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12 October 2000      (Add to favorites)
Start of Business: Thursday, 12 October 2000
Procedural text: NOTICES: Presentation
Procedural text: BUSINESS: Government Business
Procedural text: BUSINESS: General Business
Procedural text: OPERATION TOTEM
Procedural text: BREAST CANCER DAY
Speech: WEST PAPUA: MORNING STAR FLAG
Speech: WEST PAPUA: MORNING STAR FLAG: Suspension of Standing Orders
Speech: WEST PAPUA: MORNING STAR FLAG: Suspension of Standing Orders
Speech: WEST PAPUA: MORNING STAR FLAG: Suspension of Standing Orders
Procedural text: COMMITTEES: Environment, Communications, Information Technology and the Arts References Committee: Extension of Time
Speech: YELLOW RIBBON PROGRAM
Procedural text: COMMITTEES: Employment, Workplace Relations, Small Business and Education Committee: Reference
Speech: COMMITTEES: Publications Committee: Report
Speech: CHILD SUPPORT LEGISLATION AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 2) 2000: Report of Community Affairs Legislation Committee: Additional Information
Speech: COMMITTEES: Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee: Report
Speech: COMMITTEES: Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee: Report
Speech: COMMITTEES: Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee: Report
Speech: COMMITTEES: Regulations and Ordinances Committee: Report
Speech: COMMITTEES: Regulations and Ordinances Committee: Report
Speech: COMMITTEES: Public Works Committee: Reports
Speech: COMMITTEES: Public Works Committee: Reports
Procedural text: COMMITTEES: Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business References Committee: Reference
Procedural text: NOTICES: Presentation
Procedural text: BILLS RETURNED FROM THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Procedural text: AGED CARE AMENDMENT BILL 2000: First Reading
Speech: AGED CARE AMENDMENT BILL 2000: Second Reading
Procedural text: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: Second Reading
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: Second Reading
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: Second Reading
Procedural text: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: BUSINESS: Routine of Business
Speech: BUSINESS: Routine of Business
Procedural text: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Speech: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: In Committee
Procedural text: COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL AMENDMENT BILL (NO. 1) 2000; COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL LEGISLATION (PROVISION OF INFORMATION) BILL 2000: Third Reading
Question without Notice: Telstra: Telephone Subscribers Contract
Question without Notice: Telstra: Besley Inquiry
Question without Notice: Remuneration Tribunal: Determinations
Question without Notice: Economy: Performance
Question without Notice: Minister for Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business: Telecard
Question without Notice: Members of Parliament: Conduct
Question without Notice: Telstra: Staff
Question without Notice: Northern Australia: Economy
Question without Notice: Minister for Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business: Telecard
Question without Notice: Education: Disabled Students
Question without Notice: Minister for Health and Aged Care: Ministerial Hospitality Expenses
Question without Notice: People with Disabilities: Government Initiatives
Question without Notice: Minister for Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business: Telecard
Question without Notice (Speech): Health: National Child Nutrition Program
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Defence Force Aid to Civilian Authorities
Question without Notice: Women: United Nations Protocol
Question without Notice (Speech): Centrelink: Parent Payment Debts
Question without Notice (Speech): Taxation: Employee Benefit Arrangements
Question without Notice (Speech): Taxation: Employee Benefit Arrangements
Question without Notice (Speech): West Papua: Indonesian Forces
Question without Notice (Speech): Questions Nos 2899, 2904 and 2856
Question without Notice (Speech): Questions Nos 2899, 2904 and 2856
Question without Notice (Speech): Questions Nos 2899, 2904 and 2856
Question without Notice (Speech): Remuneration Tribunal: Determinations
Question without Notice (Speech): Remuneration Tribunal: Determinations
Question without Notice (Speech): Remuneration Tribunal: Determinations
