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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st)

NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings


11/01/2002 
 
8:00 Sex and History: TWIH.   From sex scandals to the origin of sex 
toys, host Josh Binswanger uncovers an hour of steamy history. 
Burlesque star Dita Von Teese demonstrates the classic techniques of 
striptease that drove our grandfathers wild. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 Storm Chasers.   Journey through the eye of a hurricane and 
ride along the path of a raging tornado with the courageous few who 
call themselves storm chasers. These daring scientists, journalists, 
photographers, military personnel, and weather enthusiasts track the 
most harrowing storms in order to observe the violence and erratic 
conditions firsthand and witness nature's terrific beauty and power. 
Through analysis of their hard-won data and experiences of their 
narrow escapes, they help protect lives and property. CC  [TV PG] 
 
10:00 Survival Technology.   In an historic survey of man's 
adaptation to killer environmental conditions, we travel to the desert, 
the Arctic, the sea, jungle, and space, charting the body's physiological 
responses to extreme circumstances such as frostbite, heatstroke, and 
hypothermia. We talk with military survival experts and learn about the 
latest cutting-edge survival gear, as well as the equipment aboard the 
space station, and look to the future, when nano-technology will create 
a new type of technology. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 The Real Robinson Crusoe.   Daniel Defoe's book was based 
on his life--but Defoe's fiction wasn't as wild as Alexander Selkirk's real

life. After arguing with the captain of a privateer, Selkirk was marooned 
on an island west of Chile. After five years of isolation, he was rescued 
and made a fortune. But wealth didn't make him happy, and he 
eventually returned to the sea where he died. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/02/2002 
 
8:00 Fire on the Mountain.   In July 1994, Chicago Tribune reporter 
John Maclean h
eard reports about a tragedy on Storm King Mountain 
in Colorado--a raging wildfire killed 14 elite firefighters. An official 
inquiry found firefighters at fault, but Maclean refused to believe it. For

him the tragedy had too many eerie parallels to the Montana Mann 
Gulch inferno 45 years earlier. Why would firefighters make the same 
mistake twice? Based on his bestseller, Maclean pieces together what 
really happened. Scott Glenn narrates. CC  [TV G] 
 
10:00 A History of Britain.  The Wrong Empire. Historian Simon 
Schama sets off on his longest journey of discovery yet, from the back 
streets of revolutionary Boston to the slums of Calcutta; from the slave 
plantations of Barbardos to the fortifications of Quebec. Retracing the 
footsteps of Britons, Scots, Irish, Welsh, and English who took the flag 
to four corners of the globe, he tells the exhilarating and terrible story

of how one small set of islands came to dominate the world in the 
space of less than a century. [TV G] 
 
11:00 The Ship.  Days 11-17. In a dramatic sea rescue, a 
crewmember stricken with a mysterious illness is swept off to a 
hospital. Following Cook's path along Australia's eastern coast, the 
modern crew lands on a remote island for some relaxation and 
authentic Aborigine festivities, and learns the negative impact Cook's 
journey had on the native people. Before reaching open sea, the crew 
sails to Possession Island to the birthplace of modern Australia and 
contemplates the ramifications of Cook's imperialism. CC  [TV PG] 
 

11/03/2002 
 
8:00 The Battleships.  A Thirst for Blood and Iron. A saga of power, 
politics, and one-upmanship, our series spans two centuries of naval 
war--from the era of sail to retirement of the world's last battleship. 
During the Napoleonic Wars, the British fleet of sailing men-of-war 
ultimately defeated the French. In America, the Civil War tested a 
brazen new weapon--the turret gun. As the century turned, when 
Germany tried to rival her naval supremacy, the British built the HMS 
Dreadnoug
ht--the largest, fastest, and deadliest battleship ever 
created. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 The Battleships.  Clash of the Dreadnoughts. The outbreak of 
hostilities between Germany and Britain in August 1914 saw the 
battleship at almost the peak of its superiority among fighting ships. In 
firepower, nothing could equal that of the dreadnought--now the 
ultimate class of battleship in navies worldwide. On windswept waters 
of the North Sea, the world's two greatest navies put their fleets to the 
test of fire. We see how, despite losing more ships and more men than 
Germany, Britain's Grand Fleet remained master of the North Sea in 
WWI. CC  [TV G] 
 
10:00 The Battleships.  The Darkness of the Future. With the signing 
of the Treaty of Versailles ending WWI, the entire German High Seas 
Fleet was scuttled. But soon a new arms race began between Britain, 
the U.S., and Japan. Radical new battleships, larger and with even 
more firepower were planned. By the mid-1930s, Italy, Russia, and a 
re-emerging National Socialist Germany began building up their fleets. 
As political conditions deteriorated in Europe, it was clear that the 
battleship would play a major strategic part in future armed conflicts. 
CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 Mail Call.  Future Gear/Marine Camouflage/Army's New 
Armored Vehicle. R. Lee Ermey, the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket",

applies his gruff sense of humor in this half-hour series that answers 
viewers' mail about what the armed forces were, and really are, like! 
Shot on location, Ermey reads questions on air and then sends them 
out to military experts in the field for answers and brief demonstrations.

Ermey looks at possible gear for GIs on tomorrow's battlefields; how 
the Marines designed their new camo pattern; and examines the 
Army's new armored vehicle, the Stryker. CC  [TV PG] 
 
11:30 Basic Training.   The recruits attempt to pass Phase One of 
their training with a series of tests demonstrating their proficiency in the

Army's command structure and core values. Then, it's on to Phase 
Tw
o, a.k.a. the "Gunfighter Phase", where the soldiers begin tactical

weapons training in the field. Their first task--to build a camouflaged 
firing position on a battlefield. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/04/2002 
 
8:00 Mail Call.  Tank/Gatling Gun/Samurai Sword. R. Lee Ermey, who 
played the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies his gruff sense
of 
humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail about what 
the armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on location, Ermey 
reads the questions on air and then sends them out to military experts 
in the field for answers and brief demonstrations. In this episode, he 
finds out how to steer the WWII tank M5A1 (the Stuart); how fast a 
Gatling gun can fire; and why the samurai sword is so powerful. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
8:30 Basic Training.   Physical Training (PT) is one of the primary 
activities throughout Basic Training, and in this episode, the recruits 
experience their second PT test. By the end of Basic Training, passing 
their final test is a prerequisite to graduating, and this interim step will

let them know how much more work remains. Another major milestone 
of every soldier in Basic Training is marksmanship. While some 
recruits are naturals with their rifles, others struggle to find the target.

CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 A History of Britain.  Forces of Nature/Victoria & Her Sisters. 
Historian Simon Schama explores Great Britain's "Romantic 
Generation" in the mid-1770s, when the country was intoxicated by a 
great surge of political energy. Rediscovering England's wildernesses, 
the intellectuals also discovered the plight of the common man, turning 
Nature into a revolutionary force. By the time 18-year-old Queen 
Victoria ascended the throne in 1837, the massive advance of 
technology and industrialization was rapidly reshaping both the 
landscape and the social structure. [TV G] 
 
11:30 The Making of Boy's Toys.   Sleek boats, private planes, 
expensive cars, high-tech gadgets. A behind-the-scenes look at the 
making of The History Channel's "Modern Ma
rvels Boy's Toys Week"--
from the interviewing of experts to the directing of recreations. [TV PG] 
 

11/05/2002 
 
8:00 Inside the Presidency with Roger Mudd.  The Making of the 
Presidential Libraries. In exclusive interviews, Roger Mudd talks with 
former Presidents Jimmy Carter, George H. Bush, and Bill Clinton 
about the building of their presidential libraries and their views on their

places in history. In addition to the one-on-one interviews with the 
former Presidents, Mudd reveals how Presidential Libraries came 
about, and what happened to presidential papers prior to Franklin 
Roosevelt's decision to establish a federal system for preserving them, 
and recent controversies over their funding. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 A History of Britain.  Empire of Good Intentions/The Two 
Winstons. Britain faced the challenges and consequences of running 
the biggest empire the world had ever seen. Duty dictated that the 
Empire's job was to give its subjects what they needed for eventual 
self-government. While the ideals of Empire may have been noble, the 
reality in countries like India and Ireland was blood, grief, and broken 
promises. Then, historian Simon Schama deals with fundamental 
questions about how we cope with our past and if our history is 
relevant to life in a new century. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:30 History's Crimes & Trials.  The Yorkshire Ripper. The story of 
Peter Sutcliffe, the English gravedigger and killer who terrorized 
northern England in the 1970s with a series of macabre and savage 
murders. CC  [TV PG] 
 

11/06/2002 
 
8:00 Stories from the Hall of Fame.  Bowling. From balls to bags, 
shirts to shoes, pins to perfect games, the International Bowling 
Museum and Hall of Fame in St. Louis, Missouri celebrates all things 
bowling. Join world-class bowler Parker Bohn III for a tour of the 
museum as he reveals the stories of some of the Lords of the Lane, 
including Hall-of-Famers Mark Roth, Andy Varipapa, Dick Weber, and 
Peter Weber. We also look at the perfect 300-Game through the eyes 
of PBA To
ur veterans Johnny Petraglia and Bob Learn. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 Axes, Swords and Knives.   Blade implements have been a 
part of civilized man's journey since the Paleolithic Age, when sharp 
tools were chipped off of flint or obsidian. But with the discovery of 
metallurgy, people were able to forge stronger, more versatile blade 
implements. We visit an axe-throwing contest in Wisconsin for an 
introduction to the least subtle of the blade tools. Then we visit a 
swordsmith and an experienced swordfighter who work in traditional 
methods from ancient sources, and review the history of knives. CC  
[TV G] 
 
10:00 Siege Machines.   A look at siege machines--a machine that 
converts energy into mechanical force to go over, under, or through 
fortified or fixed defenses too strong for conventional force. These 
engines range from man's first long-range missile weapon, the 
slingshot, to the laser cannons and satellite-destroying robots of the 
21st century. All of these machines are designed to breach barriers--
castle walls, entrenched troops, even outer space. When the going 
gets tough, the tough get siege machines. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 The Bloody Tower of London.   We'll go inside the Tower of 
London, actually 20 towers, and see how this microcosm of nine 
centuries of history struck fear into the hearts Englishmen. Built on the 
site of ancient Roman ruins, William the Conqueror began construction 
in 1067, and subsequent monarchs added their own touch. Built to 
subdue the turbulent citizenry of London, the Tower claimed the lives 
of many until the mid-18th century. CC  [TV PG] 
 

11/07/2002 
 
8:00 The Day the Towers Fell.   A riveting special that reveals the 
never-before-told stories of eyewitnesses, including amateur and 
professional photographers, caught in the horror of the World Trade 
Center tragedy. Images captured by many of the photographers are 
seen for the first time on television. Together, they provide startling and

intensely personal firsthand accounts of that fateful day--stories of 
te
rror, hope, and survival. CC  [TV PG]
 
9:00 The World Trade Center: Rise and Fall of an American Icon.   
On September 11, 2001, terrorists did the unthinkable when they flew 
two fuel-loaded jetliners into the World Trade Center. The Twin 
Towers' physical height and symbolic stature made them the perfect 
target. They were remarkable achievements in architecture, 
construction, and technology. In this 2-hour profile, we look at how the 
WTC was constructed and talk to representatives from the Army Corps 
of Engineers, New York's Office of Emergency Management, FEMA, 
and DNA experts about the aftermath. CC  [TV PG]
 
