight in his proper place--mounted on a charger!  CC  
[TV PG] 
 
 11:00 Sex in the 20th Century.  The Politics of Pleasure. The '70s 
ushered in a new era of sexual experimentation unlike anything 
America had ever seen--open marriages, swinging, and pornography 
were prevalent. But the '80s signaled a shift in thinking, with much of 
the country suffering a sexual hangover. Herpes helped fuel a carnal 
backlash, but soon a more deadly disease would grab headlines--
AIDS. With the advent of Viagra and President Clinton's tryst with 
Monica Lewinsky, the '90s proved we're a nation of extremes in sexual 
expression and repression. CC  [TV 14-S] 
 

 01/27/2003 
 
8:00 Shackleton.   Movie. Kenneth Branagh stars as Sir Ernest 
Shackleton, leader of a 1914 ill-fated expedition to the Antarctic. The 
cast and crew spent five weeks living and working from a modern 
7,500-ton icebreaking ship off the coast of Greenland. This 3-hour 
movie is based on the detailed diaries and actual accounts of 
expedition members. Written and directed by Charles Sturridge. (2002) 
CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 The Essex: The True Story of Moby Dick.   The whaler Essex 
sailed from Nantucket in 1819 and met its doom in the middle of the 
Pacific in 1820, when a sperm whale attacked, causing the ship to 
sink. Adrift in small whaleboats, the crew faced storms, thirst, illness, 
and starvation. Reduced to cannibalism, but succeeding in one of 
history's great open-boat journeys, the few survivors were picked up off 
South America. Here is the true story of the adventures of the Essex, 
which provided inspiration for Herman Melville's novel "Moby-Dick".
CC  
[TV PG] 
 

 01/28/2003 
 

 8:00 UFOs: Then and Now?  The Innocent Years. In a 
comprehensive series investigating the UFO experience, we begin with 
a review of surprising imagery from cave paintings to Medieval 
frescoes to Renaissance art. But in the late 1940s, the modern era of 
UFO sightings took off with the mysterious crash of a flying object near 
Roswell, N
ew Mexico. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 UFOs: What You Didn't Know.  UFOs in the Bible. Journey 
back through time into the mysterious world of UFOs as revealed 
through ancient biblical texts. Through intensive re-interpretation of 
early religious documents, researchers believe that they have found 
evidence of ancient UFO activity. From Elijah's flying "chariots of fire"

to Ezekiel's "wheels within wheels in the sky", and even the enigmatic

aerial phenomenon leading Moses during Exodus, we put a modern 
perspective on the writings of the Bible in the context of UFOs. CC  [TV 
G] 
 
 10:00 The Trans-Siberian Railroad.   It's the longest, most expensive 
and complicated railroad ever built. Ordered by the Czar in an effort to 
save his empire and unify his country at the twilight of the 19th century,

the Trans-Siberian Railroad nearly tore Russia apart. Intended in part 
for defense, the railroad provoked a war, crossed great lengths over 
treacherous terrain, and encountered logistical and economic failures. 
Ironically, "enemies of the state" built the railroad--men sentenced
to 
hard labor in Siberian prisons. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 Infamous Murders.  The Cannibals. A disturbing look into the 
ultimate taboo. We examine the cases of three murderers who ate the 
flesh of their victims: Jeffrey Dahmer, a loner who killed up to 17 young 
men in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Andrei Chikatilo, Russia's worst serial 
killer responsible for killing at least 53 people; and Ed Gein, another 
murderer from Wisconsin, whose horrible crimes inspired Alfred 
Hitchcock's "Psycho", as well as "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre"
and 
"The Silence of the Lambs". CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:30 Infamous Murders.  Killing for Thrills. Some murderers live a 
shady second life in the midst of their communities, secretly satiating 
their desire for power and transforming their homes into chambers of 
horror. We examine four such modern murderers who killed for thrills: 
Leonard Lake and Charles Ng, who raped and killed up to 25 people in 
California; and Fred an
d Rosemary West, who transformed their home 
at 25 Cromwell Street in Gloucester, England into a slaughterhouse, 
even killing their own 16-year-old daughter. CC  [TV PG] 
 

 01/29/2003 
 
 8:00 UFOs: Then and Now?  Cause for Alarm. Studies some of the 
most disturbing UFO sightings, including: a 4-day extravaganza in 
1952, when UFOs cruised the skies over the White House; sightings in 
1967 near a secret U.S./Canadian submarine detection base; 
controversial events at the U.K./U.S. air base at Bentwaters, England; 
and the military's Test Area 51 in Nevada. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 UFOs: What You Didn't Know.  UFO Hot Spots. For those who 
study the UFO phenomenon, "UFO Hot Spots" are those places 
around the globe known for a long history of UFO sightings and 
reports. From Brazil to Mexico, from Washington State to Florida, 
multiple witnesses, including air traffic controllers and even the military,

confirm that something unexplained is repeatedly happening in the 
night sky. Tales of alien abductions, bizarre and chilling photographs of 
UFOs, and hours of videotape all abound as we search for UFO Hot 
Spots. CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 Icebreakers.   They are the toughest ships in the water, plowing 
headlong into one of nature's hardest obstacles. Modern icebreakers 
can smash through 10-foot thick ice sheets without stopping, allowing 
scientists and commercial shipping access to some of earth's most 
inhospitable spots. Join our bone-chilling journey as we patrol the 
Great Lakes on the USCG Cutter Makinaw and traverse the infamous 
Northwest Passage on the maiden voyage of the USCG Healy, the 
newest Polar Class Icebreaker in the U.S. Fleet. CC  [TV G] 
 
