Selections from the Teachings of
Franklin Merrell-Wolff



Bibliography

PCWO: Philosophy of Consciousness without an Object. Reflections on the Nature of Transcendental Consciousness. New York: Julian Press, 1973.

PTS: Pathways through to Space. A Personal Record of Transformation in Consciousness. New York: Julian Press, 1973.

Contents

Ambrosia (Bliss)
Brahmajnana – See Enlightenment - Dr. Wolff’s first Fundamental Recognition – 7 August 1936
Consciousness, Relative
Consciousness-without-an-Object – See also Enlightenment - Paranirvana
Discrimination
Disturbances – Electro-magnetic
Death
Drugs – See Tantra
Ego-Functioning – See Consciousness, Relative
Egoistic Consciousness – See Consciousness, Relative and Thought
Emptiness – See God – God is a Void; Enlightenment - Paranirvana
Enlightenment – It is a priceless treasure
Enlightenment – It erases all sorrow
Enlightenment – It is necessary to solve the world’s problems
Enlightenment – It is harder in later life
Enlightenment - It is only the beginning of life
Enlightenment - It is virtually endless
Enlightenment – The price exacted on the personal man
Enlightenment – Burned up in the Fire and released
Enlightenment – Recognitions can be different
Enlightenment – Partial enlightenment
Enlightenment – Recognition by thought
Enlightenment – Nirvikalpa Samadhi
Enlightenment – Paranirvana
Enlightenment – We must want only God
Enlightenment – Seek it only for the sake of humanity
Enlightenment – It is ever an act of Grace
Enlightenment – Dr. Wolff’s first Premonitory Recognition
Enlightenment – Dr. Wolff’s second Premonitory Recognition – “Nirvana”
Enlightenment – After the second premonitory Recognition
Enlightenment – Dr. Wolff’s reinterpretation of substantiality
Enlightenment – Dr. Wolff’s first Fundamental Recognition of 7 August 1936
Enlightenment – After Dr. Wolff’s first Fundamental Recognition
Enlightenment - The High Satisfaction
Enlightenment - The High Indifference
Evolution, Spiritual
Fire, Inner – See Enlightenment – Burned up in the inner Fire and released
God
God – As Satchitananda; Humanity as Atman-Buddhi-Manas
God – God is the One in the Many
God – God is the unitive Reality
God – God is a Void, Emptiness – See also Enlightenment - Paranirvana
Guru
High Indifference – See Enlightenment – The High Indifference
High Satisfaction – See Enlightenment – The High Satisfaction
Indifference – See Enlightenment – The High Indifference
Isolation of Essential Element
Jesus
Karma
Knowledge – Knowing all
Kundalini
Language
Longing for Liberation
Merrill-Wolff, Franklin
The Mystery Sage
Nirvana – See Enlightenment – Second premonitory Recognition – Nirvana
Objects
Other Communities
Paranirvana – See Enlightenment – Paranirvana
Past Lives
Paths
Personal man – See Enlightenment – The price exacted on the personal man
Plan, Divine
Power
Recognition(s) – They can be different – See Enlightenment – Recognitions can be different
Recognition by Thought (Manas) – See Enlightenment – Recognition by thought
Relative Consciousness – See Consciousness, Relative
Religion
Sages – Their position
Sages – Not ascetic
Satisfaction – See Enlightenment - The High Satisfaction
Science of Recognition
Self – Dividing point between two worlds of consciousness
Senses
Sleep
Spiritual Evolution – See Evolution, Spiritual
Subjective Moment in Consciousness
Substantiality
Tantra
Thought (Egoistic Consciousness) – See also Consciousness, Relative; Language; and Enlightenment – Recognition by thought
Turn from Object to Subject
Worldliness
Appendix 1. Aphorisms
Appendix 2. Poems
Compassion
The Nameless



Ambrosia (Bliss)

One day, after the evening meal and while still sitting at the table, I found that, by gradual transition, I had passed into a very delightful state of contemplation. … My breath had changed, but not in the sense of stopping or becoming extremely slow or rapid. It was, perhaps, just a little slower than normal. The notable change was in a subtle quality associated with the air breathed. Over and above the physical phases of the air there seemed to be an impalpable substance of indescribable sweetness which, in turn, was associated with a general sense of well-being, embracing even the physical man. It was like happiness or joy, but thee words are inadequate. It was of a very gentle quality, yet far transcended the value of any of the more familiar forms of happiness. (PTS, 2.)

