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10th Texas Cavalry

 

1861

 

The 10th was organized with about 900 men during the late summer of 1861 at Goose Lake, about 10 miles north east of Wills Point, Van Zandt Co., Tx. by Col. M. F. Locke. Many of its members were recruited in the towns of Quitman and Tyler, and from the Counties of Upshur, Rusk and Cherokee.[1] It’s companies were formed with men from the following areas:

“A” Quitman- Captain Charles D. McKnight, Wood County

“B” Quitman- Captain John Wilson, Wood County

“C” Captain James H. Rucker, Upshur Co.

“D” Starrville- Captain Alexander Earp, Smith and Upshur Counties

“E” Captain Hulum D. E. Redwine, Rusk Co.

“F” Captain William D. L. F. Craig, Shelby and Panola Counties

“G” Captain Mat Barton, Rusk Co.

“H” Captain Anderson Whetstone, Van Zandt Co.

“I” Captain Robert B. Martin, Cherokee Co.

“K” Tyler- Captain L. M. Todd, Smith Co.

 

May 19, in a letter to Governor Clark Col. Locke asks to have Dr. A. B. Flint of Coffeeville, Upshur Co., appointed as one of his Regimental Surgeons.[2]

 

Aug. 24, Col. Locke is at Lafayette, Upshur Co., Texas trying to organize companies for the war.

 

Sept. the companies are being consolidated at Camp Flournoy, Wood Co., Texas.

Oct. 9, the 10th arrives near Plano, Texas.

 

Oct. 20, Col. Locke in a letter sent from Dallas to the “Texas Republican”[3] claims they are leaving for Galveston and are about 1000 strong.

 

Oct. 22 the 10th is petitioning to be accepted into the Confederate States Army for duty in the State of Texas[4] by Governor Clark.

 

Oct. 23, arrive outside Corsicana, Texas.

 

Oct. 29, hold drills for the locals.

 

Oct. 30, leave Corsicana headed north.

 

Oct. 31, the regiment is accepted into the Confederate States Army for 12 months duty by Maj. George W. Chilton.[5]

 

Dec. 9, at Coffeeville, Upshur Co., Texas.

 

Dec. 18, at Camp Barton, Upshur Co. A soldier writes they had to leave Camp Ector? due to “failing water”. In the same letter he complains about “ fireside heroes and featherbed generals”. This in in reference to those who are complaining about the cost of outfitting and supplying the 10th.in its moves all over Texas.[6]

 

Dec. 21, the “Texas Republican” reports the 10th has been ordered into winter quarters by Gen McCulloch.[7]

 

Dec. 24, they apparently are still in Upshur Co., Texas with the authorities wondering who was giving the orders for their movements.

 

1862

 

 

Jan. 5, The 10th passes thru Clarksville, Tex.

 

Jan. 31, at Red River Co., Tex..

Feb. 2, Governor F. R. Lubbock writes “ The people of Texas, as it were, live on horseback, and it is with great aversion they enlist in the infantry.” This explains why few infantry regiments are available to be sent to Arkansas.[8]

 

Feb. 12, The regiment leaves Clarksville, Texas and heads for Arkansas.[9]

 

Feb. 14, cross the Red River.

 

Feb. 15, reach Rocky Comfort, which is now Foreman, Ark.

? 1, Henry Watson, Sergeant Co. F, writes home in a letter the Company is near Little Rock, Ark. and has “ a good deal of sickness “ in it. He also writes “ there is severil of hour Redgement that Deserted a few days back they are deserting in other Redgment every few days We are getting plenty to eat now such as we have beef and bred but we dont get enough salt......”[10]

 

Mar. 6, In the “Arkansas true Democrat”, Little Rock, it is noted 40 men from the 10th were left behind and are at St. John’s Hospital sick. In the same issue Col. Locke expresses his gratitude for the care given the men.

Mar. 15, the 10th is stationed at Jacksonport Arkansas. The men are suffering from a measles epidemic and General Cabell writes to General Van Dorn the Regiment cannot move as they were getting sick at the rate of 30 per Day.[11] Bell Irvin Wiley in his book Life of Johnny Reb concludes that for every soldier killed in battle or of mortal wounds, there were three deaths from disease. Total deaths during the war for both sides has been estimated at 623,026, with an additional 471,421 wounded for a total of 1,094,453. In WW II our total casualties were 1,078,162.

 

April 15, the 10th is ordered dismounted and sent east of the Mississippi to Memphis Tenn. to serve under General S. Price. [12]

 

April 16, Conscription Law Passed. All Men between 18 and 35 are to enlist and all previous enlistments are extended “for the duration”. An unpopular part of this law was the exemption of owners of more than 20 slaves. Due to the high cost of slaves[13] this effectively exempted the rich from involuntarily fighting. In March 1861 a typical 14 year old female domestic slave cost $1300 and one 9 years old cost $1000. At this price it is evident the majority of enlisted men could not have owned slaves Also of note on December 21, 1864 the brigade the 10th is a part of lists 20 servants.

 

April 17, Henry Watson writes from DesArk, Ark. saying the order to dismount was “very much opposed “ but the choices were that or to disband. They decided to remain on foot but they are not to be considered infantry and will continue to receive the wages of cavalry. He continues stating “ although did not like to give up my horse mutch but our country needs our assistance and I expect to serve my 12 months out some way...” He also notes the horses are being sent home.

 

April 20, arrive at Memphis, Tenn.

 

April 23, they are ordered to prepare to move to the railhead to take cars to Corinth Miss.

 

April 29, the 10th with 565 men of 1052 present, is shown as belonging to General J. L. Hogg’s 1st Brigade, Army of the West, Corinth Miss.[14]

 

May 4, Hogg’s brigade is in General J. P. McCown’s division near Corinth Miss.

 

May 29, the Confederate army evacuates Corinth and retreats.

 

June 3, at Shannon, Miss.

 

June 27, at Priceville, Miss.(about 6 miles east of Tupelo) when they are ordered to Chattanooga, Tenn. as fast as possible.

 

June 30, in Atlanta, Ga.

 

July 14, Camp May, Chattanooga, Tenn. A list of all who have died to date is sent to the “Texas Republican” newspaper in Marshall, Texas. It lists 217 men have died to date. The list is printed Aug. 16, 1862. E. G. Littlejohn in a letter home says of the 1200 or so men who enlisted there are now 410 in camp.[15]

 

Aug. 7, leave Loudon, Tenn. for Kentucky.

 

The 10th,11th, 14th, 15th Dismounted Texas Cavalry and McCray’s Arkansas Infantry regiment form the 1st brigade under the command of Colonel T. H. McCray.

 

Richmond, Kentucky.

 

Aug. 30, the 10th commanded by Col. C. R. Earp participated in the Battle at Richmond, Kentucky. At 9 am that morning, after a forced march of 13 miles, turned the right flank of the Federal forces and forced them to retreat. 2 miles later the Federals reformed their lines and the Brigade attacked again. When they were within 400 yards the Federals opened fire from a force of 6000 men, 6 cannons and 1 Regiment of Cavalry. Approaching to within 200 yds. the Brigade was forced to take cover behind a fence. Showered with heavy fire they were only able to return it using 2 cannons on their right flank. After 20 minutes the Federals attacked . Waiting until the Federals were within 50 yds. the Brigade opened fire and advanced. The effect on the enemy was devastating, whom fell back and when they saw us advance began to retreat. After we had advanced 1/2 a mile the enemy broke and fled in all directions. The battlefield was littered with 500 Federal casualties, one rifled cannon, 600 rifles and 3,000,000 cartridges. For this engagement the 10th was commanded by Col. C. R. Earp, 1st Brigade, Army of Kentucky. Total men in the 1st Brigade was 1500 with 20 K.I.A., 120 W.I.A. and 8 missing.[16] The Confederate Congress issued a Joint Resolution thanking the men involved. This was the first battle for the 10th.Tx. Cav. J. M. Spinks, Co. G states “The first time I shot I dropped on my knees to load, and my rear file rank man was shot thru the heart. In our next engagement they shot in the muzzle of my gun.” Mr. Spinks survived the war, was never wounded, and later lived in Kilgore Texas.[17] E. G. Littlejohn says the 10th suffered 52 casualties in the battle.[18]

 

Sept. 9, the army gets to within 3 miles of Cincinnati, Ohio before retreating back into Tennessee.

 

Oct. 19, at Cumberland Ford, Tenn.

 

Oct. 22, McCown’s division posted to Cumberland Gap, Tenn. provisions are very scarce in the area and General Bragg may have to scatter his army to let them forage for food.

 

Oct. 25, E. G. Littlejohn[19] says the snow is 8” deep and they have no tents.

 

Oct. 27, at Cumberland gap, Ky.

 

Oct. 31, the 10th is shown in the 2nd Brigade under Brig. Gen. M. D. Ector, 2nd Division commanded by Maj. Gen. J. P. McCown.[20]

 

Nov. 3, back at Loudon, Tenn.

 

Nov. 8, E. G. Littlejohn reports they received their first pay. 6 mos. wages plus $50 bounty plus $25 for clothes equals $191.[21]

 

Dec. 6, near Manchester, Tenn. rain, snow and very cold for the past 6 days.

 

Dec. 14, 15 miles from Murfreesboro, Tenn. at Camp Reederville. Still no tents, just a canvass fly.

 

Dec. 23, still at Camp Reederville.

 

Murfreesborough, Tenn.

 

Dec. 31, after 2 days and nights with no fires, very “ inclement and disagreeable weather [22]“, and under cannon fire that night, the men were glad to attack at 7 a.m. The brigade[23] attacked across a 500 yard wide field toward the prepared positions of the Federals. At 200 yds. the enemy opened fire at which time the brigade charged at a run, stopping at 100 yds. they returned the fire. Continuing to advance they were within 30 yds. before the Federals could fire again. Continuing to attack they captured 6 cannons along with the Battle Flags of the 34th Illinois Infantry Regiment. Before the sun rose the regiment lost 80 men.[24] Forcing the enemy back[25]the10th moved so fast it went thru the enemy's camp to find “coffeepots and frying pans were on the fires.“ the brigade kept up a running battle for 2 1/2 miles before stopping. Ordered to another position the brigade marched 1 1/2 miles to a point where they were able to restock ammunition. Moving on again they marched about a 1/2 mile where they again engaged the enemy. Driving back one line of infantry the brigade came under heavy fire from cannons and infantry at a distance of 60 yds. This position was too strong to take and the Brigade fell back and regrouped.[26] Out of about 350 men present the 10th suffered 12 K.I.A. and 118 W.I.A. in almost 8 hours of continuous fighting. Camping for the night the troops were able to have fires for the 1st time in two nights. Early the next morning the men build breastworks of rock. That evening the enemy shelled the position but could dislodge the Brigade. The next day brought little action. and at 10 a.m. on Jan 3, 1863 the brigade marches away. During this battle the 10th under Col. Locke captured 3 stands of colors. An incident reported by Col. Locke is very noteworthy; “The enemy’s lines having been formed immediately in our front, their standard bearer, directly in front of mine, was waving his flag, casting it forward, and , by various motions, urging the Abolition column forward, when Sergt. A. Sims, flag-bearer of this regiment, discovered him and pressed forward with incredible speed directly toward the enemy’s banner, and, on reaching within a pace or less of his adversary, he planted the Confederate flag firmly upon the ground with one hand and with a manly grasp reached the other after the flagstaff held by his enemy; but the other gave back, and in that movement they both fell in the agonies of death, waving their banners above their heads until their last expiring moments.”[27] The Federal flag was captured.

 

1863

Jan.9, camped near Shelbyville Tenn.[28]

 

Jan. 22, from Shelbyville Tenn., Henry Watson writes that Co. F had 3 killed, 4 wounded and 2 missing.

 

Feb. 16, Ector’s brigade is crossing the ? river at Lewis’s Ferry.

 

Feb. 28,the 10th is commanded by Col. M. F. Locke, Brig. Gen. M. D. Ector (1517 men present), Maj. Gen. J. P. McCown’s Division, Smith’s Corps, Army of Tenn.[29]

 

April, Col. Locke is interviewed by the “Texas Republican” in Marshall, Texas. He is in bad health.[30]

 

April 22, still at Shelbyville, Tenn. J. A. Templeton writes home saying he has given up hope of receiving a letter from home but the mail is very “uncertain”[31]

 

May 9, the 10th at Shelbyville Tenn., along with the rest of Ector’s Brigade, is ordered to cook 3 days rations and then to Mississippi to help Vicksburg. The same day they march to Wartrace Tenn. to board trains south.[32] The route taken by train is Wartrace, Chattanooga Tenn. , Dalton Ga., Atlanta Ga., Montgomery Al., Selma Al., and then to Demopolis Al. From there by foot to Jackson Miss and on to Canton, Miss. Upon joining up with General Johnston’s army they moved on up to Yazoo City, Miss.[33]

 

May17, at Meridian, Miss. J. G. McCown, of Ector's Brigade, writes: “Ector's Brigade from Texas and McNair's from Arkansas were in the Army of Tennessee, and fought side by side in many battles. If either brigade was ever whipped, I don't recollect it. Both brigades had every confidence in each other, and a very strong attachment grew up between them. Ector's Brigade was nicknamed Chubs, McNair's was Joshies. I well recollect that our brigade (Ector's) was camped at Morton, Miss., and McNair's at Meridian, in 1863. I got a short furlough, and went up to Aberdeen, Miss., to see my grandmother. On my return I got into Meridian in the night, and found on the track a car loaded with flour, two hundred pounds in a sack. On inquiry I found that two Joshies were guarding it. I introduced myself as a Chub. I stole one of the sacks and got it on the next train, and went on to Morton, my camp. Every man in these brigades remembers the time down on Big Black, in Mississippi, when Gen. Walker separated Ector's and McNair's Brigades. At that time he had a poor opinion of us. He said we had no discipline, and ought to be discharged. Both Ector and McNair resented his remarks, and called on him about it. After the two days' fight at Chickamauga, Gen. Walker apologized for what he said, and complimented both brigades very highly.” [34]

 

May 20, at Brandon Miss.

 

May 26, the 10th is at Canton Miss. in Ector‘s Brigade with 1,357 men present. Walker’s division.

 

May 31, still at Canton.

 

June 8, Ector’s brigade is in the vicinity of Yazoo City, Miss. The troops report in letters home they can hear the cannons at Vicksburg.

 

June 10, Ector’s brigade is still in the vicinity of Yazoo City, Miss. with 1,364 men. The troops say they are getting better meal and beef so the camp is more cheerful.

 

 

July 4, Vicksburg surrenders.

 

July 5, William E. Whitsett, Private, Company H, 9th Texas Infantry writes in a letter, “had started in to relieve Vicksburg on the 5th of July, at roll call that morning amounted to 36 thousand active fighting men. We reached Big Black and were placing our Pontoons across the stream, this being about the middle of the afternoon, when Genl. Johnson received a courier with dispatches announcing the surrender of the place and forces by Pemberton on the 3rd July. Our army was firing(?) with right in front and Genl. Johnson immediately about faced us through the left in front and we had hardly gotTenn. good under way when Genl. Stuls(?) federal Cavalry, showed up on our rear and we had it with them tough and hot. From there to our fortifications at Jackson Mississippi, which we reached and occupied about 9 o'clock at night in a hard driving pour down of rain, I believe as hard as I ever saw fall, filling and flooding our trenches with water.”[35]

 

July 9, Federal troops arrive at Jackson and prepare to attack. Walker’s division is in the right center of the city’s defenses. Instead of attacking the enemy dug trenches.

 

July 10, skirmishes all day and cannon fire.

 

July 11-16, both sides are too weak to defeat the other but Federal reinforcements make holding Jackson impossible so the Confederates withdraw after dark toward Brandon Miss. and finally to Morton. William E. Whitsett, Private, Company H, 9th Texas Infantry writes again “The Federals kept us corralled here for nine days and nights. Genl. Johnson giving them the slip just after dark one night, muffled his artillery and made the boys place their Blankets down under foot on the Pontoon bridge across Pearl River for Cavalry and Artillery to pass over the stream. The retreat was an eminent success and a great surprise to the Federals who the next morning charged our works and found them empty.”[36]

 

July 26, Walker’s division is ordered from Morton to Meridian by rail.

 

Aug. 13, near Morton, Mississippi. in a letter home Dee Hardman Ridley of the 9th Texas Infantry writes “First I will give you the news. I went to the country to my dinner the other day and got a fine dinner, a nice drink of Blackberry wine and seen two of the nicest young Ladies. Brought back a mess of Roasting Ears for dinner next day so you see we keep a lookout ahead. I don't get an opportunity of going often though. Today is wash day with us. We don't drill any today. The men wash their own clothes. It looks rather funny to see them, they are so awkward in the place of a bench and battling stick. They whip the dirt out round a tree. William Chittem(?) is fine today and is going to take this letter to you for me. He is discharged on account of bad Health. We get some peaches and apples to eat by paying one dollar a dozen. When dinner is ready to eat (we have no plates), every man gets a piece of bread goes to the oven and gets a piece of meat and stands up to eat it, unless they have a log close by to sit on. If they, we, happen to have any gravy, we use our pocket knives for forks and draw up round the oven in the place of the table.”[37]

 

 

Aug. 21 The brigade is still at Morton, Miss., great deal of rain.

 

Aug. 23, Walker’s division is ordered without delay to Chattanooga, Tenn. by railroad.

 

Sept. 19-20, the 10th under Col. C. C. R. Earp is part of the Army of Tennessee again under General Braxton Bragg. Ector’s Brigade, Walker’s Division, Reserve Corps.

 

Chickamauga, Ga.

 

Sept. 18, Friday, late that night the brigade crosses Chickamauga Creek at Byram’s Ford and camp about a mile past.

 

Sept. 19, Saturday, early in the morning General Forrest requests a brigade of infantry and Wilson’s is sent. Upon hearing firing General Walker finds Ector’s and Wilson’s brigades being attacked by greatly superior numbers of the enemy and are forced to fall back. General Walker states they fought with great “gallantry”. Against heavy odds they fought steadily until Liddell’s division of reinforcements arrive. Even these reinforcements could not hold the enemy and the confederates had to fall back again. About 1 o’clock Cheatham’s division arrives and helps. Fighting finally ends one hour after dark with the Confederate forces sleeping on the field of battle. Wilson and Ector‘s brigades have suffered heavy casualties. “No fires allowed; the night cold and chilly; the moon, although shining, sends a meager light through the dense woodland. Dead and wounded all around us, friend and foe writhing in pain; litter bearers worked to exhaustion for their comfort; cries for water from the wounded rending the air, and yet a threatened night battle” No food brought up, the men eat what if anything they have in their haversacks. “Sleep is overcome with the fear that tomorrow might be the last on earth.....talk of who is dead who is wounded”.

 

Sept. 20, Sunday, clear but crisp, 10:30 a.m., Ector’s brigade is down to about 500 men. The battle continues on the right wing with Walker’s Division. Ector’s brigade is ordered to aid the advance of the first brigade on the extreme right flank being in the second line during the attack. The attack goes forward with success and by sundown the Confederates have won a complete victory routing the Federals and camp on the battlefield again that night. The Federals retreat to Chattanooga during the night. The brigade suffers 59 K.I.A., 239 W.I.A. and 138 M.I.A. The Confederate Army captures 15,000 weapons and about 7000 prisoners.

 

William E. Whitsett, Private, Company H, 9th Texas Infantry writes “Our Company H in this Battle was commanded by Capt. Geo. W. Daniels of Bonham, the Regiment by Col. W. H. Young, the Brigade by Genl. M. D. Ector, and the Division by the immortal old Gen. Frank Cheatham than whom a better one never lived and we were in Genl. Walkers Sub-Corps, with Genl. McGains (?) Arks supporting us on the left with Forrest Cavalry, dismounted and supporting us on the right. We were the extreme right Regiment and Co. H was the extreme right Co. of Infantry in Genl. Braggs Army. We were pitted direct against Genl. Rousseau's Brigade of Kentucky Regulars, who were supported by Maj. Loomis West Virginia Battery of Eight Napoleon Guns, this battery we charged twice and were driven back, it being supported by Rousseaus Brigade, which had been reinforced by the 1st California Infantry, we charged them the 3d time and captured the Battery Complete and drove the Ky. Regulars and the 1st Californians back until we were ordered to halt and reform and readjust our lines and late that evening we carried all of Rousseaus lines, they breaking in the utmost confusion and falling back on Chattanooga and Tennessee River“[38]

 

STANDARD [CLARKSVILLE, TX], November 7, 1863, p. 2, c. 1

Ector's Brigade in the Battle of Chickamauga

 

Few, if any troops in the Confederate army have a more enviable fame than Ector's Brigade. It is composed of the 9th Regiment Texas Infantry, Col. Young, 10th, 14th, 15 (or 32) regiment Texas cavalry (dismounted) commanded respectively by Lieut. Col. Earp, Col. Camp and Col. Anderson, the 29th regiment N. C. by Lieut. Col. Creasman, Stone's Ala. Battalion, and Pounds Miss. Battalion, numbering some 1,300 effective men in the late battle, where the old brigade added fresh laurels to those it had already won on many a well fought battlefield, albeit it was at the cost of many of its bravest spirits. This brigade was at once upon its arrival at Chattanooga to reinforce Gen. Bragg, placed in the reserve corps. The position of the reserve involved the certainty that their duties would be heavy, and their toils incessant. They were at once placed on piquet duty on the bank of the Tennessee river, where they remained until it became necessary to fall back to counteract the flank movement of the enemy. These being foiled by Gen. Bragg, the order finally came to move upon Rosengrantz's [sic] grand Army of Invasion, and Ector's brigade was at the head of the column. In this, as in every other battle, it has been their fortune to participate, their corps burnt the first powder, and were amongst the foremost in assaulting the enemy. At Chickamauga creek it first encountered the vandals, and in common with other brigades of the division it drove the enemy back, on the eve of the 18th, and just after dark it crossed over the stream, and lay upon its arms almost in sight of a greatly superior force of the enemy.
On the next morning it moved out, and soon came in contact with Thomas' corps, fighting them gallantly until the supporting Brigades were driven back, when these veterans being flanked, and almost surrounded, were ordered to fall back, which they did without confusion, cutting their way through a line of the enemy which had flanked them on their left, and got in their rear. In this engagement Col. Young commanding 9th Texas, a very gallant, and efficient officer, was severely wounded: The loss in officers, and privates was very heavy. Two other brigades being now ordered forward engaged the enemy and Ector's brigade moved upon their right, and regained their lost ground, pushing the enemy some distance before it.—It drove back three lines, charged several masked batteries, which were supported by strong bodies of infantry, and captured several pieces of artillery; but was again forced to retire, for a short distance, finding itself greatly outnumbered, and the supporting brigades again having given way after making a most gallant fight. Only one of the guns could be saved. In this charge were lost many of its most gallant officers, and men. Col. Andrews, commanding 32d Texas, a gallant and chivalric officer, was severely wounded while leading his regiment, flag in hand, several flag bearers having been shot down. After his fall a private in the 10th Texas, J. C. Neal, again raised the flag, and brought it out. This gallant soldier was also killed on the next day. Capt. Dixon and Lieutenant Williams of the 32nd Texas were killed near the battery taken, while gallantly leading the charge. Their gallantry availed but little, as this brigade with more than one-third of the number carried into the fight already killed and wounded, was left alone to breast the storm of battle, which broke upon them in all its fury. And nobly did they do their duty. In danger of being surrounded again, it moved by the right flank, and took position a short distance in the rear. In a short time Cleburne's division came up, and this brigade was ordered up as a support to that division. It was not engaged again during the evening, although exposed to the heavy artillery fire of the enemy. Gen. Cleburne's division moved upon the enemy about sundown and continued to drive them until after dark. Night finally put an end to the struggle of the combatants, and a dull silence seemed to portend an angry morrow. On Sunday morning the brigade acted as a reserve, and about 10 a. m. it was ordered up at double quick to support the lines in advance, which had given away, after sustaining a heavy loss before one of the strongest works that the enemy had on the field. At the time it came up our lines in advance were in considerable confusion, and it was evident that it was all important for the brigade to hold the enemy in check, until these could be reformed.
Nobly did it do its duty. Coming up at a run, it gave a yell, and dashed at the foe.—Then like a wall of living fire, it stood, fighting at considerable disadvantage and being exposed to a raking fire from left, and front. Its line of battle could be distinctly marked by its dead, and wounded, after the struggle was over. The very air seemed filled with bursting shell and minnie balls. When the lines were reformed the brigade moved forward, and continued to drive the enemy until after night fall.
Brig. Gen. Ector was slightly wounded four times, and had two horses shot from under him. Capt. Kilgore A. A. G., and Lieut. H. M. Lane, A. D. C., were wounded, and Lieut. T. B. Trezevant, A. I. G., received a bullet hole through his cap. Every member of General Ector's Staff, down to his orderly, lost at least one horse, and every mounted officer in the Brigade had his horse killed or severely wounded. During the whole of the engagement the General and his staff were to be seen directing, encouraging, and leading the men. So stubborn was the resistance offered by the enemy, than an Indian belonging to the brigade could not forbear expressing his admiration while coolly picking them off with his rifle by the remark, "Yankee fight good this time."
A large portion of this brigade is composed of Texans—cut off entirely from home, and all the association and benefits to be derived from kindred, and friends. Even the poor privilege of mail communication is denied them. But their conduct will speak for them—they need no higher eulogy.
I cannot close without paying a deserved tribute to the gallantry of North Carolina, Alabama, and Mississippi troops attached to this brigade. They endured all with us, and with us are entitled to an equal share of the praise. Our association with them has been most pleasant and agreeable.
W. S.

 

Sept. 21, the Confederates advance after the Federals as far as Rossville.

 

Sept. 22, Ector’s brigade is ordered to Ringgold and take the train to Mississippi to rejoin the Army there.[39]

 

Oct. 6, at Meridian, Miss.

 

Oct. 15, at Camp Cannon, Meridian, Miss.

 

Oct. 17, ordered to Brandon Mississippi to join French’s Division, Army of Mississippi.

 

Oct. 24, near Brandon, Miss.

 

Nov. 1, at Camp Harper, Brandon, Miss.

 

Nov. 5, hard rain, no tents and few blankets.

 

Nov. 6, at the depot in Brandon, Miss. headed for Meridian.

 

Nov. 16, at Meridian, Miss. building winter quarters. E. G. Littlejohn reports they have good clothes and blankets.[40]

 

Nov. 20, the 10th is in Ector’s Brigade (2707) men, French’s Division, Department of Mississippi, General J. E. Johnston commanding. Rain.

 

Nov. 29, still at Meridian, cold & windy.

 

Dec. 9, Ector’s brigade leaves Meridian by train.

 

Dec. 22, at Camp Harper, Brandon, Miss.

 

1864

 

Jan. 8, General French is ordered to bring his troops back to Meridian.