11:00 The End of the World.   It's not the first millennium we've 
encountered, so why do some take an apocalyptic look at this, the 
second in recorded Western history? Join us as we take a new look at 
the old ideas still hanging around. What ancient prophecies have come 
true, if any? Should we expect a rash of self-proclaimed acts of doom? 
CC  [TV G]
 

11/08/2002 
 
8:00 Sex in the 20th Century.  The Century Turns On. The 20th 
century revealed changes in America's sexuality that no floor-length 
skirt could hide. We follow the rising hemlines and racing heartbeats as 
electricity lit our cities and love lives in this often amusing and always

fascinating history of shifting sexual values. British psychologist 
Havelock Ellis's groundbreaking research revealed that sex was 
"natural and pure and good," and Margaret Sanger began a 50-year

crusade to legalize birth control. CC  [TV 14-S]

9:00 Sex in the 20th Century.  Passion's Coming of Age. In his 1928 
book "Why We Misbehave", Dr. Samuel Schmalhausen described a 
new generation of Americans who were all too eager to sever ties with 
their Victorian predecessors. Goodbye floor-length dresses, 
chaperones, and stuffy mores. Hello petting parties, flappers, and 
Sigmund Freud! We'll cover the Roaring '20s, the Great Depression, 
and World War II, and see the radical effects they wrought on how 
Americans thought about sex. CC  [TV 14-S] 
 
1
0:00 Sex in the 20th Century.  Make Love, Not War. Men and 
women who had embraced the carnal liberties allowed during war 
returned home to find a breeze wafting through their bedrooms. We 
explore the tumultuous 1950s and '60s, which began with a cold war 
and ended with a sexual revolution. In the 1950s, America tried to turn 
back the sexual clock, and when Alfred Kinsey revealed that 50% of 
polled women had sex before marriage, the Rockefeller Foundation 
withdrew his funding. But the arrival of "the pill" in 1960 would
change 
all that. CC  [TV 14-S] 
 
11:00 Sex in the 20th Century.  The Politics of Pleasure. The '70s 
ushered in a new era of sexual experimentation unlike anything 
America had ever seen--open marriages, swinging, and pornography 
were prevalent. But the '80s signaled a shift in thinking, with much of 
the country suffering a sexual hangover. Herpes helped fuel a carnal 
backlash, but soon a more deadly disease would grab headlines--
AIDS. With the advent of Viagra and President Clinton's tryst with 
Monica Lewinsky, the '90s proved we're a nation of extremes in sexual 
expression and repression. CC  [TV 14-S] 
 

11/09/2002 
 
8:00 Battle of the Bulge.   Movie. Epic story of the Nazi war 
machine's last desperate offensive. Henry Fonda, Robert Shaw, and 
Charles Bronson star. (1965) CC  [TV PG] 
 
11:00 The Ship.  Days 17-19 As the Endeavour reaches the open 
sea, the crew navigates using Cook's original methods, which were the 
most advanced of his time, but a far cry from modern technology. All is 
well, until news of the September 11th attacks reaches the crew. Once 
the group, particularly the Americans, is assured that their loved ones 
are safe, they decide to complete the voyage. For the first time, the 
group functions as a real crew, ready to face the challenges of the 
temperamental sea. CC  [TV PG] 
 

11/10/2002 
 
8:00 Outlaw Biker Gangs. A 2-hour look back at the days when 
leather-clad hoodlums turned the motorcycle into a symbol of violence 
and a Harley meant mayhem. Prof
iles "Wino" Willie Forkner, who 
founded an outlaw biker gang called the Boozefighters, and the 
notorious Hell's Angels, who terrorized towns across America. CC  [TV 
PG] 

10:00 M1 Abrams: Supertank!   Join us as we penetrate the history 
of the world's most sophisticated tank--the M1 Abrams Main Battle 
Tank. In the most radical departure in U.S. tank design since WWII, the 
Supertank combines speed, heavy protective armor, and a fearsome 
120mm main gun. In February 1991, the new and unproven Abrams 
tank was rapidly deployed on the frontline of Operation Desert Storm. 
Using night vision and laser targeting, the M1 Abrams tank destroyed 
the cream of Saddam Hussein's armored Republican Guard. CC  [TV 
G] 
 
11:00 Mail Call.  Tank/Gatling Gun/Samurai Sword. R. Lee Ermey, 
who played the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies his gruff
sense 
of humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail about what 
the armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on location, Ermey 
reads the questions on air and then sends them out to military experts 
in the field for answers and brief demonstrations. In this episode, he 
finds out how to steer the WWII tank M5A1 (the Stuart); how fast a 
Gatling gun can fire; and why the samurai sword is so powerful. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
11:30 Basic Training.   Physical Training (PT) is one of the primary 
activities throughout Basic Training, and in this episode, the recruits 
experience their second PT test. By the end of Basic Training, passing 
their final test is a prerequisite to graduating, and this interim step will

let them know how much more work remains. Another major milestone 
of every soldier in Basic Training is marksmanship. While some 
recruits are naturals with their rifles, others struggle to find the target.

CC  [TV G] 
 

11/11/2002 
 
8:00 Wrecking Ball. Is man's urge to destroy innate? We all like to 
see things smashed, exploded, sunk, and destroyed. During this 2-
hour special on mayhem and falling rubble, we meet America's first 
family of destructi
on, the Loizeaux, who have imploded more 
structures than all of their competitors. We also learn about the 
psychology of wrecking things and meet stressed-out Japanese 
businessmen who pay to smash porcelain objects in "The Relief 
Room", and military demolition experts called sappers. CC  [TV PG] 
 
10:00 Wrecking Ball. Is man's urge to destroy innate? We all like to 
see things smashed, exploded, sunk, and destroyed. During this 2-
hour special on mayhem and falling rubble, we meet America's first 
family of destruction, the Loizeaux, who have imploded more 
structures than all of their competitors. We also learn about the 
psychology of wrecking things and meet stressed-out Japanese 
businessmen who pay to smash porcelain objects in "The Relief 
Room", and military demolition experts called sappers. CC  [TV PG] 