Introspective analysis revealed the fact that the elixir-like quality was most marked during the exhalation, thus indicating that it was not derived from the surrounding air. Further, the exhaled breath was not simply air expelled into the outer atmosphere, but seemed to penetrate down through the whole organism like a gentle caress, leaving throughout a quiet sense of delight. It seemed to me like a nectar. Since that time I have learned that it is the true Ambrosia. (PTS, 2.)

[The true Ambrosia] seems to have had a vital part in clearing the way for the Illumination that came later. (PTS, 3.)

I felt the Ambrosia-like quality in the breath with the purifying benediction that it casts over the whole personality, even including the physical body. I found myself above the universe, not in the sense of being above space, time, and causality, My karma seemed to drop away from me as an individual responsibility. I felt intangibly, yet wonderfully, free. I sustained this universe and was not bound by it. (PTS, 5.)

Consciousness focused in action, whether intellectual or physical, stops the Current. The presence of some people affects It adversely, while that of others does not. The effect on the body is interesting. The after-effect of this surprisingly gentle Current, with all its exquisite delight, is a feeling of intangible tiredness in the body, somewhat like that which would be experienced after a period of protracted pain. Physical effort is difficult. The reason for this seems to be evident. One effect of the Current is clearly purifying, and this action upon the matter of the body is something of an ordeal. There is no emotional not intellectual discomfort, save that without the Current the world seems barren.

I am studying the effect of the Current upon others. Sherifa is immediately responsive to It and recognizes Its presence, at times even before I do. It will grip an audience, but those who have heretofore given recognition to a consciousness of substantially lower quality do not seem to be aware of the Ambrosia. Perhaps it is too subtle. (PTS, 6.)

Life without the Elixir has become more empty than it was before the Current was first experienced. Mere external affairs utterly fail to hold my interest.

The conditions of town life seem definitely adverse to holding consciousness within the Current of Bliss. Driving an automobile in traffic is particularly inimical. The reason seems quite clearly to be that under these conditions it is much more difficult to hold the inner concentration unbroken. To steer a way through the outer confusion requires objective concentration. I, at least, cannot yet move through these conditions with safety by giving only peripheral attention to them. Perhaps it may be possible to establish the correlation so that it will hold under these adverse conditions, but the demand upon the vital strength is severe. (PTS, 6-7.)

The moment of creative discovery is the crucial one. There is then a deepening of consciousness, a sort of retreat of the relative world, in a subtle sense, and then the quality of Bliss flows over the personality. From a profound level thought is stimulated, or, perhaps more correctly, felt. (PTS, 7.)

Without the Current the objective world is like a desert in the invidious sense of the term. How is it possible for humanity to be so attached to this outer life? Yesterday I deliberately turned Inward and invoked the Current with the accompanying deepening of Consciousness, but in this case in a modified form. Always there is the gentle Joy. (PTS, 15.)

At this very moment I am again within the Current which, also, is Myself. Speaking from the standpoint of the individual conscioiusness I shall write of It, as much as I can convey in words.

I had been doing a little manual work and, at the moment, was stopping and looking at some gravel that had been carried from a distant valley. While doing so I sank into a brooding state and seemed to retreat to a distance where there was a profound, palpable, and pregnant Silence. I attended to This as to a Voice and received the value of a Communion. There were no words, no ideas, not any other form, yet, one might say, It was the very essence of Sound or Meaning. It was utterly satisfactory and filling. It was the very Power that makes all things to become clear. Again there flowed the Current of gentle Joy that penetrates through and through. (PTS, 20.)

I shall attempt an analysis of this Current of Joy as it affects the outer consciousness including the physiological man. To the sensuous consciousness It appears as of the nature of a fluid, for there is a sense of 'flowing through.' It penetrates all tensions with the effect of physical release. Spots that are not so well feel both rested and stronger. All over and through and through there is a quality that may well be described as physiological happiness. The organism feels no craving for sensuous distraction in order to find enjoyment. The external life of the individual could appear highly ascetic and austere to others, but all the while it would be profoundly happy. ... I wish, by every means possible, to make the point clear that in the Current lies the highest possible value which, from the relative standpoint, we call enjoyment. (PTS, 20-1.)

I found that a conceptual coordination, produced while one stood or sat before an audience, released, concomitantly, a current-like quality that had, among other features, the effect of holding the audience in a kind of stillness which I would describe as possessed of depth. The attention of the individual member of the audience was held even though he did not understand the ideas developed, as was often found to be the case in subsequent conversations. A simple repetition of the same conceptual coordination did not have the same power in the same degree. I thus found a definite correlation between the Current and creativeness. From the relative standpoint the Current requires a progressive disintegration and reintegration of forms. Once a form becomes relatively fixed, the Current subsides. And yet, in a very curious way, this disintegration and reintegration leaves a certain subtle master-form unaltered, The result is essential consistency between all formal integrations produced in the Current, provided the individual understands the art of language, that consistency still remains, though in a deeper sense which is not so easily recognized. (PTS, 28-9.)