 

Jan. 14, at Camp Cannon, Meridian, Miss. E. G. Littlejohn reports the houses they built for winter qurters in good shape, he also reports the capture of Capt. Buck Kilgore while trying to cross the Mississippi River. Littlejohn lost $170 which he was sending home to his family.[41]

 

Feb. 3, General French is ordered to Jackson. The Yankee army is moving east from Vicksburg and the Confederates think it may be headed toward Mobile. It turns out he is headed for Meridian Mississippi and Selma Alabama but his plans are thwarted by the defeat of his cavalry forces in northern Mississippi by Nathan Bedford Forrest. Sherman wanted to destroy everything in his path and is quoted as saying “ Vigorous war means universal destruction.”

 

Feb. 4, General French arrives at Jackson with his command.

 

Feb. 5, Yankee troops advancing cause General French to cross the Pearl River and move toward Brandon Miss.

 

Feb. 8, Ector reports 25,000 to 30,000 Yankees marched thru Clinton and on to Jackson Miss.

 

Feb. 9, Ector’s brigade is near Newton watching federal troops moving east from Vicksburg. General French receives orders to take his men to Newton Station on the 10th and then proceed by rail to Mobile , Alabama.

 

Feb. 10, General French is ordered not to wait on railcars for his artillery and wagons, if necessary send them by road to Meridian.

 

Feb. 11, orders to go to Mobile are countermanded.

 

Feb. 14, General French is at Meridian Miss. He is ordered to start out at 5 a.m. to Alamutche Miss. then cross over into Alabama to Gaston then proceed to Moscow, Ala. In company with Loring’s division when they cross the Tombigbee River they are to halt and wait orders.

 

Feb. 16, the march to Lewis’s Ferry (on the Tombigbee River ) will resume at 5 a.m.

 

Feb. 17, at Lewis’s Ferry, ordered to march to Demopolis early tomorrow along with Loring’s division.

 

Mar. 14 at Demopolis, Ala., plenty to eat.

 

Feb. 20, having burned Meridian again Sherman turns his army back toward Vicksburg and makes a path of destruction 50 miles wide across the state of Mississippi “which the present generation will not forget.”

 

March 23, LieuTenn.ant Colonel Walter A. Roher, of the 20th Mississippi, from camp near Demopolis, Alabama, writes to his cousin after a grand review has taken place;

“Gen French's Division came next commanded by Gen [Samuel G] French, he is an unpreTenn.ding man not considered of much ability, has a fine black eye, he has none of the swell about him that distinguishes some of the other Generals. First in his Division, is Ector's Brigade, composed of wild Texas and Arkansas boys, they are good in a fight but are wild and reckless and trouble-some, hard to manage. Gen [Mathew D.] Ector is a fine man, about thirty five or forty years of age, Short and heavy, dark hair and eyes..."

 

March 29, at Demopolis Al.. General French is ordered to proceed by easy marches to Lauderdale Springs Miss.

 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, April 8, 1864, p. 1, c. 6

Camp 1st Missouri Brigade,
Lauderdale, Miss., April 5th, 1864.
Editors Mobile Evening News:
. . . Since camping many improvements are being made for our convenience in camp. Tents have been pitched, sheds, huts, awnings "chebangs", tables, stools, beds, etc. made. I have a diminutive tabernacle which probably has not its model in the Confederacy. Last night an affair occurred which I think deserves a record. After dark some of the men set fire to some pine burs, and commenced throwing them at each other. This at once suggested a sham battle. Ector's brigade is camped within 200 yards of, and parallel to our brigade. Several hundred of them lighted their burs, formed in line of battle, and challenged us for a fight. Volunteers from the 2d, 6th, 5th and 3d Missouri regiments formed and attacked them in front, the 1st and 3d cavalry flanked them on the right, and the 1st Missouri flanked them on the left. The engagement surpasses description!—Imagine a thousand blazing pine burs flying meteor-like, past and athwart each other, through the air, the charge and the retreat, amid the deafening cheers of the combatants, and some idea will be formed of the brilliancy of the scene. "Look! look! how beautiful!" we exclaimed, as we beheld it. It reminded us of the bomb-shells which were poured upon the city of Vicksburg during the siege. When prisoners were captured, a truce was agreed to, and an exchange made. The boys have it that Gens. Cockrell and Ector commanded their respective brigades. Be this as it may, officers (?) were numerous enough, judging from the number of commands of "Forward; up men!" I believe the Texans were finally driven to their Tents, and the battle ended very amicably. It may be denominated the battle of the "Pine Burs." Large quantities of ammunition is being prepared preparatory to another engagement tonight. . . . Crow.

 

“All the troops of French's division that are here were reviewed a nine o'clock by Gov. Clark of this state. Many ladies were present and a salute of five guns was fired by the "Wooden Battery". Our brigade made a fine appearance as usual, we battery boys had on our best cloths, our horses,

harnesses, and guns, were in the best condition, the six fine horses on my gun are hard to surpass. Our battery and brigade have had great fun during the past week, fighting sham battles, with Ector's Texas Brig, each side would gather piles of pine burrs during the day, as we were camped amidst pines, and at night, the officers would take command, form their lines of battle, each man

armed with a pine torch in one hand and a haversack full of burrs, or a pile of burrs close by, were ready at command to light the burrs and throw them at the opposing line. The burrs would blaze like they had been soaked in turpentine and as thousands of them were sailing through the air at once on a dark night, the illumination was grand. As those blazing burrs fell into the opposing lines, they were immediately snatched up, and came sailing back again, only to be returned the second and even third time before they were consumed. The tremendous yelling that was carried on, made the woods ring for miles and miles around; the fruits of victory were the mess kits of the opponents, which were generally held until late the next day, when the owner was required to take off his hat, and politely ask for the loan of his kit, the victors of today were ofTenn. the borrowers of tomorrow. To get mad over your loss made maters worse as Gen. Gates learned to his sorrow, when he lost his kit one night, when he got ready to beg for it, it was returned. In these battles we were all equals, and the rules of the engagements had to be carried out by officers, as well as

privates. This showed the independent spirit of the Southern soldier, he knew no superiors, when from under his military oath. No men were more obedient to every command of their officers than the Missouri and Texas, and I am [to] say the Southern soldiers in general.”[42]

 

April 18, General French is ordered to Tuscaloosa Al. by way of Gainesville.

 

April 20, The weather is warm and the road dusty.

 

April 21, has been a warm day, and the roads good, dry and dusty.

 

April 23, camped for the day at Pleasant Ridge, a nice village, with a fine male academy. The country up to this place is beautiful, we are in Green county. This is a rich, healthy country, and everything, even in these times looks prosperous. Had a shower of rain on us about eleven o'clock, which settled the dust, it was a blessing. We were as usual welcomed along our rout by the

women, with plenty of good water and lunches. Oh, how we do love our true women, we love to fight for them. It is sorrow unspeakable for such women to be held under Yankee rule, as they are in some parts of our Southland.

 

April 24, moved at five thirty this morning and marched fourteen miles by one o'clock and camped. Had a heavy rain last night and the roads were bad for our infantry. This morning was quite cold, but pleasant in the middle of the day.

 

April 25, pass through a tolerable good country today, I noticed many good fields of wheat, which will be ready for the harvest in two or three weeks. We are now seven miles from Tuscaloosa, Ala.

 

April 26, arrive at Tuscaloosa. General French reports they are camped on the river and all is well.

 

April 28, “I find Maj. Gen. French’s Division at Tuscaloosa, it is small but the troops are well drilled. The Texas brigade of Brig. Gen. Ector was poorly armed and not well clothed, but still presented a most soldierly appearance“[43]

 

April 29, April 29th. Our whole command was reviewed this morning on Pikes St. in Tuscaloosa, by Gen. French, and Col. Hodge, of the President staff.

 

May 2, an order from the War Department in Richmond Va. orders men assigned to units east of the Mississippi river who have been caught on the west side, are to be transferred to units serving in the Trans Mississippi Dept.

 

May 5, camped along the Black Warrior River near Tuscaloosa, Al., the men are catching fish in traps.

 

May 6, Weather fine, have a standing order to be ready to leave at a moments notice, so no passes are given to go any-where. 5 P.M., orders have come for Gen. Ector's Brig. and Artillery to move in the morning.

 

May 7, They are to leave at 5:30 a.m. by train for Rome Ga.

 

May 10, resumed march about sunrise and after marching about four miles, reached Monticello, the county seat of Shelby county, a village of about two hundred inhabitants. Ector's Brig. goes by

rail to Jacksonville, Ala. some 80 miles away.

 

May 11, 1864. ad a hard cold rain last night, quite cold for this season of the year. The Infantry are awaiting transportation. The R.R. are not able to do the business required of them.

 

May 12th. “It was real cold last night, but the sun rose clear this morning, and we will now have cheerful weather. Our train really moved up a little today, about eight miles to Lime station, it has the right name, as thousands of barrels of lime are made and shipped at this station. About fifty

people live here, all engaged in the lime business. This R.R. we are on which goes by Jacksonville, Ala. and on to Near river, Ga. was inTenn.ded to go from Rome to Salina, but is not completed to either place there is also a branch road leaving this station for Decatur, Ala. but has only eighteen miles completed. We are to remain here until another train takes a pull at us. The country here is

low and thinly settled.”[44]

 

May 15, left camp a little after sunrise and marched twenty miles, passing through Jacksonville, Ala. they camp some 31 miles from Rome, Ga.

May 16, Ector’s brigade in Maj. Gen. French’s Division, Stewarts Corps, arrives in Rome Ga.

Stewart’s Corps. was formerly the Army of Mississippi.[45] “ Started before sunrise marched twenty miles, and halted to rest and feed our teams. Ector's Brig, is in front and are making fast time, they are a fine set of men, and Missourians can depend on them in the time for need. Resumed our march at two o'clock and arrived at Rome, Ga. about seven P.M. We crossed the line into Ga. this morning, so are out of the Blue Mountain valley, it is a rich valley and rather thickly settled, but from the Ga. to Rome, the country is good and nicely improved. The first town we arrived at in Ga. was Cave Springs, a nice town of three hundred inhabitants. We have orders to cook two days rations, and load our battery on the cars, and we will go to the front near Kingston tomorrow. Gen. Ector's Texas boys will go also.”[46]

 

May 17, 1 p.m., Ector’s brigade is preparing to go to Resaca Ga. by rail. Word is received that the Federals are only 2 1/2 miles away and advancing. They are at once placed across the river into works. Skirmished with the enemy, casualties appear to be around 71 men. At midnight the brigade is withdrawn and marched to Kingston.

 

May 18, after marching all night arrive at Kingston at 7 a.m.; continue on to Cassville,

 

May 19, On the left of Hood’s corps-skirmishing all day, light casualties- 5 men wounded. Major General French’s command now consists of Ector, Sears, Cantey and Reynolds brigades. Casualties to the Division have been 76 men.

 

May 20, army still in good spirits but continued retreating impairing confidence.

 

May 22, country hilly and rocky, heat oppressive and road dusty.

May 27, brigade moved to French’s extreme right, next to Loring’s extreme left.

 

May 28, 11 a.m. fight along French’s line, enemy repulsed. 1 p.m. Ector’s troops ordered to be watchful but rest.

 

May 29, orders received on how to cover a retreat should it be necessary.

 

May 31, near New Hope Church about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta.

 

June 4, staff officer reports army strength at 44,000 infantry. Spirits are good, army is fed better than ever, and new men are footsore.

 

June 25, picket duty.

 

June 27, Ector’s brigade is at but not involved in the battle of Marietta Ga. The brigades of Sears and Cockrell suffered 186 casualties.

 

July 2, Kennesaw Mountain, Ga.

 

July 10, the confederates cross over the Chattahoochee River and destroy all the bridges behind them.

 

July 17, Gen. J. B. Hood replaces Gen. Johnston. This is not a popular decision. General R. E. Lee said that Hood was a bold fighter, but added, “ I am doubtful as to other qualities necessary ”. Hoods ex classmates claimed he lacked battlefield cunning and cleverness! How true these assessments would prove to be. Ector’s brigade is stationed on the Chattahoochee River on both sides of the Railroad Bridge; its right wing extending up the river to Peach Tree Creek thence up it to Adam‘s brigade of Loring’s division. They are constantly under fire and suffer some casualties. French’s division is the extreme left of the army.

 

July 19, that night the brigade is moved to entrenchments on Peachtree Creek centered on the Marietta Rd.

forming the extreme left of the line.

 

Peach Tree Creek

 

July 20, 12 midnight, the brigade is moved to the right along the main works until it is within 1/2 of a mile of the Pace’s Ferry road in battle formation. The attack originally scheduled for 1 p.m. did not actually begin until after 3 and even then it was not coordinated. At 4 p.m. French’s division constituting the extreme left of the army advances to the attack. Ector’s brigade, on the divisions right near the Pace‘s Ferry Rd., moves thru abatis, felled timber and dense undergrowth. Reaching an open field about 600 yds. from the enemy entrenchments, who is supported by two batteries of artillery, Maj. Gen. French orders line of battle formed which is done under artillery fire. He then orders Ector’s brigade to stay in the edge of the woods as it advances. Approaching to within 300 yds. of the enemy lines it nears Gate’s brigade and halts under the brow of a hill. Lt. General Polk now orders General French to leave General Ector in command of his and Gate’s brigades and take Sear’s brigade along with the divisions artillery to the top of a ridge to his right. Before the two brigades can advance further the general attack fails and at dark they are ordered to withdraw to the original positions on the Marietta Rd. They never engaged the enemy. The entire Division has 1 killed and 18 wounded out of 1500 men. Despite 5 hours of continuous attacks elsewhere, the battle is lost. Gen. Hood’s first battle is a bloody failure as Union troops bury over 800 confederate dead left in front of them. The first Union artillery shells fall upon Atlanta.

 

Battle of Atlanta

 

July 21, retreat to Atlanta with the division taking position on the west side of the city. Cockrell’s brigade on the left of and Sear’s and Ector’s brigades on the right of the Turner’s Ferry road occupying about 3000 yds. of trenches. Ector’s brigade stretches from Turner’s Ferry Rd. to near the Marietta Rd. with a redan occupied by Ward’s battery in its center. [47]

 

July 22, the enemy advances and light skirmishing on the right flank. Heavy firing heard east of town, major engagement by Gen. Hardee’s corps.

 

July 23, the division makes a fake attack, few casualties.

 

July 24, cannon fire all day, 10 p.m. heavy skirmishing on the right. The brigade completes a 50’ square infantry redoubt on its left flank.

 

July 25 & 26, usual cannon fire and skirmishing.

 

July 27, while in the redan with Ward’s battery Brig. Gen. M. B. Ector is severely wounded above the left knee by a cannon shell and his left leg has to be amputated. Col W. H. Young of the 9th Texas Infantry takes command of the brigade.

 

July 28, Federal troops seen moving to the left. 1 p.m., Federals attack left flank and front of the division. The division‘s artillery opens fire. General Walthall asks for a brigade to be sent to the Lick Skillet road and Ector’s under command of Col. Young is sent, arriving at the close of battle.

 

July 29-Aug. 3, usual cannon and rifle fire.

 

July 31, Sunday, all quiet. Ector’s brigade returns to French’s division and takes up position with its left near Wards battery and its right at a creek.

 

Aug. 1, extremely heavy artillery fire in the afternoon killing one man at the division headquarters.

 

Aug. 4, heavy attack at 4 p.m., drives in vedettes. Counter attack by 46th Miss. captures 21 Yankees. 7 killed, 25 wounded, and 1 missing. Enemy has some 30 pieces of artillery in the divisions front, among them a battery of 4 1/2 “ guns which fired almost continually day and night into the city, never at the front lines. General French reports these guns used heated shot to try and set the city on fire.

 

Aug. 6, brigade attacks and captures front rifle pits of the federals but has to withdraw. The division suffers 5 killed, 39 wounded included Major Redwine of the 10th Texas which had been on picket duty.

 

Aug. 7-25, usual cannon fire. On the 9th it was for 7 straight hours. On several occasions over 2000 rounds of artillery a day fired at the division. General French says this annoys his men a little! The area in front is covered in rifle balls like hail on the ground. It is reported that the division picked up 10,000 lbs. worth and delivered them to the ordinance department. While the cannon fire on the troops usually ends at night, the shelling of the city never stops. Gradually the vedettes are pushed back until the enemy is only about 200 yds. away.

 

Aug. 26, pickets find the enemy has withdrawn from in front of Atlanta overnight but were still in force from the division’s left flank near the Lick Skillet Rd., south.

 

Aug. 27, the enemy is gone from the left. Ector’s and Sear’s brigades make a reconnaissance down the Turner’s Ferry Road to near the Chattahoochee river. The 39th North Carolina and 14th Texas move ahead as skirmishers and drive the enemy pickets back to the river. Finding the Federal 20th Corps protecting the ferry General French orders the return to Atlanta.

 

Aug. 28-30, strange the silence, no firing.

 

Aug. 31, French’s division and some state forces are the last troops around Atlanta. At 3 pm Col. Young and 4 regiments of Ector’s brigade are ordered to capture a Federal party on the railroad near Atlanta. Moving by Turner’s Ferry road and thence by cross roads to the rear of the enemy near the river at the railroad they discover they have missed them.

 

Sept. 1, ordered to evacuate Atlanta. Ector’s brigade is the first of French’s division to leave at 9 p.m. on the McDonough Road. The division is the rearguard. Marched all night.

 

Sept. 2, continue marching all that day, camp late that night.

 

Sept. 3, resuming the march that morning the brigade arrives at Lovejoy’s Station at 3 p.m.. Upon arriving ordered into the front lines to relieve Gen. Bate‘s division of Hardee‘s corps.

 

Sept. 4, under considerable artillery fire all day on the divisions left, dig fortifications and improve the defenses.

 

Sept 5, under heavy fire all day. So bad is the enfilade fire of the enemy that 40 men are killed and wounded by artillery.

 

Sept. 6, Federals withdraw at 4 a.m. toward Jonesborough where they entrench.

 

Sept. 8, a flag of truce to arrange exchange of prisoners, all quiet otherwise,

 

The 10ths casualties for the period May 18 thru Sept. 5 are 14 killed, 140 wounded and 10 missing.

 

Sept. 9, General Sherman orders all civilians to evacuate Atlanta.

 

Sept. 12, citizens begin leaving Atlanta, the Confederate Army sends wagons to help carry them to the railroad at Lovejoy‘s Station.

 

Sept. 18, the army resumes the march from the Macon railroad toward the West Point railroad.

 

Sept. 19, arrive at railroad this morning at Palmetto, Ga.

 

Sept. 20, take position in a line from the Chattahoochee River on the west to east of the West Point railroad.

 

Sept. 21, the army in good spirits as they fortify their positions. General hood is trying to provide shoes for the men.

 

Sept. 22, scouts report the union army very quiet as well as the refugees from Atlanta suffering “ vastly “. 10th arrives at Palmetto, Ga. about noon, it has been raining for several days.

Sept. 23, at camp near Palmetto, Ga. Henry Watson mentions how the campaign has been “long and worrisom” and do not see the end as the Yanks have such a larger force. He also mentions the spirit of the men is still high despite their 3 year enlistment being up. He also mentions when the campaign is over the brigade might be furloughed. He also mentions casualties from his company (F) as 2 killed, 5 wounded with 2 of those probably dead.

 

Sept. 26, President Davis and General Hood tour the army and are received enthusiastically.

 

Sep. 29, the Army of Tennessee leaves camp at Palmetto, Georgia and cross the Chattahoochee River at Pumpkin Town and Phillip’s Ferry.

 

Oct. 1, army is camped at Dark Corner, 8 miles from Pray’s Church.

 

Oct. 2, reach vicinity of Lost Mountain.

 

Oct. 3, Stewart’s Corps leaves Big Shanty early this morning and works all night destroying the railroad from Acworth Station to near Kennesaw.

 

Oct. 4, Gen. French and his Division leave Big Shanty Ga. at 3:30 p.m. moving toward Allatoona.

 

Allatoona, Ga.

 

Oct. 5, arrive at Allatoona at 3 a.m., maneuvering all night over trackless mountains they get in position by 9 a.m. Offer terms of surrender to the Federals but it is ignored. Attack at 10 a.m. with Cockrell’s and Ector’s brigades thru abatis and felled timber under artillery and rifle fire they overrun the outer defenses and 1 redoubt on the west side of the railroad cut. After a rest they rush the 2nd redoubt and capture it after murderous hand to hand fighting. Meanwhile Sear’s brigade is attacking the on the east side of the railroad cut which forces the surviving Federals into the last redoubt. While preparing to assault the last redoubt at 12:15, receive word of enemy troops advancing in their rear[48]. Started to withdraw to New Hope at 1:30 p.m. taking all the wounded they could but are forced to leave behind many. Enemy stores could not be destroyed due to faulty matches? During this battle Lt. M. W. Armstrong of the 10th Tx. captures a U.S. flag and its bearer. Ector’s brigade loses 43 K.I.A., 147 W.I.A. and 11 M.I.A. This was a particularly savage battle as General French reports savage hand to hand combat with 799 casualties out of a little over 2000 men involved. The division also captured 206 prisoners and the flag of the 93rd Illinois Infantry,

 

Oct. 6, Stewart’s Corps is at New Hope Church.

 

Oct 7, leave Dallas and move to Van Wert.

 

Oct. 8, army leaves Van Wert at 8 am and marches to Cedartown.

 

Oct 9, move to Cave Spring.

 

Oct. 10, near Coosaville.

 

Oct. 12, march 30 miles to Resaca. Immediately started tearing up the railroad tracks from Dalton to a point 2 miles north.

 

Oct. 13, finish tearing up tracks from Resaca to Tunnel Hill. Stewarts men capture Tilton and about 300 men.

 

Oct. 14 & 15, move toward and reach a point 9 miles from La Fayette.

 

Oct. 16, remain in camp.

 

Oct. 17, camp near Alpine.

Oct. 20, army reaches Gadsden , Alabama.

 

Oct. 21, rest in camp.

 

Oct. 22, march 12 miles and camp.

 

Oct. 23, near Brooksville.

 

Oct. 25, camped around Somerville, Al.

 

Oct. 26, camped at Decatur, Al.

 

Oct. 27 & 28, remain in camp.

 

Oct. 29, leave Decatur and march to within 3 miles of Courtland, Al.

 

Oct. 31, reach Tuscumbia, Al.

 

Nov. 1 thru 9, heavy rains.

 

Nov. 15, heavy rain for last 2 days.

 

Nov. 16, all military activities suspended, the day having been set aside for a day of fasting and prayer by President Davis.

 

Nov. 18, Stewart’s Corps ordered to cross the Tennessee river tomorrow.

 

Nov. 19, unable to cross today due to bad weather.

 

Nov. 20, Stewart’s Corps crosses the Tennessee river and moves up the Lawrenceburg Rd. The army heads north with 26,000 men. The roads are so bad whole regiments have to help the artillery move up hills. Ector’s brigade is detailed to guard the pontoon train and will not rejoin Stewart until in front of Nashville, Tenn.[49]

 

Nov. 21, Stewart’s Corps continues on the Lawrenceburg rd.

 

Nov. 24, camp 12 miles from Henryville.

 

Nov. 25, Stewart’s Corps is at Henryville.

 

Nov. 26, 2 miles north of Mt. Pleasant, Tenn.

Nov. 27, Stewart’s Corps moves to within 3 miles of Columbia, Tenn. and takes up position on the left of Cheatham’s Corps.

 

Nov. 28, find out the enemy has abandoned Columbia overnight and move into town.

 

Nov. 29, moving north Stewart’s Corps. along with most of the army try to engage the enemy near Springhill but without success, and Bivouacs at 11 p.m.

 

Franklin Tennessee

 

Nov. 30, march at daylight. The Corps makes contact at Franklin Tenn.and a savage battle is fought from about 4:30 p.m. to midnight. However Ector’s Brigade is guarding the pontoon train and is not engaged. The 2 other brigades in French’s division lose over 1/3 of their men. Although the Confederates win this battle the high casualties they suffer effectively destroys the Army of Tennessee. 13 Confederate generals are killed, wounded or captured, more than any other battle of the war. The enemy retreats toward Nashville Tenn.

 

Dec. 1, cross Harpeth river.

 

Dec. 2, moving to Nashville Tenn. the army arrives late in the evening with Stewart’s Corps forming on the left of the army.

 

Dec. 3, the army prepares its positions facing Nashville.

Dec. 4, since Nov. 21 Ector’s brigade has lost 1 K.I.A. and 14 W.I.A.

 

Dec. 9, very cold and snowing.

 

Dec. 10, the 10th is still in Ector’s brigade now commanded by Col. David Coleman.

 

Dec. 11, “coldest day I ever saw. Our position being in open fields, with no timber for miles to break the force of the wind, which is blowing a perfect gale from the north, no wood to make fires and most of us thinly clad, our suffering is in Tennessee”[50]

 

Dec. 14, Ector’s Brigade is out in front of the left flank on picket duty.

 

Nashville, Tennessee

 

Dec. 15, Ector’s brigade is out in front as skirmishers and is forced back to the Confederate lines. Late in the morning Ector’s Brigade is attached to Gen. Walthall and assigned to his left flank to cover a redoubt near Compton’s house. At 11 am the Federals stormed the redoubt forcing Ector’s Brigade to withdraw. During their withdraw Ector’s brigade lost all their entrenching tools, this prevented them from properly fortifying Shy’s Hill during their stay there. The Confederate General whose troops relieved them blamed Ector's men for the loss of the hill the next day even though Ector’s men had been ordered away.[51] The attack by the Federals broke the Confederate lines to the right of the brigade and forced them to retreat to a position between the Granny White and Franklin Pikes on Shy’s Hill[52] where General Hood ordered them to hold the left flank . Late in the day the enemy attacked but failed to carry the hill. The fighting ended at dark. Gen. Stewart says this about Ector’s brigade “Also Ector’s brigade, commanded by Col. Coleman, in falling back from its position on the Harding Pike, was thrown over on the left and beyond my personal observation. The report of Col. Coleman is, therefore, referred to for account of its operations, which I have been told were characterized by the usual intrepidity of this small but firm and reliable body of men.” During the night the entire army prepared for the attack which they were sure would come at daylight. At midnight Ector’s brigade is ordered to report to the Commanding General and used as a reserve force.

 

Dec. 16, at an early hour the enemy attacked. The lines held but Ector’s brigade is ordered to the right flank to counter a breakthrough. Fighting hard they check the Federal advance but are unable to drive them back.. This prevents the Confederate army from retreating thru this pass, in fact only one route was left open for the entire army to retreat down. At about 2 or 3 p.m. the lines break and the Confederate army retreats. It starts to rain that night.

 

“The battle of Nashville was the most complete victory of the war, and won by the Union army. The Confederate army, although it held the field at Franklin, was terribly punished and much demoralized by its great losses, but coffered itself with a halo of valor equal to any display on any field of the great war on either side. The army realized that Hood's campaign was a forlorn hope, and that the Confederacy was on its last legs, yet the Confederate soldier, true to his duty and in face of inevitable defeat, maintained a bold front, waiting for final order of his government to desist or to be crushed finally.