Question without Notice (Speech): Remuneration Tribunal: Determinations
Question without Notice (Speech): Remuneration Tribunal: Determinations
Question without Notice (Speech): Remuneration Tribunal: Determinations
Speech: PERSONAL EXPLANATIONS
Procedural text: COMMITTEES: Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee: Extension of Time
Speech: COMMITTEES: Environment, Communications, Information Technology and the Arts References Committee: Report: Government Response
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Presiding Officers Conference
Speech: COMMITTEES: Selection of Bills Committee: Report
Speech: STATES GRANTS (PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION ASSISTANCE) BILL 2000: Report of the Employment, Workplace Relations, Small Business and Education Legislation Committee
Speech: STATES GRANTS (PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION ASSISTANCE) BILL 2000: Report of the Employment, Workplace Relations, Small Business and Education Legislation Committee
Procedural text: COMMITTEES: Membership
Speech: COMMITTEES: Employment, Workplace Relations, Small Business and Education Legislation Committee: Report
Speech: COMMITTEES: Employment, Workplace Relations, Small Business and Education Legislation Committee: Report
Speech: COMMITTEES: Joint Standing Committee on Treaties: Report
Procedural text: ASSENT TO LAWS
Speech: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: OUTSOURCING
Speech: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: OUTSOURCING
Speech: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: OUTSOURCING
Speech: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: OUTSOURCING
Speech: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: OUTSOURCING
Question without Notice (Speech): Minister for Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business: Telecard
Question without Notice (Speech): Minister for Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business: Telecard
Question without Notice (Speech): Minister for Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business: Telecard
Procedural text: DOCUMENTS: Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Centrelink: Compliance Activity for Family and Community Services
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Telstra: Report for 1999-2000
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Telstra: Report for 1999-2000
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Telstra: Report for 1999-2000
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts: Report 1999-2000
Speech: DOCUMENTS: Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts: Report 1999-2000
Procedural text: DOCUMENTS: Consideration
Procedural text: COMMITTEES: Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee: Report
Speech: COMMITTEES: Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee: Report
Procedural text: COMMITTEES: Consideration
Procedural text: ADJOURNMENT
Speech: ADJOURNMENT: South Australia: Hawker Community
Speech: ADJOURNMENT: Besley Inquiry
Speech: ADJOURNMENT: SpaceFutures 2000 Conference
Speech: ADJOURNMENT: School Funding
Speech: ADJOURNMENT: Katlewski, Mr Yan
Procedural text: DOCUMENTS: Tabling
Question on Notice: Civil Aviation Safety Authority: Corporate Governance Standards
Question on Notice: Civil Aviation Safety Authority: Wagga Wagga Office
Question on Notice: Goods and Services Tax: Model Farm Businesses Tax Invoices
Question on Notice: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission: Programs and Grants to the Bass Electorate
Question on Notice: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission: Programs and Grants to the Gippsland Electorate
Question on Notice: Derby Tidal Power Scheme: Funding
Question on Notice: Federation Guard
Question on Notice: Mobile Telephones: Emission Information
Question on Notice: National Jet Systems: Audit
Question on Notice: Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs: Value of Corporate Services
Question on Notice: Department of Family and Community Services: Market Testing of Functions
Question on Notice: Artillery Barracks, Burt Street, Fremantle: National Heritage List
Question on Notice: Taxation: Research and Development Deductions
Question on Notice: Airservices Australia: Salary Bonus Payments
Question on Notice: Telephone Lines: Capacity
Question on Notice: Farm Innovation Program: Assessment of Applications
Question on Notice: Monaro Community Radio: Permanent Licence
Question on Notice: Dairy Industry: Deregulation