In the Current, we stand in the presence of the Ceaseless Motion which, at the same time, can be characterized as Changelessness. In one sense, we may say that the Key to Immortality is to be ceaselessly creative, while remaining eternally Identical. Nirvana is pure creativeness and, consequently, cannot be captured within fixed definition. On the other hand, genuine objects of consciousness can be defined, since they are forms. Nirvana is inconceivable but It is ceaselessly Conceiving. Herein is a partial explanation of the Nirvanic Bliss that can fall within the understanding of the more common consciousness. Creative activity, even on the lower levels, such as begetting, does awaken a degree of bliss, though of progressively inferior and grosser quality as we approach the physiological. Usually such minor blisses last but for a moment, or, at best, for brief periods with subsequent depression and exhaustion. Conceive of the intensity of the bliss raised beyond all relative imagination, and far beyond the power of any physiological organism to endure, and then regard it as not lasting merely for a moment or a brief period, but extending with unbroken continuity indefinitely; then something of the Bliss-aspect of Nirvana may be apprehended. Is it so surprising that many become 'God-intoxicated' and fail to go to the winning of real Mastery? (PTS, 29-30.)

At the time [after the second premonitory Recognition] I could not invoke the Current, though the force of Knowledge remained unbroken, as far as attained. (PTS, 30.)

The Current is clearly a subtle, fluid-like substance which brings the sense of well-being already described. Along with It, a more than earthly Joy suffuses the whole nature. To myself, I called It a Nectar. Now, I recognize It under several names. It is ... the 'Soma,' the 'Ambrosia of the Gods,' the 'Elixir of Life,' the 'Water of Life' of Jesus, and the 'Baptism of the Spirit' of St. Paul. It is more than related to Immortality; in fact it is Identical with Immortality. (PTS, 31.)

I found Myself above space, time, and causality, and actually sustaining the whole universe by the Light of Consciousness which I AM. Almost at once, there followed the Nectar-like Current and the gentle, yet so powerful Joy. (PTS, 32.)

There were no words, no ideas, not any other form, yet one might say It was the very essence of Sound and Meaning. It was utterly satisfactory and filling. It was the very Power that makes all things to become clear. Again there flowed the Current of gentle joy that penetrates through and through…. It appears as of the nature of a fluid, for there is this sense of ‘flowing through’. It penetrated all tensions with the effect of physical release. All over and through and through there is a quality that may well be described as physiological happiness. The organism feels no craving for sensuous distraction to find enjoyment. (PTS, 36.)

Also I … employ more judgment in invoking the Current which is Bliss. There exists a throttle, command of which gives to man the power to control this Current. It is but a due exercise of wisdom so to adjust the flow of the Current that Its action is balanced to meet the strength of the personal man. (PTS, 39.)

Brahmajnana – See Enlightenment - Dr. Wolff’s first Fundamental Recognition – 7 August 1936

Consciousness, Relative

The relative forms of consciousness inevitably distort non-relative Consciousness. Not only can I not tell this to others, I cannot even contain it within my own relative consciousness, whether of sensation, feeling, or thought. Every metaphysical thinker will see this impossibility at once. I was even prepared not to have the personal consciousness share in this Recognition in any way. But in this I was happily disappointed. (PTS, 5.)

If the thought-current remains active it can reflect, in some measure, the inner Reality, and thus the personal man has a share in the Awakening. In addition, this correlation is necessary if any of the value of the Illumination is to be conveyed to the intelligence of other individuals. (PTS, 11.)