 

It is difficult to get at Hood's losses. He claims to have lost 54 guns and 10,000 men, including his loss at Franklin (about 6,252 men killed, wounded, and prisoners, . Livermore puts his prisoners at Nashville at 4,462 men, and Thomas lost 3,061 men. Hood did not lose many men killed and wounded, as he was really flanked and maneuvered into a rout by Thomas. He could not move his guns, as the horses were in the rear for safety, and the break the second day was so sudden and rapid that the horses could not be brought up“[53].

Dec. 17, the retreat reaches Springhill Tenn., weather changes back to rain and sleet.

 

Dec. 18, Rain, 2 p.m. arrive at the Duck river and with 6 other brigades form the rearguard under General Walthall to protect the army as it crosses. Some of the soldiers are barefoot and their feet bleed as they march.

 

Dec. 19, cross the Duck river at 11:00 p. m, weather is extremely cold. The sufferings of the troops were terrible. Without protection from the severity of the weather, without blankets, and many without shoes, and nearly all indifferently shod, the horrors of the retreat were to be seen as the bare and frost bitten. feet of the soldiers, swollen, bruised, and bloody, toiled painfully on the march over the frozen pike.

Dec. 20, General Hood sent a member of his staff to General Walthall, who had established his headquarters at the residence of Nimrod Porter, near Columbia, with the urgent request that he call at army headquarters immediately. General Walthall at once rode to headquarters, and the writer accompanied him. On the pike, as Walthall approached army headquarters, he met General Hood on his horse in company with Dr. Darby, who was the medical director of the army. Hood said to Walthall substantially as follows: "Things are in a bad condition. I have resolved to reorganize a rear guard. Forrest says he can't keep the enemy off of us any longer without a strong infantry support, but says he can do it with the help of three thousand infantry with you to command them. You can select any troops in the army. It is a post of great honor, but one of such great peril that I will not impose it on you unless you are willing to take it, and you had better take troops that can be relied upon, for you may have to cut your way out to get to me after the main army gets out. The army must be saved, come what may, and if necessary your command must be sacrificed to accomplish it."

Walthall, in reply, said: "General, I have never asked for a hard place for glory nor a soft place for comfort, but take my chances as they come. Give me the order for the troops, and I will do my best. Being the youngest major general in the army, I believe, my seniors may complain that the place was not offered to them, but that is a matter between you and them."

General Hood said in reply: "Forrest wants you, and I want you."

General Forrest rode up during the conversation in time to understand what had been said, and he remarked: "Now we will keep them back."

Hood gave verbal orders for Walthall to take any troops he desired, and he selected eight brigades, estimated at three thousand effective, as follows: W. S. Featherstone's, J. B. Palmer's, D. H. Reynolds's, O. F. Strahl's (commanded by Col. C. W. Keiskell), Smith's (commanded by Col. C. Olmstead), Maney's (commanded by Col. H. R. Field), Ector's (commanded by Col. D. Coleman), and Quarles's (commanded by Brig. Gen. George D. Johnston). These brigades reported to Walthall, who had them inspected and a report of effectives made. The eight brigades numbered one thousand six hundred and one effectives. He then united these brigades into four divisions as follows; Featherston and Quarles, under command of Brig. Gen. Featherston; Ector and Reynolds, under the command of Brig. Gen. Reynolds; Strahl and Maney, under the command of Colonel Field; Smith and Palmer, under command of General Palmer. The Cavalry consisted of Jackson's, Buford's and Chalmers' divisions of cavalry, and Morton's Battery. The entire force fell under the command of General Forrest.

The field return of this command's effectives was as follows: Featherstone, 498, Reynolds, 528[54], Palmer, 297, Field, 298, total, 1,621. General Walthall moved his headquarters from Nimrod Porter's to the residence of Mr. Orr, in Columbia, and the infantry rear guard was encamped near the Pulaski Pike, south of Columbia.

General Thomas (Federal Commander), in his official report dated Eastport, Miss., January 20, 1865, says this of Hood's rear guard: "He had formed a powerful rear guard, made up of detachments from all his organized forces, numbering about four thousand infantry, under General Walthall, and all his available cavalry and artillery under Forrest. With the exception of this rear guard, his army had become dishearTenn.ed and a disorganized rabble of half armed and barefooted men, who sought opportunity to fall out by the wayside and desert their cause to put an end to their sufferings. The rear guard, however, was undaunted and firm, and did its work bravely to the last."

Thomas was one of the most imposing characters in the military annals of his country, and his language carries a distinctness of statement and an absolute certainty of commanders, their commands, and events.

Dec. 21, Rain of previous day turns to snow. Ector’s brigade has 341 men and 20 servants. It is still acting as one of the brigades in the rear guard. Colonel Field, with his small infantry division, was in observation on the river, with a cavalry regiment picketing in front of him. Colonel Field reports the efforts of the enemy to effect a crossing of Duck River.

 

Dec. 22, When General Wood's infantry appeared on the morning of the 22d south of Duck River, General Walthall ordered Colonel Field to reconnoiter and skirmish with the enemy, and formed the remainder of his command in line across the Pulaski Pike. The enemy was in force, and easily compelled Field to fall back on Walthall's line. General Wood rapidly deployed in front of Walthall, and forced him to retreat on the Pulaski Pike. Walthall marched about twelve miles, and encamped at Mrs. Mitchell's, about two miles from Lynnville, where he remained until the morning of the 24th.

Dec. 24, “Walthall's men spent Christmas Eve encamped at Sugar Creek, fourteen miles south of Anthony's Hill. At Sugar Creek, the rearguard came upon a large part of Hood's ordnance train, which had been delayed there so that the mules could be used in moving the pontoon train to the

river. If the trains were to be saved, Forrest would have to come up with another delay of Wilson‘s Cavalry.”[55]

 

Dec. 25, At daylight on the morning of the 25th Walthall withdrew his troops from the works, marched through Pulaski, and left the pike on the road for Bainbridge. The roads were almost impassable, and the artillery and the few wagons which made up the train were moved with great difficulty. Wilson, with a considerable mounted force, pursued and pressed the rear guard with unusual vigor and audacity. A few miles from Pulaski scattering wagons of the main army were overtaken, and these were carried when practicable, notwithstanding it greatly embarrassed the infantry. The boldness and vigor of Wilson's pursuit was now pressed with increased determination, and it was determined to turn upon him. An advantageous position was selected for a line on Anthony's Hill, four miles from Pulaski. Featherstone and Palmer, with a brigade of cavalry on each flank, and Reynolds and Field and Morton's artillery in the reserve for support were put in ambush to await the enemy's approach. So broken is the ground at that point and so densely wooded that there was no difficulty in concealing the troops. A thin line of skirmishers was thrown to the front, which the enemy promptly engaged, and when it proved stubborn, he dismounted part of his cavalry men and made a charge. When the attacking force neared the troops lying in wait for them, the latter delivered a destructive fire, and a section of Morton's artillery, masked near by, opened fire with considerable effect. The enemy retreated in disorder, and Featherstone and Palmer promptly pursued and captured a number of prisoners, horses, and one piece of artillery. Captain Morton took charge of this gun, and after turning it with effect upon the enemy carried it from the field.

About sunset the rear guard was withdrawn from Anthony's Hill, at midnight reached Sugar Creek, camped for the night, and there came upon a large part of the army ordnance train, which had been delayed, so that the mules which belonged to it might be used to aid in moving the pontoon train to the river.

Dec. 27th the march was continued, and the rear guard crossed Shoal Creek about two o'clock in the afternoon. On the south side of Shoal Creek the infantry formed in line to guard the crossing. Here the cavalry passed and moved on to the Tennessee River. At 1 P.M. the infantry were withdrawn with the exception of Reynolds, who was left with instructions to picket the creek and rejoin Walthall the following morning, and Walthall marched to and occupied the works covering the pontoon at Bainbridge.

Dec. 28, General Walthall issued the following circular to the "infantry forces of the rear guard" December 28, 1864, 3 a.m.: Featherstone's Brigade will move promptly (without further orders) at daybreak across the bridge, to be followed by Field and Palmer.

 

General Reynolds will withdraw his command from Shoal Creek in time to reach the main line by daybreak and leave a skirmish line behind for a half hour. He will follow Palmer. Ector's Brigade will cover the road until the whole command has passed, and then will follow, leaving a line of skirmishers behind until the rear of the brigade has passed on to the bridge.

In obedience to the directions contained in the above circular, the infantry were the last of the rear guard to cross the Tennessee River. Walthall with his incomparable infantry, together with the magnificent cavalry and artillery under Forrest, saved Hood's army from annihilation and enabled him to escape, south of the Tennessee River.

Ector’s brigade is the last of the rearguard to cross the river into Alabama. This makes them the last confederate infantry to leave Tennessee. Rejoining Stewart’s Corps. at Burnsville, Miss.

 

1865

 

Jan. 3, Stewart’s Corps. at Burnsville, Miss. is ordered to continue the march to Tupelo, Miss.

 

Jan. 8, camped at Tupelo Mississippi. The Confederate Secretary of War writes Generals Beauregard and Hood to “repress by all means the proposition” to furlough the Trans-Mississippi troops.

 

Jan. 9, General Taylor writes the army needs “rest, consolidation and reorganization” “if moved in its present condition, it will prove utterly worthless.”

 

Jan. 10, in a letter to General French, E. T. Freeman writes that Ector’s brigade expects to be furloughed as a brigade in a short time.

 

Jan. 14, General Hood orders Corps commanders to resume inspections and drills on the 16th.[56]

 

Jan 16, French’s Division is at Tupelo.

 

Jan. 19 Camped at Verona, Miss. some 5 miles from Tupelo.

 

Jan. 25, still at Verona.

 

Jan. 30, French’s division is described as very weak but still able to garrison Mobile and Choctaw Bluff.

 

Feb. 1, French’s division is ordered to Mobile Al. So much for the furlough. I wonder how the men of the 10th felt as the unit has been east of the Mississippi since April 1862, almost 3 years.

 

Feb. 9, French’s Division is told to board the train at Newton Station at 6 o’clock on the 10th, proceed to Meridian Miss. and then on to Mobile Al. Once there General French is to turn over his command to General Maury.

 

Feb. 14, 5 a.m., the Division is marching from Meridian toward Moscow via Alamutche & Gaston.

 

Feb. 15, French is ordered to continue on to Lewis’ Ferry.

 

Feb. 17, French’s Division is ordered to continue on toward Demopolis Al.

 

March 10, the 10th is commanded by Capt. Jacob Ziegler, Ector’s Brigade, French’s Division, District of the Gulf, Mobile Alabama.

 

March 23, the brigade is at Spanish Fort on the east side of Mobile Bay.

 

March 29, French’s command is ordered to march to Lauderdale Springs, Miss. by easy marches. it is obvious they are caught in Spanish Fort before they can carry out this order.[57]

 

April 1, the brigade is ordered withdrawn from Spanish Fort and sent to Fort Blakely.

 

April 7, Federal troops have 90 cannons shelling the fort, each gun fires every 3 minutes.

 

April 8, for whatever reason the brigade is still at Spanish Fort. The ground the brigade is defending is swamp and they are unable to dig trenches. The enemy thus moved cannons to that side and heavy shelling with an infantry assault after dark breaks their line and forces the abandonment of the fort.

 

April 9, after retreating down a narrow causeway thru the swamp all night the survivors reach Fort Blakely and from there to Mobile.

 

April 9, Gen R. E. Lee surrenders in Virginia.

 

April 16, all units of French’s Division are ordered to report to Col. Coleman, commanding Ector’s brigade.

 

April 18, the 10th is at Meridian, Miss.

 

April 30, still at Meridian.

 

May 4, the 10th is surrendered by Gen. Richard Taylor at Citronelle Alabama.

 

1894 by General Dabney Herndon Maury - USA Minister to Colombia, S. A.; Founder of the Southern Historical Society;

“To resume my narrative, the final day of our service for the Confederacy was one of the deepest gloom to us. The little army of Mobile had held steadfastly together with the dignity of men who had risked all from a higher motive, and we stood by each other to the last. My own deep

sadness was cheered by the sympathy of the noble men who had been my comrades. Gibson's Louisiana brigade had been especially active and enduring in the defense of Spanish Fort; Ector's Texans, the Alabamians, and North Carolinians, and Massenbury's Georgians made up that steadfast little garrison. They were all around me now, and the Louisiana band, the only one left in the army, came to my encampment that evening and gave me their farewell serenade. The officers of the Louisiana regiments which had served with me longest came to my Tent in a body and

bade me an affectionate goodbye.“[58]

 

The 10th is paroled at Meridian Miss. and given transportation to Shreveport, La.[59] R. Todhunter, Higginsville, Mo., writes: Noting the many prominent commands mentioned from time to time in the VETERAN,[60] I have seen no record of what I consider, with pardonable pride, one of the best brigades in the Confederacy. I refer to Ector's Texas Brigade, composed of the Ninth Texas Infantry, Tenn.th, Eleventh, Fourteenth, and Thirty Second Texas dismounted cavalry, and for the last year of the war the Twenty Ninth and the Thirty Ninth North Carolina Infantry (Eleventh Texas, after the battle of Murfreesboro, remounted). ordered to report to Gen. D. J. Maury, at Mobile. From this place the brigade was sent under Gen. R. L. Gibson to Spanish Fort, there remaining over two weeks, fighting continuously though outnumbered many times by the enemy. Both armies entrenched within three hundred yards of each other.

In many of the above engagements, though our loss was from thirty to sixty three per cent of the effective strength (Chickamauga sixty three per cent) no engagement exceeded Spanish Fort in severity.

The various campaigns and engagements grouped above will be recalled by members of many brigades in the Armies of Tennessee and Mississippi, as they fought side by side with us.

I deem it a duty while esteeming it a privilege to say that we never met a foe in open field whom we did not drive, nor did we ever meet a foe who could drive us. In some battles a brigade or command on the right or left of ours giving way, it was necessary to move by the flank in retreat. In that event firing of small arms did not cease, nor did the enemy's loss lessen. In many battles notably Richmond, Ky., Murfreesboro, and Chickamauga, Ector's Brigade was among the first of the infantry to open and the last to close.

The regiments comprising this brigade entered the Confederate service over eight thousand strong, and surrendered at Meridian, Miss., under Lieut. Gen. R. Taylor, to Gen. E. R. S. Canby only five hundred and forty men, nearly all of whom were battle scarred. Every commander of this brigade was, during the war, either killed or wounded. Gen. Ector, who commanded longer than any other officer, had his leg shot off at Atlanta. Being an old man at that time, he was never able to resume duty. Some of the most prominent men in the State of Texas to day were members of that brigade.

 

AUGUST 30, 1862.-Battle of Richmond, Ky.

 

JOINT RESOLUTION OF CONFEDERATE CONGRESS.

 

Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are due, and are hereby Tendered, to General E. Kirby Smith for the signal victory achieved by him in the battle of Richmond, Ky., on the 30th of August, 1862 [1862], and to all the officers and soldiers of his command engaged in that battle, and especially to General Churchill, General Cleburne, and Colonel Preston Smith, of whom he says, "I almost fear to particularize, lest I do not full justice to all. But I cannot close without expressing my admiration at the promptness and intelligence with which General Churchill, Cleburne, and Colonel Preston Smith executed the orders given to them January

 

SEC. 2. Resolved, That special acknowledgments and commendation are declared for that highest order of generalship with which this victory was followed up, utterly annihilating with 5,000 an army of 10,000, of whom full 5,000 were actually captured, besides the slain in battle; and for the brilliant campaign, in which the speed, vigor, and constancy of a rapid advance resulted in planting the Confederate flag upon the capitol of Kentucky, and upon the shores of the Ohio River, in front of the great city of Cincinnati.

SEC. 3. Resolved, That the superior generalship displayed in rapidly gathering the immediate fruits of a victory, and in following it promptly with a campaign of activity, enterprise, and unwearied constancy, renders it worthy of the applause of the Government and the emulation of the army.

 

SEC. 4. Resolved, That the President is requested, in appropriate general orders, to make public the sense of Congress in the premises, and to cause the same to be communicated to General E. Kirby Smith and the officers named, and to be read at the head of each regiment engaged in that battle.

 

Approved February 17, 1864.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

People of the 10th

 

 

 

Brigade Command and Staff

 

 

Ector, Matthew Duncan 2/28/1822 – 10/29/1879 Enlisted as a pvt. In the 3rd Texas Cav., he was promoted and eventually commanded the 14th Texas Cav. Promoted to Brig. Gen. on 8/23/1862 he was placed in command of the Brigade. Wounded slightly 3 times at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/19 & 20/1863 he was severely wounded at Atlanta on 7/24/1864 resulting in the amputation of his left leg just below the knee. Recovered, he was promoted to Major General and ordered to Mobile, Ala. but did reach there in time. After the war he resumed his career as a lawyer and was elected to the 6th Judicial District but was removed by the Federals in 1867. Moved to Marshall and resumed being a Lawyer. Reappointed to the 7th Judicial District by the Governor in 1874. Died 10/30/1879 while court was in session at Tyler, Texas and is buried in Greenwood Cem., Marshall, Harrison Co., Tex. ( picture). Ector County in west Texas names for him. Listed in “TEXANS WHO WORE THE GRAY” by Sid S. Johnson pg.

(Picture)

 

Young, William Hugh 1838 - 1901 Originally commanded the 9th Texas Infantry, he was wounded 4 times in battle. He assumed command of the Brigade on 7/24/1864 when M. D. Ector was wounded at Atlanta, Ga. Wounded a 5th time at Allatoona, Ga. on 10/5/1864 his foot was later amputated. Captured 10/7/1864 due to his wound he was held prisoner at Johnson's Island, Ohio. Young was not released until July 24, 1865. General Young died in San Antonio on November 28, 1901, and is buried in the Confederate Cemetery there. Listed in “TEXANS WHO WORE THE GRAY” by Sid S. Johnson pg.

 

Andrews, Julius Col. Commanded from 10/5/1864 after Allatoona, Ga. until he was wounded near Nashville, Tenn.. on 12/4/1864. He was originally commander of the 32nd Texas Cav. Of Ector’s Brigade.

 

Coleman, David Col. Commanded from 12/4/1864 at Nashville until early 1865. He was the last man across the pontoon bridge over the Tennessee River during the retreat. Originally commanded the 39th North Carolina Infantry of Ector’s Brigade.

 

Original Regimental Commander

 

 

Locke, Matthew Francis Col. Organized the 10th Texas Cavalry in summer of 1861. Resigned 3/6/63, surgeons Certificate “affection of the spine, asitis and chronic hepatitis”. 7/20/1824 died 6/4/1911 in El Paso, Tex . [61] (Picture).

 

Regimental Staff After Reorganization

 

Earp, C. R. 1827. Originally 1st Lt. Co. D. Elected Lt. Col. 5/8/1862. 10/27/63 on furlough to return men from over the Mississippi River. Paroled 7/3/65 at Marshall, TX.

 

Brown, J. S. Regimental Commissary Sgt.

 

Francis, C. C. 1834. Regimental Surgeon. POW 1/2/1863.

 

Hart, V. T. Assistant Regimental Surgeon 6/5/1862.

 

Hilliard, M. C. Assistant Regimental Surgeon.

 

 

Jarvis, James Jones 4/30/1831. Regimental Adjutant, Major. Originally Co. A. Slightly wounded 12/31/1862 at battle of Murfreesboro, Tenn.,[62], again at Jackson, Miss. in 1863. Home on furlough when war ended. Texas State Senator, donated land for Jarvis Negro College, Hawkins Tx. Died 1/20/1914 and is buried in Oakwood Cem., Ft. Worth, Tex..[63] (Picture)

 

Kelly, J. W. Regimental Sgt. Major. Acting Quartermaster. Wounded 9/19/1863, Chickamauga, Ga.

Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Lindale, Texas. Shown as from Co. C.

 

Moore, E. P. Capt. 1832. Regimental Chief of Subsistence, Ector’s Brigade. Originally Co. D.

 

Scott, Spencer B. Appointed Regimental Quartermaster, 7/7/1862.

 

Sparks, W. J. Regimental Adjutant.

 

Walton, T. O. Regimental Ordinance Sgt., 4/17/1862.

Weir, R. A. Regimental Quartermaster Sgt.

 

Winbray, John A. Regimental Quartermaster 1826.

 

Company A Wood County

 

^ Original enlistee on muster roll dated 9/16/1861 from the Texas State Archives

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

 

Allred, John A. ^

Allred, Thomas M. ^

 

Bain, T. C. ^

Barnes, R. H.^ 1st Lt.

Bateman, J. P. ^

Bates, Mack ^

Baxter, Eli Leroy ^ 11/1/183? Died at Guntown, Miss., 5/10/1862.[64] <

Baxter, E. M. ~

Benton, T. F. ~

Boyd, James A. ^

Bratcher, J. A. ^

Bratcher, William ~

Bryant, C. P. ^ b. 1843. Died at Jacksonport, Ark., 4/10/1862. <

Bryant, W. A. ^ 1845. Died at Little Rock, Ark., 4/9/1862. <

Butler, J. R. ^ 1843. POW at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/19/1863. Died at Camp Douglas Prison, Chicago, Il. 4/25/1864 of inflammation of the lungs.

Byram, John ^

 

Carter, Abraham ^

Case, W. L. ^

Cogswell, W. V. ^ Teamster*

Condon, R. T. ^

Cooke, Alexander ^

Cooke, S. L. ^

Cooper, Burwell Zachariah ^ 3/25/1842. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865, paroled at Meridian Miss., 5/9/1865. Texas Pension #16050. Died 9/20/1920 at Colorado City, Tx. (picture)[65]

Crabb, S. F. ^ 1842. Died at Holly Springs, Miss., 6/30/1862. <

Crabb, Tom J. ^ 2nd Lt. 1828. Dropped. The 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas lists him as dying in Kaufman Co., Texas, since last meeting.

Crow, William ^

 

Davis, D. B. ^

Dear, J. H. ^

Dement, John ^

Dement, Charles ^

Dement, George ^

 

Essary, W. L.^

 

Farbrough, James W. ~ 1st Cpl.

Faulkner, A. J. ^ 1834. Died at Jacksonport, Ark., 4/3/1862. <

Finley, Z. R. ^

Fisher, Joshua ^ Died at Little Rock, Ark., 5/30/1862. <

Fletcher, W. H. ^

Flournoy, R. R. ^

Flournoy, Sam H. ^ 1842. Died at Jacksonport, Ark., 4/3/1862. <

Fowler, William H. ^ 1839. Left at Little Rock, Ark., “illness.” <

Front, W. G. ~ 3rd Cpl.

 

Gholson, W. J. ^ 1840. Died at Little Rock, Ark., 3/31/1862. <

Goode, M. V. ^

Goode, T. G. ~

Graves, T. J. ^ 1841. Died at Macon, Miss., 5/28/1862. <

Greene, T. W. ~

 

Hart, Sam ^ 3rd Sgt..

Hendricks, Martin ^

Horton, C. L. ^ 1815.

Hutton, John ^ Teamster*.

 

Jarvis, J. J. ^ see Regimental Staff After Reorganization.

Jones, A. A. ^ 1841.

Jones, A. H. ^ 1839.

Jones, J. C. ^ 1843.

 

Kelly, J. L. O. ~

Kerr, William M. ^ 1838. Died at Little Rock, Ark., 5/30/1862.<

Kirk, Henry ^ Teamster*

Knox, William M. ~

 

Lee, B. W. ^

Lindley, J. M. ^

Lindsey, W. ^ 1843. Died 5/20 or 25/1862 at Memphis, Tenn. Buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn. <

Livingston, Charles H. ~

Long, Thomas ^ 1839. Died in General Hospital, Macon, Miss., 6/12/1862. <

 

Maloney, W. H. ^

McBride, A. A. ~ 1831. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865[66].

McGee, John Abraham Dr. ~ Discharged 6/22/1862. 1/8/1844 – 7/1/1905, buried in Rice Cem., Navarro Co., Tx. Company A., 10th Texas Cavalry. C.S.A. marker on grave. Navarro County History, Volume 6, pg 74

 

McKnight, Charles David ^ Capt. 9/3/1824 - Dropped. Son born in 1871 in Quitman.[67]

McMillan, James W. ^ 2nd Cpl.

Miller, F. ^

Moore, A. J. ^

Moore, O. B. ~

Murray, George ~

Murray, Robert A. ~ Died 3/12/1862 at Little Rock, Ark. <

Murray, S. F. ^ 1835.

 

Nash, John C. ^ 4th Cpl.

Noyes, R. H. ^ Bugler.

 

O’Kelly, J. L. ^ 1840.

 

Parker, J. L. ^

Parker, Lafayette F. ~

Parker, W. H. ^

Paris, E. V. ^

Patton, Bradford ^

Patton, Jacob C. B. ~

Phillips, Houston ~

Pierce, G. G. ~

Pierce, William T. ^

 

Raines, G. R. ^ .

Raines, P. P. ^ 1837. Present 4/5/1864. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Emory Texas.

Raines, William F. 1838.^ Died at Guntown, Lee Co., Miss., 6/10/1862. <

Rainwater, B. F. ^ 1838. Died at Chattanooga, Tenn., 7/13/1862. <

Ratliff, B. F. ^

Ray, James L. ^ 1840. Present 4/5/1864. discharged at Meridian, Miss. in 1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Mineola, Texas. Died 4/23/1929 and is buried in the Texas State Cem., Austin Texas, Confederate Field, Section 1, Row U #11.

Ray, John C. ~

Reid, Bailey M. ^

Reeder, A. H. ^ 1844. Died 4/30/1862 at Little Rock, Ark. <

Reeder, A. N. ^

Riggle, John W. ^ 1st Sgt.

Robertson, S. G. ^

Rowland, J. R. ^ 4th Sgt.

Rushing, J. C. ^

 

Sartain, J. F. ~

Shamberger, W. N. ^ 1836. Died 3/31/1862 at Little Rock. Ark. <

Shipp, J. M. ^ 11/4/18420. Wounded 9/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga., discharged 11/23/1863 due to wound. Applied under the Confederate Veterans Act of 1881, in Wood Co., Texas. Died 11/13/1902 buried in Sand Springs Cem., Wood Co., Texas.

Shuford, A. M.^ 1831. Died 4/6/1862 at Little Rock, Ark. <

Siceloff, James B.^ Ensign/Sgt.

Slaughter, G. H. ^ 1843.

Spradling, R. W. ^ Teamster. *

Stewart, John R. ^ 1842. Died 7/4/ 1862 at Enterprise, Miss. Buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss. <

 

Tharp, R. G. ^ 1837. Died at Guntown, Lee Co., Miss., 3/30/1862. Widow filed under Confederate Veteran Act of 4/9/81 in Wood Co., Texas. <

Thompson, Simon ^ 2nd Sgt.

Tollett, W. W.

Tomlinson, James R. ^ < Died 12/19/1861 at Camp Barton, Tex.

Trousdale, James ^ 1838. Died 6/1/ 1862 at Enterprise, Miss. Buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss.