11/12/2002 
 
8:00 Secret Passages.  Death. Journey through a netherworld of 
ancient passageways and secret chambers that reveal as much about 
life as they do about death. On this mystical trip into the mysterious 
world of death, we visit hidden tombs that reveal lost civilizations and 
buried treasures, and ancient underground cemeteries that became 
refuge for the oppressed. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 Snipers.  One Shot--One Kill. Statistics prove it's damned hard to 
kill an enemy soldier on the battlefield. That's why the U.S. Marine 
Corps urges its best marksmen to become snipers--human machines, 
inhuman patience and precision. From distances up to 3 miles, 
tomorrow's Marines train to neutralize enemies with one shot from their 
rifles--a shot that can mean the difference between peaceful surrender 
and bloody assault. We journey from Vietnam to Africa and Eastern 
Europe to observe these snipers watching...waiting...firing. CC  [TV 
PG] 
 
10:00 Camouflage.   From ancient hunters' camouflage to computer-
generated digital pattern uniforms, we uncover the past, present, and 
future of deception through disguise. During an ambush exercise by 
U.S. Marines, we learn that camouflage came from natur
al coloration 
and patterns of flora and fauna. The art of military camouflage took off 
in WWI with the use of the airplane, when the French learnt to hide 
from "eyes in the sky". It's a world of shadows and smoke, where
even 
cities disappear through disguise. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 In Search of...  Killer Bees. A photographic report from Brazil 
on the behavior of the bees and genetic experiments underway to stop 
the savage swarms. Leonard Nimoy hosts this classic TV series. CC  
[TV G] 
 
11:30 In Search of...  Deadly Ants. A look at the billions of fire ants 
that march across the southern United States and the failure so far of 
all attempts to stop them. Leonard Nimoy hosts. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/13/2002 
 
8:00 The True Story of the Philadelphia Experiment.   In 1943, a 
warship was rendered invisible in the Philadelphia Naval Yard, then 
teleported instantly to Norfolk, Virginia, and back. But this technological

breakthrough was achieved at such horrific human cost--crewmen 
missing or gone insane, dead sailors fused into bulkheads--that 
authorities deep-sixed the experiment. Or so goes the legend that still 
flourishes. We examine this tallest of seaman's tales and learn how 
real anti-submarine technology led to talk of "disappearing ships".
CC  
[TV G] 
 
9:00 Snipers.  World's Deadliest Snipers. Among the world's best, the 
British Royal Marines build on their noble traditions and the lessons of 
history to hone the skills of snipers and place them in a proud global 
lineage. The daring British Commandos, perfecting their use of 
camouflage and stalking, cleared the hedgerows at Normandy. The 
Russian Red Army snipers, known for patience and stealth, helped to 
break the siege of Stalingrad. We also look at a little-known force--the 
Red Army's deadly women snipers, who fought alongside the men. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
10:00 Tunnels of Vietnam.   Here is the heroic story of a daring band 
of infantry soldiers, the "Tunnel Rats", charged with a daring mission--
to search for, find, and destroy a secret subterran
ean network of 
enemy tunnels in Vietnam. Armed with only a flashlight, valor, and a 
.45, they faced a determined foe and overcame lethal odds, 
uncovering secret enemy arms and intelligence caches. Tragically, 
many of these volunteers died and others were seriously wounded on 
this terrifying suicide mission. CC  [TV PG] 
 
11:00 Organized Crime: A World History.  China. On January 2, 
2000, a freighter from Hong Kong docked in Seattle. When INS 
officials opened one of the cargo containers, they found 12 disoriented 
Chinese stowaways, who had paid exorbitant fees to Snake Heads, 
smuggling agents from a vast criminal syndicate that spans cultures, 
countries, and history. Featuring gang leaders from 1920s' Shanghai to 
1970s' New York Chinatown, we investigate the history of the Chinese 
underworld from its mythical origins in a long-ago Shaolin monastery. 
CC  [TV PG] 
 

11/14/2002 
 
8:00 The Real Spartacus.   Long before Stanley Kubrick's film 
starring Kirk Douglas, Spartacus had unwittingly become a 
mythological icon of resistance against oppression worldwide. We'll 
look at the real Spartacus, focusing on his struggle against Roman 
forces, his time as a gladiator, and his role in the infamous slave revolt

against Rome in 73 B.C., which convulsed the great empire for two 
years before the uprising was put down and 6,000 slave rebels were 
crucified along 150 miles of the Appian Way. CC  [TV PG] 
 
9:00 Snipers.  Stalk and Kill. Meet the ultimate hunters in a deadly 
game where the quarry shoots back--U.S. Army snipers. Experts of 
stealth and stalking, they can kill with a single shot from nearly a mile,

or creep within yards of an enemy target remaining virtually invisible. 
Starting with American snipers in the Revolutionary War and ending 
with 21st century snipers and the latest technology at the U.S. Army 
Sniper School, we review the history of these marksmen who train to 
become the "most hated men on the battlefield." CC  [TV PG] 
 
10:00 The M-16.   The most powerful assault rifle ever use
d in 
combat, the M-16 became the symbol of our lost war--Vietnam--and 
can easily be called America's most unloved gun. Yet, 30 years after 
its introduction, it stands as a potent icon of U.S. military strength 
worldwide. We'll explain how it almost ended up on the scrap heap! CC  
[TV G] 
 
11:00 Organized Crime: A World History.  Russia. With the fall of 
communism, a rapacious new gangster class arose from all of the 
former Soviet Republics and became criminal millionaires. The Red 
Mafiya, which seized power with staggering speed in the post-Soviet 
free-market free-for-all, can be traced back centuries to the Thieves 
World--a secret criminal culture with a strict code of conduct based on 
loyalty and opposition to the government. We cover the Redfellas 
evolution--from roots in Imperial Russia to shocking global reach today. 
CC  [TV PG]
 

