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Otter Creek Township, Vigo County, Indiana

Otter Creek Township, Vigo County, Indiana

From the History of Vigo and Parke Counties, together with Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley,
by H. W. Beckwith. Chicago: H. H. Hill and N. Iddings, Publishers, 1880, pages 499 to 501.

This township occupies the middle of the northern tier of townships of the county, and is bounded west, east and south by the townships of Fayette, Nevins, Lost Creek and Harrison, and by Parke county on the north. From Fayette township it is separated by the Wabash, which washes the whole western side. The township is further watered by Otter creek (from which the township takes its name), which flows from the east to the west side in an irregular though generally westerly direction. This creek, and Sugar, in the northern part of the township, furnish the water for stock and afford good drainage for the sections through which they flow. In former times Otter creek afforded water-power sufficient to run a mill and distillery of considerable dimensions. The distillery, in the early days, was considered almost as essential to the comfort of the community as the mill. Indeed, the pioneer in some instances felt that while the hominy block and the rifle might supply him with eatables, the more complex contrivances of the distillery were necessary to supply him with the cheerful beverage essential to the keeping away of ague and the counteracting of the bites of rattlesnakes.

Some of the finest land in the state is to be found in this township. The Wabash bottoms, which include a large part of the western portion, are celebrated for their richness, while a wide strip of prairie occupying the middle of the township and joining the bottoms on the east, is not excelled anywhere for fine productive farms. The eastern portion is rather flat for successful cultivation every year, much of which is in the condition that nature left it. The big ditch in the western part of the township is the former Wabash and Erie canal. The railroad has long since superseded its use and it has now fallen into decay. The Eastern Illinois railroad enters the township near the northwest corner and in its course to Terre Haute divides it in two nearly equal sections. Of the Terre Haute & Logansport railroad, which enters the township at its northeast corner, the same may be said. The Indianapolis & St. Louis railroad passes through the southeast corner. These roads, with their stations of Atherton, Otter Creek, Ellsworth, Markle and Grant, afford good markets and outlets for the products of this section.

The old Lafayette and Terre Haute wagon and pack-horse road, which was one of the first opened in western Indiana, passes through the township from north to south in a direct line. Along this road many of the early settlements were made. Indeed, it may be said that what the railroad of to-day is in its attractiveness to settlement, this wagon-road was in its time. Among the first, and possibly the very first, settlers of the township, were the Baldings from New York, and Jacob and David Lyon from Ohio. These men opened farms in 1816, their location being in the central part of what is now Otter Creek township, but what was then Knox county, and a year later Sullivan. In 1817 Joseph Evans located in the eastern part of the township and built a cabin. In the southeastern part of the township, as early as 1816 or 1817, Mr. Briggs was the first settler. In 1819 William Watkins settled at Markle's Mills, on Sec. 36. Gershom Tuttle came as early as 1818. William Denny David Lyon, A. M. Ostrander, William Johnson, Thomas White, Anthony Creal, Isaac and Jacob Balding, and Abraham Markle were prominent among the early settlers. The last named built the first mill on Otter creek, and a son of his, N. B. Markle, was the first white child born in the township. The mill built by Markle, though not a very extensive affair as compared with some of the modern establishments of to-day, was in those times an institution. It had one run of burrs for wheat and one for corn. To this mill the early settlers came to have their grists ground for a distance of many miles around. The roads were very bad in the early days, and it was common in those times for the patron of the mill to wait a day or two for his turn at the mill.

Mr. Tuttle was the builder and proprietor of a distillery in the early times. It is said that good whisky was made at this factory and sold at reasonable prices. A bushel of corn was considered an equivalent for a gallon of its essence after paying the manufacturer his profits, and the pioneers interchanged the one for the other. Though whiskey was cheap, and everybody drank it, they do claim that the evil effects of drinking were not so great as with the higher priced but much doctored product of later times. The distillery was run for about fifteen years and then fell into decay. Afterward Clark Tuttle improved and ran the distillery as a mill for a short time. About the time of the completion of the railroad Clark Tuttle built the steam-mill of which he has since been proprietor. The second mill, now known as Creal's mill, was built by Ormsby Green, about 1828-30.