Trout, W. S. ^ 3rd Cpl. 3rd Lt. 5/1862. 1st Lt. 3/1863. Detailed as body guard for Major Ector, paroled 7/9/1865 at Marshall, Tx.[68]

Turman, Thomas G. ^ 1st Sgt. 1838. 12/8/1863, left camp near Brandon Miss. for home on furlough. [69] Wounded at Nashville, Tenn., 12/1864. Admitted to Way Hospital in Meridian, Miss., 1/19/1865 for wound. Applied under the Confederate Veterans Act of 1881, in Wood Co., Texas. Died 1/1/1901 buried in Sand Springs Cem., Wood Co., Texas.

Turman, William H. H. ^ 1841.

Turner, Frank ^ 1833. Died 5/27/1862 at Macon, Miss. <

 

Vannay, J. W. ~

 

Wagner, Lisby ~

Waldrip, A. J. ^ 1834. Enlisted 9/25/1861, promoted Cpl. 5/1863. Wounded 9/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga., absent 4/5/1864 due to wound. Died from wound, 4/1864.[70]

Ward, J. W. ^ 1837. Died at Jacksonport, Ark., 4/27/1862. <

Warren, Thomas J. ^

Wheeler, George W. ^

Wheeler, Henry ^ 1833. Died 3/30/1862 at Little Rock, Ark.. <

White, A. E. ^ 1838. Died 6/20/1862 at Enterprise, Miss. Buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss. <

White, D. M. ^ 1838. Discharged 3/20/1863.

White, J. B. ^

White, S. C. ~

Williams, J. P. ^

Williams, William F. ^

Wright, J. J. T. ^ 2nd Lt. 1836. Wounded severely at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/1863. Applied under the Confederate Veterans Act of 1881, in Wood Co., Texas.

Wright, T. H. ^

 

Yarbrough, G. G. ^

Yarbrough, J. F. ~

Yarbrough, James W. ^

Yarbrough, William M. ^ 1833. Died 4/19/1862 at Little Rock, Ark. <

 

Yoder, D. A. ^

 

Negro Lewis

 

* According to the 9/16/1861 muster roll teamsters cannot be paid.

 

Co. B

“Wood County Rebels”

 

^ Denotes original enlistee as taken from the Muster Roll of 8/5/1861.

# Denotes original enlistee as taken from the Muster Roll of 9/16/1861.

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

 

Adams, A. L. #

Alred, L. P. M. ^

Angell, John W. # 1830.

Attaway, E. L. ~

Attaway, David #

Austin, James M. ^ # Pvt./2nd Sgt. 1827 died 1865[71]. Discharged 6/15/1862 under Conscript Act. may have reenlisted and served until 1864 when discharged at Tupelo Miss. suffering from Typhoid. Enlisted in 22nd Texas Cav. he served in La. and at the close of the war died at Mansfield, La.[72]

Ayers, William H. # 1843. At Texas General Hospital, Auburn, Al., 4/30.1864. K. I. A. Spanish Fort 4/8/1865. Buried in Magnolia Cem., Mobile, Al.

Ayers, R. S. ^

Azbell, J. V. #

Azbell, H. M. #

 

Baird, Alex ^

Bates, Daniel ~

Bates, William ^ # 1839. Died 3/29/1862. <

Baxter, J. F(H). ^

Bayles, Charles ~

Belcher, J. W. ~ Wounded 8/30/1862 at Richmond, Ky., died 6/12/1862. Buried in Clark Co., Miss. <

Bell, David ~

Bell, G. W. Jr. ^

Bell, James A. #

Bently, John H. .^ # 4th Cpl.

Benton, F. M. .^ # 3rd Sgt.

Benton, Jacob ^ # 1835.

Benton, John L. #

Berry, Darius A. ~ 2/13/1840 died 4/5/1895. Buried in Old Ft. Houston Cem., Palestine, Texas.[73]

Berry, William ^

Blaylock, John J. ^ #

Boyles, Charles ^ #

Brewer, T. J. # 1833.

Brown, J. P. # 1839.

Brown, J. S. # 1840.

Brown, John. W. ^ # 4th Sgt.

Brumley, W. B. ^

Burnett, William C. ~.

Burton, Jacob ~

Butler, J. F. # Died 6/1/1862. <

Byrum, Cyrus J. ~ 1835. Died 5/22/1862. <

Byrum, S. T. ^ #

 

Campbell, Tim ~ .

Cannon, Joseph W. # 1st Lt.

Clark, W. G. ^ # <

Clayton, John ^ #.

Coats, J. A. ~

Coats, W. H. # 1840.

Collier, C. R. # 1836.

Connally, James Polk # 1844. Discharged due to Conscript Act, 6/14/1862. Died 9/27/1881 , buried in Sulphur Springs City Cem. Tx.

Conger, T. E. ^ # 2nd Cpl.

Cook, J. # 1844. Discharged due to Conscript Act, 8/4/1862. E. G, Littlejohn heard he died? Letter #8.

Cooper, B. T. ^

Cowan, James W. ^ 1st Lt.

Crumpler, D. A. # 1839. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Winnsboro, Texas.

 

Davis, B. P. ~

Davis, Isaac A. # 1842. Died 5/16/1862. <

Davis, J. M. #

Davis, John D. ^ #

Dill, J. C. ^

Duncan, James ~

Duncan, John R. ~ ^

Duncan, Silas # ~Farrier 7/2/1820. Died Loudon, Tenn., 8/3/1862. buried in New Providence Cem., Loudon Co., Tenn.[74]

 

Etheridge, M. #

Evans, B. G. ^ #

 

Fields, A. J. ~

Fields, W. C. ~

Forbis, O. S.^ #

Forbis, W. J. ^

Fowler, W. M. #.

Freeman, M. H. ^

Freeze, H. B. ~ Died 3/12/1862. <

 

Garret, B. F.^

Garrett, A. H. ^ #

Garrett, John D. ^

Goley, R. L. ~

Grant, A. J. # Died 4/9/1862.<

Greer, Daniel ~

Greer, James ^ # 1810. Died 4/30/1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.<

Greer, John J. #

Greer, Samuel ^ # <

Gunter, J. J. ~

Gunter, W. W. ~

Guy, J. W. ~.

 

Halderman, E. # 1840. Died 3/20/1862.<

Hall, J. R. ^

Hamilton, A. F. ~ 1841-5/21/1932. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. His Great Grandson, Chuck Carlock, wrote the book “History of The Tenth Texas Cavalry (Dismounted) Regiment 1861-1865” from which this info was taken.

Hamilton, W. F. #

Hanson, John M. #

Hanson, T. S. ~

Hanson, William F. ~ Wounded 9/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga., promoted Lt. 12/16/1863. Sick at hospital, Auburn, Al., 9/10/1864. In Hospital at Meridian, Miss. 4/1865 for Rheumatism where he surrendered. [75]

Harrell, D. A. ^

Harris, David ^ # Ensign

Harris, W. J. #

Harris, W. T. ^ # 1835. Died 11/14/1861 at Corsicana, Texas. [76] <

Harry, John T. ~

Hart, W. H. #

Hay, George C. ~ Cpl./Sgt.

Hay, Levi H. #

Hill, C. C. ~

Horton, C. L. ^

Howard, Isaac N. ^

Howard, Jesse # 1830.

Hoyle, L. A. ^

Huggins, John W. #

 

Ingram, J. J. ~

 

Jarrod, James ^

Johnson, J. M. #

Johnson, J. W. ~

Johnson, T. L. ^

Jones, W. J. ^ #

Jones, Willis G. ^

 

Kinchelow, E. B. ^ #

King, Franklin A. # 1840. Wounded 9/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga. POW at Nashville, Tenn., died 12/28/1864 at U S Army hospital, Chattanooga, Tenn.

King, J. W. #

 

Landers, W. B. #

Leverett, T. J. ^ Dr.

Lindley, Robert A. # 1842. Discharged 1/26/1864 for wound. Marietta Hospital, 7/9/1864 for wound in back. Applied under the Confederate Veterans Act of 1881, in Wood Co., Texas.

Lyles, B. D. #

Lyles, J. M. ^ #

Lyles, Washington ~

 

Mansell, S. K. #

McCord, W. M. ^

McFarland, James C. ^

McFarland, H. #

McLaren, F. R. # 1840. Died 4/30/1863, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.

McLaren G. W. ~ Died 2/25/1863 of smallpox, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.

McMillan, P. R. ^

Millsaps, C. J. #

Minnick, J. W. ^ #

Moore, James E. ~ Died 3/21/1862.<

Moore, Thomas. J. ~ 1838. Wounded 8/30/1862 at Richmond, Ky., discharged. Applied under the Confederate Veterans Act of 1881, in Wood Co., Texas.

Moore, F. J. #

Moore, E. P. # Appointed Quartermaster Sgt. by Col. Locke on 10/3/1861.

Morgan, M. D. ^

Moseley, J. H. ~

 

Oliver, J. D. ~ Died 5/30/1862.<

 

Palmer, J. R. # 1838. Died 6/13/1862, buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss.<

Payne, J. T. ~

Payne, W. E. #

Phillips, Lemuel ^

Pond, W. L. ^

Price, Gary D. ^ # 1838. Applied under the Confederate Veterans Act of 1881. in Wood Co., Texas, “Wounds”.

Price, James ~

Price, Thomas P. ^ # 1835. Died 5/10/1862.<

Puckett, Nat ^

 

Rambo, John H. ^

Redding, H. R. ~

Redding, John B. ~

Reeves, J. J. ~

Reinhardt, M. A. ^ # 7/2/1842. POW, Memphis, Tenn.. Sent to Alton, Ill. Prison, 9/1/1863. Died 9/23/1914 and is buried in Little Hope Baptist Church Cem. Wood Co. Tx.

Reinhardt, R. S. ^ # 1st Cpl. 1840. Died 6/7/1862. <

Richards, J. W. #

Rogers, F. M. #

Rounceville, J. R. ^

Rozell, G. W. ^ # Bugler

Rozell, James M. ^ # 3rd Lt.

Rozell, J. W. ^ # 1843.

Rozell, Peter ^

Rozell, P. M. ^

 

Setzler, John ^ # Died 4/3/1862.<

Setzler, L. T. ^ # 1839. Died 5/4/1862.<

Setzler, W. H. ^ #

Shamburger, W. ^ #

Simpson, Christopher Columbus # Bugler

Smith, J. P. #

Smith, Newton #

Starr, William # 1839. Died 3/28/1862.<

Stephens, J. S. #

Stout, Henry ^# 2nd Lt. Dropped, 5/25/1862.

Strickland, W. L.^

Swain, M. R. ~

 

Taylor, T. N. #

Thompson, B. F. Jr. ^ #

Tippett, William ^

Tritall, John C.#

 

Usselton, R. W. #

 

Vaden, Oliver ^

Vickery, Daniel ^ # 1833. Died 3/25/1862.<

Vickery, James S. ^ # 1835. Died 6/19/1862.<

Vickery, A. H. ^ #

 

Waters, J. M. ^

Watts, W. G. ~

Weathers, W. M.^ #

Webster, A. S. #

Weed, J. J. ~

Wheeler, W. H. ^

White, W. H. ^

Willingham, B. T. ~

Willingham, R. T. ^ # 3rd Cpl.

Willingham, G. ^ # 1837. Died 3/16/1862 at Benton, Ark. <

Wilson, C. C. #

Wilson, John W. ^# Capt. 1828. Dropped 5/25/1862.

Wilson, James M. ^ #

Wood, J. J. ^ # Died 5/10/1862.<

Wright, J. C. ~ Died 3/8/1862.<

 

Yandell, Samuel # 1828. Died 3/3/1862. <

 

Ziegler, Jacob ^ # 1825. 1st Sgt. Wounded 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. , promoted Capt/ 9/19/1863. Commanded the Tenth at its surrender at Meridian, Miss, May 9, 1865[77]. Applied under the Confederate Veterans Act of 1881, in Wood Co., Texas.

 

 

 

 

Co. C

Upshur County

#denotes muster rolls of 9/25/1861 and 10/7/1861.

^ denotes muster roll sometime after 10/20/1861.

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

 

Alford, Erasmus Lodwick ^ # 1842. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Received Pension # 3245. Moved into the Confederate Men’s Home on 1/29/1901. Died 2/20/1901 and is buried in the Texas State Cem., Confederate Field, Section 2, Row Q, Number 36, Austin, Texas.

Allison, J. N. #

Allison, Thomas Jefferson, Sr. ^ # 1823. Died 4/30/1862 of typhoid fever. Family resided at Gladewater.[78]<

Andrews, John B. ^ # 1839. Wounded severely in thigh at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/1862. Died 3/11/1911 in Oklahoma. Widow received Texas Pension # 21221.

Armstrong, William P. ^ # 1840. POW, 10/17/1862. Died in Texas General Hospital, Quitman, Miss. 8/28/1863 of Pneumonia. Buried in Texas Confederate Cemetery in Clarke County, Miss.

 

Barnes, A. #

Barton, James B. ^ # 1839. Died 5/14/1862.<

Beasley, S. W. # Blacksmith

Black, Henry L. ^ # 1829. Died 5/5/1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.<

Brooks, J. H. ~

Brown, James H. ^ #

Brown, Thomas ~

Bryson, John A. ^ #

Bumpass, James ^ #

 

Careman, C. B. ~

Castleberry, James H. # 1839. Died 3/4/1862. <

Chisom, G. #

Christian, G. ~

Clingman, F. H. ^ #

Coffman, Caswell N. ^ #

Coffman, John H. ^ # 3rd Sgt. Died 5/31/1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.<

Cox, A. H. ~

Craver, David ^ #

Craver, Lucius C. ~ 1841 Died 2/19/1863 at Shelbyville, Tenn.[79].

Craver, W. H. ~

Croam, C. L. ~

Crossley, Pleasant Green ~ According to his Pension Application and Service Records, he enlisted in Co "C" 10th Texas Cavalry on 1 Dec 1861 as a pvt. at Coffeeville, Upshur County, Texas and was discharged in the Spring of 1865. Buried at Eastland County Texas b: 6-5-1842 d: 8-19-1908.[80]

 

Davie, S. M. ^ #

Davis, B. B. ~

Davis, W. H. ~

Dean, J. F. ~

Dearmore, G. W. ~

Dearmore, Thomas B. ^ # Ensign/Pvt. Died 5/20/1862.<

Dudley, James ~

Dudley, John ^ # .

Duncan, Thomas A. ^ # 1st Cpl. 1834. Died Upshur Co., Tx., 1/14/1862. <

 

Earp, James S. ^ # 2nd Sgt.

Edwards, J. #

Evans, W. B. ^ #

 

Faso, John ^ # Original Muster Roll shows him Dishonorably Discharged on 10/19/1861.

Ferguson, A. R. ^ # 1834. Died 5/30/1862.<

Ferguson, James A. ^ #.<

Fincher, W. B. ~ Died 7/3/1862.<

Fincher, W. S. ~.

Fisher, G. A. ~ POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Attended 1905 veterans picnic in Longview, Tx [81]

Flint, Abijah B. ^ # 1838. Appointed Regimental Assistant Surgeon of the 10th, present 4/5/1864. Surgeon of Ector’s Brigade and later on of French’s Division. Survived the war, buried at Clarksville, Tx.[82]

Fox, John ~

 

Garrett, John W. ^ #

Garrett, Leonard H. ^ # Original Muster Roll of 9/16/1861 shows him Honorably Discharged.

George, C. A. ~ Died.<

George, J. W. ~

German, W. C. ~

Gillum, John C. ^ # 1842. <

Gillum, William H. ^ #

Gingles, C. M. ~. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Ripley, Texas.

Gorman, William C. ^ # <

Gregory, Jonathan #

Griffin, John Bunn ^ # 1st Sgt. 1839. Severely wounded 10/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn.,[83]

foot amputated 3/9/1863.

Grifton, James <

 

Hagens, William Beauregard Jr. ^ # 2nd Lt. 11/26/1822. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Died 6/13/1891, buried in Covington Cemetery, Falls Co., Tx.

Hamilton, Archibald ^ #

Harmon, Thomas H. ^ #

Harrison, James H. Jr. ^ # 1842. Wounded at Atlanta, Ga. 1864. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865.[84]

Harrison, James H. Sr. ^ # Died 6/28/1862.<

Hathaway, Pleasant ^ #

Hicks, John W. #

Hilliard, John B. ^ #

Holbert, Claie D. ^ # 1st Lt. 1825.

Holbert, L. E. ~ .

Holmes, William Henry ^ # Lt. Enl 10/31/1861 Taos, Tx b 1841 Tx; d 1917 Wood Co. Tx.[85] Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Lindale, Texas.
Holyfield, C. H.~

Hoss, M. V. <

Hunnicutt, E. B. ~ Died 5/10/1862.<

Howard, Calvin ^ # 4th Cpl. Died 6/1/1862.<

 

Jones, Samuel ^ # Bugler <

 

Kaufman, John H. ~ 3rd Sgt.

King, E. M. D. ~

 

Lee, George #

Lee, Isham M. ^ # Died 12/1/1861.<

Lee, James J. #

Lee, Robert T. ^ # .

Leroy, Gilbert ^ #

Little, James D. ^ #

Lowery, James L. ^ #

Lunsford, John H. ~

 

Maddox, L. H. ~ Died 5/13/1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.<

Marshall, J. H. #

Massey, W. H. # Apr 3, 1813 Mar 4, 1867 Lafayette Cemetery , Upshur Co., Texas.

 

McCutcheon, A. D.~ 2nd Lt.

McCutcheon, James ^ #

McGee, J. H. 1843. ~

McGee, James T. ^ # 2nd Cpl./Color Guard Sgt. 1839. Wounded at Richmond, Ky., 8/1862. Killed 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. while trying to reach the fallen flag.[86] His obituary appears in the 4/18/1863 edition of the “Texas Republican”.

McGee, W. G. ^ # 2nd Lt./Capt.

McGough, J. T. ~

McGrill, William B. ~ Died 8/17/1862, buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss.

McKinney, David ~

Miller, William Y. ^ # 1837. Original Muster Roll shows him Honorably Discharged on 10/18/1861.

Mings, J. ~

Mings, David Wesley ~ Died of Measles 4/17/1863.[87]

Mings John Travis ~ Died of measles 4/27/1863.[88]

Mobley, Alexander H. ^ # 3rd Cpl.

Montgomery, James N. ^ #

Montgomery, R. J. ^ # <

Moore, Dudley ~

Morgan, Daniel M. C. ^ #

Moseley, Alfred M. ^ # <

Moseley, Elijah R. ^ #

 

Neal, D. L. ~

Neal, John D. ^ # 1843. Killed 9/20/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga. His heroics are told in the “STANDARD” [CLARKSVILLE, TX], November 7, 1863, p. 2, c. 1

 

O’Brian, Dennis B. ^ #

Orton, William ^ #

 

Pace, Sion ^ #

Patrick, Charles ^ # <

Patrick, James H. ^ #

Philips, E. S. ~

Philips, John Floyd, ~ Died 5/15/1862.[89]<

Pierce, Silas M. ^ # 1838.

Poer, Robert B. ^ # 1843.

Pritchard, J. M. ~ <

 

Ray, John W. ^ # Buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Pritchett, Upshur Co., Texas .

Ray, William F. ^ #

Ridley, Robert H. ^ #

Ross, M. V. ~

Rucker, James H. ^ # Capt.

 

Schooler, J. W. ~

Shepperd, James R. ^ # 1833. Discharged 8/26/1863 at Morton, Miss., due to “ enlarged spleen, general pneumonia “ Buried in Locust Grove Cem., Upshur Co., Tx.[90]

Shepperd, William Washington ^ # 10/24/1839 – 2/4/1920. Seriously wounded in arm 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. Sent to Hospital at Quitman Miss. then sent home. Buried in Locust Grove Cem., Upshur Co., Tx. [91]

Shields, J. H. ~

Simpson, George W. ^ # <

Smart, W. W. ~ <

Smith, D. A.

Spratt, John J. ^ # 1838. POW at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/19/1863. [92] Camp Douglas Prison, Illinois. (Picture)

Spratt, J. J. Jr. #

Stiles, A. Benton ~ 1841.

Stubbs, J. A. ~

Summerow, M. E. ~

Summerow, M. P. ^ #

 

Talley, W. J. ~ Died 3/25/1862. Texas

Tanton Nathan M. ^ <

Team, Steve ^ #

Thomas, George ^ # 1834. Died 5/3/1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.<

Thompson, H. P. ~

Turner, John R. ^ #

Turner, Marcus D. ^ #

Turner, Willis Benjamin ^ #

 

Walters, Phillip T. ^ #

Walters, Robert F. ^ #

Watkins, James R. #

Weir, Cullen C. ^ 4th Sgt.

Whittington, Jasper Newton ^ # Present 10/1863. Widows Pension #24423. Died 5/2/1913 and is Buried in Bradfield Chapel Cem., Morris Co., Tx.[93]

Wilkes, John #

Williams, W. J. ~

Williamson, Nathan H. ~ Wounded in the knee 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn., died from wound 2/7/1863 in hospital at Knoxville, Tenn,.[94]

Williford, M. R. ~

Wilson, H. P. ^ # <

Wilson, William E. ^ #

Wright, Henry E. ^ #

Wright, John B. ^ #

 

Co D

Upshur County

# Denotes original enlistee as taken from the Muster Roll of 9/16/1861.

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

 

Alston, J. ~

Andrews, Johnson #

 

Bailey, S. P. ~ Pvt./2nd Lt.

Bass, J. H. #

Bass, J. T. #

Bazemore, James L. # 1838. Present 4/5/1864. Paroled at Millican, Brazos Co., Tx., 7/3/1865.[95]

Bazemore, Lemuel C. Present 4/5/1864. [96]

Beam, D. W. #

Beavers, M. W. # <

Brown, William #

Burns, S. # 1839.

 

Calvert, John Napoleon # 2/4/1843 died 8/27/1937 at Pittsburgh, Camp Co., Tx.[97]

Calvert, William C. # 1843. Died at Camp Douglas Prison, Chicago, Il. Nov. 27, 1864.

Cherry, Isham P. ~ Regimental Commissary Sgt., 5/8/1862

Cherry, Joshua P. #

Cherry, N. J. #

Clinton, William R. #

Coffey, J. H. # 1840. Exchanged POW at Vicksburg, Miss., 11/15/1862, died 5/8/1863.[98]

Coker, Joseph # <

Cope, A. H. #

Cope, William Henry Harrison b. Sep 6, 1840 d. Dec 17, 1921 Buried in Willow Oak Cem., Upshur Co., Texas.

Cornelius, J. M. ~ POW 3/23/1864. Died 1/12/1865 of “variola,” in Prison, Rock Island, Illinois, Jan. 10, 1865.

Coslet, A. #

Cox, Sidney R. # 1840.

 

Dailey, Nathaniel # 3rd Cpl.

Daniels, J. P. # 2nd Sgt. <

Davis, G. W. #

Davis, H. # Farrier

Davis, John J. #<

Davis, John M. # 1/7/1835- 12/13/1891. Buried in Paron Cemetery, Wood County.

Davis, S. H. # Ensign Died 6/1862, buried in Confederate Cem., Okolona, Chickasaw Co., Miss.

Davis, Samuel H. Jr. #.

Davis, S. H. Sr.~ Ensign. Dropped from roll, 7/20/1862.

Davis, S. S. #

Dunwoody, H. #

 

 

Earp, Alexander Capt. # 8/10/1832. Resigned, 5/8/1862. Served as Upshur County Sheriff 9/12/1857 to 8/6/1860 and again 11/7/1882 to 11/4/1884. Died 3/5/1920 and is buried in Hopewell Cem., Upshur Co., Texas.

Earp, Cullen R. # 1st Lt. 1827. Elected Lt. Col. 5/8/1862. See Regimental Officers.

Earp, Henry # 12/17/1843-2/23/1904 Upshur, Co. TX[99]

Earp, J. C. # 5/18/1862.<

Earp, Russell M. #

Eaton, N ~.

Edwards, M. H. # <

Ellis, M. C. #

 

Farley, W. N. ~

 

Gage, Joshua # 1st Cpl.

George, A. J. #

George, B. F. #

George, J. H. # <

Gilliland, A. F. #

Gilliland, H. C. #

Gilliland, S. G. #

Gilliland, W. H. ~

Goss, Benjamin F. #

Goss, W. L. #

 

Harper, W. G. ~

Harrison, W. B. # Died 5/17/1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.

Hefner, L. G. # 3rd Lt. Wounded 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. Died from wound 2/15/1863.[100]

Hughes, J. H. #

Hurt, John M. # Died at 9 o'clock, Feb. 21st 1862, of Typhoid Pneumonia at the home of David Taylor, Rocky Comfort, Ark. Buried in volunteer portion of the Grave Yard, Rocky Comfort, Ark. [101]<

 

Jones ,George W. Y. # <

Jones, Samuel L. G. # Bugler

Jones, T. M. # 1839. <

Jones, William J. # <

Jones, William M. #

 

Lee, J. E. # <

Lilly, T. B. #

Lindley, Elijah # <

Long, John M. #

 

Manion, J. N. ~

Manley, M. D. ~

Matthews, J. D. K. ~ Died 2/21/1882, buried in Atoy Cem., Cherokee Co., Tx.

Matthews, J. L. #

Matthews, W. N. #

Matthews, W. B. # 4th Sgt.

May, John S. ~

McGee, William Y. # <

McKinney, C. A. #

McMurtey, W. C. #

McSpaddin, J. T. #

Merritt, Daniel Dunkley # 1842. Reported killed, 1862. Brother in Law to Capt. Alexander Earp.[102] <

Milner, J. A. #

Morris, H. ~ 4th Cpl.

Morris, William # 3rd Sgt

Murphy, H. D. ~

 

Newberry, J. H. ~

 

Porter, Hezekiah S. # Died 3/6/1862 of measles, buried at Clear Spring Church, Clark County, Arkansas.[103] <

 

Ringo, E. ~

Ringo, Robert ~

Ringo, Samuel ~

Robertson, J. T. ~

 

Saunders, J. R. #

Shelton, W. V. #

Shrum, Elisha, #

Sims, Andrew # Sgt. 1837. Flag bearer. Mortally wounded in battle 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. while heroically trying to capture the enemy flag. Report states that both men, while in front of their respective Regiments, fought each other for their flags before each were killed.[104] Died from wound 5/1/1863.

Sims, G. W. ~

Sims, J. B. ~

Sims, J. N. # 2nd Cpl.

Smith, H. L. #

Smith, Richard William # 2nd Lt./Capt. 9/20/1837. Wounded severely in face 9/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga.. Paroled at Marshall, Tx., 7/3/1865. Died 6/20/1909. [105]
Smith, G. T. W. #

Smith, W. M. #

Snider, William F. # Died 1/16/1925 and is buried in the Texas State Cem., Austin Texas, Confederate Field, Section 1, Row Q #30.

