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Box Office Report for Nov. 19-21, 1999--Threshold Productions (UT)

Carl's Topic of the Day



Mon., November 22, 1999


Box-Office Weekend Grosses for November 19-21, 1999
a commentary by Carl Sticht


It's no surprise to see the new James Bond film The World is Not Enough open at the number one spot at the box office this past weekend. The surprising thing however, is that it opened with an estimated $37.2 million, surpassing the $27 million opening of Rugrats the movie, coinciding with this same weekend last year. Even though it was totally panned by the majority of reviewers, it still rose above the critical slams by being the biggest opening for a Bond film in the US.

But the new James Bond installment was not the only winner at the box-office this weekend. Sleepy Hollow's opened at $30 million, making it a sure hit this holiday season. This is Tim Burton's biggest movie opening with Johnny Depp in the lead role. It's a refreshing turn for Tim Burton, and will probably top out around $100 million by the end of it's US run.

All in all the top movies' grosses this weekend surpassed those of last year. This is due to the fact that more theaters have opened in the past twelve months and the top films are playing on more screens compared to last year. Typical Hollywood estimates would dictate that The World is Not Enough will more than likely surpass $130 million. This would make it the highest grossing James Bond film domestically, and will probably surpass Goldeneye's worldwide gross of $351 million. Expect The World is Not Enough to get a lot of its money from male repeat movie-goers, as this one is definitely the most action-packed in the whole franchise and has the best-looking counterpart(s) that Brosnan has had in a long time. Just as long as they don't pay attention to Denise Richards' acting. That's understandable.

-Carl Sticht

read the review for The World is Not Enough


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