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© Commonwealth of Australia

 

Senator WOODLEY  (Queensland) (9.51 a.m.) —I present the report of the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee entitled Air safety and cabin air quality in the Bae 146 aircraft, together with the Hansard record of the committee's proceedings and documents received by the committee.

Ordered that the report be printed.

Senator WOODLEY —I move:

That the Senate take note of the report.

This was a very arduous inquiry, one in which we had to deal with conflicting expert evidence. That is not unusual, but it was a very important inquiry, and hinging on the acceptance or otherwise of that expert evidence were some very serious matters. It was a report that went through numerous drafts because the committee itself was very keen to make sure that what was said in that report would in fact take account of the evidence which we had received and that it put down recommendations which would take us forward in terms of this issue.

I want to thank very sincerely my colleagues on the committee and particularly the committee secretariat. John O'Keefe and Andrew Snedden had to endure many meetings over the report and had to revise the report numerous times. I thank them for their patience and their attention to that detail. I would also like to thank the research person in my office, Vivienne Wynter, who had to endure innumerable phone calls, emails, faxes and letters in an almost constant bombardment for over 12 months from people who were concerned about this issue.

There is international interest in this issue. Inquiries similar to the inquiry which we conducted are being conducted at present in the United Kingdom and in the United States. My office was contacted by media, not only from here in Australia but from the United Kingdom, Sweden and Italy. As part of my interest in the inquiry, I visited the House of Lords committee, which was conducting a similar inquiry, and had a conversation with Lady Wilcox, the chair of that inquiry. They have decided not to release their report until our report is available because they believe that we may have some things to say which they want to take note of. In terms of international interest, I note the interest of Professor Baloet of France and Professor Van Nettan of Canada. There is tremendous interest in this whole issue of air safety and of cabin air quality. I do not think tabling this report will see the end of those inquiries. In fact, I know that it will not.

I want to deal with a number of the issues in the report, first of all with the medical issues. Under this heading, conflicting evidence was received. The committee has noted the behaviour of one of the medical experts who appeared before us, Dr Loblay. We were disappointed that his attacks on other medical witnesses reduced the value of his evidence, but we did include some of that evidence because it gave the other side of the story and therefore enabled us to have balance in the report. We were disappointed, however, that he attacked other medical experts and spent a fair bit of his time in doing that. He did not make a written submission to the committee but used parliamentary privilege to attack others.

The committee noted that the weight of evidence, in terms of those who appeared, was on the side of those who recognised that there is a serious health problem that we are dealing with. The committee recognised that this health problem affects some but not all of those who are involved in flying and crewing the BAe146 aircraft. We note that Alysia Chew, one of the flight attendants, had her case decided in the New South Wales court and that the judge said that her pre-existing illness was exacerbated by the fumes in this aircraft, but underlined that the issue of whether this is a short- and medium-term health problem or a long-term health problem is yet to be decided. For that reason the committee has recommended the National Health and Medical Research Council undertake extensive research into this area. The committee notes that there is dispute about what is called the `aerotoxic syndrome', which is to do with the cumulative effect of exposure to fumes. This is still under dispute, but the committee believes there is enough evidence to raise serious questions and so we, again, have referred this matter to the National Health and Medical Research Council.

There was great debate amongst the witnesses about whether or not this was a health or a safety issue, and there were those who wanted to distinguish between those two. The committee believes that that is an artificial distinction. If health is impaired and therefore performance is impaired for flight crew, then this is also a safety issue. We note that both pilots and flight attendants have been impaired in their operation. Therefore it is not only a health but also a safety issue.

The committee noted that the BAe146 has particularly shown up this problem under Australian conditions. We are not sure why, but particularly the heat and probably the long distances flown may have exacerbated the problem. It has been long running issue. We recognise attempts by Ansett to solve the problem: more than any other airline and more than the manufacturer, Ansett has put a lot of money into trying to solve the problem. The committee particularly thanks Ansett for its cooperation in helping us to understand the issues. However, I need to say that we have not necessarily agreed with the airlines' evidence at some points. So although we thank the airlines, it does not mean that we necessarily agree with them on every point.

