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HART AND LYNE CUSTOMS BROKERS

Customs Brokers

We continually provide new and revised information concerning United States of America, Canadian and Mexican government regulations, transportation services, trade restrictions. Canadian International Trade Tribunal, North American Free Trade Agreement Review Panel, World Trade Organization (WTO) decisions and trade rulings and Customs Co-operation Council commodity classification rulings.

The Harte & Lyne Story In mid-1892, the Port of Hamilton faced a crisis. The only customs broker had disappeared, throwing his clerk, William H. Lyne, out of work and abandoning the numerous importers using Hamilton as a major distribution point. The Customs Port Collector approached William to assume the customs brokerage licence for Hamilton. William Lyne (1859 - 1952) and Robert Harte (1857 - 1943) formed the partnership of Harte & Lyne, in August 1892, to provide customs brokerage services to foreign importers warehousing and distributing through the port of Hamilton. Over the years Hamilton became a manufacturing city. Robert Harte retired. William H. Lyne sold the firm to his son, John H. Lyne (1895 - 1965). The company's focus changed to provide customs services primarily to manufacturers located in the Hamilton area. Through sub agents, customs clearance services were offered at ports other than Hamilton. In the late 1950's, Don Greene of Tridon Limited and other clients developed export markets for their products. John retired and sold the firm to his son, William C. Lyne (1924 - 1996). William sought out the best local talent for his partner. Jack McCullough, Traffic Manager of Studebaker Automotive, accepted William's offer. The company offered international freight forwarding services and established relationships with European agents. The family tradition continues.