Speare, J. H. #

Stapler, John T. ~

Steelman, A. #

Steelman J. A. #

 

Talley, H. P. ~

Taylor, G. W. ~

Taylor, Thomas W. #

Thornton, B. D. ~ <

Tilman, S. S. ~ Wounded 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. Wounded 7/20/1864 at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., POW at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/1865. Lived in Mt. Vernon Tx. after the war. [106]

Trouell, Y. F. #

Tucker, J. M. #

Tuel, W. H. ~ 12/18/1836 – 9/27/1923 Buried in Old Gilmer Cem., Upshur Co., Texas.

Turner, C. C. #

Turner, G. W. ~ .

Turner, W. W. # 1st Sgt.

 

Walker, Robert M. #

Walker, W. J. #

Wallace, Charles E. ~

Walton, T. C. #

Warren, Eli H. #

Western, W. B.

Williams, David F. #

Williams, T. F. ~

Williams, Samuel T. #

Winn, T. H. #

 

 

 

 

Company E

Rusk County

“Bully Rocks”

 

^Denotes Original Muster Rolls of September 16 & 18, 1861.

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

> Death reported in the July 18, 1862 edition of the East Texas Times.

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

 

Arnold, Martin V.^

 

Barber, John ^

Barker, S. D. ~ Died 5/9/1862, Guntown, Miss. ><

Berry, George W. ~

Berry, James T. ~

Berry, Samuel W. ^ 1840 Killed 8/30/1862 at Richmond, Ky.[107]

Berry, Silas Joseph ~ 1839 POW 5/4/1865 at Citronelle, Al., paroled 5/9/1865, Meridian Miss. Died 1/18/1901 in Fannin Co., Tex. His Widow received Pension #21012 from 12/1/1912.

Brewer, Leven ~

Brewer, William T. “Thad” ^ 2/22/1836 2nd Lt. Died 12/09/1901, buried in Brewer/Price Cem., Rusk Co., Tex.

Buchanan, S. Edwin ~

Buckley, Timothy John ^

 

Cameron, James M. “Matt“ ^ 3rd Cpl.

Carr, W. L. ~

Cauley, John W. ~ 2nd Sgt.

Clay, James William ^

Craig, Paul Bunting ^ 1843. Severely wounded in lung at Atlanta, Aug. of 1864. Furloughed due to his wound in Jan. 1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Henderson, Texas. Witnessed Pensions for W. B. Turner, W. P. Davis, C. P. Padgett, G. W., Mrs. S. M. Hale(1909) and Mrs. W. A. Prior. Texas Pension #20703. Died 6/20/1917, buried in Craig Cem., Rusk Co., Tex.

Culp, Henry ~ 1840. Died 5/2/1862 at Pine Bluff, Ark. Reported dead in the 7/18/1862 edition of the East Texas Times.<

Culp, William ~

Cunningham, James E. H. ^

Curbo, Thomas Benton ^ 4/11/1842 Absent on furlough July-Aug., 1863. AWOL Sept.-Oct. 1864. Died 6/6/1907, buried in Moyers Cem., Rusk Co., Tex. Tombstone picture.

Curbo, Thomas J. 1/14/1838. Died 4/1/1823 buried in Oak Grove Cem., Hill Co., Texas.[108]

Curvin, Thomas A.^

 

Davis, John Wesley ~ 7/26/1843. Wounded seriously in the right thigh 9/18/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga., he was captured and later sent back thru the lines. POW 5/4/1865 at Citronelle, Al. [109]

Davis, William P. ~ 3/7/1836 Discharged 6/27/1862, furnished substitute at Priceville, Miss. Later reenlisted and served in McCords Regiment. Witnessed the Pension Application of Alexander Moores, W. B. Turner, Mrs. J. H. Deason, Mrs. S. J. Berry and S. J. Berry. Received Pension # 17150 approved 8/1909. Died 1916, buried in Black Jack Cem., Rusk Co., Tex.

Deason, H. C.^ Died 1862 of Measles. >

Deason, James Henry ^ 1840 AWOL 8/31/1862 west of Mississippi River. Last muster roll dated October, 1863 shows him absent, sick. Died 11/12/1874, buried in McCarter Cem., Rusk Co., Tex. His widow received Pension #16384, approved 8/31/1909. Family history states he may have been hung by Yankee Troops in retaliation for the killing of some Yankee soldiers after the war.

Deason, J. R. ~ 1842 ><

Deason, John C. ^ 1st Cpl.

Deason, Robert C. ^ 3rd Sgt. 1/8/1840. Died 5/31/1862 at Macon, Miss. of Pneumonia.<

Deason, Walter M. ~ 2/7/1838. Died Lauderdale Station Miss. 7/10/1863.

 

Eachers, John A. ~

Easley, William ^ 1846. Survived the war and lived in Dallas, Tex. before his death.

Eaton, Joel ^ 1843 Wounded slightly 9/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga. AWOL as 2nd Cpl since 11/7/1863. Apparently captured, died at Camp Morton Prison, Indianapolis, Ind. 2/27/1865.

Ector, Wiley Benjamin ^ 4/14/1827. Maj. Promoted to Brigade Staff.

 

Floyd, Thomas J. ~

 

Gatliff, Aaron ^

Gibson, Robert Russell ^

Gilley, James M. ^ 1843 Listed as a deserter on the original Muster Roll of October, 1861.

Grigsby, G. W. ~

 

Hadrick, John ~

Hanack, Louis ~

Hargraves, Edward ^

Hardin, F. P. ^ 1824 1st Lt.

Harvey, William H. ^

Hudman, Alvin H. H. ~ Died 3/20/1910 at Pecos, Reeves Co., Tx.

Hudman, Thomas F. ~ 1840. Died at Searcy, Ark of measles on 4/8/1862. ><

Hudson, Jesse Francis ^ 1849 Died of measles 3/14/1862 at Little Rock Ark.[110] Reported dead in the July 18, 1862 edition of the East Texas <

Hudson, Rufus ~ Died of measles 4/6/1862 at Little Rock, Ark.[111] > <

 

Ingle, John ^ 2nd Cpl.

 

Johnson, C. M. ~

Jones, Paul C.^ 2nd Lt.

 

Kelly, Anderson ~

Kelley, John ~

Kelly, J. M. ~

Kennedy, J. H. ~

 

Langston, Nathan ^

Ledbetter, Jefferson R. ^ “Rusk County Rebels” lists him in Co I 18th Texas Inf.?

Lewis, Sterling ~1839. Died of consumption. Reported dead in the 7/18/1862 edition of the East Texas Times. <

Lloyd, Thomas Brown ^ 7/12/1836. Promoted to 2nd Lt. 8/22/1863. Wounded in left leg 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. POW 7/19/1864. Released 6/12/1865. Died 11/15/1889 buried in Lloyd Cem., Rusk Co., Tx. [112]

Lloyd, William Emory

 

Matthews William J.^ 1833. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/1863, died 10/20/1863 in hospital at Cassville, Ga.

Mayberry, George W. ^ 1840. Died 3/30/1862 at Camp Van Dorn, Oil Trough, Ark. congestion of the brain. ><

Mayo, Anderson S. ^ Ensign.

McAnally, William ~

McAnulty, William N. ^ 1842 Sgt., survived the war and was a merchant in Henderson.

McCarter, Joseph B. ^ 1833. Died at Camp Douglas Prison, Chicago, Il., Feb. 6, 1863.

McCauley, James H. ~

McCauley, John H. ~ 2nd Sgt. 1842 Present 4/5/1864. 1870 Census Rusk Co., pg. 337B.

McCauley, Robert H. ^

McCauley, Robert James ^

Melton, David T. ^

Melton, James F.^

Melton, John T. ~

Melton, William Madison ^ 1/16/1839, 4th Sgt. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. in knee 9/1863. Sent to hospital at Meridian Miss.. Furloughed. Paroled May 22, 1865 at Mobile Alabama. Died 2/17/1904. Widows Pension #16345.

Moores, Alexander ~ Present 4/5/1864. 5/16/1844 died 1/13/1898, buried in Tennessee Cem., Rusk Co., Tx., Widows Pension Application # 19233.

Moores, William A. ^ 1st Lt. 9/19/1824 Not re-elected as officer at reorganization on 5/8/1862. Became paid substitute for W. D. Davis. From 10/1863 to at least 9/1864 he spent time in various hospitals. Died 12/16/1867, buried in Tennessee Cem., Rusk Co., Tx.

Murff, Jeremiah M.^

 

Nelson, John W. C. ^ 1838 – 1909, buried in Cedar Hill Cem., Cherokee Co., Tx.

Nelson, John McCampbell ^ 1826. AWOL in Ky. Transferred to Co. D, 14th Tx. Cav. Survived the war.[113] Listed as buried in Gary Hill Cem., Rusk Co., Tx. in an unmarked grave.

Nelson, Taylor ~ Died at Jacksonport, Ark. from measles on 3/31/1862 . ><

Nevills, Paul J. ^ 1845 Left sick at Barboursville, Ky. Indications are he was discharged as underage on 8/29/1862. “Rusk County Rebels” shows him as in Co B 3rd Texas Cav. Minister.

 

Oliver, Elijah H. ^ 1845 Discharged 6/24/1862 due to burnt hand. Reenlisted 1/21/1863 at Henderson, Tx. Wounded 9/18/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga. Furloughed 2/16/1864 for wound. Died 1867, buried in Old City Cem., Henderson.

 

Philips, Caleb ^ Sgt. 1841. Present 4/5/1864. Surrendered 5/26/1865 at New Orleans, La. Received Pension # 11620 on 3/20/1906. Died 8/10/1921 at Henderson, Rusk Co., Tex. Buried in Crow Cem., Rusk Co., Texas.

Parish, Stephen Gilbert ^ 1843. Died at Oil Trough, Ark. ><

Pinkston, Henry J.^ 1842. Died 8/1862 at Atlanta, Ga.

Prior, George Wilson*# 5/16/1839. POW at Vicksburg, Miss.. on 7/4/1863. Held at Camp Morton and from 3/22/1864 at Fort Delaware where he was released 6/9/1865. Witnessed Texas Pension for P. B. Craig, 1912 and Widows Pension for Mrs. T. B. Curbo 1909. Approved for Pension # 16371 on 8/31/1909. Died 6/16/1917 at Henderson, Rusk Co., Tex.

Prior, William “Bill”* 4/16/1839. Wounded 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. in right thigh. POW Citronelle, Al. 5/4/1865. Died 6/16/1917, buried in the Strong Cem., Rusk Co., Tx. Tombstone picture.

Prior, Wilson Asa 1837. Enlisted 12/5/1861, discharged 12/31/1862 at Loudon, Tennessee. Enlisted again 6/2/1863 and was captured at the Mississippi River while on his way home on furlough. Paroled 5/9/1865 at Meridian, Mississippi. Died 9/10/1909, buried in the Strong Cem., Rusk Co., Tex. Tombstone picture. Widows Pension to Melissa A. Prior # 19222 from 6/1/1910.

 

 

Quaide, William Riley ~

 

Ransom, Henry B. ^ 1824. Originally Regimental Sgt. Major/ 1st Lt., later Regimental Adjutant. POW 6/3/1862 at Boonesville, Tenn. Sent to Prison at Johnson’s Island. Ohio. .

Redwine, Hulum D. E. “Ras” ^ 1837. Capt., promoted to Major on regimental Staff on 6/12/62. Formed Co. E in Rusk Co., severely wounded in the left foot at Atlanta, Ga. Same shell wounded Charlie Birdwell in the left foot. Helped form the H. & O. Railroad after the war. Died 9/7/1879, buried in Old City Cem, Henderson, Rusk Co., Texas. Tombstone picture.

Redwine, Rufus Fenna ^ 1835 POW 8/31/1862. Died from wounds 12/11/ 1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn. Older brother to H. D. E. Redwine.

Riddle, Thomas ^

Roundtree, Jacob H. ^ 1838. Died at Jacksonport, Ark., measles. ><

Rushing, Ben F. ~ 1842. POW at Spanish Fort, Al. 4/8/1865.

Rushing, Thomas Marion ~ 1839. Enlisted 3/1862, discharged on 6/24/1862, dislocated shoulder. [114]

Ryan, R. J. ~ Died at Enterprise, Miss.. of measles on 5/8/1862. Buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss. ><

 

Sentell, John B. “Pet” ^ 7/7/1835. Witnessed pensions of W. M. Melton , Alexander Moores, G. W. Prior, Mrs. J. H. Deason, W. P. Davis & J. R. Russell. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Henderson, Texas. Pension #20299. Died 3/16/1912 in Rusk Co.

Skelton, James W. 1830. Present 4/5/1864. Died 2/6/1865 and is buried in Old City Cem., Henderson.[115]

Smith, A. R. ~ Cpl.

Smith, Isaiah K. ^

Spence, Ira John ^ 1835 Wounded slightly at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/1863. Present 4/5/1864. Died 12/14/1922 and is buried in the Texas State Cem., Austin Texas, Confederate Field, Section 1, Row X #20.

Stone, Robert Lewis ~ 9/23/1842. AWOL since 2/15/1864. Died 11/7/1907, buried in Wright Cem., Rusk Co., Tx.

Stone, William James ^ Buried in Wright Cem., Rusk Co., Texas.

Stovall, Sims Kelley 1835. Resigned as Regimental Chaplin, 7/8/1862, “dyspepsia, chronic diarrhea.” Filed for Pension #05715 on 2/9/1900. Buried in Cedar Hill Cem., Cherokee Co., Texas.[116]

Stroud, A. D. ~ Witnessed Widow of W. M. Melton's Pension Application and the applications for J. R. Russell, C. P. Padgett in 1909 and Caleb Phillips. Signs as a Medical Doctor for Caleb Phillips after the war?

Summers, William T. ^ 1817 – 1892. Buried in Cedar Hill Cem., Cherokee Co., Tx.

 

Taylor, J. D. ~ Capt.

Terry, James E. ^ Married E. J. Nelson 6/29/1865.

Travis, W. W. ~ ><

Tucker, William ^

Turner, Wade B. ~ 3/30/1832. Sgt. Wounded 9/19/1863 at Chickamauga, GA., right leg amputated. Received Pension # 16406, approved 8/31/1909. Died 1/23/1925 near Pine Hill, Rusk Co., Tex. Buried in Shiloh Cem., Rusk Co., Texas.

 

Vansickle, Elias S. ^ 1st Sgt.

 

Wagoner, Angus ^ ><

Wagoner, Daniel ^ musician. ><

Wagoner, Doct. ~ .

Wagoner, John ^

Welch, Cisery N. B. ~ 1843. Died 3/26/1862 of measles at Jacksonport, Ark. Brother to W. H. H. Welch. ><

Welch, William Henry Harrison ^ 1841, Sgt. Killed in battle sometime after April 5, 1864 ( last muster roll ).[117]

Wimberly, Ezekiel A.^

Wright, Silas J. ~

 

York, Jesse ^ 1833. Died 4/2/1862 at Camp Dorn, Oil Trough, Ark. ><

York, William M. ^

Young, W. Frank ~ 2nd Lt./ Capt. Enlisted 11/2//1862. Wounded slightly at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/1863. Present 4/5/1864. Promoted to Capt. 11/24/1864. POW at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Longview, Texas and the 1905 veterans picnic in Longview, Tx.[118] Witnessed Pension application for T. J. Rosson in 1912 and E. H. Hopson in 1914. Received Pension # 37439 from 6/1/1921 at Gregg Co., Tx.. Died 6/20/1925 in Longview, Gregg Co., Tx.

 

 

 

Company F

Panola County

 

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

* Listed in Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

 

Appling, Christopher Columbus ~ * Died 6/22/1862 at Macon, Miss.[119]<

Armstrong, G. H. ~

Armstrong, R. B. ~ * 1826. Discharged 6/12/1862. Married the widow of J. W. Bird.[120]

Atkinson, J. F. ~ *

 

Banks, Eli ~ * 1842. Sgt. Wounded in the ankle near Atlanta, Ga. summer of 1864. 9/23/1864. Henry Watson thinks he may be dead as no word having been heard.[121]

Barbee, C. L. ~ 1841. Died 6/2/1862 at Guntown, Lee Co., Miss.<

Bark, E. L. 1831. ~

Bell, Joe H. ~* 2nd Cpl./1st Sgt. 1832. Reported missing in battle 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn.[122]

Benton, J. M. ~

Bigger, C. T. ~ *

Bird, J. W. ~ *1833. Detached as Waggoner. Died during the war, his widow married R. B. Armstrong.[123]

Ocmulgee Hospital, Macon, Ga. 9/16/1864, wound. POW Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865.

Booty, Augustus James ~ * 2nd Lt./Capt. 4/9/1844. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/19/1863. Furloughed home from Ga. late summer 1864.[124] POW in Tensas Parish, La., 9/27/1864. Served as District Judge of Panola and Harrison Counties.[125] Died 8/17/1882 and is buried in the Booty Cem., Natchitoches La.[126]

Booty, John L. Jr. ~*

Bowlin, James ~

Brantley, J. S. ~

Burt, A. L. ~ * Sick in hospital in Arkansas, early 1862 but rejoined the 10th at Jacksonport, Ark. [127]

 

Campbell, D. ~

Cariker, George W. ~ *

Cauley, A. D. ~ 1837. Killed in battle 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn.[128]

Cauley, Winslow W. Killed near Atlanta, Ga. summer of 1864.[129]

Cherry, Henry ~

Clark, W. G. ~ 1839. Died at Macon, Miss., 6/2/1862. <

Coats, J. Augustus ~ *1839. POW Citronelle, Al. 5/4/1865. Mentioned. [130]

Cogswell, W. V. ~ POW at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/19/1863. Died at Camp Douglas Prison, Chicago, Il. 12/ 13/1863. Buried in grave #899, Chicago City Cemetery.

Craig, William D. L. F. ~ * 1817, Capt. and later Col. Elected Major on Regimental Staff at reorganization, 5/8/1862. Wounded 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn., and again 6/18/1864 near Atlanta, Ga. Given furlough to heal,[131] Died 1/8/1904 at Handley, Texas. Mentioned in Letter by J. A. Templeton.[132]

 

Daniels, William H. ~ * 1840. Killed near Atlanta, Ga. summer of 1864.[133]

 

Ferguson, W. ~ 1829. Died in General Hospital, Macon, Miss. 5/20/1862. <

Fite, Abraham Monroe ~ * Enlisted 1/1/1862 at Carthage, Panola Co., Texas. Present on Muster Roll 4/5/1864. Wounded in the elbow near Atlanta, Ga. summer of 1864. Shown as absent 9/1/64. 9/23/64 Henry Watson mentions him again in a letter, the wound is still “very bad.”[134] Died 11/23/1904 in Panola Co., Texas. Widow received Pension #38438 from 9/1/1922.

Fite, Monroe ~* Enlisted 1/1/1862 at Carthage, Panola Co., Texas. Wounded in leg.[135]

Fite, Newton O. ~ *1838. 12/8/1863 at home and not expected back. Could not cross Mississippi River to return to his unit. Furloughed to Texas for 45 days per G. O.. #14 on 10/13/1863. In Provost Guard at Shreveport, La. Has witness’s to verify claims he served in Walkers Texas Division west of the Mississippi before he was discharged at Marshall, Texas in spring of 1865. Witness to Pension application for S. L .Fite in 1899, H. C. Hooker, L. R. Metcalf and Mrs. Nettie Williamson in 1909, Mrs. J. H. L. Hull in 1910. Received Pension #20707 from 6/1/1912. Died 11/7/1917 and is buried in Fite Cem., Panola Co., Texas.

Fite, Smith L. ~ * 7/27/1839. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/20/1863 in leg. At Blackie Hospital, Madison, Ga. Received land certificate for 1280 ac. Received Texas Pension #03254 in Panola Co., Texas from 10/13/1899. Died 7/14/1925 in Panola Co., Texas.

Fleming, G. F. ~ * 1838. Enlisted in 1862.

Forsythe, James P. ~ * Cpl. 1841. Sick in hospital in Arkansas for 16 days early 1862. Wounded in battle 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn.[136] POW at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/1865. Witness to the Pension application of S. L .Fite in 1899, J. J. Langley in 1901, J. H. Ritter in 1906, H. C. Hooker, L. R. Metcalf and Mrs. Nettie Williamson in 1909, Mrs. J. H. L. Hull in 1910, N. O. Fite in 1911, Mrs. N. M. Yates in 1914 and Mrs. M. B. (A. M. Fite) Chadwick in 1922.

Freeland, D. P. ~*

Freeland, James H. ~1834. Died at Little Rock, Ark., 4/9/1862.<

Freeland, P. G. ~*

Freeland, W. J. ~ 1835. Died 5/9/1862 at Memphis, Tenn., buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn. A member of Truitt's Masonic Lodge #149. The 111 year old minutes of the lodge dedicated a page to his death in the Confederate Army in or near Memphis, Tennessee in 1862.[137]<

 

Garner, T. W. ~ 2nd Lt.

Gary, Leroy ~ 1837. Enlisted 12/1/1861 at Coffeeville, Tx. Died of measles at Little Rock, Ark. 3/15/1862. [138] <

Gray, James N. ~* 3rd Sgt. 1838. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga., transferred to 3rd Texas Cav. On 11/10/1863.

Greenwood, B. H.~

Griffin, Alfred ~ *

Grisham, William W. ~* 2nd Lt.

 

Hardin, T. H. ~ Killed in battle 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn.[139]

Hardy, John F. ~ * Bugler

Harris, John C. ~ 1824. Died at Little Rock, Ark. 4/20/1862.<

Harrison, J. H. ~

Harrison, J. N. ~

Henry, R. D. ~ * <

Herrin, William ~*

Herron, J. L. ~ * 1st Lt.

Herron, L. F.(G) ~

Hill, W. H. ~ 1842. Admitted to Way Hospital, Meridian, Miss.. 2/4/1865. Furloughed 2/1865. Survived the war, buried in Detroit #1 Cem. Co. Tx.

Hilliard, Alexander C. ~* 1st Sgt. 1838. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865.[140]

Hilliard, Claiborne Jr. ~ * 04/26/1836. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. 01/06/1891, Hilliard Family Cemetery Shelby County. Comments: Eldest of Three brothers who went to war together. He enlisted age 25.[141]

Hilliard, Silvaman T. “Tex“~*12/17/1839. Enlisted 9/16/61 in Wood Co., Texas. Killed in battle 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn.[142]

Hinton, G. W. ~*

Hodges, C. M. ~

Hodges, Thomas ~ * 4/17/1864 at Lee Hospital, Lauderdale Springs, Miss. Wounded in the head near Atlanta, Ga. summer of 1864. 9/23/1864, Henry Watson thinks he may be dead as no word having been heard.[143]

Hood, S. M. ~ * 1834. Sick with measles in Arkansas early 1862. [144] POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865.

Hooker, Henry C. ~ * 12/8/1837. Enlisted 9/16/1861 at Porters Bluff, Panola Co., Texas. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Received Pension # 17247 from 8/31/1909 in Panola Co., Texas. Witness to the pension of Mrs. N. M. Yates 10/26/1921. Died 1/7/1928 in Panola Co., Texas.

Hooker, James ~*

Hull, James Henry Lauriston ~ * 4th Sgt. 5/5/1843. Enlisted 10/31/1861. Surrendered at New Orleans, La. 5/26/1865. Paroled June 1865.[145] Died 9/13/1906, buried in City Cem., Carthage, Panola Co., Tx. Widows Pension #19190. Wrote many letters home during the war.

 

 

Hull, Thomas Philip

 

Hull, Thomas Phillip ~* 1st Lt. 1923. Dropped, probably at reorganization on 5/8/1862. Later served as Capt., 4th Brigade, Texas State Troops. Witness to Pension application of S. L .Fite in 1899, J. J. Langley in 1901 and J. H. Ritter in 1906. Died 9/23/1911 at Beeville, Tx. Buried in City Cem., Carthage, Panola Co., Tx. [146] (Picture) [147]

 

Jackson, Silas C. ~* 1828. Discharged, 6/20/1862. It appears he later reenlisted in Co. A. 28th Regiment Texas Cavalry Dismounted from 1863-1865, died 03/04/1894. His widow Nancy received Texas Pension # 03640 from 10/10/1899 at Shelbyville, Shelby Co., Texas.[148] .

 

Kersey, John ~ Died 4/17/1862.<

King, C. William ~* 1828. Died 4/5/1862 of measles at Jacksonport, Ark in early 1862. [149]<

 

Langley, George W. ~ * POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. [150]

Langley, J. J. ~ *Cpl. 1840. Wounded slightly in the hip near Atlanta, Ga. summer of 1864. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Received Texas Pension #08169 from 3/30/1901 at Beckville, Panola Co., Texas.

Lewis, William H. ~ Died 7/1/1862, buried at Aberdeen Cem., Aberdeen, Miss.<

Lout, James ~ Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/1862. 4/5/1864, AWOL in Texas but reporting in by Surgeons Certificate as long as communication possible across Mississippi River.

 

Malar, J. W. ~

Maynor, John F. ~ Died 1/11/1862 at Enterprise, Miss., buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss.

McCann, Hugh ~ * Died at Priceville, Miss.., 6/27/1862.<

McCaskill, C. E. ~ *

McCaskill, J. J. ~ Died at Corinth, Miss., 5/15/1862.<

McClanahan, W. * “Bill” ~ Transferred from the 3rd Texas Cavalry at reorganization at Corinth. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/1863., POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Lived at Sabine Pass, Tex. After the war.[151]

Melton, Henry P. ~ *1st Cpl./ Sgt. Wounded in battle 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Died 11/18/1882 aged 43. Family lore says he never fully recovered from his wounds. Buried in Old North Cem., Nacogdoches Texas. [152]

Metcalf, I. N. ~*

Metcalf, Leander R. “Dock” ~ *11/1840. Enlisted 10/31/1861 at Taos, Texas. Wounded at Allatoona, Ga. on 10/5/1864. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Received Texas Pension #16247 from 8/31/1909 at Beckville, Panola Co., Texas.

Moore, Jacob ~

Morgan, A. J. ~ *

Murphy, J. M. ~ POW at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/1863. Died at Camp Douglas Prison, Chicago, Il. 12/4/1864.

 

Pierce, Alfred ~

Plemmons, G. F. ~

Poag, J. Samuel ~ *

Pounds, D. T. ~ *

Prince, J. R. <

Pugh, B. D. ~ Died 5/20/1862.<

 

Ramsey, C. F. ~*

Reed, J. M. ~

Risinger, Giliard David Lafayette ~* 1833. Detailed as Provost Guard, 1/1864. Received Texas Pension # 9333 from Shelby Co., Tx. from 10/22/1902.[153]

Ritter, James Henry ~*1843. Enlisted 9/1861 in Panola Co., Texas. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Received Pension # 11600 from 3/20/1906 in Panola Co., Texas.[154]

Ross, John Barnard ~ 10/16/1838. Enlisted 02/01/1862 Clarksville, Texas. Severely wounded at Corinth, Mississippi 05/29/1862, Discharged at Loudon, Tenn. Died 09/03/1905, buried in Fairview Cemetery, Shelby County. Spouse Laura H. m. 06/14/1875 Travis County Texas.[155]

 

Rowe, Bernard Hubbard. ~ from Panola (son of San Jacinto Battle participant James Rowe), F Company, was mortally wounded at the Battle of Richmond, probably on the 30th.  He died on September 5, according to his service record.