The Senate found that this problem potentially breaches several civil aviation regulations of this country. It causes short- to medium- and possibly long-term illness and may jeopardise our safety. The report recommends a major clinical study into the effect of contaminated aircraft cabin air on human health. We have recommended that the problem that I have referred to before, known as aerotoxic syndrome, should be considered for inclusion in the National Occupational Safety Code for reference in future workers compensation and income protection issues. We have asked CASA to go back and have another look at the BASI report. In the first instance they said that they were not going to take up the recommendations in the BASI report, and we have said they must go back and look at it again. The Senate committee believes the manufacturer of British Aerospace Systems could do more to take responsibility for this problem. It is about corporate responsibility and accountability.

Finally, a number of journalists have been very helpful in getting this inquiry out into the public arena, and we certainly want to thank them. I particularly acknowledge the work of former Age investigative journalist Tanya Ewing, Phillip Williams of the 7.30 Report, and ABC Radio Current Affairs. They have all followed this issue very doggedly. Other reporters have taken the time to show an interest, and to them we owe a debt of gratitude; for it was the Senate inquiry and the associated media coverage that placed public pressure on the airlines and CASA to take this problem seriously. I also want to acknowledge some of the flight crew who first brought the problem to the attention of my staff and me. I would like to particularly thank Judy Cullinane, Susan Michaelis, the Flight Attendants Association of Australia, and the AFAP, as well as the medical and occupational health and aviation specialists who worked to shine some light on this issue. It has been a case where the Senate and the institution of journalism were a last resort for the people affected. I also thank the airlines for their cooperation with the inquiry. (Time expired)

Senator FORSHAW  (New South Wales) (10.01 a.m.) —I seek to add some remarks with respect to this most important report. Firstly, I endorse the comments of Senator Woodley about the hard work of the committee secretariat in helping us to finalise this report. We were still working on the final document yesterday, and that demonstrates that there has been a lot of hard work put in by a lot of people over a long time with regard to this issue.

This is a unanimous report in that all of the members of the committee support the recommendations. However, some members of the committee would have perhaps given different emphasis to various issues during the consideration of the issues before us. With respect to the comments just made by Senator Woodley, there are some areas which I would either disagree with or at least cast in a different light. For instance, Senator Woodley has thanked the media. Certainly the media and particular journalists have played an important role in highlighting what is regarded by everybody—including the airline industry, both operators and manufacturers—as a serious issue: the contamination of cabin air by chemicals or oil fumes. At the same time, I found it a matter of concern that, during the committee's consideration, there were quite biased reports in the media, including reports which very much pre-empted the findings of our committee. I recall one particular Sunday program—I generally find the Sunday program very good—that I believe presented a very biased and one-sided picture.

There is no doubt that there is a problem when air inside the cabin and the cockpit of an aircraft becomes contaminated with any substance. Obviously, if it becomes contaminated with oil fumes or chemicals that may be injurious to the short, medium or long-term health of the passengers and crew, it is a serious situation. Equally, it has to be recognised that a plane is a confined space. It appears that what occurred in the BAe 146—and apparently also occurs in other aircraft—is that leaking oil seals in the engine caused oil which had bled off the engine to get into the air and into the cabin.

As Senator Woodley correctly pointed out, some witnesses appeared in camera because of concerns about their particular situations being made public. Some air crew alleged and demonstrated to the committee, I think conclusively in a number of cases, that they had suffered ill effects. Whether or not their condition had become a long-term medical problem for them was a matter of some dispute. I have to say that it was a difficult task for us—certainly for me, not being a medical expert or an aircraft engineer—to find our way through much of the evidence to the truth, particularly when evidence was disputed by experts from both sides. Of course, those issues are not clear. When you get medical experts arguing about whether or not there is such a syndrome as aerotoxic syndrome, we mere senators, without medical qualifications, have got a problem to confront. That is why we have recommended that the National Health and Medical Research Council should have a look at this issue and do the appropriate work to determine the short-, medium- and long-term health effects of contaminated air in the cabin and cockpit of an aircraft.