 11:00 Perfect Crimes?  John List/Green River Killer. In 1971, John 
List brutally murdered his entire family and fled--a month later the 
bodies were discovered. For almost 20 years, List, who had 
established a new identity, succeeded in pulling off his crime--until a 
popular TV show ferreted him out. Police involved in Washington 
State's Green River Killin
gs weren't as lucky. In 1982, a female body 
was found floating in Green River. Then, four more bodies were 
discovered. 49 bodies later, and the killer remains at large--though the 
search continues. CC  [TV PG] 
 

 01/30/2003 
   
 8:00 UFOs: Then and Now?  Nightmare. Examines the most 
debatable aspect of alien contact--human abduction! From the first 
recorded case, the 1961 kidnapping of Betty and Barney Hill, to the 
1976 Allagash Incident, when four friends were whisked away while on 
a camping trip, we hear firsthand from participants and a 
neuroscientist, who offers more earthbound solutions. CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 UFOs: What You Didn't Know.  When UFOs Arrive. It's all 
hush-hush as we track a secretive global paper trail, delving into 
government plans on how to deal with other-planet visitors. Searching 
historical records, we find that protocols are in place--from the U.S. 
military's JANAP-146 reporting requirements to France's Cometa files, 
from Chapter 13 of the FEMA Fire Officer's Guide to Disaster Control 
titled "Enemy Attack and UFO Potential", to a now-repealed federal
law 
titled "Extraterrestrial Exposure". CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 Ice Road Truckers.   During the harsh winter of Canada's 
Northwest Territory, remote villages and work camps are cut off from 
the world. To keep them supplied, a tenacious group of long-haul 
truckers drive their rigs over hundreds of miles on ice roads cut across 
the surface of frozen lakes. Sometimes the ice cannot support the 
heavy rig, and driver and cargo plunge through the ice and sink to the 
bottom. Hitch a risky ride along with the Ice Road Truckers as they 
drive headlong into bone-chilling danger. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 Infamous Murders.  Streets of Fear. An examination of three 
modern-day serial killers who found their victims--usually lone females-
-on the streets of British and American cities. The Yorkshire Ripper 
earned his nickname from his frenzied attacks on prostitutes and 
young girls in Leeds in Northern England. Joel Rifkin confessed to 
k
illing 17 women and was convicted of murdering 10 prostitutes in New 
York. And Arthur Shawcross picked up prostitutes in New York City, 
then drove them to the surrounding countryside, where he killed them. 
CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:30 Infamous Murders.  Intent on Murder. An examination of killers 
who choose their victims by type, categorizing innocent people with 
their own sick desires. Gary Heidnick kidnapped young black women in 
Philadelphia, claiming he wanted to start a baby farm. John Gacy 
targeted teenage boys; he was the worst serial killer in the U.S. at the 
time of his arrest. And Kenneth Erskine chose frail and elderly people 
to strangle in London, England. CC  [TV PG] 
 
  
 01/31/2003 
  
 8:00 UFOs: Then and Now?  Aliens and Contact. On July 11,1991, 
thousands across Mexico looked skyward during a total eclipse and 
were greeted with a wave of UFO sightings. Was this a prelude to 
imminent contact? Or will humans get to them first? Join us for a 
review of mankind's efforts to reach out to Extraterrestrial Intelligence 
as we listen for a signal that we are not alone! CC  [TV G] 
 
 9:00 Roswell: Final Declassification.   In 1947, a strange object fell 
from the sky near Roswell, New Mexico, and controversy brewed over 
what it really was. In November 2001, we convened a team of experts 
at the National Archives for an exclusive first look at the top-secret 
government files of the UFO incident. We unveil the remaining 
classified files--11 boxes with 17 notebooks of declassified files, 
photos, transcripts and audiotapes of dozens of witnesses, and 22 
films and videos--in a definitive statement on the 50-year-old mystery. 
CC  [TV G] 
 
 10:00 Winter Warriors.   Armies engaged in cold-weather combat 
have suffered insurmountable casualties from freezing as well as 
enemy fire. Stories from Napoleon's attack on Moscow, the Battle of 
the Bulge, and Korea's Chosin Reservoir detail how Mother Nature can 
be the most formidable adversary. We'll see how contemporary armies 
train by incorporating les
sons learned from past tragedies and Alaska's 
indigenous population. CC  [TV PG] 
 
 11:00 Perfect Crimes?  The Great Brinks Robbery/The Zodiac Killer. 
Don your deerstalker hat and play armchair detective as we assign you 
two historical crimes--one almost perfect and one yet unsolved. First 
stop, Brinks, Inc.'s Boston headquarters, where nine masked men stole 
around $2,775,000. Then, search for the Zodiac Killer, who taunted 
police with letters and calls after his five known murders.
Previous History Channel primetime listings:
December 2002

November 2002

Official HistoryChannel.com Homepage
From the invention of the electric battery in 1800 to the murdered remains of missing Washington intern Chandra Levy being discovered in a Washington D.C. park*, find out what happened when with our exclusive History of the World Timeline!
GO TO: HistoryChannel.com/worldtimeline

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of March, 2002.