The first school-house built in the township was near Markle's Mill, in about 1820. It was, like most other of the improvements of its time, a simple affair, being constructed of logs and the cracks daubed with clay. Dr. Hotchkiss, it is claimed, was the first teacher. The present state law was not then, nor until many years later, in force, and the only provision for the instruction of the youth was voluntary contribution, both for building and teaching. The people of the neighborhood met together, bringing whatever implements they possessed in the way of axes, saws and augers, and in a short time cut the logs, raised and covered the building that was to be the center of scientific, moral and religious instruction, as well as a point for political gatherings, for such it proved to be. Not a dollar of money was expended in the construction of the pioneer school-houses. The trees furnished all of the materials, and the pioneers were both architects and builders. The course of instruction was limited as to extent and length of time required to pass, it being a little spelling, reading and writing for about three months in the year. Dr. Hotchkiss received his pay from those who patronized the school, at so much per scholar sent. There are now six schools in the township, all in a prosperous condition. The old-time log school-houses have given place to comfortable frame and brick buildings.

The first church building in the township was the Union church, on the La Fayette road, about a quarter of a mile north of Otter creek. It was built about 1840, by a union of all persons interested in propagating Christianity, and remains such to this time. It was dedicated by Rev. Mr. Jewet. Prior to this the township was not without religious meetings and instruction. At nearly the very earliest date of settlement preaching was had, and continued at regular intervals in the groves, in private houses, and in school-houses, by several denominations, especially by the Methodists and Baptists. In 1867 the Methodists built on the La Fayette road, near the Parke county line, a very neat and substantial church. It is of brick. The membership of the church is about forty. Another Methodist house of worship is the Rose Hill church, situated on the range line road, a mile and a quarter north of Otter creek. This is a fine building, 42 x 60 feet in size, and cost $6,400. It was built in 1869, and dedicated in 1870 by the presiding elder, Rev. John L. Smith.

HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek, pp. 499-501


R.W. BROTHERTON, Terre Haute, farmer, is the son of Abel and Sarah (WELPTON) BROTHERTON, who were natives of New York, and who were married in 1817. ABEL BROTHERTON was born in Schoharie county, New York, August 16, 1797. His wife, Sarah WELPTON, was born in the same county, May 5, 1800. They emigrated west in 1822, and located in Vigo county, Indiana, where they remained until their deaths. His death occurred April 24, 1850, and hers May 11, 1859. R.W. BROTHERTON was born in Vigo county July 29, 1827, and is an industrious and hard-working man. Believing that a rolling stone never gathers moss, he has remained in his native county all his life. Mr. BROTHERTON received an education the same as any of the pioneers' sons, by attending school winters and working on the farm in summer. His occupation has always been an humble tiller of the soil. June 27, 1861, he was married to Miss Mary HALL, daughter of William and Eliza (BRIGHAM) HALL, who were of English descent, and came to Vigo county, Indiana, in 1843. Mrs. BROTHERTON was born in Yorkshire, England, January 28, 1833. They have one child living, Richard W.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 503


DAVID CLOYD, Atherton, farmer, was born in Lincoln county, Kentucky, in 1825, and in 1827 his father, John Cloyd, came to Parke county, Indiana, and settled in Floyd township, where he remained until 1857. He then removed to Champaign county, Illinois, where he died in 1868. His wife's maiden name was Susan BOATMAN, a native of Kentucky, who died in Parke county in 1828. David CLOYD remained in Parke county until 1876, and then removed to Vigo county, where he has since been following his former occupation of a farmer. In 1850 he was married to Miss Sarah KILBURN, daughter of Henry KILBURN, who was born in Parke county, Indiana, in 1832. By their marriage they have five children, three sons and two daughters: Susan, Amanda E., wife of J.H. JOHNSON; Henry M., John and Valentine. Mr. CLOYD has by his own industry become the owner of 101 acres of land in Parke county.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 508