There was reference made to one witness, Dr Loblay, where we agree that it was unfortunate that he attacked the credibility of other professional witnesses. That did not help his cause or our deliberations. But, equally, I note that the medical expert, Dr Loblay, provided evidence in a case before the New South Wales compensation court—a matter that Senator Woodley just referred to—where his evidence was valuable and accepted at that time by the court. That was the case of Ms Alysia Chew. I will not go into detail because it is contained in the report, but the judge there found that there had been an aggravation of a pre-existing illness for this person as a result of exposure to fumes in the cabin air. So there is no doubt that there is a health issue. Secondly, there is an acceptance that this issue requires examination by the appropriate expert bodies both here in Australia and overseas. The airlines and the manufacturers argue that they are complying with all of the standards that are laid down, and in that the committee has not been able to find that that is not correct. That is largely their defence.

If I can very quickly turn to the other key issue, which was whether or not this is a major safety issue. The public need to be confident that aircraft are operating safely, and to do that they often look to the record of the particular airline or the particular aircraft. As we know, Qantas has been regarded for many years as one of the world's safest airlines because of its record. This is where we have an interesting situation. On the one hand, the BAe 146, which was the real focus of our inquiry, has been acknowledged even by the company that there is a problem with these fumes or with cabin air quality. But, at the same time, they have argued and I believe with a great deal of justification that they have been endeavouring, along with Ansett, to deal with the issues, to improve the air flow and to improve cabin air quality as much as they can.

Further, they argue that, in terms of public safety, that aircraft is operating safely. I particularly want to place on the record that the British Aerospace 146, as the evidence showed, is an aircraft that has flown throughout the world for pretty close to 30 years, with approximately 350 aircraft operating in some 52 countries, and it has a very good record when it comes to safety in terms of the number of accidents. But that is not to say that one can never improve the situation. I believe that all of the witnesses, including the representatives of the airlines and aircraft manufacturers, treated the committee's inquiry seriously. I would hope that they and the regulators, particularly CASA, would take notice of our recommendations and act upon them. This is an issue that I think still has a long way to go. It is an issue that is of relevance to the entire airline industry throughout the world. I am sure it is a matter that our committee and this parliament will revisit. (Time expired)

3rd link above

Senator O'BRIEN  (Tasmania) (10.11 a.m.) —I rise to speak on the same matter of the Rural and Regional Affairs and References Committee's report entitled Air safety and cabin air quality in the BAe 146 aircraft. There are many things that Senators Woodley and Forshaw said that I can agree with. I would like to place on record my thanks to members of the secretariat and particularly the secretary, Andrew Snedden, for the work they have done in pulling together a series of complex issues in a report which attempts to reflect the views of the committee on those very complex issues. I thank the members of the committee secretariat for their work on the matter.

I want to focus briefly on the recommendations that go to the role of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, CASA, in this matter. Yesterday, the Senate Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee handed down a report which was extremely critical of certain CASA officers and, in fact, called for CASA to consider whether certain actions should be taken against those officers in relation to another matter. I am not going to debate that now, but there is a bit of a common theme flowing through those reports in the sense that this report recommends that CASA reassess matters which they had previously assessed relating to the cabin fume issue. The Civil Aviation Safety Authority told the committee that they accepted the manufacturer's views and the operator's views on the issue of fumes and refused to act on a then Bureau of Air Safety Investigation's recommendation in relation to this aircraft. This is serious when you consider some of the evidence that we received. Indeed, on page 81 of the report, the committee notes a comment of Mr Lawrie Cox, Senior Industrial Officer of the Australian Federation of Air Pilots. I want to quote that, because that contains a bit of the flavour of what the committee was saying in relation to the role of CASA in this matter. Mr Cox is quoted in the report as saying this:

The role of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority throughout this process is, to say the least, appalling. ...

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has simply taken the advice of a commercial operator that is obviously protecting its basic interests as the regulatory authority, as being the basis of their position that there are no safety concerns in the operation of this aircraft and there are no health effects and no changes or effects on pilots' licensing. It is an unacceptable position from our point of view that the authority can take that stance, particularly with the amount of material that has been given.