 

Rowe, James F. ~* Died at Macon, Miss., 5/30/1862

 

Rye, B. L. ~

 

Scott, John J. ~ * 1838. Wounded at Atlanta, Ga., died 9/24/1864 in Foard Hospital, Forsyth, Ga.

Scott, Thomas Jefferson, ~ 01/12/1842. Discharged, 6/11/1862. Died 04/12/1910 Joaquin, Sholar Cemetery, Shelby County. Spouse Elizabeth Simms, m. 1865 Abbeville, Alabama. Pension #09332. Parents: John and Nancy Perkins Scott. Comments: County 1845.[156]

Scott, William ~*

Scruggs, S. L. ~*

Shaw, W. P. ~ *

Shepherd, J. L. ~*

Shivers, Jabel S. ~

Shivers, W. L. ~

Sims, Thomas J. ~*

Smith, G. Walt ~ *

Smith, W. H. ~ * Capt. Absent since 2/12/1863. Married Martha E. Johnston.[157]

Sparkman, Thomas J. ~ *1841. Sick with and then recovered from small pox. Reported by Henry Watson to be discharged due to wound (accidental) in hand.[158]

Stone, James Childs ~* 1827. Discharged due to Conscription Act 2/28/1862.[159]

Stone, John Nichols ~ * 1831. At Texas Hospital, Auburn, Al., 12/31/63 to 6/30/1864. Died.[160]

Sweeden, L. ~

 

Taylor, W. H. ~ 1838. Died at Corinth, Miss., 5/17/1862.<

Thomas, W. M. ~

Thompson, E. F. ~

Thompson, J. C.* ~

Tims, John ~

 

Walker, Jeptha Faye Jr. ~* 10/4/1835. Detailed as regimental hospital steward, 12/30/1863. Present, 4/5/1864. POW 5/4/1865, Citronelle, Al. Died 1/2/1900, buried in Mansfield Cem., Mansfield, DeSoto Parish, La. Tombstone shows him as “Dr.”[161] Moved to Mansfield, La. after the war and was a Druggist, Planter, and successful businessman until his death. [162]

Walker, N. H. ~ 1837. Died 5/3/1862 at Guntown, Lee Co., Miss. <

Walker, Sidney J. ~* Orderly Sgt./2nd Lt 1838. Reported missing in battle 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. Later listed as POW. [163] Paroled at Meridian, Miss.. 5/9/1865.

Wall, Conrad H. ~ *1840. Early 1862 in Little Rock, Arkansas come down with measles. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/1863, died 11/30/1863.

Wall, Jack ~ * 9/23/1864 Henry Watson states how Jack is in better Health than ever.

Ward, T. W. ~

Watson, Henry ~ * Sgt. 1839. Sick in Hospital with measles in Arkansas for 16 days early 1862. Sick in Hospital again for 25 days summer of 1864. Wrote many letters home. Did not return after the war, presumed dead, date unknown. [164]

Watts, William H. ~ 1842. Died Center point, Ark., 3/8/1862.<

Westmoreland, William ~ Died 6/5/1862, Macon, Miss.<

Wethington, G. H. ~

Whiddon, W. H. (Seth)? ~

Whiddon, William Anson ~ 8/29/1845 – 9/26/1919. Discharged 6/11/1862 for being underage, later rejoined Co. D, 34th Texas, Cav. Married Melissa Jane Dorman, 03/28/1868 Shelby County.[165] Texas Pension #19785. Buried in Joaquin Cem., Shelby Co., Tx.[166]

Williamson, James Newberry ~ * Cpl. 1839. Hospitalized 5/14/1863 and again in Feb., 1864 for wounds. Shown as POW at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/1865. Died 11/27/1889, buried in Old Williamson Cem., Panola Co., Tx. in unmarked grave.[167] Widow received Texas Pension #16220 from 8/31/1909 at Clayton, Panola Co., Texas.

Wills, John J. ~ Absent 9/1/1864 to 3/1/1865, presumed captured. Buried in Sand Flat - Antioch Cem, Smith Co., Tex.

Womack, James ~* 1837. Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn., 12/31/1862. Paroled June 1865.[168]

 

Yarbrough, James L. ~

Yarbrough, G. W. ~

Yarbrough, J. H. ~

Yates, Sanford S. ~ 1837. Enlisted 9/16/1861 at Camp Flournoy. Wounded in the arm on 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn.[169] Sent to Hospital at Dalton, Ga. Received a furlough and went home to Texas to recover. Reported by Surgeons Certificate as long as there was communication east of the river. Died 7/13/1914 in Tarrant Co., Texas. Widow received Texas Pension # 37791 from 12/1/1921.

 

 

 

Co G

Rusk County

“Texas Troopers”

 

* Denotes names from Co. G as remembered by J. M. Spinks and P. B. Barber.

# Denotes original Sept. 16, 1861 muster from Texas State Archives

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

> Death reported in the July 18, 1862 edition of the East Texas Times.

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

 

Ames, Alfred A. *#

Anderson, James E. “Jim”*

Anderson, James “Bob”*#

Angell, James R. “Jim” *#

Arnold, George Whitfield “Whit”~ 1842 Cpl. . Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/1862. Wounded again at New Hope Church, Ga. he later died 7/10/1864 at Flewellen Hospital, Cassville Ga.[170]

 

Barber, P. B. “Thad“*# 1843. POW at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/1865. Died at Kilgore, Tex. [171] Attended 1905 Veterans Picnic in Longview, Tx.[172] Witness to Widows Pension Application for C. A. Stiles. Witness to Pension Applications for S. D. Hutchings in 1913, J. M. Spinks in 1909, G. P. Birdwell in 1913, Mrs. S. A. Littlejohn and Mrs. James Whitfield in 1923.

Barham, Stephen Hamlett “Tobe” 10/2/1842 ~ Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn., 12/31/1862, placed in Invalid Corps. Received Texas Pension #27399. Died 6/30/1911, buried in Mt. Enterprise Tx., Old Town Cemetery, Row 70.

Barthold, Edward # 7/23/1835 – 1/20/1922, buried in Old City Cem., Henderson, Rusk Co., Texas.[173]

Barton, James Madison “Matt” * # Capt., later Lt. Col. on Regimental Staff. Formed Co. G in Rusk, Co., 10/14/1819 – 9/17/1879. Buried in Old City Cem, Henderson, Rusk Co., Tx. James resigned his commission before the end of the war due to ill heath. [174](Tombstone Picture)

Becton, Joseph S. “Joe” *# 1842. 4th Cpl./ Orderly Sgt. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/1863, killed at Spanish Fort, Al. 4/1865.[175]

Bell, Lycurgus “Kerge*# 1843, died 6/7/1862 at Little Rock, Ark.

Birdwell, Benjamin Franklin *# 1842. Original Muster Roll of 9/16/1861 shows him as the Regimental Standard (Flag) Bearer. Wounded at Richmond, Kentucky 8/30/ 1862. Wounded at Atlanta, Ga., 8/1864 furloughed home from near Atlanta.[176] Later officer in Mt. Enterprise chapter of U. C. V. Died 12/18/ 1894, Mt. Enterprise, Rusk Co., Tx.

Birdwell, Charles Allen*# 1839 4th Sgt. Wounded at Chickamauga 9/19/1863 and again at Atlanta, Ga. summer 1864 by the same shell which wounded Col. Redwine. One of 3 brothers.

Birdwell, George Preston*# 1838. Promoted to regimental Chaplin as a Baptist, 8/7/1863. Present, 4/5/1864. Surrendered in North Carolina in 1865. Texas Pension #22848 from Cherokee Co., Tx. from 12/1/1913.

Bobbett, S. H.# 1838. Wagoner, no later record.[177]

Bothall, Edward* .

Britt, Andrew M.*#

Brownlow, R. S. ~

Butler, William*# 1840. Sgt. Captured 9/19/1863 at Chickamauga Ga. Sent to Camp Douglas Prison in Chicago he was released May 18, 1865. Died 1928 at age 96. [178]

 

Carter, Andrew A.*# 1841, POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/65. Alex? - 13 April 1840 - 24 Sept. 1902 Buried in Harmony Hill Cem. Rusk Co.

Chamness, Stephen M. # 04/20/1842 Wagoner, AWOL in Rusk Co. His pension application states he was disabled permanently by measles. Received Texas Pension #20291. Died 09/15/1922, buried in Timpson Woodlawn Cemetery, Shelby County.

Collum, John*

 

Davis, B. Griff *# 4/30/1833. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/65. Witnessed Texas Pensions for R. M. Furlow (1909), Mrs. S. M. Hale(1909) and S. H. Barham (1914). Died 5/30/1925, buried in King Cem., Rusk Co., Tx. Received Pension # 25265 from

Day, Lawrence*# 7/21/1845. discharged. Died 3/11/1910, buried in Overton Cem., Sect. B, Rusk Co., Tx.

Dickson, David L.*#

Dixon, Robert ~

Dunegan (Dougan)#, Andrew J.*

Durkee, Adolphus Gustavus *# 3/833 Capt./ Regimental Quartermaster on 5/8/1862. Died 1900, buried in Greenwood Cem., Marshall, Harrison Co., Tex.

 

Echors, (Eachors), John A. #

Echors, G. A. ~

 

Furlow, Charles B.*# 1837, wounded severely at Murfreesboro, Tenn.., 12/31/62. Discharged in late 1864, he returned home along with his two surviving brothers after the war. Died in 1869 and is buried at Mt. Enterprise, Rusk Co., Texas.[179]

Furlow, James T.* Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn., 5/4/62, POW and later died 3/20/63 in a US Army hospital.[180]

Furlow, John P*# 1839 3rd Cpl. Detached as nurse at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 1/2/1863. POW at Murfreesboro, died at US Army Hospital #4 Murfreesboro, 2/2/1863. [181]

Furlow, R. M. “Bob“ * 1834. Came home with furlough winter of 1864 and was unable to cross Mississippi River to rejoin his unit. Texas Pension #16388. Witness for Pension for Wade B. Turner. Buried in Mt. Enterprise, Rusk Co., Texas.

Furlow , Timothy Augustus “Gus” * 2/18/1814. Enlisted 4/5/1862 at Jacksonport, Ark. Present 4/5/1864. Wounded by a mini-ball next to his heart at Altoona Pass, Ga. on 10/5/1864 which he carried the rest of his life. [182]Paroled 5/15/1865 at Montgomery, Al. Died 4/1/1919, buried in Stroud's Creek Cem., Hood Co., Tx. [183] Widow received Pension # 45517 from 3/1/1929.

 

Garner, William* Captured at Nashville, Tenn., 2/26/1865.[184]

Garrett, Mansfield # 1832, died 2/1/65.

Gatlin, James Henry* Cpl. 12/14/1843. POW Murfreesboro, Tenn.., 12/31/1862. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/19/63, paroled at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/65. Died 2/18/1907 buried in Gatlin Cem., Rusk Co., Tx. Texas Pension #16396.

Gibson, Q. K. “Cos”*# Capt. in Co. K.

Gladney, James M. “Jim”* Died 5/25/1862, ><

Gladney, Thomas S. “Tom”.*

Goforth, Reuben*# 9/4/1841 Ensign. Wounded in the leg at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/19 or 20/1863. POW at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/1865. Died 1/25/1882, buried in Mt. Moriah Cem., Gregg Co., Texas. (Picture)

 

Haines, Alfred ~

Hale, Howell Pope*# Sgt. 1839 . Detached 8/7/1863. Wounded at Atlanta, Ga. in 1864 and sent home. Discharged 1/23/1865. Died 2/28/1886 in Rusk Co., Texas. (Picture). [185] Widow received Pension #16381 from 8/31/1909 in Rusk Co., Texas.

Hale, J. C. “Bud”* .

Harnage, George H. “Cudy”*# 1839, died 6/12/1862, buried at Canton, Miss.<

Heath, John N.# 1839, died 4/6/62 at Little Rock, Ark.<

Henry, D. N. Listed on Louisiana POW rolls; Paroled at Shreveport June 12, 1865.[186]

Herrin, Elijah Byrd “Lige” 1835? Paroled 5/9/1865 at Meridian, Miss.[187]

Hicks, John M.*# died 3/24/62 at Little Rock, Ark.<

Hicks, John Reece*#

Holland, J. V. ~

Hollingsworth, W. H. ~ Wounded at Spanish Fort, Al. April, 65, POW at City Hospital, Mobile, Al..[188]

Holloway, Bill*

Holt, John Thomas ”Clay”*# 1844, present on the 4/5/64 muster roll. Surrendered at New Orleans, 5/26/1865. Died 1879.[189]

Hopson, Briggs W.*#

Hopson, Ed H.* 1846. Enlisted 8/19/1864 and was a POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/65. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Pittsburg, Texas. Received Pension # 33278 from 9/1/1916 at Smith Co., Tx.

Hopson, James. Madison “Mat”* 3rd Cpl/Lt.

Hopson, William A. “Bill” *#

Hoyle, John A. # .

Hudson , Jim Taken prisoner in Kentucky.[190] Killed at the battle of Chickamauga, Ga.[191]

Hutchings, Stokeley D. * # 1830, wounded at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/62. Survived the war and lived in Rusk Co. in 1870 and then in Marlin, Tx.[192] Received Pension # 22932 from 12/1/1913 in Marlin, Falls Co., Texas..

 

Irwin, Robert B.*#

Irwin, Asa G.#

 

Jefferies, Nathaniel Benton # 2/5/1841, died Knoxville, Tenn. 11/3/62, illness.[193]

Johnson, Jasper T. ”Rance”*#

Johnson, John H.*# 1841, wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/62. Wounded again at Atlanta, Ga. summer 1864. Surrendered in the Trans-Mississippi Department in 1865.[194]

Johnson, Ransom B. # >< died between 9/61 and 7/62.[195]

Jordan, A. G. “Alex”*

 

Keele, Jacob *# Bugler. Died at Guntown, Lee Co., Miss. 5/25/1862.<>

Kennard, George T.*#

Kilgore, Constantine Buckley (Buck)*# 1st Sgt./Lt. 2/20/1835. Made Capt. and then Adjutant of the brigade. Wounded at Chickamauga, captured, and imprisoned at Fort Delaware from 1864 to March 1865[196] admitted to the bar and practiced in Rusk County, Tex.; elected justice of the peace in 1869; member of the State constitutional convention in 1875; elected to the State senate in 1884 for a term of four years; was chosen president of that body in 1885 for two years; resigned from the State senate in 1886, having been elected to Congress; elected as a Democrat to the Fiftieth and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1887-March 3, 1895); appointed by President Cleveland United States judge for the southern district of Indian Territory March 20, 1895, and served until his death in Ardmore, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), September 23, 1897; Buried in the White Rose Cemetery at Wills Point.[197] Listed in “ BIOGRAPHICAL DIRECTORY OF THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS“ and “TEXANS WHO WORE THE GRAY” by Sid S. Johnson, pg.

Kuykendall, George # 7/1840 died at Lauderdale Springs, Miss., 4/24/62. > <

 

Langston, Jordan L.*

Lay, Baylis W.* Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn., 12/31/62 and later killed at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/19/63.[198]

Leech, Levi Washington ~ 1838. At Ross Hospital, Mobile, Al., 3/29/1865 for wound. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Witness to Pension application of N. O. Fite in 1911.

Leach, Tom M.*

Leach, W. Henderson*# 3rd Lt.

Lee, John A.#

Linthacum, Thomas B.*#

Littlejohn, Elbridge G.* 1/3/1841. Wounded in right hip and the head at Murfreesboro, Tenn., sent to Hospital #5, Knoxville, Tenn. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/65. Witness to Pension of G. P. Birdwell on 7/2/1910. Smith Co. Commissioner 1872 - 1876. Died 12/12/1913 buried in Ebenezer Cem., Arp, Smith Co., Tex. Widow received Pension # 39257 from 9/24/1923 in Smith Co., Texas.

Lloyd, William W.#

Long, J. Tom.*

 

Martin, Andrew J.*# 1834, left behind sick in Ky.[199] 9/15/62. Died 12/9/62 in Prison, buried at Lexington, Ky.

Martin, Isaac* 1838, Jan. 1863, in Hospital #5, Knoxville, Tenn. from a knee injury not related to battle. Reported well 12/22/1863 at Brandon, Miss. [200] Captured 3/22/1865, POW at Tuscaloosa, Al., 5/22/65.

Martin, William Page*

Mayfield, W. M. ~

McCall, Lamar D.#

McCallum, Felix G. # Died at Lauderdale Springs, Miss. on 5/4/62.<

McClure, Tom L.*#

McDonald, G. W. ~

Miller, Mark M.*# Farrier.

Miller, William A.* 9/16/1837 – 5/22/1930 at Henderson.

 

Mitchell, Robert F. “Bob” *# 2nd Lt. 1823 Present 2/1862, dropped from roll. Later Co. B, 14th Texas Cavalry.[201]

Mitchell, Sam T.* Present 4/5/64, died of wounds at Atlanta, Ga.[202]

Monk, Columbus H. ”Lum”*

Monk, John R. ”Rank”*#

Moon, G. W. ~

Moore, George Washington*# 1838, wounded in head at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/63. POW at Spanish Fort, Ala., 4/8/65. Shown as POW at Citronelle, Ala. On 5/11/1865. Attended 1905 veterans picnic in Longview, Tx [203] Witness to the Pensions of J. M. Spinks in 1909 and T. J. Rosson in 1912. Received pension #15298 from 7/24/1909. Died 1914 and is buried in McGrill/Moore Cem., Longview, Texas.[204]

Moore, James Harvey*# 1834, wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/63. Died 1/24/63.

 

Page, Halley ~

Parker, Henry Robert Thomas *# 8/9/1838 Present on the 4/5/64 muster roll, wounded at Altoona, Ga., crippled.[205] Died 5/28/1887 buried in Shiloh Cem., Rusk Co., Tx.

Parker, William Wyatt Washington *# 1840, wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/63, died from wound 2/3/63 in hospital at Atlanta, Ga..

Patrick, Granville D.*#

Patrick, Robert, D.*# POW at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/65. Died Before 1887.[206]

Pertum, W. M.#

Phillips, E. H.*, Cpl. Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/63, POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/65. Buried in Union Presbyterian Church Cem., Franklin Parish, La.[207]

Phillips, Elijah “Liege” *# 1832, wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/63, wounded at Chickamauga, 9/63. Absent in Trans – Miss.. AWOL. Died 4/6/1890, buried in the Old Prospect Cem., Nacogdoches Co., Texas.[208]

Phillips, E. M.*

Prather, John T. ~ .

Prior, George Wilson*# See Co. E.

Prior, William “Bill”* See Co. E.

Prior, Wilson Asa # see Co. E.

Prothro, John T. 1844. *# Transferred to Co. C, 14th Texas Cav.

 

Reeves, J. E. # Original Muster Roll shows him transferred to Captains Todd’s unit? on Oct. 25, 1861.

Reeves, P. E. Original Muster Roll shows him transferred to Captains Todd’s unit? on Oct. 25, 1861. .

Renfro, John L.* Killed 8/30/62 at Richmond, Ky.[209]

Rettig, Charles*# 1843, wounded at Richmond Ky., 8/30/62, died 9/26/62.[210]

Richards, William F. “Bill” * 10/1829. Present 4/5/64. Enlisted April 1862, surrendered near Henderson in Rusk County. PENSION: #1834.[211]

Richardson, William H. # 1835. 1st Cpl.. Died 5/4/1862 in Kemper Co., Miss.. Grave is located just across state line in Alabama, also shown as buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss. [212]<

Robertson, Franklin “Frank” *

Robertson, Jefferson F. “Jeff” *#

Robertson, William A. “Bill”*

Robinson, James T. ~

Robinson, W. A. J. ~

Rosson, Thomas Jeff *# 1842. Enlisted 9/25/1861. Wounded in arm at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/63, wounded again 6/18/64 at Latimer Court House, Ga. Wounded 3rd time at Atlanta, Ga. by shell fragment, in hospital at Augusta, Ga. POW at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/65. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Longview, Texas and the 1905 veterans picnic in Longview, Tx.[213] Witness to Pension Application for G. P. Birdwell on 8/14/1913. Received Pension # 21407 from 6/1/1913 at Gregg Co., Tx. In the application his doctor states due to an old war wound in the upper calf of the right leg Mr. Rosson is “totally incapable to do manual labor.” Witness to the Pension applications of S. D. Hutchings in 1913, E. H. Hopson in 1914, Mrs. S. A. Littlejohn and Mrs. James Whitfield in 1923. Died Oct. 31, 1928 in Kilgore, Tx. and is buried in Danville Cem.

Russell, Crue C. *# 1837, transferred to Co. D, 14th Tx. Cav.

Russell, James Ross*# 1832, transferred to Co. D, 14th Tx. Cav. On 4/8/1863. Texas Pension #20352. Died after 3/1912.

 

Smith, Archie C.*#

Smith, William H. “Bill” * Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/63. Transferred to Co. B, 14th Texas Cav. [214]

Southerland, J. # 1840, died Macon, Miss. 6/1/62.><

Spine, John W. ~

Spinks, John Monroe “Roe”*# 1839. Enlisted 9/25/1861. Musician, captured at Ft. Blakely, Al. in April 1865. Listed as POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/65. He returned home on May 25, 1865. [215]“He was the guide that led Ector's brigade from the top of Kennesaw Mountain to the support of Gen. Cockrell in the charge where the Federal General McCook was killed, and he carried the last Confederate dispatch to Atlanta. He was with Gen. Forrest at Sugar Creek, where so many horses of the enemy were killed; was near Gen. Walthall when his horse was shot from under him, and saw the carnage of war from start to finish. A dashing cavalryman, he made a good name as a soldier and enjoys and honorable position in the walks of peace. He was captured at Blakely, Ala., in April 1865, and returned to home in Texas, May 25th of the same year. “ Taken from TEXANS WHO WORE THE GRAY by Sid S. Johnson, pg. 152. Witness to Widows Pension Application for C. A. Stiles in ?, S. D. Hutchings in 1913, W. F. Young in 1921, Mrs. S. A. Littlejohn and Mrs. James Whitfield in 1923.. Pension allowed from 3/1/1911. Died 9/7/1928 in Gregg Co., Tx.

Spinks, Samuel Preston “Sam” * 12/9/1830[216]. Wounded in thigh at Richmond Ky. 8/30/62, died 9/5/62. [217]

Starr, John W. ”Jack”*# 1843 died 6/11/1862 in Clarke Co., Miss. Buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss.<

Still, Charles Alexander ~ enlisted 5/1863 at Shreveport, La. [218]POW Citronelle, Miss.. 5/4/65. Paroled at Meridian Miss. on May 9, 1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Overton, Texas. Died 11/11/1912, buried in Overton Cem., Rusk Co., Texas. Widows Pension Application # 21612.

Still, John W*# 1843 died June 6, 1862, buried at Canton Miss. <

Still, Thomas Henry “Tom” * 1/8/1837 – 3/11/1907, buried in Overton Cem., Rusk Co., Texas. Promoted to Sgt. 12/15/1862. Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/62. Discharged 5/25/ 1863, substitute.[219]

Stone, M. F. # Died May 14, 1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.

Stone, Jonathan * # 1826, discharged 6/25/1862 at Tupelo, Miss.[220]

Stone, W. F. ~

Stroud, Alpheus Dickson “Alpha” M. D. *# 3/29/1839, detailed asst. surgeon. Witness to Texas Pension of S. M. Chamness in 1911. Died 11/6/1919 and is buried in Old City Cem., Henderson.

Stroud, Ethan A.*#

Stroud, M. L. ~ .

 

Templeton, John M. *

Thompson, B. Frank. ~

Thompson, John Martin*# 1st lt./Capt. b. 6/9/1829 d. 1907. Resigned in May, 1862, reputedly due to bad health.[221] Died 3/23/1907 Houston, Texas.[222]

Thompson, T. M. ~

Thornton, F. Marion *#

Trammell, Columbus M. “Lum”*

Trammell, George W. Jr. *# 1837 3rd Cpl. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/1864, present 4/5/1864. Witness to Texas Pension of S. M. Chamness in 1911.

Trammell, Thomas J.* .

Truitt, Frank D.*# 9/20/845 – 1/15/1908, buried in Pleasant Hill Cem.,

Tubbs, John S.* Wounded in right arm[223] at Richmond, Ky. 8/30/62, discharged

Turner, Sam W.*#

Tutt, Gabriel Hans *# 1829/31 Died Chammons Station, Miss., 5/10/62, ><

Tutt, Richard H. “Dick”*#

 

Wade, James H.*# 1840, missing at Chickamauga Ga., 9/20/63, present 4/5/64, POW at Atlanta, Ga. 9/2/64. later transferred to 1st Texas Artillery. Survived the war.[224]

Waites, James*#

Washerman, Page*

Wasson, William S. ~ 2nd Sgt.

Walling, J. R.

Watkins, Jesse A. 1845 – 1899, buried in Old City Cem., Henderson.[225]

Watkins, James H.*# Absent west of Miss. River.<

Watson, Alvan Benton*# 1838, died 8/30/62 at General Hospital, Okolona, Miss. Buried in Confederate Cem., Okolona, Chickasaw Co., Miss.

Watson, James Monroe # 8/8/1834. Severely wounded at Chickamauga Ga. 9/20/64, sent to Atlanta, Ga. to Hospital. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/65. Died July 17,1914, buried in Peatown Cem., Lakeport, Tex. His widow Mira received Pension #32640[226] (Picture) His letters home are published on the book “The Civil War Letters of James Monroe Watson/ edited by Judy Watson McClure, Nortex Press.”

Watson, William B. “Bill”*# 2nd Sgt.

Weaver, John J.*#

Welch, Alexander ~

Whitfield, James “Jim” *# 8/1839. Pvt./Cpl. Enlisted 9/25/1861. Wounded and captured at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 12/31/63, paroled from City Point, Va. from Camp Morton, Ind. on 4/12/1863. Present 4/5/1864. Wounded again at Atlanta, Ga., admitted to Ocmulgee Hospital, Macon, Ga. 7/11/64 for “ V. S. left hand, fractured metacarpal bone ring finger.” Furloughed. The witness’ on his wife's Pension application state he was at the surrender on 4/26/1865. Died 10/18/1921. His Widow received Pension # 39516 from 12/11/1923.

Whitfield, John R.*# 3rd Sgt.

Wilkins, Mortimore “Mort”*#

Wise, C. B. , ~

Wise, Charles W.*# Bugler.