H.S. CREAL, miller, Burnett, was born in Otter Creek township, Vigo county, Indiana, in 1830, and this has been his home all his life. He has been engaged most of his time in milling, and now owns the mill purchased by his father, which was one of the first built in the county. He is also half owner of the first mill built in the county, built by Mr. MARKLE. Mr. CREAL's father, Anthony CREAL, was a native of York state, and came to Vigo county in an early day, and settled in the vicinity of where Mr. CREAL now lives, where he built a tannery, which he managed until he bought the mill Mr. CREAL now owns. His father resided in the county until his death, which occurred in 1875, and his wife, Malinda WILLIAMS, died in 1878. Mr. H.S. CREAL was united in marriage in 1858 to Miss Hannah GRAY, and the issue of their happy marriage is six children, three sons and three daughters: Joseph A., John W., Sarah M., Dora E., Herbert, and Edith E.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 504


HARRISON DENNY, Terre Haute, farmer, is the son of WILLIAM and Margaret >font color=red>DENNY, who were natives of Pennsylvania, and came to Pickaway county, Ohio, in an early day. They then went to Vigo county, Indiana, in 1824, and remained until their deaths, Mr. DENNY dying in 1850 and Mrs. DENNY in 1836. Mr. DENNY served as scout in the war of 1812 under Gen. HULL, he being one of two out of sixteen that returned home. Harrison DENNY was born in Vigo county, Indiana, in 1825, and has resided ever since on the same farm that his father bought in 1818, six years before he came to the county. It consists now of 320 acres, which he has under good improvement. Mr. DENNY is one of the practical farmers of the county. In 1847 he married Miss Luna BALLOU, daughter of Aaron and Margaret BALLOU, who were natives of York state and France. Mr. BALLOU died soon after he came to Vigo county, in 1835. Mrs. BALLOU now resides in the county, eight-one years of age. The wife of Harrison DENNY was born in Saratoga county, New York, in 1831.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - pp. 502-503


JOSEPH DOTY, Burnett, carpenter, was born in Butler county, Ohio, April 30, 1853, and came to Vigo county with his parents in 1859, where they became landowners in Otter Creek township. His father was a native of Ohio, and died in this county in 1867. His mother, Sarah J. GRAY, was a native of Ohio, and resides at the old homestead. Mr. DOTY never served an apprenticeship at his trade, but is capable of doing almost anything in wood-work and iron. He was married in 1877 to J.F. SMITH, a native of Vigo county, whose parents came to the county in an early day.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 505


HARVEY EVANS, Terre Haute, farmer, is the son of JOSEPH EVANS, who was a native of Virginia, born in 1790. Joseph EVANS went to Kentucky in an early day, thence to Orange county, Indiana, where he also was among the first settlers, and then he removed to Knox county, and in 1818 came to Vigo county, Indiana. He located in Otter Creek township, and spent his life in hard labor preparing a home for himself and family. This he accomplished previous to his death, which occurred in 1854. Harvey EVANS was born in Knox county, Indiana, November 27, 1817, and came to Vigo county with his parents. He has been a resident of the county ever since, and the first schools he attended were schools taught in private families, it being fifteen years before there were any school-houses built in the vicinity where Mr. EVANS lived. He well remembers seeing Indians after they came to the county. In 1844 he married Miss Eliza WILSON, daughter of John and Jane WILSON, and by their marriage they have four children, of whom two are living: Mary A., wife of W.I. RITTER, and Everett W. The names of the deceased are James R. and Walter G. Mr. and Mrs. EVANS are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - pp. 501-502