Elsewhere in the report, the committee noted that a previous employee of CASA, Mr Best, had raised in a risk observation report matters which had come to him through the industry, where concerns were being expressed about the incidence of cabin fumes in this particular type of aircraft. On page 80 of the report, the committee notes the exchange between officers of CASA, particularly Mr Villiers, and Mr Best about the matter. I quote paragraph 4.97 of the report:

The Committee notes that CASA did respond to Mr Best's Risk Observation Report, but views with concern the response of Mr Villiers of CASA. Such a response would, undoubtedly discourage staff such as Mr Best from making further RoR's and this would be highly undesirable.

So what did the committee ask CASA to do? The committee recommended:

... that CASA should reassess matters recommended for further action by the BASI/ATSB incident report (No. 199702276) concerning the incident on 10 July 1997 involving Captain Kolver.

That was an incident where the pilot of a BAe 146 operating in a freight capacity experienced such problems, having been exposed to fumes, that he handed over control of the aircraft prior to landing. The committee recommendation goes on:

The Committee also recommends that CASA reassess its requirements for monitoring the operations and cabin and cockpit air quality of the BAe 146 aircraft operating in Australia and, where necessary, introduce regulations under the Civil Aviation Act 1988 specifying:

·a specific national standard for checking and monitoring the engine seals and air quality in all passenger commercial jet aircraft;

·maintenance procedures (including specific maintenance procedures for ageing aircraft);

·specific, appropriate maintenance and operational procedures for the BAe 146 which pay particular attention to the need to ensure aircraft are withdrawn from operational flying and serviced to ensure any operating faults resulting in oil leaks, fumes or smoke are immediately repaired;

·that incident reports should now be specifically designed so as to reflect the history of the cabin air problem that has been encountered on the BAe 146;

·sources of contamination in the cabin and cockpit environment in the BAe 146 be identified and further evaluated using appropriate sampling and analytical technology for the contaminants which, for example, might result from the burning of lubricating oil used in the BAe 146 engines;

·companies operating BAe 146 and other passenger commercial jet aircraft in Australia provide CASA with specific reports on the results of monitoring these matters within an appropriate timeframe, whether quarterly or six-monthly, in order that CASA can assess the operations of the aircraft; and

·air quality monitoring and compulsory reporting guidelines for all passenger jet aircraft operators.

They are extensive recommendations in relation to CASA. As I said, there is a consistent theme running through a number of matters before the committee which goes to the effectiveness of CASA—in this case, another incident where, in the view of this committee, CASA has not acted appropriately. As I said yesterday in relation to the ARCAS matter, the report of the committee said that CASA had not acted properly. In relation to this matter, the committee is also clearly saying that CASA has not acted properly. The committee has highlighted the concerns of people who either are or have been in the industry. There is ample evidence in the report of the concerns of crew members and former crew members about exposure to fumes in the cabin, and there is ample evidence of allegations of serious health effects.

Indeed, our attention was drawn to concerns which arose out of a workers compensation case in Queensland. This was evidence before the committee, and I think it was also noted in a Supreme Court case in Queensland. One of the doctors who operated on the Ansett panel to assess the danger of the fumes in the cabin was the assessor of a particular workers compensation claim in the Queensland jurisdiction—a claim which was rejected. The Supreme Court reflected on that, as does the committee in this report. That is one of the matters that led to a recommendation with strong support across the committee that the Minister for Transport and Regional Services, in cooperation with appropriate state ministers, appoint an experienced, retired judicial officer or eminent person to review cases such as the one we came across to ensure that justice is indeed done for people who have suffered the effects of cabin fumes where there is appropriate evidence that perhaps they should have been compensated and that perhaps their case was not dealt with appropriately because of the inappropriate participation of people in the review process or, alternatively, because the information was not available to allow them to succeed. I see that my time is up, so I finish by commending the work of the committee to the Senate and expressing my support for the report.

Debate (on motion by Senator O'Brien) adjourned.

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