11/15/2002 
 
8:00 Wild America: TWIH.   Host Josh Binswanger presents an hour 
devoted to the dangers of the American wild--from an alleged act of 
cannibalism to an icy race to save a dying town. Survival expert Tom 
Brown Jr. teaches primitive, but effective, techniques of wilderness 
survival. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 Snipers.  Law Enforcement Snipers. Travel to Los Angeles, San 
Jose, and Albuquerque as snipers train with special enforcement units 
that work to subdue the deadliest and most cunning criminals. In 
Fairfax, Virginia, we stare over the shoulders of Secret Service snipers, 
who operate as the eyes and ears of the most important U.S. security 
detail. With precision shooting and sophisticated reconnaissance 
abilities, a well-placed law enforcement sniper can make the difference 
between a routine arrest and an impromptu massacre. CC  [TV PG] 
 
10:00 The Colosseum.   Nothing symbolizes the Roman Empire at its 
height or Rome in magnificent ruins more than the Colosseum. Built in 
70 A.D., it seated 80,000 people, boasted a retractable roof, 
underground staging devices, marble seating, and lavish decorations. 
It still serves as the prototype for the mode
rn stadium. The complexity 
of its construction, the beauty of its architecture, and the functionality
of 
its design made it the perfect place for massive crowds to congregate 
for the bloody spectacles it contained. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 Cain and Abel: A Murder Mystery.   Biblical brothers' bonds 
are broken by murder in Eden in one of the most chilling accounts in 
the Old Testament. Journey back to the Land of Nod, where the guilt-
ridden fugitive was banished, and find out how Cain lived out his days. 
CC  [TV G] 
 
  
11/16/2002 
 
8:00 Traitors Within.   The "Year of the Spy", 1985 proved a 
devastating year for U.S. intelligence agencies--4 Americans from 4 
agencies were caught and prosecuted for spying. Major cases profiled 
include: the FBI's Robert Miller, the Navy's John Walker spy ring, the 
CIA's Edward Lee Howard, and the NSA's Ronald Pelton. While the 
FBI and CIA finally caught up with several spies in '85, two of the most 
damaging spies in U.S. history--the CIA's Aldrich Ames and the FBI's 
Robert Hanssen--were working right under their noses. CC  [TV PG] 
 
10:00 A History of Britain.  Forces of Nature. Explores the "Romantic

Generation" of the mid-1770s, when Great Britain was intoxicated by a

surge of political energy. Rediscovering England's wilderness, 
intellectuals also learned of the common man's plight, turning Nature 
into a revolutionary force. But for the real poor, life was harder than 
ever. Thrown off their land, families headed for factories and 
poorhouses. And post-Revolution France, where despotism of crown 
was replaced by a police state, posed a warning to Britain's 
revolutionaries. [TV G] 
 
11:00 The Ship.  Days 20-34. Heading into the final stretch of the 
journey, the winds are calm, the sea still, the ship stagnant, and the 
crew bored. Even a hefty 18th-century rich and sweet dessert doesn't 
lift their spirits. Eventually, the navigators are thrilled to finally spot
land 
and make a stop, as Cook did, on the exotic island of Savu, where they 
indulge in island fest
ivities and savor its delicacies. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/17/2002 
 
8:00 The Color of War.  Fueling the Fire. During WWII, the leaders of 
the U.S. military challenged themselves to create the most advanced 
supply system in the history of warfare. The servicemen who fought 
the supply war played a critical, and under-appreciated, role in 
achieving victory. Without them the Allied war machine would have 
ground to a halt. Peter Coyote narrates this compelling journey into 
WWII through the eyes of those who lived it, using color film and 
photographs unearthed from archives and personal collections. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
9:00 P38: Lightning Strikes!   Designed by visionary aeronautical 
engineer Clarence "Kelly" Johnson, Lockheed's twin-engined P38 was

the most advanced fighter of its day, proving more than a match for the 
Japanese Zero. This is the dramatic story of the P38's struggle for 
supremacy in the skies of the Southwest Pacific during WWII. Taking 
the viewer into the cockpit of this formidable aircraft, we reveal the 
thoughts of the men who pushed the Japanese back through the 
Pacific, out of the Philippines, and all the way home to Japan. CC  [TV 
G] 
 
10:00 Tracking Terror: The CIA in the Middle East. The attacks on the World

Trade Center and Pentagon on September 11, 2001 forever changed 
the way Americans view terrorism. No one claims to know it would 
happen, but at the time of the attack, a former CIA case officer, one of 
the few Arabic-speaking agents in the CIA, was saying that America 
was vulnerable. His name is Bob Baer, a CIA veteran of more than 20 
years. Baer can't tells us everything that he knows, but viewers will find

his insight into the new enemy--terrorism--enlightening. CC  [TV PG]
 
11:00 Nordhausen.   It was the world's largest underground factory--
seven miles of tunnels built to manufacture Hitler's secret weapons, 
primarily the V-2 rocket. But Nordhausen kept more than one secret. 
Technology and torture went hand-in-hand--25,000 concentration 
camp workers died there--and som
e of those associated with 
Nordhausen later helped take America to the moon. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/18/2002 
 
8:00 Mail Call.  Knight's Armor/WWI Backpack/Landmine. R. Lee 
Ermey, who portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies
his 
gruff sense of humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail 
about what the armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on 
location, Ermey reads the questions on air and then sends them out to 
military experts in the field for answers and brief demonstrations. 
Ermey learns about the different pieces of a 15th-century knight's 
armor; what was inside a WWI infantry back; and what makes up a 
landmine. CC  [TV PG] 
 
