The Santana525 is a very close winded boat in all wind conditions. Like a dinghy, she is very light on the helm and very weight conscious. So, under reaching circumstances, it is best to carry the outboard engine on the main cabin sole with most of the weight over the keel. The boat does not like weight in the bow, and does not go well with over 18 deg. of heel. She is best sailed with 4 people, which gives enough hands and weight for all conditions. Try to make it possible to work the whole boat from the cockpit. This is one of the few boats on which the crew can stay in the cockpit 90% of the time. Too much weight forward in most conditions will be more harmful than too much weight astern.
    The headsail size should be determined by what handicap system you are going to sail in.
        PHRF                          155% LP Maximum
        IOR                             150% LP Maximum
        MORA                        150% LP Maximum
        MORC                        170% LP Maximum
        CLASS RACING        150% LP Maximum
        MORF                         150% LP Maximum
    If you race in more than handicap class you may need more than one # one headsail. The following guideline will help you get the maximum performance from different sail combinations in various conditions. The wind velocity is measured in apparent wind speed.

GOING TO WINDWARD  
The ideal crew weight seems to be between 600-675 pounds and it is best to use four crew members. The boat is close winded and will tack through 65 deg in winds from 10-20 knots, 90-130 deg below 10 knots.

            0 to 10 KNOTS
    HEADSAIL TRIM- The 170% LP light #1 genoa is used for MORC handicap. It should be of 3oz material with a large skirt and clew about 24" off the deck. A 160% LP light #1 for PHRF should be the same. To achieve the best sheeting angle for these two sails it is necessary to install a track outside the standard track by 7". It should run parallel to the standard track and go further aft. This track is very important because it allows the genoas to be barber hauled inboard and out.
    The sail should be no closer than 6" to the spreader and requires constant trimming according to the increase or decrease in wind velocity.
    If the boat is racing IOR, MORF, or MORA, it would be best to use a 150% 3 oz jib top. The clew of this sail is quite high. The sail is generally sheeted to the stern of the boat. This sail is very good in 1-5 knots
        MAINSAIL TRIM- The boom should be at the centerline of the boat. The top batten should be be parallel to the boom, and the mainsheet travler car should be to windward. The leech of the Main should be soft with a slight amount of twist. The Cunningham tension should take the wrinkle out of the luff, and the outhaul should be set in the same manner. Back-stay tension will bend the mast, and take the draft out of the main, so be careful not to take too much. You will have to adjust the cunningham to the amount of draft in the main.
    The travler, mainsheet, and Cunningham adjustments will have to vary according to the velocity of the wind. The main is very important on this boat because it is so big.
        CREW PLACEMENT- All four people can be in the cockpit. It may be necessary for one person to be on the leeward deck to get a little heal to the boat. The helmsman should straddle the mainsheet travler.  This will help to lift the stern out of the water. Between 5-10deg of heel is desirable. The crew should move very softly because the boat is sensitive. It is best to try to foot the boat rather than go for the pointing ability.

             10 to 15 KNOTS
        HEADSAIL TRIM- The 150%5oz genoa should be used and should be sheeted to the outboard track. Keep it about 6" from the spreaders. It should have a set of reef points.
        MAINSAIL TRIM- The main should be full, with the travler car set close to the center of the track. Again, set the top battens parallel to the boom. There should be good tension on the Cunningham and back stay, the clew should be close to the black band and the travler should be adjusted with the wind velocity.
       CREW PLACEMENT- The three crewmen should be on the windward rail, no further forward than the aft end of the trunk cabin. The crew is positioned shoulder to shoulder with their legs over the rail.

        15 to 18 KNOTS
         HEADSAIL TRIM- The headsail to be used is the 150% 5oz genoa. The trim is the same as above, however, it is lead to the standard inboard track.
         MAINSAIL TRIM- The main is reefed to the first batton. The travler must be adjusted to the puffs of wind to help reduce weather helm. Look at the mast bend because too much will make the main too flat, and let the fore stay fall to leeward.
        CREW PLACEMENT- The crew should be on the rail, shoulder to shoulder, and the first man is about two feet aft of the aft end of the trunk cabin. Try to have only one person make sail adjustments. It is very important to keep the boat as flat as possible. Be sure to have the crew with their legs over the rail.

       18 to 20 KNOTS
        HEADSAIL TRIM- Use the 110% jib. This headsail is sheeted to the inboard track with the clew going between the upper and lower shrouds.
        MAINSAIL TRIM- A full main can be used. There should be a good amount of mast bend. The top of the mast will fall off to leeward, but that is OK. It is super important to play the travler. At times the main may be only full in the batten area.

      20 to 23 KNOTS
     HEADSAIL TRIM- 100% jib is the headsail to use, and the trim is the same as above.
     MAINSAIL TRIM- The main should be reefed again and set as before.

CLOSE REACHING

      0 to 5 KNOTS
     HEADSAIL TRIM- Use the biggest, lightest headsail you have, making sure the lead is far enough forward. It should be farther forward than when going to windward. A jib top is the best sail for reaching. 1 to 5 knots is too light for any type of stay sail.
    MAINSAIL TRIM- The boom vang should be set but not too hard. The trim of the main can be done by the travler. The cunningham  and outhaul should be let off, and both the main and the headsail will require constant trimming.
   CREW PLACEMENT - The crew placement should be approximately as described for going to windward in 0 to 10 knots. You do want some weight forward to get the stern up.