SAMUEL EVANS, farmer, Burnett, was born in Randolph county, North Carolina, in 1827, and came to Vigo county in 1849, and has been a resident of the county ever since. He served two years in the late rebellion, in the 28th U.S., and participated in the battles of the Wilderness, Richmond, Petersborough and others. He is a member of Terre Haute Lodge, No. 4, A.F. and A.M. In 1866 he married Miss Matilda ANDERSON, and they have four children: John W., Nelson, Fannie, and Turner. Mr. EVANS is a staunch republican.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 505


J.H. JOHNSON, Atherton, farmer, was born in Vermilion county, Indiana, September 16, 1832, and removed to Vigo county in 1839, where he has been a resident since, except seventeen years spent in California and Oregon, where he was engaged in mining and farming. He subsequently returned to Vigo county, and in 1872 married Miss Amanda E. CLOYD. Mr. JOHNSON is the son of W.H. JOHNSON, one of the early settlers of Vigo county. He is an industrious man, and is a member of the I.O.O.F.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 505


W.D. JOHNSON, farmer, Atherton, was born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, in 1830, and is the son of W.H. JOHNSON, who was a native of Ross county, Ohio, born in 1800, and who came to Vigo county in 1824, and after remaining two years removed to Lafayette, where he engaged in the hotel business and the manufacture of brick. He built the first brick hotel that was built in Lafayette, and in 1829 removed to Eugene and engaged in the hotel business for about ten years, and in 1839 returned to Vigo county and became one of the prominent farmers for many years. He was twice married. His first wife was Jane S. DENNY, daughter of Wm. DENNY, who was an early settler of the county. They were married October 22, 1824. She was born November 9, 1802, and died May 25, 1848. His second marriage was to Mrs. John UNDERWOOD, in 1849. She was born in 1804 and died in 1865. Mr. JOHNSON died in 1868. W.D. JOHNSON now resides at the old homestead. January 20, 1859, he was married to Miss Abby C. ROGERS, daughter of J. ROGERS, who was one of the early settlers of this county. She was born in Vigo county in 1837, and the issue of their happy union is three sons and one daughter: Clara B., George S., William H., Harvey D., and one deceased, Mary H. Mr. JOHNSON is a member of the I.O.O.F., and was raised a whig, and when the republican party was organized, he joined its ranks and has since stood by that party.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - pp. 504-505