8:30 Basic Training.   Each year, more than 45,000 recruits arrive at 
Fort Jackson, South Carolina and attempt to endure a 3-month 
transformation from civilian to soldier. We focus on 6 recruits, who tell 
us why they joined and what they think lies ahead as they begin the 
long and grueling process. From in-processing to the end of the first 
day, the stunning reality of Army life begins to seep in. In this series, 
we follow their successes and failures as the 4 men and 2 women 
strive to be all that they can be. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 Magellan's Lost Fleet.   In 1519, Fernando Magellan set sail 
with 270 crewmen aboard 5 ships aiming to prove that the Spice 
Islands could be reached by sailing westward; circumnavigating the 
globe was not on his mind. Magellan himself would never reach his 
goal, and only one ship with 18 men would ever see Spain again. Now, 
a group of explorers, armed with historical records, local legend, and a 
team of divers, are headed to Patagonia, Argentina. They hunt for one 
of history's true treasures--one of Magellan's ships! CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 Drake's Secret Voyage.   Between 1577 and 1580, Sir Francis 
Drake did what no commander had yet done: He sailed around the 
world. But instead of publicly celebrating this historic feat, accounts of

his voyage were mysteriously covered up by his investor Queen 
Elizabeth I. H
istorians are locked in heated debate over many aspects 
of that journey. What was its purpose? What did Drake discover? 
Where did he establish the first American outpost? We talk to Drake 
experts and amateur historians who have entered the debate. CC  [TV 
G] 
 

11/19/2002 
 
8:00 Myths of the Titanic.   A ground-breaking exploration into why 
the Titanic tragedy evolved into mythical proportions, and why and how 
different generations interpreted the ill-fated voyage to illustrate its own

issues. Featuring newly discovered archive film, feature film, and 
wartime propaganda footage, we reveal how successive generations 
remade the story to serve their own needs, creating one of the 20th 
century's most heart-rending legends. Features an interview with 
survivor Molly Brown's great-granddaughter Muffet. CC  [TV PG] 
 
9:00 Titanic: 90 Years Below.   In its day, the Titanic was a 
technological wonder. People were so enthralled with the largest 
moving man-made object in the world that they truly believed it 
unsinkable. Until it slipped out of sight on April 15, 1912. In a 90-
minute special filled with spectacular footage of both recent and 
archival expeditions, we explore the history of the ship and the 
technology that finally found it and enabled exploration and salvaging 
dives. CC  [TV G] 
 
10:30 Japan's Mysterious Pyramids.   Most historians and 
archaeologists maintain that civilization as we know it began about 
5,000 years ago with the emergence of the earliest Egyptian dynasty. 
But, a small yet persuasive number of scientists believes that a highly 
advanced civilization, nearly twice as old, flourished during the last Ice

Age. Solid evidence of this 10,000-year-old civilization is difficult to 
produce, but some feel a recent discovery off the coast of a tiny 
Japanese island, Yonaguni, may be the proof they seek. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:30 The Making of Boy's Toys.   Sleek boats, private planes, 
expensive cars, high-tech gadgets. A behind-the-scenes look at the 
making of The History Channel's "Mo
dern Marvels Boy's Toys Week"--
from the interviewing of experts to the directing of recreations. [TV PG] 
 

11/20/2002 
 
8:00 Ghost Ships.   Ships sailing without a crew? Phantom 
destroyers? Boats that disappear, then reappear? The Flying 
Dutchman, the Mary Celeste, the Dash, the Teazer, and the more 
recent Joyita--crews of these vessels vanished without a clue to their 
fates. We travel the seven seas seeking answers and hear from 
witnesses to the bizarre events. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 Raise the Monitor!   A 4-pronged anchor, a 138-year-old 
propeller, and a 36-ton steam engine. The ironclad USS Monitor, the 
Civil War's most advanced warship, is being recovered piece by piece 
from a watery grave 16 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North 
Carolina. Join us for a voyage of discovery as we trace the incredible 
efforts to save this historical treasure on the verge of collapse--from its

1973 rediscovery to the National Atmospheric and Oceanic 
Administration and Navy's efforts to save the engine. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 From the Files of Interpol: The World's Most Wanted.  No 
Place to Hide. Interpol has had a dubious history in its dealings with 
terrorist and war criminals. It wasn't until 1985, when Raymond Kendall 
was appointed Secretary General, that the first "Red Notice" for
a 
terrorist was issued. A year later, Kendall launched "Interpol's Most

Wanted" notices. These measures for international criminals are in 
sharp contrast to Interpol's dark history during WWII, when the Nazis 
took it over. We look at its history, from founding in Vienna in 1923 up 
to modernization in 1985. CC  [TV PG] 
 

11/21/2002 
 
8:00 The Lost Ark.   An intriguing documentary that explores the 
mystery of the Ark of the Covenant, in which Moses is said to have 
placed the two tablets of stone on which God inscribed the Ten 
Commandments. Reviews the 3,000-year-old evidence about the 
missing Ark which may reveal its location. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 Blind Man's Bluff.   In a 2-hour special, based on the bestseller 
by Christ
opher Drew and Sherry Sontag, we document the stories of 
the brave men who dedicated their lives to stalking the world's oceans 
during the Cold War. Submarines were the super-secret front line of 
the Cold War and played an undersea game of hide and seek with the 
fate of the world as stakes. For the first time on TV, U.S. and Russian 
submariners share their stories and harrowing experiences. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 Save Our History.  USS Arizona. Over 1.5-million people a 
year visit the Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor. However, inside the 
sunken hull, over a million gallons of oil threaten to spill into the harbor

and create an environmental disaster. We trace the history of the ship 
from construction in 1914 to sinking in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 
1941, and review the ensuing rescue, salvage, and battle damage 
investigation. Today, underwater exploration continues and radical 
plans to save the deteriorating tomb are being developed. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/22/2002 
 