Wilson, William Oscar*# 1839. Sick at Ringold, Ga., 12/1862. Sick July and Aug., 1863. In Hospital at Newton, Miss. Dec. 63.[227]

Wright, James A. #

Wright, John H. R. # 1835, died 7/1/62, buried in Aberdeen Cem., Aberdeen, Miss. <

Wyche, Drew # Absent on furlough. Married M. D. Alston 12/3/1866.[228]

Wynne, Richard Moore “Dick” *# 6/3/1844, enlisted 5/12/1862. 2nd Lt. 6/11/1863 1863. Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn., 12/31/62. Severely wounded again at Nashville, Tenn. 12/16/64, he became a prisoner and did not return home until December, 1865. From this wound his right arm was “dead“ and his right leg partially paralyzed. Officer of Camp Buck Kilgore U. C. V. 1894. Sheriff of Rusk Co. he was removed from office by the Yankee Government during reconstruction. Raising a crop on his farm he studied and passed the Texas Bar. 1880 he was a State Senator in Austin. In 1883 he moved to Ft. Worth, Tex. Died 7/15/1915 (8/25/1922?) and is buried in Greenwood Cem., Tarrant Co., Tx. [229] (Picture)

 

 

Co H

Van Zandt County

“Warriors”

@ Original muster rolls of 9/20/1861.

# Original muster rolls of 7/26/1861.

* Undated Muster Roll

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

 

Allen, William A. @#

Bates, Levi <

Bates, Daniel Sr. <

Beatty, J. K. <

Beatty, William W. @#4th Cpl.

Beetler, J. R. ~

Belvin, Alec W. @# 2nd

Benton, Peter S. @

Benton, Thomas H. @# 5/2/1844. Wounded 9/1863 at Chickamauga, Ga. Present 4/5/1864. Died 6/16/1884. Died 6/12/1881 and is buried in Cryer Creek Cemetery. Widow received pension #46381.[230]
Boykin, James F.
@
1840. Died 4/6/1862, Jacksonport, Ark.<

Boykin, Robert S. ~

 

Cameron, Jeremiah @#*

Cantrell, James R. @*

Center, W. J. ~ Died 6/5/1862, Enterprise, Miss. buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss. <

Christman, Jeptha G. @#*

Christman, J. M. @#*

Clariday, R. H. ~ Died 4/8/1862, Jacksonport, Ark.<

Clark, George W. @#*

Clark, Leman @#* Died, 5/13/1862, Guntown, Lee Co., Miss.<

Cochran, Clay ~

Coker, G. R. @1840. Died, 3/22/1862, Jacksonport, Ark.<

Collins, Alex ~ Died 6/9/1862, Tupelo, Miss.<

Collins, Carrol ~ Died 2/20/1862, Rockport, Ark.<

Cox, Joseph, A. @#*

Cox, James P. @#*

Crockett, Henry J. @#* 1st Sgt.

 

DeWitt, Charles B. ~ Died 5/26/1862, buried in Clarke Co., Miss.

Dickson, Anthony @#*

Dickson, A. P. @#* <

 

Edgar, James M. @

Edgar, Richard *

Ellidge, Sampson W. (M) @#* 1843. Died 6/20/1862 at Enterprise, Miss., buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss. <

Ellis, John A. @* 1834. Died 4/22/1862, Little Rock, Ark.<

 

Fannin, William W. @

Fanning, J. J. ~ Died 3/16/1863, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.

Farmer, Ewell O. @* 1835. POW at Jackson, Miss. Died at Camp Morton Prison, Indianapolis, Ind. 6/22/1864.

Farmer, Francis M. @#*1838. <

Farmer, Frederick @#*

Farmer, George M. @*

Fletcher, J. F. ~

Flowers, J. L. ~

Flowers, M. F. ~

 

Gibson, H. P. ~

Gibson, J. M. ~

Gibson, T. J. ~

Gilbreath, Alex J. #*

 

Hampton, L. P. @#* 1842. Wounded 12/31/1862, Murfreesboro, Tenn. Died 3/9/1863, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.

Hampton, Charles P. @#* 3rd Sgt./1st Sgt. 7/10/1844. POW at Citronelle, Al. 5/4/1865. Died 2/23/1924, buried in Graceland - Orange Grove Cem, Lake Charles, La.[231]

Hardee, Samuel Bryant @* 1839. POW, 10/30/1862, Richmond, Ky. Wounded 12/31/1862, Murfreesboro, Tenn. Died 2/13/1863, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn..

Harper, W. G. @

Hatton, H. M. @#*

Hatton, James Thomas ~ Cpl. 2/2/1841. Wounded, 9/19/1863, Chickamauga, Ga. POW, 5/4/1865, Citronelle, Al. [232]

Hays, Jasper N. @*

Hazelwood, R. H. @*

Henry, E. L. <

Henry, J. C. @#*1st Lt.

Henry, W. D. ~ Discharged.

 

Ingram, William @ 1840. Died, 5/8/1862, Guntown, Lee Co., Miss. <

Inman, Joseph A. #* Died 1/18/1863, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.

Inman, Leonard R. @#* Died 1/31/1863, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.

Irwin, John W. @#* Farrier

 

Jackson, W. M. @

James, Wilson P. @#*3rd Cpl.

 

Kuykendall, P. E. @*

Kuykendall, Peter S. @*

 

 

Lyles, Richard S.

Lyles, Richard S. @#* Pvt./ Capt. 1831. Wounded 9/19/1863, Chickamauga, Ga. Wounded, Allatoona, Ga. Killed in action on 3/ 31/1865 at Spanish Fort, Al, while drinking a cup of coffee. Eeceived the rank of Captain as a result of the death of Capt T. W. Summers. A friend from his unit returned his New Testament Bible to his wife in Rusk County after the war. On 5/4/2003 a marker was placed by the family at Linn Flat Cem., Nacogdoches Co., Texas, next to his wife, in honor of Capt. Lyles. [233]

 

Manning, John O. @#* 1841. Picked up the fallen flag at Murfreesboro, Tenn. after all the color guard ware killed or wounded. Died 2/14/1863, probably from wounds sustained at Murfreesboro, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.. Named to the Confederate roll of Honor for his actions at Murfreesboro.

Marrs, Andrew J. @* 1836. Died 3/16/1862, Jacksonport, Ark.<

Martin, W. A. @

McBride, D. M. ~

McEnturff, James T. @*

McMillan, W. A. @ 1835. Died 3/29/1862, Jacksonport, Ark.

Miller, G. P. @#

Morris, E. N. ~

Morris, John ~

Moseley, J. H. @#*

Moore, W. B. @#* 3rd Lt.

 

Nail, William W. @#* 1837. POW, Jackson, Miss. Died at Camp Morton Prison, Indianapolis, Ind. 2/4/1864.

Neal, James H. @#* 1842. Died 5/15/1862, Enterprise, Miss., buried in Texas Confederate Cem., Clarke Co., Miss.<

Neal, James F. @* 1843. Died 3/23/1863, Shelbyville, Tenn., buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn..

Neal, Joseph F. @#*

 

Odom, A. J. @

 

Padgett, C. P. ~ 8/29/1841. Enlisted 12/3/1861. Present, 4/5/1864. Survived the war, Witnessed the Pension Applications of Alexander Moores, Mrs. S. J. Berry and S. J. Berry. Received Pension # 16369 from 8/31/1909. Died 4/29/1920 and is buried in the Pinkston Cem., Rusk Co., Tx.

Padgett, James M. @#* 1832. Died, Tupelo, Miss.<

Pickle, Isaac @#* 1839. Died, 12/31/1862, Pittsburgh, Tx.<

Price, James W. @#* 2nd Sgt.

 

Robinette, James L. @* 1832. 2nd Lt. Died 3/2/1863, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.

Robinette, Michael M. @*

Rose, James ~

Rose, David @#* Bugler

Russell, David @#* 2nd Lt.

 

Smith, George ~ <

Smith, H. V. @#*

Smith, Levi @#* 1840. POW, 10/30/1862, Lexington, Ky. Died 11/25/1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.

Smith, Peyton @#*

Smith, Richard B. @*

Sosby, W. J. @#*

Stallcup, G. A. @

Stallcup, T. B. @ (Sgt.) 1842. Died 3/2/1863, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.

Summers, Thomas W. @#*1st Cpl. 1837. Died 9/25/1863, buried at Newman, Coweta Co., Ga.

 

Tucker, Zill @#* 1828. Died at Clarksville, Tx.<

 

Wages, John D. @*

Whetstone, Anderson @#* Capt.

Whetstone, J. S. J. ~ 1st Lt.

Williams, Leroy M. @

Williams, Marion @

Williams, W. G. ~ 1837. Died 2/22/1863, buried in Willow Mount Cem., Shelbyville, Tenn.

Wilson, F. M. ~

Wilson, Isaac N. @*

Wilson, William H. @#

Wilson, McKenzie J. @#* 4th Sgt.

Wise, John M. * Died, little Rock, Ark.<

Wise, Jack *

 

Yergan, John A. @#*

 

Note; 71names found on original musters not included due to lack of evidence they ever left the state or were otherwise discharged.

 

 

Co I

Cherokee County

“Cherokee Cavalry”

# Denotes original Muster Roll dated Sept. 16, 1861.

^ Denotes original Muster Roll dated Sept. 2, 1861.

@Denotes original Muster Roll dated Oct. 2, 1861.

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

 

 

Armstrong, Martin Wiley @ # 2nd Lt. on 7/281862. 12/16/1841. Captures U. S. flag and bearer, Allatoona, Ga. on 10/5/1864. Paroled 5/9/1865 at Meridian, Miss. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Alto, Texas. Died 8/30/1922, buried in Harrison-Armstrong Cem., Cherokee Co., Tx. His widow receives Pension #38717 from 1/13/1923.[234]

Astin, Hugh L. @ # ^ 1839. Wagoner, POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/3/1865.

Ball, Rufus ~ Died at Duvall’s Bluff.<

Ball, Taudy ~ Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/1863. Present 4/5/1864. Died 5/20/1899 in Cherokee Co., Tex.. His widow received Pension # 22745 from 12/1913.

Barrett, John G. @ # 1839. Died 5/10/1862.<

Benson, John H. ^ 9/1/1828 Enlisted 9/1861, discharged overage.[235]

Berry, Oscar M. @ # ^ 1842. Enlisted Sept. 25, 1861 at Quitman, Texas. Died 6/3/1862 in Miss.[236]<

Blakey, A. A. ~

Blanks, A. M. ^

Bowlin, William @ # 1840. Died at Jackson, Miss., 6/7/1862.<

Bradford, George @ # ^

Broome, Milton E. @ # ^

Burk, James P. ~ Died 3/27/1862.<

Burks, James L. @ # ^ 1829. Discharged on Surgeons Certificate. Witness to Pension application for Mrs. M. W. Farmer on 5/7/1906, his testimony states he “saw her husband frequently during the war“.

Burks , John H. @ # 1836. POW at Chickamauga, Ga. Late Sept., 1863. In prison hospital, 9/29/1863. Held at Zollicoffer barracks, Nashville Tenn.[237]

 

Calder, H. C. ^

Cannon, James Harrison @ # ^ 1840. Discharged on Surgeons Certificate for illness Nov., 1861. Re-enlisted in Co. B, 28th Texas Cavalry in April, 1862, later 1st Lt. Buried in Cedar Hill Cem. Pension # 24980 in Nov., 1913.

Carlton, Bedford @ # ^

Carlton, Carter B. @ # ^

Carlton, Orville ~

Cawthon, Benjamin F. @ # ^ 1833. Died in General Hospital, Macon, Miss.., 6/9/1862.<

Coleman, Edward H. @

Coleman, Edwin M. # ^

Coleman, James H. @ #4th Cpl. ^ 1827. Died 5/6/1862 at Holly Springs Miss. of Measles. His widow received Pension #00751 approved 8/23/1899.<[238]

Cornelison, Milton @

 

Dalby, John Ward @ # ^ 1838. Detailed to Provost Guard. Paroled at Macon Miss in May 1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Ponta, Texas. Pension # 28940 in 1914.

Dalby, Seth T. W. @ # ^

Davis, Benjamin W. @ # ^

Dear, Owen (A. L. ) ^

Dement, Thomas H. @ # ^

Dewitt, Charles B. @ # ^ 1842. Died 5/26/1862. Buried in Texas Confederate Cemetery in Clarke County, Miss. <

 

Egbert, Daniel @ #1st Sgt. ^ Orderly Sgt. (Probably same as 1st Sgt.)

Egbert, George T. @ # ^ 1844. POW at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/19/1863. Held at Zollicoffer barracks, Nashville Tenn. Survived the war.[239]

Evans, John D. @ # ^2nd Lt. Discharged on Surgeons Certificate.

 

Farmer, Memory W. @ # ^4th Sgt. 1824 . Detached in 9/1863. Died 9/1904 in Cherokee Co., Tex. His Widow received Pension #11844 approved 9/25/1906. Buried in Cedar Hill Cem.

Faulkner, Frank B. @ # ^ 1841. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865.

Francis, Joseph Mallory @ # 1843. Wounded severely at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/1863. Roll dated 10/31/1863 reported absent wounded. Roll dated 4/5/1864 reported absent on furlough, surgeons certificate. Married 5/15/1865, therefore logical to assume he never returned to duty. Witness to Pension application for the Widow of James H. Coleman on 9/7/1899. Died 5/6/1901. His Wife received Pension #31601 from 7/1/1915.

Frazier, James @ # ^ 1843. Died 5/11/1862. <

 

Gibson, George W. @ #3rd Sgt. ^1st Lt. 1832. Present 4/5/1864. The 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas lists him as dying at Rusk, Texas, since last meeting.

Givens, Hugh L. ^

Glass, Alphonzo @ #

Glover, William P. @ # ^

Goodson, James Polk ~ POW July, 1864 from near Chattahoochee, Ga., and was confined at Camp Morton Prison, Ind., until the close of the war.[240]

Goodson, John F. @ # ^ 1/2/1841. POW at Murfreesboro, Tenn., 12/31/1862, paroled 2/11/1863. Present 4/5/2864. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Jacksonville, Texas. Witness to Pension application for Mrs. J. M. Francis on 6/19/1915. Died 3/6/1921, buried in Jarrett Cem., in Cherokee Co., Tx.[241]

Graves, Thomas P. ^

 

Hall, J. F. M. ~ Capt.

Hardy, William R. ^

Harris, Evan S. ^

Heath, A. T. ^

Henderson, James ~

Hendricks, Edwin @ # ^ 1844. Died 6/2/1862.<

Henson, William C. @ # ^

Hill, George B. @ # ^

Hill, Pharaoh ^

Holcomb, Joel M. @ # ^ 1841. Died 4/30/1862.<

Holcomb, John L. @ # ^

Holcomb, Joseph W. # ^

Holcomb, Lewis G. @ #

Holcomb, Samuel A. @ # 1843. Died at Little Rock, Ark., 4/25/1862.<

Holcomb, Thomas Harrison 2/2/1837 – 10/17/1918, buried in Shiloh Cem ? Received Pension #15607.[242]

Holmes, James A. @ # ^

Holloway, Thomas B. @ #

Holloway, William ^

 

Jarrett, John W. @ # 1831. Died in Mississippi, 1862.<

Jones, Austin ^

Jones, David ^

Jones, John R. @ # 1837. Died 7/26/1864, buried at Forsyth, Ga.

Jones, Lewis Poe @ # 12/24/1840. Wagoner. Wounded at Allatoona, Ga., 10/5/1864, entered Hospital in Feb. 1865 from this wound. Claims he saw M. W. Armstrong capture an enemy flag at Allatoona. Claims he was discharged just prior to end of war as a result of his wound. Witnessed Pension for. J. W. Dalby on 9/8/1914 and Mrs. M. W. Armstrong on 12/30/1922 Died 5/7/1933, buried in Lowe's Chapel Cemetery, Rusk , Cherokee County Tex. Received Pension #23723, filed 7/30/1913.

Jones, Pinckney Rhodes ~ 11/21/1839 Wounded 3 times, last time severely at Allatoona, Ga. on 10/5/1864, this wound rendered him unfit for duty and he furloughed at Tupelo, Miss..[243] Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Ponta, Texas. Witnessed the Pension for Mrs. M. W. Armstrong #38717 on 12/30/1922. Died 2/18/1924 and is buried in City Cem., Jacksonville, Cherokee, Co., Tx. his obituary is in the 2/18/1924 Cherokee County Banner, Cherokee Co., Tx. Commander of Camp No. 1555 U.C.V. Filed 11/8/1915 for Pension #32219.

Jones, William C. ^

 

Keahey, Samuel @ # ^

Keahey, W. S. ^

 

Loyd, James B. @ # ^

Lodin, James @ # ^

Lodin, Jason S. # ^

Long, J. L. H. @ #

Loona, J. C. ^

Lowe, John W. @ # ^

Lunsford, Jesse H. @ #

 

Magness, Benjamin A. @#2nd Lt.

Malliard. Jeff J. ^

Mankins, William L. @ # ^

Mann, C. T. ~

Mansell, James R. @ # ^1st Cpl. 1839 Died either 4/28 or 5/1/1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.<

Mansker, Samuel ~ Disability, discharged? “pthis pulmonalis.”[244]

Martin, Robert B. #^@ Capt.

McEachern, Benton W. @ # ^

Mcfarley, James ^

McLeod, William @ # ^Died 4/25/1862.<

Meazell, William @ # ^

Monkers, James Henry @ # ^ 1842. POW at Murfreesboro, Tenn., 12/31/1862 and again at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Died 1925 at Tipton, Tillman Co., Ok.[245]

Monkers, Samuel @ # ^ 7/9/1844. Died 12/17/1913 in Tisimingo, Ok.

Moore, James W. @ # ^

Miller, Jesse A. @ # ^ 3rd Cpl. 1827. Discharged. Buried in Cedar Hill Cem., Cherokee Co., Tx.

Murray, John T. @ #1st Cpl. ^3rd Lt. 1829. Resigned 6/24/1862, “chronic dysentery, bronchial infection of lungs.”

 

Newman, P. L. ~

 

Odom, Asbury Calvin “Archy” @ # 1835. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Died 4/11/1885, buried in Atoy Cem., Cherokee Co., Tx.[246] Widow filed for Pension #31155 on 4/24/1915.

Odom, Cornelius George # 1/7/1836. Wounded and POW at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/19/1863 and held at Zollicoffer barracks, Nashville Tenn. Paroled 3/4/1865 at Camp Morton, Indiana. Exchanged at City Point, Va., 3/10-12/1865.[247] Received Pension #22325 from 12/1/1913. Witnessed pension application 5 for Mrs. Taudy Ball on 9/6/1913 and J. W. Dalby on 9/8/1914. Died 9/10/1914 and is buried in Salem Cem.

Odom, Neil @ ^ Survived the war and became a Baptist Minister.[248]

Oppenheimer, Daniel @ # ^ 1st Lt./Capt. 11/22/1836. Wounded and POW at Nashville, Tenn., 12/18/1864. 3/1/1865 he and other prisoners are sent to POW camp.[249] Discharged at Richmond Va. after the war as a Capt. After the war he and his brother Anton resumed as merchants, ranchers and bankers and were very successful finally moving their operations to San Antonio, Texas. Died in San +io, Tx. On 12/7/1915.[250]

 

Park, William S. @ #2nd Sgt.

Parks, John @ # 1844. Died 4/1/1862.<

Payne, Robert C. ~

Phillips, William @ # ^

Pristage, John W. @

 

Quinlen, John @ # 1816. Died 5/30/1862.<

 

Rains, Charles B. ^

Reynolds, Joel @ # ^2nd Cpl.? 1842. Killed 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. See W. F. Young’s Pension Application

Ricketts, William died 1/13/1901. Widow applies for Pension #36769 on 6/28/1920.[251]

Roberts, William @ #1st Lt. ^3rd Sgt.

Robinett, Isaac @ # ^ 1844. Died 5/20/1862.<

Robinett, J. W. ^

 

Scurlock, James W. # 1840.

Shepherd, Thomas R. @ #2nd Cpl. 1813. Died 5/20/1862.

Shepperd, Thomas A. @ # ^ 1840.<

Shepperd, P. R. ~

Simmons, R. F. ~

Singletary, George Harrison 8/20/1839. Died 11/23/1882. Widow applies 10/26/1914 for Pension #29642.

Singletary, George Harrison Sr. ~ Cpl. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Witnessed pension application # 2275 for Mrs. Taudy Ball on 9/6/1913.

Spaulding, James A. ^

Stafford, Harvey @ #

Stafford, Samuel M. @ # ^ 1836. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Ponta, Texas.

Stafford, Thomas A. ~

Stafford, Thomas J. @ # ^

Stoner, A. B. ~

Stubblefield, W. H. ~

 

Taylor, George W. ^4th Cpl.

Templeton, John Allen @ # 12/15/1844. POW at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/19/1863. Sent to Zollicoffer barracks, Nashville Tenn., Transferred to Camp Douglas, Ill in Oct. 1863. Released 5/23/1865 at New Orleans, LA. [252] Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler, Texas from Jacksonville, Texas. Witness for Pension application for Mrs. M. W. Farmer on 5/8/1906 and Mrs. J. M. Francis on 6/19/1915. Lived at Jacksonville, Tx. after the war. Was Adjutant of Camp No. 1555, U. C. V., wrote a biographical sketch for P. R. Jones, 10/6/1921. Applied for Pension #47166 on 7/24/1930. Died 5/8/1931, buried in City Cem., Jacksonville, Cherokee Co., Texas.. [253] Listed in TEXANS WHO WORE THE GRAY by Sid S. Johnson.

Thomason, J. W. ~

Thompson, Campbell H. #^ @

Thompson, D. C. ~ Died 4/28/1862.<

Thompson, George W. @ # ^

Thompson, Hilliard J. @ #

Thompson, James ~ Died at Pine Bluff, Ark., 5/26/1862.<

Thompson, K. B. @ # ^ 1832. Died 4/28/1862.<

Thompson, Malcolm @ # ^ Ensign 1801. Died 6/2/1862.<

Thompson, Wiley D. #^

Thompson, W. J. ~

Thompson, William R. @ # ^

Tillman, Henry N. @ # 1832. Died 5/30/1862 at Memphis, Tenn.<

Timmons, Jordan @ # 1833. Died 5/9 or 20/1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.

Turner, Henry B. ^

 

Van Zandt, John R. @ #

 

Waggoner, William A. @ # ^ 1843. Wounded at Murfreesboro, Tenn.., 12/31/1862. Present 4/5/1864. 12/23/1842 died 2/21/1882, buried in Atoy Cem., Cherokee Co., Tx.

Walker, Miller Brownlow @ # ^ 1836. Wounded at Richmond, Ky., 8/30/1862, disabled, discharged 8/7/1863. Died 5/30/1903 in Cherokee Co., Texas. Widow filed for Pension #17459 from 11/20/1909.

Wallace, F. C. ~

Walters, Moses @ # 1841. POW at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/19/1862. Held at Zollicoffer barracks, Nashville Tenn. Survived the war. [254] The 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas lists him as dying at Santa Anna, Texas, since last meeting.

Ware, Robert C. ~ Died 4/9/1862.<

Welch, Thomas M. @ #^

Whiting, Carleton H. ^

Wiggins, John T. @ #Jr. 2nd Lt./Capt. ^2nd Sgt. 1834. Resigned 6/1862. [255] Witness to Pension application for the Widow of James H. Coleman on 9/7/1899.

Williams. E. C. ^3rd Cpl.

Williams, Elbert ^

William, John L @ # ^

Williams, Ferdinand L. @ # ^

 

Yarett, J. W. ~

 

 

 

Company K

Smith County

< Death published in the Aug. 16, 1862 edition of the Texas Republican

~ Enlistee taken from soldiers and Sailors Website

 

Adams, A. J. ~ 1845 Discharged due to age on 11/22/1862. Pension # 11588. Moved into the Confederate Veterans Home in Austin, Texas on 4/7/1912 where he died on 11/15/1917. Buried in the Texas State Cem. Sec. 3, Row J grave #45.

Adams, John Q. ~1842. Died, 6/24/1862. <

Allen, John W. ~ 3rd Sgt.

Avants, James ~

 

 

Birdwell, Sam L. ~ 1843. Confederate Honor Roll for Murfreesboro, Tenn. Wounded at Altoona, Ga., 10/5/1864. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler Texas from Jacksonville, Texas. Later lived at Chandler, Henderson County, Tex.[256] Listed in “TEXANS WHO WORE THE GRAY” by Sid S. Johnson pg. 149.

Bryant, B. M. ~ POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865.

 

Callahan, F. M. ~

Chamblis, B. A. ~ 3rd Cpl. .

Chambless, Edward ~ 1835. POW, 12/27/1862, paroled, died April 1863 and is buried at Port Hudson, La.[257]

Chandler, A. N. ~ 2nd Lt.. 1831. Died 5/26/1862. <

Chandler, R. J. D. ~ Died 6/1/1862. <

Clary, Martin V. ~ 1841 Lt, Wounded at 12/31/1862 at Murfreesboro, Tenn. POW near Nashville, Tenn., 12/15/1864. listed in the “Official Records” [258]

Coker, R. S. ~

Coker, Thomas ~

Coker, W. T. ~ 10/10/1846. POW at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/19/1863, released in 1865. Lived at Roby, Texas after the war.[259]

 

Dowis, Tyra, J. ~

Downey, Calvin ~

Dunn, B. F. ~

 

Felton, Richard M. ~

Finley, W. H. ~

 

Gibson, Quinton K. ~

Glenn, William Riley ~ 5/10/1838. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/1863. Captured at Allatoona, Ga., 10/5/1864. Sent to Camp Chase, Ohio. Returned home in June 1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler, Texas from Tyler. Died 2/15/1913, buried in Oakwood Cem, Smith Co., Tex.[260] Listed in TEXANS WHO WORE THE GRAY by Sid S. Johnson.

Gordon, Alfred

Gordon, Alford ~ <

Gordon, David ~ 1844. Died 5/14/1862. <

Harrison, John A. ~

Haymore, Thomas J. ~ Died 1/17/1862. <

Hazell, D. H. ~ 1841. Died 6/14/1862. <

Henderson, H. L. ~

Henderson, P. B. ~ 1841. Died 7/6/1862. <

Hicks, J. T. ~ .

Hicks, S. Houston ~

Hill, E. A. ~

Hitt, J. Wilson ~

 

Jarman, J. M. ~ 4th Cpl.

Jarman, John J. ~

Jarrett, John ~

Johnson, John H. ~

Jordan, John R. ~

 

Kelly, W. P. 1834. ~ Died 3/25/1862. <

Knight, W. R. C. ~

 

Lawrence, S. W. ~ .

Lee, Charley ~

Lee, J. T. ~

Lyles, J. A. alternate spelling is Lisles ~ Died 5/7/1862. <

 

Matthews, Allen C. ~ 1838. Died 5/17/1862. <

May, J. P. ~ 1828. Died 2/17/1862 in the home of David Taylor, Rocky Comfort, Arkansas, buried in the volunteer portion of the Grave Yard at Rocky Comfort, Ark.[261]

McAdams, L. R. ~ 1845. Died 5/20/1862. <

McDonald, Albert T. ~

McDuffie, Eli J. ~

McClung, L. M. ~

McMurry, Joseph P. ~

Miller, James C. ~

Murray, C. G. ~ 1st Sgt.