WILLIAM A. JONES, formerly president of the Indiana Normal School, was born in East Haddam, Connecticut, June 16, 1830. His mother died when he was five years of age, and after two years he went to live with an uncle, who was a congregational minister, at South Glastonbury, Hartford county, where he remained till fourteen years of age. During this period of life he was thrown into the most staid and reflective atmosphere of New England society, where influences calculated to develop a thoughtful turn of mind surrounded him. Here he was kept constantly at school. At the expiration of this time he went to Wolcottville, Litchfield county, Connecticut, to live with his father, who had married again. He was thus transplanted into an entirely different community, where influences unlike the former impressed themselves on his character. He remained here four years, during which time he worked at mechanical pursuits, except during two winters, when he attended school. Observing, while yet a boy, that the shops and factories of New England were lowering the grade of labor, and cheapening its compensation by the introduction of foreign labor, he came to the conclusion that the only way in which the New England boy could secure a prospect of satisfactory employment was to learn to do something which the foreign labor could not perform. He must seek his field of action in pursuits requiring the educated brain at hand. During his stay here this thought was being brought out. He was giving attention to reading, and helping to some extent to form literary societies: so that, notwithstanding the character of the place, the earlier tendancies of his mind took the lead. At the age of eighteen he returned to his uncle's to pursue a course of not preparatory to entering Williston Seminary, which he entered, and in due time completed the course. He then went to Hartford, and graduated from the Harris Commercial School, after which he engaged in teaching in Bristol, Connecticut. He then spent three years as secretary and treasurer of a manufacturing establishment at Wolcottville. It has always been a mental tendency of Mr. JONES, in whatever business he has been engaged, to study and understand the science or theory of that business; hence during his connection with the above house he made a special study of political economy, as applied to manufacturing. At the age of twenty-six Mr. JONES moved to Illinois, and settled at Altona, Knox county, where he taught seven years in the public schools. During this period he filled several offices in the town, and was at the same time a close and indefatigable student in his profession. The reputation gained here as a teacher led to his being invited to Aurora, Kane county, to take charge of the schools of that city, where he remained six years, gaining a still wider reputation, and causing his services to be sought after from various quarters. In 1870 he was invited by the trustees of the Indiana State Normal School to become president of that institution. He organized the school on the 6th of June of that year; and although it started under adverse circumstances, and with a roll of only twenty-one students, it has become a recognized institution, sending out its teachers and its influence to all parts of the state. In this normal school the state provides for the training of teachers to take care of her public schools. President JONES has been successful in this institution in carrying out his principles of metaphysical instructions. He has made it emphatically a school of mind. When you witness the exercises of this school, in any of its departments, you feel that you are in a mental workshop. The objective facts too commonly relied on as the end of education are here made the means. They are only the tools and instuments by which the mind works out its powers of analysis and its comprehension of abstract truth. This principle as here carried out gives tone and character to the whole school and makes it, in this important respect, an institution sai generis. Unless this key to the spirit of the Indiana Normal School is understood, no one can properly appreciate its true character, or have any just conception of its merits as a training school for teachers. Since January, 1879, Mr. JONES has been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He is the owner of a fine improved farm, consisting of 190 acres, located in Otter Creek township, which he purchased while in the school, in view of making it his future home. In 1853 he married Miss Caroline E. WILSON, a native of Wolcottville, Connecticut.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - pp. 506-508


GEORGE A. PAINE, farmer, Terre Haute, was born in Vigo county, Indiana, December 24, 1829. His father, Alva PAINE, was a native of Massachusetts, and came to this county (Vigo) in about 1827, and located in Otter Creek township, where he remained until his death, in 1844. Mr. PAINE's mother died in 1876. The subject of this sketch, by his untiring industry and economy, is the possessor of a fine farm consisting of 328 acres. He began by working by the month for eleven and thirteen dollars, until he earned enough to buy a span of horses and farming implements. After this he rented for some time, until he purchased a half interest in 240 acres of land, and by strict attention to business not only paid for his half, but bought the other half. March 26, 1862, he was married to Miss Clarissa MILLS, daughter of H.B. and Lucinda MILLS. She was born in Kentucky in 1839. The issue of their happy marriage is three children: Henry A., Edward J. and Lucinda B., and one deceased, Luna M.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 504


AARON PENCE, Terre Haute, blacksmith, is the son of Peter and Margaret (NEWELL) PENCE, who were natives of Ohio, and of German-Irish descent. They came west in 1834 and located in Parke county, Indiana, and became one of the prominent families of that county. Soon after they came to that county they purchased a farm on which they resided until their deaths. Mr. PENCE died October 15, 1877, and Mrs. PENCE in 1867. Aaron PENCE was born in Parke county, Indiana, December 25, 1836, and resided with his parents, attending school from thirty to forty days in the winter and working on the farm in the summer. This he continued until sixteen years of age, and then went to Rockville, in the same county, and served an apprenticeship, learning the blacksmith's trade, which he completed at nineteen years of age. The spot where he learned the trade is now marked by a church. December 31, 1857, Mr. PENCE took a life partner, his choice being Miss Caroline WITHAM, daughter of Thomas and Sarah WITHAM, who were natives of Kentucky and Maryland. March 24, 1846, Mr. WITHAM died. Mrs. WITHAM now resides in this county (Vigo). Mr. PENCE came to Vigo county in 1861, and located on the Lafayette road five miles north of Terre Haute, where he has been engaged in his former occupation, that of a blacksmith. Being a competent workman, and dealing honestly with his many customers, he has not only secured a large patronage but a wide circle of friends.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 506