8:00 Daredevils and Risk-Takers: TWIH.   Some do it for money, 
others because it's their duty. This week, we uncover history's 
daredevils and risk-takers--from the barrel riders of Niagara Falls to 
Evel Knievel. Host Josh Binswanger visits a school where Hollywood 
stuntmen-in-training learn how to survive 40-foot falls and a fiery hell. 
CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 The Search for Atlantis.   Ted Danson takes viewers on a 
spectacular 2-hour search for one of the greatest civilizations the world 
has ever known--the fabled Lost City of Atlantis. The epic journey 
spans the globe from the volcanoes of the Azores to the uncharted 
jungles of South America and even to the archives of Nazi Germany. 
This program also brings the glittering Lost City to life once again, with

painstakingly recreated islands, harbors, palaces, and temples. CC  
[TV PG] 
 
11:00 Shark Attack 1916.   The summer of 1916 saw a series of 
shark attacks along New Jersey's shore; four met death in the jaws of 
the New Jersey man-eater before the attacks stopped. Using 
recreations,
 archival film, and interviews with historians, experts, and 
those who lived through the terror, we revisit the trauma and see if the 
sharks could come again. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/23/2002 
 
8:00 Rolling Thunder: The True Story of the 3rd Armored 
Division.   Among America's battle-scarred tank units, the 3rd 
Armored Division is remembered as first among equals. The 3rd 
earned its reputation as the "Spearhead Division" in WWII, when it
led 
Allied Forces into the heart of Germany. During the tension-filled 
decades of the Cold War, the 3rd Armored stood eyeball to eyeball 
with the Soviet Union. In the Gulf War, this specialized tank unit 
overpowered Iraqi armor. From Elvis Presley to Colin Powell, the 3rd 
has always been on the front lines of history. CC  [TV PG] 
 
10:00 A History of Britain.  Victoria & Her Sisters. By the time 18-
year-old Queen Victoria ascended the throne in 1837, the massive 
advance of technology and industrialization was rapidly reshaping the 
landscape and social structure. The question of how to create a better 
world in the face of social upheaval in the age of the machine would 
preoccupy the Victorian Age. Women would take center stage in 
shaping society. Whatever world would emerge by the end of the 
century, "Victoria's Sisters" would ensure it was no longer purely
a 
man's world. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 The Ship.  Days 35-43. Analogous to Cook's crew, the modern 
sailors long for the pleasures of home. The captain announces a 
change in plans. As a result of anti-American riots in Jakarta, their final

destination will instead be Bali. The shipmates complete menial tasks 
and compete in games to keep occupied. Approaching Bali, the crew 
celebrates with an enormous feast and fond farewells to mark the end 
of their adventure into history. After 6 weeks, the Endeavour docks in 
Indonesia on October 6, 2001. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/24/2002 
 
8:00 Battle Group: Spruance.   Raymond A. Spruance was one of 
the U.S. Navy's most brilliant admirals. He won the Battle of Midway 
and engineered
 the Navy's push across the Pacific in WWII. A military 
intellectual, the "Quiet Warrior" shunned the press and avoided the

flamboyance often seen in the highest-ranking officers. Though little-
known today, his achievements rank among the greatest in U.S. 
military history. In this 2-hour history, we review his campaigns, 
including Okinawa, Iwo Jima, the Gilbert and Marshall Islands. CC  [TV 
G] 
 
10:00 The Rohna Disaster: WWII's Secret Tragedy.   When the 
HMT Rohna sank in 1943, it marked the greatest loss at sea of U.S. 
Army personnel in WWII: 1,015 soldiers, 3 Red Cross workers, and 
120 ship's crew perished. Yet the U.S. government never revealed the 
truth about the disaster, in part to hide Germany's missile capability, 
and also to keep secret the deplorable conditions on board and lack of 
lifeboats. After the recent release of documents under the Freedom of 
Information Act, we unveil a military debacle kept under wraps for 
decades. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 Mail Call.  Knight's Armor/WWI Backpack/Landmine. R. Lee 
Ermey, who portrayed the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies
his 
gruff sense of humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail 
about what the armed forces were, and really are, like! Shot on 
location, Ermey reads the questions on air and then sends them out to 
military experts in the field for answers and brief demonstrations. 
Ermey learns about the different pieces of a 15th-century knight's 
armor; what was inside a WWI infantry back; and what makes up a 
landmine. CC  [TV PG] 
 
11:30 Basic Training.   Each year, more than 45,000 recruits arrive at 
Fort Jackson, South Carolina and attempt to endure a 3-month 
transformation from civilian to soldier. We focus on 6 recruits, who tell 
us why they joined and what they think lies ahead as they begin the 
long and grueling process. From in-processing to the end of the first 
day, the stunning reality of Army life begins to seep in. In this series, 
we follow their successes and failures as the 4 men and 2 women 
strive to
 be all that they can be. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/25/2002 
 
8:00 Mail Call.  Flak Vest/Medieval Crossbow/WWI Pilots. R. Lee 
Ermey, the sergeant in "Full Metal Jacket", applies his gruff sense
of 
humor in this half-hour series that answers viewers' mail about the 
armed forces. Shot on location, Ermey reads the questions on air and 
then sends them out to military experts in the field for answers and 
brief demonstrations. In this episode, we find out: If a bullet can 
penetrate body armor? How accurate was a medieval crossbow? How 
did WWI pilots shoot through their propellers? CC  [TV PG] 
 
8:30 Basic Training.   Each year, more than 45,000 recruits arrive at 
Fort Jackson, South Carolina and attempt to endure a 3-month 
transformation from civilian to soldier. We focus on 6 recruits, who tell 
us why they joined and what they think lies ahead as they begin the 
long and grueling process. From in-processing to the end of the first 
day, the stunning reality of Army life begins to seep in. In this series, 
we follow their successes and failures as the 4 men and 2 women 
strive to be all that they can be. CC  [TV G] 
 
9:00 Ronald Reagan: A Legacy Remembered.   Ronald Reagan has 
been off the world stage since his letter to Americans announcing that 
he suffers from Alzheimer's. But his impact on the U.S. and the world 
lives on. In a series of intimate interviews, including Nancy Reagan 
and the Reagan children--Patti Davis, Ron Reagan, and Michael 
Reagan--we present the private stories of a very public man. Fellow 
leaders, including Mikhail Gorbachev, also appear, along with intimates 
who tell behind-the-scenes stories about key turning points. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 The First Americans.   
 

