Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!

London Transport
Country Area Routes 300–303

North of the Thames

Last updated 09-08-06.

300

In 1965 Route 300 was a daily service between Stifford Clays (Whitmore Avenue) and Grays (War Memorial) via Fairway and Turps Corner, extended on Mondays to Saturdays to East Purfleet (Mill Road) via West Thurrock and Stonehouse Corner, with some journeys extended to Purfleet Station. This service was renumbered 375 quite late in London Country days as the 300 number was needed for the renumbering of the 303A to eliminate the “A” suffix.


Route 301 was one of the country area’s major trunk services and ran between Watford Heath or Little Bushey and Aylesbury via Bushey, Watford, King’s Langley, Apsley Mills, Two Waters, Hemel Hempstead, Boxmoor, Berkhamsted, Northchurch and Tring. Route 306 is described below.

A more detailed history of route 301 can be found in Kenneth Warren’s book, The Motorbus in London Country (Ian Allan, 1984; ISBN 0 7110 1360 8).

301 SUNDAY
This “E” plate is for the Sunday extensions to the basic Watford to Tring service, when the 301 was extended to Aylesbury and Watford Heath or Little Bushey.
301-306
Split plates tended to be made for specific bus stops where there was insufficient space to display all route numbers on separate plates. This one would probably have come from a bus stop in Watford town centre, or possibly Bushey & Oxhey Station.

301A

In the mid ’sixties route 301A provided just one Monday to Friday rush hour journey between Ovaltine Works and Watford By-Pass (Savage & Parsons). It was a very rare route and the journeys did not last into the ’70s.


Route 302 ran between Watford Heath and Bennetts Gate via Bushey & Oxhey, Watford, Ridge Lane, Langleybury, Kings Langley, Apsley Mills, Two Waters, Moor End, Hemel Hempstead town centre and Longlands. Along with the 301 it provided the main trunk service between Bushey, Watford and Two Waters, at which point the 301 ran on to Aylesbury via Tring. The routes were very long established and were operated by RTs for many years.

Route 377 ran between Apsley Mills and Redbourn via Two Waters, Hemel Hempstead and Cupid Green.

A more detailed history of route 302 can be found in Kenneth Warren’s book, The Motorbus in London Country (Ian Allan, 1984; ISBN 0 7110 1360 8).

302
With its larger numbers and somewhat heavier than normal surface wear and edge chipping, this “E” plate is probably rather old.
302-377
Split plates are much rarer as they were usually produced where there was insufficient room to accommodate every route on a separate plate, and this tended to be on just a few stops in town centres.

303
303 SPECIAL JOURNEYS ONLY
I do not know where this “E” plate would have come from.
303-303A
The 303 and 303A changed hardly at all over the years, which accounts for this plate being old and a little weathered.

Route 303 ran between Hitchin (St. Mary’s Square) and New Barnet Station via Little Wymondley, Stevenage, Knebworth, Mardley Hill, Welwyn, Welwyn Garden City, Stanborough, Hatfield, Bell Bar, Brookman’s Park, Little Heath, Potters Bar and Barnet. The 303A also ran between the same terminii, and is described below.

A more detailed history of route 303 can be found in Kenneth Warren’s book, The Motorbus in London Country (Ian Allan, 1984; ISBN 0 7110 1360 8).


The 303A followed an almost identical route as the 303 between Hitchin (St. Mary’s Square) and New Barnet Station, except that it diverted between the Rookery and Little Heath to serve Welham Green and Brookman’s Park Station while the 303 served Brookman’s Park (town centre). The route changed hardly at all over the years which accounts for the plate being old and more than a little weathered. During the ’70s the 303A was renumbered 300 when London Country was busy eliminating suffix letters from its routes; the original route 300 being assigned the new number 375.

A more detailed history of route 303A can be found in Kenneth Warren’s book, The Motorbus in London Country (Ian Allan, 1984; ISBN 0 7110 1360 8).

This is one of the very early post-war plates without the black lines at the top and bottom. These plates were fitted into the older flat bus stop flags which also had horizontal cross bars and thus the top and bottom edges were hidden. However, they required a great deal of dismantling to change the “E” plates and hence the modern style was devised with the black top and bottom edging which could simply be dropped into the runners.

303A

303C

Route 303C ran between Hitchin (St. Mary’s Square) and Stevenage Industrial Area during Monday to Friday rush hours, and was introduced after the 303 and 303A had been converted to one-man-operation in order to retain some crew operation for the remaining conductors. It was a relatively short-lived operation and used RTs from Stevenage Garage [SV]. Of course, routes with “C” suffixes were always less common.

← →
Click on any of the tiles below to go to images of the “E” plates and the route descriptions for that number series.