M. QUINLAN, Terre Haute, groceries, was born in Davis county, Indiana, in 1849. His parents were natives of Ireland, and came to America in 1847, first locating in Davis county, Indiana. In 1850 they removed to Illinois, where they remained about three years. They then went to Parke county, Indiana, where they remained until their deaths. His father died August 10, 1854, and his mother in 1872. They were devoted members of the Catholic church. M. QUINLAN received his education at the district schools, and engaged in various occupations until 1878, since which time he has been engaged in his present business, keeping groceries and provisions. His store is located four and a half miles north of Terre Haute on the Lafayette road. By his courteous treatment of his many customers he has established a business equal to any house in Terre Haute having the same amount of capital invested. October 17, 1872, he married Miss J. RAYAN, and they have had three children: John F., Frank, and one deceased, Winford. Mr. and Mrs. QUINLAN are members of the Catholic church.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - pp. 508-509


MAHLON STEVENSON, Terre Haute, farmer, is probably the oldest citizen, now living, born in Vigo county. He was born December 11, 1820, and has resided within a quarter of a mile of his birthplace ever since. His father, Mahlon STEVENSON, was a native of Maryland, and went to Virginia in an early day, thence to Tennessee, and came to Vigo county as early as 1816, and purchased a farm, of which Mr. STEVENSON now owns a portion. In 1818 he removed to the county, where he lived until his death, which occurred about 1845. His wife was Ruth DURHAM, a native of Virginia, who died in this county about 1833. Mr. STEVENSON, the subject of this sketch, received his education in a log school-house, the windows of which were composed of greased paper. The first plows they used were the old bar-shear plow, the moldboard being wood. In 1848 he married Miss Mary DEAN, a native of Ohio, born in 1821, and they have four daughters: Anna T., Jennie, Melle and Cora.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 502


W.H. STEWART, farmer, Heckland, was born in Carroll county, Indiana, in 1819, and came with his parents to Parke county, Indiana, in 1826, and in 1829 removed to Terre Haute, Vigo county, where his parents resided until their deaths. To the credit of the citizens of Vigo county, he faithfully filled some of the offices of trust. He was first elected constable and marshal, and in 1856 was elected sheriff. He was reelected in 1858, and in 1862 was elected again marshal, and was reelected sheriff in 1868, and again in 187?. By his attention to business he has gained the good will of the citizens of Vigo county, and should he come up for any office in the future, would have no trouble in being elected. His wife, Julia KING, is the daughter of J.F. KING, one of the pioneers of the county. Mr. STEWART is a member of the order of A.F. and A.M., and his political views are democratic.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - pp. 503-504


G.D. WOOD, farmer, Atherton, was born in Vigo county, October 21, 1828. His parents were among the early settlers of the county, having settled here in 1826. Both died when he was quite young. Thus early in life he was thrown upon his own resources. He began working by the month at fifteen years of age, and by hard work and good financiering he has made for himself and family a good home. He now owns 100 acres of land, with good buildings and improvements equal to any in the county. He has been twice married: in 1854 to Ann M. UNDERWOOD, a native of Parke county, Indiana, who was born in 1832, and died in 1859. Mr. WOOD married again, March 17, 1862, to Margaret WHITE, a native of Sullivan county, Indiana, born in 1828. He is the father of three children by his former wife, Margaret E., wife of G.M. LEGETT during his life, James R. and Emma E.; and by his present wife, Thomas G. and Annie P.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 503