Murray, J. M. ~ 2nd Sgt. 1836. Died 2/8/1862. <

Murry, T. J. ~

Muzzal, Wilson N. ~ 1st Lt.

 

Peck, D. W. ~

Pool, Henry ~ Bugler/Sgt. 1843. Wounded in the hand at Kingston, Ky. and again in the head at Allatoona, Ga., admitted to Way Hospital, Meridian, Miss. Furloughed home 1/7/1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler, Texas from Lindale, Texas.[262]

Pool, James Flowers ~ 2nd Cpl.

Pool, Joseph, W. ~

Powell, J. W. ~ Died, 5/25/1862. <

Puckett, U. H. ~ .

 

Reeves, James E. ~

Reeves, Jerry ~

 

Simmons, R. H. ~

Simmons, W. M. ~

Slimmer, John N. ~ 1842. POW at Chickamauga, Ga., 9/18/1863. Died at Camp Douglas Prison Chicago, Il. 4/29/1864.

Smith, A. B. ~

Smith, E. H. ~

Smith, J. J. ~ 1st Cpl. 1811. Died 5/15/1862. <

Smith, S. M.~

Smith, T. R. ~

Speer, J. D. W. ~ 3/24/1844. Wounded at Chickamauga, Ga. 9/1863, POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Married after the war and was the father of Judge Ocie Speer, of Fort Worth; associate justice of the Texas court of appeals.[263]

Spear, John ~

Speer, L. L. ~

Splawn, Benjamin Allen ~ 4/2/1841. Discharged 8/19/1862 “chronic diarrhea and general disagreement of the digestive organs”[264] Died 1/11/1906 and is buried in Arkansas Cem., Wise Co., Tx.[265]

Splawn, Charles P. ~ 1839. Promoted to Cpl. on 7/1/1862 and then to Sergeant in 9/1862. Listed as absent sick in Hospital March-June 1863. Died in Hospital #21, Atlanta, Georgia on 6/20/1863 “chronic diarrhea”.[266]

Splawn, James ~ 1838. Died late 1862 at Pine Bluff, Arkansas. His father claimed his pay which had never been drawn.[267]

Splawn, John W. ~ 1838. Discharged 11/12/1862 “ulcer in left Leg.” [268]

Strickland, Peter

Stroud, J. C. ~ 1841. Died 12/29/1862. <

 

Todd, L. L. ~ Jr. 2nd Lt.

Todd, L. M. ~ Capt. 1837. Died 11/28/1861. <

Turner, J. D. ~

Turner, Joshua C. ~ 1841. POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Later officer in Mt. Enterprise chapter of U. C. V. Buried in Verneer Cem, Smith Co., Tex

 

Wagoner, J. W. ~.

Watford, John A. ~

Watford, R. A. ~

White, James S. ~ POW at Citronelle, Al., 5/4/1865. Attended the 1903 reunion at Tyler, Texas from Tyler.

Wooten., Edward ~ .

Wooten., John W. ~ 1st Lt.

Wren, Tate ~ Died 5/10/1862. <

Yarbrough, David C. ~ Died 4/7/1862. <

 

 

 

Unknown Company

 

Newberry, William died 5/ 2/ 1862, buried in Elmwood Cem., Memphis Tenn.

Magrill, Samuel Devoil 1843 – 8/20/1862 of disease.[269]

Barton, Robert Marion Thomas and Mary (Berry) Barton. CSA. Enlisted on 25 Sept 1861 at Camp Bailey near Fairburn, Georgia. Served as a Private in Company E, commanded by Captain Hill, 30th Georgia. Surrendered on 10 May 1865 and paroled 18 May 1865 at Tallahassee, Florida. Pension file states Robert was in Clayton County, GA. and had lived in Minden, Rusk County, Texas at since 1867. File states that he was confined to a hospital in Mississippi in 1863 and he was left behind due to him being sick and was captured or lost in Mississippi in 1863. Pension file and Rusk County, Texas records on Robert service state that he served in Company G, commanded by Captain James Madison Barton or the 10th Texas Infantry Volunteer Cavalry and Company B, commanded by Captain James H. Jones, 11th Texas Infantry (Robert’s) Regiment. Rusk County records further state, that he was 16 July 1844 in Georgia and died on 16 Jan 1920. These records also state that his wife’s name was Mary Birdwell. While the records from these two sources conflict, both records show the same personal information on Robert and he may have indeed served in all of these units at one time or another. (REF: Texas Pension file #30446 & Rusk County Rebels list) (pg 481)**** [270] 7/16/1844 – 1/26/1920, buried in Maple Grove Cem., Rusk Co., Texas..

 

 

 

LAND SCRIP. When the Republic of Texas was established, it was rich in lands but low in funds. In an effort to convert the public domain into cash, an act of December 10, 1836, authorized the issuance of land scrip for sale in the United States at not less than fifty-five cents an acre, the proceeds of the sale to be applied to the public debt. The scrip was of Tenn. called Toby Scrip, for Thomas Toby of the Toby and Brother Company of New Orleans, the chief scrip agent. During the republic era, 1,329,200 acres of public land was sold or used directly to retire debt.

Under the Confederate Soldier's Bill of April 5, 1881, wounded Confederate soldiers, their servants, or their widows were eligible to receive a 1,280-acre land certificate. Those having property valued at $1,000 or more were ineligible, and the applicant had to take two witnesses to the county court to attest to his or her eligibility. The county courts certified eligibility to the General Land Office, which in turn issued the certificates. Certificates could only be located on public domain, and for every plot of land located on a Confederate scrip certificate, a like amount of acreage had to be surveyed for the Permanent School Fund, since half the public domain had been reserved for the school fund. Though the objective of the bill was to help provide for Confederate veterans and their widows, most of those receiving the certificates sold them to others, for an average of $100 to $200 a certificate. One certificate went for $5. A total of 2,068 certificates for 2,647,040 acres were issued from July 5, 1881, to February 16, 1883. Of these, 1,726 certificates (1,979,852 acres) were properly surveyed and 342 certificates (437,760 acres) were rejected. The bill was repealed in 1883.

The state of Texas, in an effort to raise money and pay off debts, in 1879 offered for sale certain western lands at fifty cents an acre and in 1889 at two dollars an acre. Under these two acts the state sold 1,660,936 acres of land; the proceeds of the sales were pledged at one half to the public debt and one half to the Permanent School Fund. Land scrip was also the term used to describe certificates issued for internal improvements (see LAND GRANTS FOR INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS).

BIBLIOGRAPHY: History of Texas Land (Austin: Texas General Land Office, 1958). Thomas L. Miller, "Land Grants to Confederate Veterans and Widows," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 69 (July 1965). Thomas L. Miller, The Public Lands of Texas, 1519-1970 (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1972).

Manuel Guerra

 

 

 

 

 

 



[1] Joseph H. Crute Jr.- Units of the C. S. A.

[2] Texas State Archives, correspondence to Gov. Clark 1861.

[3] Texas Republican” 11/2/1861 edition

[4] O.R. Vol. 4 pgs. 125-126, chap. xi pgs. 145 and 160.

[5] Muster Rolls of Co’s E & G.

[6] Texas Republican 1/4/1862 edition

[7] Texas Republican 12/21/1861 edition

[8] O.R. Vol. 53 chap. xviii pgs. 783-785.

[9] htp://txgenes.com/TxUpshur/1865GilmerSchool.html

[10] Confederate Letters at Rusk Co., Tex. Web Site, Gloria B. Mayfield Coordinator.

[11] O.R. Vol. 8 chap. xviii pg. 782-783

[12] O.R. Vol. chap. xxv pg. 818

[13] Property deed from G. M. Elliott to J. W. Simms, Claiborne Parish La.

[14] O.R. Vol. 10 Part 2 chap. xxii pgs. 463 & 490

[15] E. G. Littlejohn Letter from the Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978.

[16] O.R. Vol. 16 Part 1 Chap. xxiii pgs. 941-943.

[17] Thrilling and varied war experiences by J. M. Spinks. Confederate Veteran, April 1907 pg. 168.

[18] E. G. Littlejohn Letter from the Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978. Letter 10.

[19] E. G. Littlejohn Letter from the Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978.

[20] O.R. Vol. 16 Part 2 chap. xxviii pg. 984.

[21] E. G. Littlejohn Letter from the Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978.

[22] O.R. chap. xxxiii pg. 930 - 932, No. 284, Report of Col. M. F. Locke.

[23] O.R. Vol. 20 Part 1 pg. 660

[24] No. 283 report of Brig. General M. D. Ector.

[25] War Time Letters of J. A. Templeton, Co. G. 10th Texas Cav. dismounted. Confederate Veteran, Jan. 1904 pg. 24.

[26] O.R. Vol. 20 Part 1 chap. xxxii pgs. 926-932. No. 283 report of Brig. General M. D. Ector.

[27] O. R. , Numbers 284 Report of Col. M. F. Locke & VOL. XX, PT I Page 774 [CHAP. XXXII.] report of lt. Gen. W. J. HARDEE

[28] War Time Letters of J. A. Templeton, Co. G. 10th Texas Cav. dismounted. Confederate Veteran, Jan. 1904 pg. 24.

[29] O. R. Vol. 23 Part 2 chap. xxxv pgs. 654-655.

[30] Texas Republican 4/11/1863 edition

[31] War Time Letters of J. A. Templeton, Co. G. 10th Texas Cav. dismounted. Confederate Veteran, Jan. 1904 pg. 24.

[32] O.R. Vol. 20 Part 2 chap. xxxv pg. 826.

[33] John Henry King Memories of North East Texas 1859 - 1863.

[34] Confederate Veteran, March 1901 page 113.

[35] Hayden Whitsett 7105 Bending Oak Rd. Austin, TX 78749 ©Ron Brothers and Hayden Whitsett, 1999, All Rights Reserved. July 29, 1999

[36] Hayden Whitsett 7105 Bending Oak Rd. Austin, TX 78749 ©Ron Brothers and Hayden Whitsett, 1999, All Rights Reserved. July 29, 1999

[37] transcripts of letters in the Gee Library Archives, Texas A&M University at Commerce, TX, (letters have been altered for punctuation)

[38] Hayden Whitsett 7105 Bending Oak Rd. Austin, TX 78749 ©Ron Brothers and Hayden Whitsett, 1999, All Rights Reserved. July 29, 1999

[39] O.R. Vol. pg. 689, Special Orders # 19

[40] E. G. Littlejohn Letter from the Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979.

[41] E. G. Littlejohn Letter from the Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. Letter # 40.

[42] W.L. Truman Memoir, Chapter 17 - Pine Cone War MEMOIRS OF THE CIVIL WAR

[43] O.R. Vol. 39 Part 2 pg. 569

[44] W.L. Truman Memoir, Chapter 17 - Pine Cone War MEMOIRS OF THE CIVIL WAR

[45] O.R. Vol. 38 Part 3 pgs. 899 to 913 Actions of French’s Division from May 16 to Sept. 6

[46] W.L. Truman Memoir, Chapter 18 - On the March MEMOIRS OF THE CIVIL WAR

[47] O.R. Numbers 703 report of Brig. Gen. W. H. Young commanding Ector’s brigade.

[48] General Hood later commented the reports of enemy troops coming to help were false. Stated in his January 9, 1865 outline of movements of his army.

[49] Numbers 244, Reports of Lt. Gen. A. P. Stewart taken from the Official Records.

[50] Diary of J. P. Cannon, 27th Alabama Infantry, taken from Bloody Banners and Barefoot Boys by Noel Crowson and John V. Brogden.

[51] J. H. WILSON, Brevet Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding, chief of cavalry and commanding officer of all the cavalry in the Military Division of the Mississippi. O. R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/1 [S# 93] NOVEMBER 14, 1864-JANUARY 23, 1865 pgs. 562 & 563.

[52] Confederate Veteran, Shy’s Hill Whence The Name, November 1912 pg. 522.

[53] Lieut. Gen. S. D. Lee's report of the battle of Nashville, Confederate Veteran June 1904 pg. 269.

[54] Ector’s and Reynold’s Brigades under General Reynolds make up this total.

[55] A Hard Place For Glory

[56] O. R. chap. LVII pg. 782

[57] Special Orders Number 89, Demopolis Al. orders from Lt. General Polk.

[58] edited, republished & (c) July 4, 1993 by Wm. Maury Morris II, wmm@Hopper.itc.Virginia.Edu All Rights Reserved

[59] Maj. L. Perot, Confederate Veteran Jan. 1899, pg. 8

[60] Confederate Veteran, July 1899 pg. 312.

 

[61]

[62] Letter home by J. A. Templeton. Confederate Veteran Jan. 1904, pg. 24.

[63] http://www.bramblett.com and B. B. Paddock, History and Biographical Record of North and West Texas (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1906), Vol. I, pp. 189-190.

[64] Texas Republican pg. 65

[65] http://familytreemaker.geneology.com

[66] McBride Military Records

[67] submitted by Ona Wood, History of Wood Co.

[68] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. #53.

[69] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[70] users.skynet.be/B.T.T.R.C/nl/wolf.htm

[71] + jwade@cswnet.com

[72] http://www.rahul.net/cgi-bin/afaoa/igmget/n=John_Austin_ss?870618

[73] http://mason.math.tntech.edu/smith2/d0001/g0000021.htm

[74] chuckhenly@comcast.net

[75] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. #39.

[76] The diary of Jacob Eliot.

[77] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. #49.

[78] East Texas Family Records - Winter 1981, Pages 22-26. Service records of Confederate Veterans who lived in the Longview area or moved there shortly after the War Between the States reveal the cross

section of the South which provided some of the city's early residents. The list, compiled from various sources, was provided by Miss Dolly Northcutt for the Longview Morning Journal, CenTenn.nial Edition, Sunday, May 3 1970.

[79] Texas Republican pg. 73.

[80] By: Maedell Crossley Meredith.

[81] The Times Clarion, Longview, dated Sept. 21, 1905, reported a Confederate Veterans picnic sponsored by the John B Gregg Confederate Veteran Camp held on Gregg County Court House Grounds. Submitted by Elaine Martin & Sharon Pierce

[82] Confederate Veteran, 1903.

[83] Official Records of the War of the Rebellion No. 284 Report of Col. M. F. Locke.

[84] Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, 1861-1865 by Mamie Yeary pg. 316.

[85] Confederate Soldiers reflect the ancestors of all members of Julia Jackson 141from our charter date of October 13, 1897 to our latest member. For further information, please contact: "mailto:cwithers@airmail.net"

[86] Official Records of the War of the Rebellion No. 284 Report of Col. M. F. Locke.

[87] Alan Shepperd at http://www.angelfire.com/tx3/RandysTexas/jwilliamson.html

[88] Alan Shepperd at http://www.angelfire.com/tx3/RandysTexas/jwilliamson.html

[89] Alan Shepperd at http://www.angelfire.com/tx3/RandysTexas/jwilliamson.html

[90] Alan Shepperd at http://www.angelfire.com/tx3/RandysTexas/jwilliamson.html

[91] Alan Shepperd at http://www.angelfire.com/tx3/RandysTexas/jwilliamson.html

[92] http://www.dwilliamson.com/ggreat.htm

[93] http://users.moscow.com/dnorman/jasper.htm

[94] Letter by A. B. Flint in University of Arkansas Libraries Special Collections.

[95] “gary bazemore”<g_bazemore@hotmail.com>

[96] “gary bazemore”<g_bazemore@hotmail.com>

[97] genealogic.virtualave.net/fg01/fg01_196.htm

[98] DiHudd@aol.com

[99] Confederate Soldiers reflect the ancestors of all members of Julia Jackson 141 from our charter date of October 13, 1897 to our latest member. For further information, please contact: "mailto:cwithers@airmail.net

[100] Letter by A. B. Flint in University of Arkansas Libraries Special Collections.

[101] STANDARD [CLARKSVILLE, TX], April 10, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

[102] By "mailto:lag@gci.net%20" 3818 Clay Products Road Anchorage, Alaska 99517

[103] EARLY DAYS OF PITTSBURG, TEXAS 1859-1874 Life of John C. Porter and Sketch of His Experiences in the Civil War John C. Porter 1874

[104] Official Records of the War of the Rebellion No. 284 Report of Col. M. F. Locke. This incident is also mentioned by other officers in their reports of the battle.

[105] Confederate Soldiers reflect the ancestors of all members of Julia Jackson 141 from our charter date of October 13, 1897 to our latest member. For further information, please contact: "mailto:cwithers@airmail.net"

[106] Confederate Veteran, May 1909, pg. 242.

[107] Rusk County Rebels

[108] Rusk County Rebels

[109] Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, 1861-1865 by Mamie Yeary pgs. 177 & 178.

[110] Rusk County Rebels

[111] Rusk County Rebels

[112] http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~monticue/George_Emory_Loyd_descendants_t...

[113] Clare Anderson "mailto:clare-p.Anderson@ntlworld.com"

[114] www.rushings.com/notes/not0073.html

[115] Rusk County Rebels

[116] Pension Records, Cherokee County, Texas.

[117] family history, Biography of brother who served in 18th Texas Infantry

[118] The Times Clarion, Longview, dated Sept. 21, 1905, reported a Confederate Veterans picnic sponsored by the John B Gregg Confederate Veteran Camp held on Gregg County Court House Grounds. Submitted by Elaine Martin & Sharon Pierce

[119] Info from “H. David Richardson “ <hdrichardson@earthlink.net>

[120] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[121] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[122] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[123] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[124] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[125] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[126] For more info go to http:/www.petronet.net/csburial/cgi-bin/test 1.idc?

[127] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[128] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[129] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[130] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[131] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[132] Confederate Veteran, January 1904, pg. 24.

[133] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[134] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[135] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[136] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[137] Shelby County in the Civil War.

[138] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas and Service Records.

[139] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[140] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[141] Shelby County in the Civil War.

[142] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[143] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[144] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[145] http://howder.home.mindspring.com/h400.html

[146] http://howder.home.mindspring.com/h400.html

[147] Courtesy of Tom Howder howder@mindspring.com

[148] Shelby Co. in the Civil War

[149] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[150] Confederate Veteran, Jan. 1902, pg. 31.

[151] Confederate Veteran, October 1904, pg. 491.

[152] Info from Tom Pinkston TPINKme@aol.com

[153] "mailto:JoanR@aol.com" & Texas Pension

[154] CADabus@aol.com

[155] Shelby County in the Civil War.

[156] Shelby County in the Civil War.

[157] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[158] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[159] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[160] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[161] www.petronet.net/csburial/cgi-bin/test1.idc?

[162] DeSoto Parish, La.; Biography: J. F. Walker, M. D. pg. 426.

[163] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[164]

[165] Shelby County in the Civil War.

[166] "mailto:glwhiddon@prodigy.net"

[167] "http://www.angelfire.com/tx3/RandysTexas/jwilliamson.html" and Information furnished by Mary M. Brown To Leila B. LaGrone & additions from Don Austin Submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Panola Co. Coordinator

[168] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[169] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[170] “Texas and Texans”, Vol. 3, pg. 1213; by Frank W. Johnson; American Historical Society, 1914

[171] Confederate Veteran, April 1907, pg. 168.

[172] The Times Clarion, Longview, dated Sept. 21, 1905, reported a Confederate Veterans picnic sponsored by the John B Gregg Confederate Veteran Camp held on Gregg County Court House Grounds. Submitted by Elaine Martin & Sharon Pierce

[173] Rusk County Rebels

[174] (REF: Compiled Military Service Record, Broadfoot’s Roster of CSA Soldiers pg 423.

[175] Letter by E. G. Littlejohn. Smith Co. Chronicles, Summer 1979 #54.

[176] Letters home by Henry L. Watson courtesy of Jean Herrin Clinkscales and submitted by Gloria B. Mayfield, Rusk Co., Texas.

[177] Listed in TEXAS CONTINUED: thegenealogists.comThe Bobbitt Family In America 96.

[178] http://www.angelfire.com/tx3/RandysTexas/enlisted.html

[179] Col. John Furlow G-Grandson to James T. Furlow

[180] Col. John Furlow G-Grandson to James T. Furlow

[181] Col. John Furlow G-Grandson to James T. Furlow

[182] Col. John Furlow G-Grandson to James T. Furlow

[183] Confederate Veterans Roster Hood County, Texas Hood County Texas Genealogical

Society Robert L. Mayo Box 980007 Houston, Texas 77098-0007 281-878-2079

[184] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. Letter #2.

[185] pg. 221 Rusk Co. History.

[186] Panola County History, Panola County’s Confederate Heroes

[187] George Ingram gingram7@iswt.com

[188] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles, Summer 1979, # 54.

[189] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. #51.

[190] Mentioned in letter from E. G. Littlejohn, Smith County Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. #19 & #30.

[191] Confederate Veteran, April 1907, pg. 168.

[192] Confederate Veteran, April 1907, pg. 168.

[193] E. G. Littlejohn Letter, Smith Co. Chronicles, Winter 1978, #16.

[194] E. G. Littlejohn Letter, Smith Co. Chronicles, Winter 1978, Letter #8.

[195] Rusk County Rebels

[196] "mailto:slemin46@yahoo.com" “Texans Who Wore The Gray” by Sid S. Johnson.

[197] See Biography by C. W. Raines, Year Book for Texas (2 vols., Austin: Gammel-Statesman, 1902, 1903). and the Handbook of Texas Online

[198] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979.

[199] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979.

[200] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979 #20.

[201] Rusk County Rebels

[202] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles, Summer 1979, # 47.

[203] The Times Clarion, Longview, dated Sept. 21, 1905, reported a Confederate Veterans picnic sponsored by the John B Gregg Confederate Veteran Camp held on Gregg County Court House Grounds. Submitted by Elaine Martin & Sharon Pierce

[204] Sue Moore Thurmon at HLBST@aol.com

[205] Rusk County Rebels

[206] Rusk County Rebels

[207] For more info go to http:/www.petronet.net/csburial/cgi-bin/test 1.idc?

[208] Rusk County Rebels

[209] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979.

[210] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979.

[211] Shelby County in the Civil War.

[212] dameron@strato.net

[213] The Times Clarion, Longview, dated Sept. 21, 1905, reported a Confederate Veterans picnic sponsored by the John B Gregg Confederate Veteran Camp held on Gregg County Court House Grounds. Submitted by Elaine Martin & Sharon Pierce

[214] Rusk County Rebels

[215] Confederate Veteran, April 1907, pg. 168. & "mailto:slemin46@yahoo.com" “Texans Who Wore The Gray” by Sid S. Johnson.

[216] E. G. Littlejohn Letter, Smith Co. Chronicles, Winter 1978, #12.

[217] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979.

[218] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. #45.

[219] E. G. Littlejohn Letter, Smith Co. Chronicles, Winter 1978, #19.

[220] E. G. Littlejohn Letter, Smith Co. Chronicles, Winter 1978, #9.

[221] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. Letter #2.

[222] Rusk County Rebels

[223] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979.

[224] Confederate Veteran, March 1912, pg. 129.

[225] Rusk County Rebels

[226] Info by George Ingram gingram7@iswt.com

[227] E. G. Littlejohn Letter Smith Co. Chronicles Winter 1978, Summer 1979. #37.

[228] Rusk County Rebels.

[229] B. B. Paddock, History and Biographical Record of North and West Texas (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1906), Vol. II, pp. 110-112.

[230] sissyyhimenorris@juno.com

[231] For more info go to http:/www.petronet.net/csburial/cgi-bin/test 1.idc?

[232] "mailto:peggybrannon@hotmail.com" “Texans Who Wore The Gray” by Sid S. Johnson.

[233] Submitted by Troy Gresham, email: "mailto:RubyGresham@Houston.rr.com," Houston, Texas thanks to troy for permission to use picture.

[234] Pension Records, Cherokee Co., Texas.

[235] Scandinavian Soldiers in the Confederate Forces. www.borgerkrigen.info

[236] WayneKathieDavis@aol.com

[237] Confederate Veteran, June 1902, pg. 264. mentioned in “Texans Who Wore The Gray” by Sid S. Johnson.

[238] Pension Records, Cherokee Co., Texas.

[239] Confederate Veteran, June 1902, pg. 264. mentioined in “Texans Who Wore The Gray” by Sid S. Johnson.

[240] "mailto:Mid101074@aol.com" from Cherokee County, Texas County History

[241] "mailto:Mid101074@aol.com" from Cherokee County, Texas County History

[242] Pension Records, Cherokee Co., Texas.

[243] J. A. Templeton, Oct 6, 1921 Obituary by Doris Scott taken from Cherokee County Banner, Cherokee Co., Tx. 2/18/1924. dorisjsc@juno.com

[244] Also listed in “ Manskers in the Civil War”

[245] Janet’s Genealogy

[246] http://chousmith.tripod.com/asbury.htm

[247] Confederate Veteran, June 1902, pg. 264. mentioned in “Texans Who Wore The Gray” by Sid S. Johnson. Also algoan@email.com

[248] Confederate Veteran, Nov. 1909, pg. 541.

[249] Joe Ashley, “Oh for Dixie, The Civil War record and Diary of Capt. William V. Davis, 30th Mississippi Infantry, C. S. A.”

[250] Handbook of Texas online.

[251] Pension Records, Cherokee Co., Texas.

[252] Confederate Veteran, June 1902, pg. 264. & "mailto:Marylove@tyler.net" “Texans Who Wore The Gray” by Sid S. Johnson.

[253] dhtem@aol.com

[254] Confederate Veteran, June 1902, pg. 264. Also in Dec. 1906, pg. 545. mentioned in “Texans Who Wore The Gray” by Sid S. Johnson.

[255] Confederate Veteran, Dec. 1909, pg. 609.

[256] Confederate Veteran, April 1907, pg. 168.

[257] For more info go to http:/www.petronet.net/csburial/cgi-bin/test 1.idc?

[258] Official Records SERIES I--VOLUME XX/1 No. 191

[259] Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, 1861-1865 by Mamie Yeary pg. 144.

[260] "mailto:peggybrannon@hotmail.com" “Texans Who Wore The Gray” by Sid S. Johnson.

[261] STANDARD [CLARKSVILLE, TX], April 10, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

[262] Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, 1861-1865 by Mamie Yeary pgs. 617 & 618.

[263] B. B. Paddock, History and Biographical Record of North and West Texas, Vol. II (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1906), pp. 208-209. & GenealogyMagazine.com - Copyright © 2000-2003 Datatrace Systems

[264] http://www.hal-pc.org/~splawn/civilwar.htm

 

[265] David Smith sccwvets@juno.com

[266] "http://www.hal-pc.org/~splawn/civilwar.htm"

[267] http://www.hal-pc.org/~splawn/civilwar.htm

[268] http://www.hal-pc.org/~splawn/civilwar.htm

[269] baysailors@aol

[270] www.bartonsite.org/BartonRoll/civil_war_1861.htm