Corfu
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Corfu, Achilleion Palace Corfu, Achilleion Palace Corfu, Achilleion Palace Corfu, Achilleion Palace Corfu, Achilleion Palace
Corfu, Achilleion Palace Corfu, Achilleion Palace Corfu, Achilleion Palace Corfu, Achilleion Palace Corfu, Achilleion Palace

The Achilleion - The Achilleion is the summer residence that was build in name of the Austrian empress Elisabeth between 1889 and 1892 on the Greek island of Corfu. After Elisabeth had visited Corfu in the sixties on several occcasions for health reasons, she became very interested in Greek mythology. She travelled to Greece on a regular basis. After the tragic death of her son Rudolf she decided to start a living on Corfu. Her husband, the emperor Frans Joseph was willing to pay the cost of 9 million gold franks.

The classical building was designed by the Italian architect Rafaele Carito and was decorated both inside and outside with neo-classical statues. Sisi herself named the house after her favorite classical hero Achilles. After Sisi had died her daughter Gisela inheritted the palace and she sold it to the German emperor Wilhelm II.

After the 1st World War the palace became part of the Greek state. Nowadays the Achilleion is a museum. There are several remains from the times of Elisabeth and of Wilhelm II that can still be seen. Remarkable are the differences between the Achilles figures that Sissi and Wilhelm II had placed in the palace. Sisi choose the dying Achilles trying to get the arrow out of his heel. Wilhelm II placed an enormous Achilles standing proudly like a hero, strong and unbeaten.

Note: we decided not to visit the Achilleion Palace because it was so busy all the time. The whole parking lot and the streets were filled with busses. Besides that we thought the entrance fee of 7 euro (2012) was a bit expensive compared to other attractions that we went to.


Hans Huisman, http://www.angelfire.com/super2/greece/ 2014
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