W.H. WORTHINGTON, Terre Haute, farmer, is a native of Virginia, where he was born in 1823. In 1835 he served an apprenticeship at the blacksmith's trade in his native state, at which trade he continued until he emigrated west, in 1856. He first went to Kansas, thence to Iowa, and to Paris, Illinois. In 1858, after remaining there two years, he removed to Terre Haute, where he carried on blacksmithing on Cherry street for a number of years. He purchased his present farm in 1870, and it is beautifully located within seven miles of Terre Haute, and consists of 225 acres. In 1865 he was married to Amanda CONLEY, a native of Indiana, and the issue of their marriage is one son and two daughters: Mary C., Victoria M. and John H. Mr. WORTHINGTON has a handsome property in the city in connection with the farm.
HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Otter Creek Twp. - p. 508


Submitted by Charles Lewis
Data entry by Kim Holly

Vigo County Interim Report on
Otter Creek Township
Listing Historic Sites and Structures



The black and white photos are from the V.C. Interim Report(1984).
Click on the black and white photo to see the site/structure as it is today.
Where a black and white photo is not shown, denotes no 'then' photo available.
Locatons given are those under each photo along with a number. I've tried my best to locate each one (31 listed for Otter Creek alone; if there is an "M" after the number, the location is questionable.


001M
House, Swallow Road; Carpenter-Builder, c.1880; Architecture


002
Friendship Baptist Church, Quail Road; Carpenter-Builder, c.1900; Architecture, Religion


003M
House, 105th Avenue; Carpenter-Builder, c.1880; Architecture


004
Farm, Atherton Road; Gothic Revival, c.1860; Architecture


005
House, U.S.41; Bungalow, c.1920; Architecture


006
House, U.S. 41; Federal/Greek Revival, c.1860; Architecture


007
Farm, U.S. 41; Italianate, c.1879; Architecture


008
Farm, U.S. 41; Prairie, c.1920; Architecture


009
House, U.S. 41; Carpenter-Builder/Eastlake, c.1900; Architecture


010
George Woods Farm, Atherton Road; Italianate, c.1880; Architecture


011
Farm, Spring Creek Road; Carpenter-Builder, c.1880; Architecture


012
House, Spring Creek Road; Carpenter-Builder/Free-Classic, c.1900; Architecture


013
Concrete Bridge, Greencastle Road; Twentieth Century Functional, c.1911, Robert E. Gibbons, Engineer; Engineering, Transportation


014
Farm, 48th Street; Federal/Greek Revival, c.1850; Architecture


015
Orth-Stephenson House, 87th Avenue; Italianate, c.1870; Architecture


016
Farm, Old U.S. 41; Colonial Revival, c.1940; Architecture


017
House, 87th Avenue; Bungalow, c.1920; Architecture


019
Jenkins House, Old U.S. 41; Colonial Revival, c.1930; Architecture


020
Farm, 43rd Street; Carpenter-Builder/Eastlake, c.1880; Architecture


021
Rance-Phillips House, Rosedale Road; Gothic Revival, c.1860; Architecture


022
Virgil Morris Farm, 63rd Avenue; Colonial Revival, c.1940; Architecture


023
Wooden Viaduct, 61st Street; Trestle, c.1940; Engineering, Transportation
**As you can see, it has been replaced with a modern concrete bridge**


024
House, 63rd Avenue; Colonial Revival, c.1930; Architecture


025
Goetz/Professor William A. Jones, 63rd Avenue; Gothic Revival, c.1850; Architecture, Education




026
Markle House and Mill Site, 4900 Mill Dam Road; Greek Revival/Italianate, 1848; Architecture, Commerce, Exploration/Settlement


027
Professor Akert House, 4310 51st Avenue, Markles; Prairie, c.1910; Architecture


028
Forest Park Baptist Church, 3900 51st Avenue, Markles; Classical Revival, c.1900; Architecture, Religion


029
Farm, 3625 51st Avenue, Markles; Free-Classic/Prairie, c.1900; Architecture


030
Farm, 57th Avenue; Federal/Greek Revival, c.1850; Architecture


031
House, 57th Avenue; Carpenter-Builder, c.1890; Architecture

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Email: cvmnrob@edge.net