Recognition of the SELF in its purity is Realization of Identity with absolute Emptiness, Darkness, and Silence, when viewed from the standpoint of relative consciousness. In point of fact this Emptiness is Absolute Fullness but, as such, never can be comprehended from the perspective of egoistic consciousness. … Relative consciousness deals with phenomena alone and can never reach beyond phenomena. But the phenomenal world rests upon the Real or Noumenal World. Thus it is that the Consciousness of the SELF or ‘pure apperceptive consciousness’ sustains the whole universe or cosmos. But the latter is an outward projection. Behind the cosmos is the formless or Transcendental World. Within the cosmos is the domain of relative consciousness. From the latter standpoint the SELF appears as formless. Hence the approach – for from the relative point of view it seems like an approach – to the SELF from consciousness posited within the cosmos takes on the form of progressive negation of all identity with form until finally Identity in the Formless breaks forth as Recognition. At this stage Recognition may well take the form of ‘I am Formlessness.” But this is really an incomplete Recognition, as Shankara has shown by his acute logic. The final Recognition is “I am not form and I am not formless.” This standpoint is neutral with respect to the cosmos and the truly Transcendental or Formless. What this really means is that beyond Nirvana there is a Paranirvana which is a state of metaphysical indifference with respect to the states of manifestation or non-manifestation. (PTS, 13.)

This study constitutes a real clarification of the problem of the relationship between ordinary consciousness and the kind of consciousness commonly called mystical. (PTS, 12.)

Throughout this whole experience [which he called the “High Satisfaction”] and the following more profound state [the “High Indifference”], the egoistic or subject-object consciousness was actively present. It was present, however, as a witness on the sidelines, while all about and through and through there was an immeasurably vaster Consciousness. (PTS, 117.)

Consciousness-without-an-Object – See also Enlightenment - Paranirvana

The final position is: The One, nonderivative Reality, is THAT which I have symbolized by 'Consciousness-without-an-object.' This is Root Consciousness, per se, to be distinguished from consciousness as content or state, on the one hand, and from consciousness as an attribute of a Self or Atman, in any sense whatsoever. It is Consciousness of which nothing can be predicated in the privative [i.e., limiting] sense save abstract Being. Upon it all else depends, while It remains self-existent. (PCWO, 171.)

Consciousness-without-an-object is the binding principle underlying the progression and evanescence of states or objects of consciousness. This binding principle neither develops nor disintegrates. It is thus the invariant element associated with all variation. (PCWO, 189.)

Objects have vanished when they are no longer present to consciousness as currently present, or present in memory, or finally, present in imagination. The fact of vanishing is not affected by the arising of other objects. Thus, vanishing operates as a principle, whether it is complete or partial. (PCWO, 189.)

Discrimination

So long as that which calls his ‘self’ has a body, [the Self or ‘I’] stood within the range of analytic observation. Stripping off the sheaths of this body until none is left is the function of the discriminative technique in meditation. At the end there remains that which is never an object and yet is the foundation upon which all relative consciousness is strung like beads on a string. As a symbol to represent this ultimate and irreducible subject to all consciousness, the ‘I’ element, I know nothing better than zero or an evanescent point. (PCWO, 38-9.)

Disturbances – Electro-magnetic

One day, … I was walking along a street in Los Angeles, and had stopped for a moment at a corner, when a streetcar close by started from a standing position. I was evidently within the range of an electro-magnetic field connected with the action of the motor. Suddenly something seemed to shift, either in the consciousness or in the brain or both. For a moment I lost orientation with the body. I cannot describe the feeling quite correctly for I know of no other experiences that are analogous. But it seemed to me to be an incipient leaving of the body. I gripped myself and the physical organism intensely with the will and walked slowly up a side street. But I had a bad time of it. The intense effort of will to hold myself tended further to induce the very condition I was trying to master. I had both to hold firmly and relax that hold, It was a kind of tight-rope walking, for either too much relaxation or too much concentration had the same effect of tending to dislodge me from the rope, which in this case represented walking in the body in this world. After a time I succeeded in re-establishing the balance sufficiently so that the crisis was past. But it was as though the rope had merely widened to a narrow path which only slowly became a broad plane wherein I was free to move without careful circumspection as formerly. The completion of this correction required years. For a long time I had to be careful in the vicinity of streetcars and also had to abandon reading metaphysical literature. For I found that the reading of the “Secret Doctrine” or the “Crest-Jewel” of Shankara had the same effect. (PTS, 40-1.)

Death

The personal life is centered upon the world-field; though it is a doomed life in any case since, inevitably, Death reaps all here. Still, the personality never quite believes this and strives in its feebleness to will its continuance in the outer world, until in ripe old age it craves rest, even though it be at the price of extinction. But when this hour of tiredness has come, it is already too late to achieve the Awakening in that body, for this Awakening calls for a profound, though possibly subtle, virility. (PTS, 37-8.)

Drugs – See Tantra

Ego-Functioning – See Consciousness, Relative

Egoistic Consciousness – See Consciousness, Relative and Thought

Emptiness – See God – God is a Void; Enlightenment - Paranirvana

Enlightenment – It is a priceless treasure

I would place this treasure far above anything which may be obtained in the wordinary world field, in whatever domain, such as achievement in government, in business, in science, philosophy, mathematics or the arts. All these stand as values far inferior to these greater values which come from Fundamental Realization. (PTS, xi.)