     5 to 15 KNOTS-
     HEADSAIL TRIM- In this range , trim the headsail the same as in 0-5 knots. There may be enough wind, though to fly a genoa stay sail. It may be tacked on the fore deck of to a deck eye and should be sheeted to the inboard genoa track or barber hauled inboard or outboard of it. The double head rig is a super combination but needs constant trimming.
     MAINSAIL TRIM- The main is very important in these conditions and is trimmed the same as mentioned above. All three sails must work together.
    
CREW PLACEMENT- As the wind builds, you must move the crew aft. This will keep the bow from going too deep and the boat more on its lines. The boat should be kept as flat as possible.

        15 to 20 KNOTS
        HEADSAIL TRIM- The headsail to be used is the 150% 5oz genoa, however, it is lead to the outer track.
        MAINSAIL TRIM- The main is probably reefed to the first batton. The travler must be adjusted to the puffs of wind to help reduce weather helm. Try to work the boat into the wave pattern that may be developing like a surfer works his surfboard.
       
CREW PLACEMENT- All of the crew should be on the rail, shoulder to shoulder, and the first man is about two feet aft of the aft end of the trunk cabin. Be sure to have the crew with their legs over the rail.

  REACHING WITH A SPINNAKER

      0 to 5 KNOTS
     HEADSAIL TRIM- Use the lightest, 1/2 oz chute in these conditions. The wind is too light for any type of stay sail.
     CREW PLACEMENT- Have the crew well forward in the boat. Have one crew member to leeward and one to windward at about the shrouds. This is an attempt to get a bow down attitude, lifting the stern out of the water to reduce wetted surface.

   5 to 10 KNOTS
     HEADSAIL TRIM- Use the lightest, 1/2 oz chute in these conditions. Note 10 knots is max. on chute.
     MAINSAIL TRIM- Use the travler as a means of adjusting the mainsail. Have very little tension , if any, on the cunningham and on main. The outhaul should be released on the mainsail. The boom vang should be snug, and showing little tension in the leach.
   
CREW PLACEMENT- Have the crew well forward in the boat. Have one crew member to leeward to induce heel to the boat. This is an attempt to get a bow down attitude, lifting the stern out of the water to reduce wetted surface.
    It is still too light to attempt flying any type of stay sail. If the winds are in the solid 10 knot range, then the stay sail will help, but experience shows people tend to concentrate only on the little stay sail to try to get it to work rather than concentrating on the big sails that do all of the work. Stay sails really produces little extra performance.

    10 to 15 KNOTS
    HEADSAIL TRIM- In this amount of air it is best to fly a 3/4 oz chute. A tri-radial, true-radial  are quite good. Some boats have had good success with star cuts, but it is felt that a genoa at 90-95 deg of apparent wind, reaching , is faster than a star cut. A 3/4 oz tri-radial is quicker than a star or genoa at 100 deg.
    MAINSAIL TRIM- Use the travler as a means of adjusting the mainsail. Have very little tension, if any, on the cunningham and on main. The outhaul should be released on the mainsail. The boom vang should be snug, and showing little tension in the leach.
    CREW PLACEMENT- Have the crew well aft in the boat. Its time to get the boat to surf.

    15 to 20 KNOTS
     HEADSAIL TRIM- Bear the boat away from 115-120deg off the wind in order to keep control, and get maximum performance out of the boat. To reach with a chute in this amount of wind it is best to have the wind at 120deg for control and speed. If you have to sail closer, a genoa would be the best sail to use.
   MAINSAIL TRIM- Use the travler as a means of adjusting the mainsail. Have very little tension, if any, on the cunningham and on main. The outhaul should be released on the mainsail. The boom vang should be snug, and showing little tension in the leach.
  CREW PLACEMENT- The crew placement would be well aft in these conditions. You may find it easy to fly a small jib or stay sail. This would help keep the bow of the boat down and create better control and may slightly increase boat speed.

  GOING DOWNWIND

  0 to 5 KNOTS
     HEADSAIL TRIM- Use the lightest, 1/2 oz chute in these conditions.
     MAINSAIL TRIM- The mainsail cunningham and outhaul should be very loose. do not try to go directly downwind. It is best to sail 150 deg and jibe if necessary to keep the apparent wind speed.
  CREW PLACEMENT - The weight should be well forward in the boat to reduce the wetted surface. As the breeze increases, move the weight of the crew a little more in the middle of the boat. As the wind increases further, move the crew more aft trying to get the boat to surf.
If the apparent wind reaches 12 knots and above use a 3/4 oz chute. This will reduce any stretch, and the spinnaker will hold its shape better. If the breeze is holding a steady 10,12, or above, a small stay sail may be effective. In almost all off wind sailing it is best to carry a straight mast. This means reducing tension on the backstay.
Sailing at 140deg to 170 deg off the wind in 10 knots and above a 1/2 oz blooper or shooter, can be very effective. The effect is almost the same as flying two chutes at one time. Many heavier and moderate displacement boats find it necessary to fly a blooper to maintain stability. This is not the case with the 525. These sails are flown to increase performance.

GENERAL NOTES
    The boat is very much like a dinghy with a keel. It is very sensitive to weight and requires a technique of sailing that is of dinghy type. It is necessary to move quickly and lightly. As the boat receives a puff of wind going to windward and starts to heel, it is important to have crew members move his weight outboard to help keep the boat level. Think in terms of a crewman sitting on the rail of a dinghy.
    While the boat heals slightly, the crew hikes out to level it. This puts the rails at a sharper angle to the wind and therefore a greater driving force is generated. As the boat levels off it literally shoots ahead as the force of wind is centered into forward motion.
    It is important to be very conscious of the slightest movement in the boat and of any changes in the wind to get the maximum performance from this boat both off the wind and on the wind.



4-8-98 Eric Roline