11/26/2002 

8:00 Home for the Holidays: The History of Thanksgiving.   From 
the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock, Lincoln's 1863 declaration naming it a 
national holiday, to turkey, Macy's parade, and football, we'll share the 
abundant feast of Thanksgiving history--including all the trimmings! [TV 
G] 
 
9:00 Boone and Crocket
t: The Hunter Heroes.   Of the many 
pioneers who crossed the Allegheny Mountains to begin a new life in 
the wilderness, we look at two who were singled out for immortality: 
Daniel Boone and David Crockett (born two generations after Boone). 
Boone brought civilization and Jeffersonian values to the rugged 
frontier and Crockett fought for the poor and dispossessed and against 
the forced removal of the Southeastern Indians. We see how these 
famed hunters, fighters, and American heroes came to represent the 
common man. CC  [TV G] 
 
11:00 Salem Witch Trials.  
 
 
11/27/2002 
 
8:00 The Wrecking Ball.   Is man's urge to destroy innate? We all like 
to see things smashed, exploded, sunk, and destroyed. During this 2-
hour special on mayhem and falling rubble, we meet America's first 
family of destruction, the Loizeaux, who have imploded more 
structures than all of their competitors. We also learn about the 
psychology of wrecking things and meet stressed-out Japanese 
businessmen who pay to smash porcelain objects in "The Relief 
Room", and military demolition experts called sappers. CC  [TV G] 
 
10:00 Construction Machines.   Feel the earth move under your feet 
and dig into the fascinating story of earthmoving equipment--from the 
simple spade to today's powerful steam shovels. Meet legendary 
giants like John Deere, Jerome Case, and the founders of Caterpillar, 
who helped forge America's monolithic construction industry. Ride on 
specialized behemoth dump trucks, delve below sea level to view 
dredging equipment, and leave the planet altogether to explore 
earthmoving space equipment in this 2-hour special presentation. CC  
[TV G] 
 

11/28/2002 
  
8:00 Kennedys: The Curse of Power.   Traces the Kennedy clan's 
calamities that occurred on the rise to power--from immigration from 
Ireland up to John Kennedy Jr.'s tragic death in 1999. The first hour 
sees the loss of Joe Jr. in WWII and the assassinations of JFK and 
RFK. Hour two witnesses Ted's downfall and role as surrogate father 
to a fatherless g
eneration. CC  [TV G] 
 
10:00 The Death of Marilyn Monroe.   Though ruled a "probable 
suicide" by L.A. County Coroner Thomas Noguchi, Marilyn Monroe's 
1962 death by drug overdose remains a source of controversy. 
Rumors of an affair with both President John Kennedy and his brother 
Robert, as well as the bizarre events that took place at her home on 
the day she died, have led many to believe she died as the result of a 
nefarious conspiracy to keep her silent about the affairs. We'll 
investigate the details, present the conflicting evidence, and let you 
decide! CC  [TV PG] 
 
11:00 A Question of Conspiracy: The RFK Murder.   In June 1968, 
Senator Robert Kennedy was gunned down in a California hotel pantry 
after winning a primary that could have earned him the Democratic 
Presidential nomination. Eerily reminiscent of brother JFK's murder, we 
follow the conspiracy trail of RFK's death. Did Sirhan Sirhan act alone, 
and why didn't he get a full trial? CC  [TV G] 
 

11/29/2002 
 
8:00 Ronald Reagan: A Legacy Remembered.   Ronald Reagan has 
been off the world stage since his letter to Americans announcing that 
he suffers from Alzheimer's. But his impact on the U.S. and the world 
lives on. In a series of intimate interviews, including Nancy Reagan 
and the Reagan children--Patti Davis, Ron Reagan, and Michael 
Reagan--we present the private stories of a very public man. Fellow 
leaders, including Mikhail Gorbachev, also appear, along with intimates 
who tell behind-the-scenes stories about key turning points. CC  [TV G] 
 
10:00 More American Eats.   Dig into the stories of the great 
inventors, innovators, dreamers, and wizards who made eating into an 
industry and transformed the American table. Clarence Birdseye really 
did invent modern frozen food; John Harvey Kellogg re-invented 
breakfast; Milton Hershey turned an elite sweet into a treat for the 
common man; and yes, there really was a Chef Boy-Ar-Dee! We also 
explore the roots of barbecue, Jell-O, and Spam--and meet the 
originator of nacho chip
s, Frank Liberto from San Antonio. CC  [TV G] 
 

11/30/2002 
 
8:00 Stalag 17.   Movie (1953). (B&W)
William Holden, as a cynical American 
GI, and Otto Preminger, as the tough Nazi prison camp boss, give 
unforgettable performances in this realistic look at life in a WWII POW 
camp. Billy Wilder directed with Don Taylor, Neville Brand, and Peter 
Graves co-starring.  CC  [TV PG] 
 
11:00 The Ship.  Days 1-3. After an exhaustive search, 40 daring and 
able-bodied men and women, including 5 Americans, were selected to 
embark on one of the most challenging and dangerous adventures of 
their lives--to relive the historic 18th-century voyage of Captain James 
Cook aboard an exact replica of his ship the Endeavour. After setting 
sail from Cairnes, Australia on August 25, 2001, increasing stress 
within the modern crew sharply parallels the experiences of Cook's 
crew before their ship crashed into the reef. 
October 2002

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