Enlightenment – It erases all sorrow

He who realizes the obverse of the Crucifixion of Jesus forgets the latter in the presence of that Majestic Glory which sheds a Light so potent as to consume all darkness within Its range. The “Eli, Eli, lama sabachtnai,” seen from one side as “My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken me” becomes, “My God, My God, how greatly has Thou exalted me!” (PTS, 38.)

Enlightenment – It is necessary to solve the world’s problems

It remains true to my present state of consciousness that I would say that no accomplishment, in the world field, can be effective in solving the wrongness which is so evidence in that field, without the insight and resources which are derived from Fundamental Realization. …

As we advance in our scientific knowledge we not only implement the powers of good that may be in the world but we also implement the powers of evil, with the result that the old difficulties, the old wrongness, return again, if anything in an amplified form. Therefore, if we are to resolve in any durable way these difficulties that call for the function of Redemption, it is necessary that more and more of this human whole should attained the perspective and the resources that come from Enlightenment. (PTS, xi.)

… that which is needed is a seeking for the ultimate Attainment on the part of as many people as possible. (PTS, xii.)

In [this that I had realized] lay the one effective key for the solving of [humanity’s] problems. The little tragedies of men left me indifferent. I saw one great Tragedy, the cause of all the rest, the failure of man to realize his own Divinity. I saw but one solution, the Realization of this Divinity. (PTS, 5.)

Enlightenment – It is harder in later life

The personal life is centered upon the world-field; though it is a doomed life in any case since, inevitably, Death reaps all here. Still, the personality never quite believes this and strives in its feebleness to will its continuance in the outer world, until in ripe old age it craves rest, even though it be at the price of extinction. But when this hour of tiredness has come, it is already too late to achieve the Awakening in that body, for this Awakening calls for a profound, though possibly subtle, virility. (PTS, 37-8.)

Enlightenment - It is only the beginning of life

I cannot too strongly emphasize the fact that Liberation is no more the end of life than is a college commencement the end of the young man or woman who graduates. It is simply the end of one stage and the beginning of another. The really worthwhile Life begins after Liberation. When this new Freedom is attained, a Man may return Home, as it were, and spend a long period enjoying the warmth and comfort of that Home. On the other hand, He may return and continue with his chosen profession on a larger field. Some, who have been highly exhausted by their labors at college, may need a long rest, but obviously Those who are strong should occupy Themselves with the Activities of Real Life. (PTS, 89.)

Enlightenment - It is virtually endless

A certain Sage..., speaking of unfolded Consciousness above the level of the highest human Adepts, said: "We attain glimpses of Consciousness so Transcendent, rising level upon level, that the senses fairly reel before the awe-inspiring Grandeur."

Here, certainly, is space for evolution far beyond the highest possibility of man as man. (PTS, 17.)

Beyond [the sage's attainment], whatever it may be, there lie further mysteries awaiting his resolution. In other words, We find no conceivable end to evolution. (PTS, 43.)

I cannot too strongly emphasize the fact that Liberation is no more the end of life than is a college commencement the end of the young man or woman who graduates. It is simply the end of one stage and the beginning of another. The really worth-while Life begins after Liberation. When this new Freedom is attained, a Man may return Home, as it were, and spend a long period enjoying the warmth and comfort of that Home. On the other hand, He may return and continue with his chosen profession on a larger field. Some, who have been highly exhausted by their labors at college, may need a long rest, but obviously Those who are strong should occupy Themselves with the Activities of Real Life. (PTS, 89.)

Enlightenment – The price exacted on the personal man

No doubt a price is exacted from the personal man. An extraordinary demand is made upon the nervous organism and so a counter activity is helpful, perhaps necessary. But, even as the personal man is much more than the physical body, the price goes deeper than the body. There is here a kind of dying, proceeding in the midst of continued bodily existence. Doubtless it is but natural that the personal nature should dread all this and, in a measure, grieve. For here we have the real meaning of the crucifixion. The personal life is centred upon the world-field; though it is a doomed life in any case, since, inevitably, Death reaps all here. Still, the personality never quite believes this and strives in its feebleness to will its continuance in the outer world, until in ripe old age it craves rest, even though at the price of extinction. (PTS, 37.)

Enlightenment – Burned up in the Fire and released

A Fire descends and consumes the personal man. For a time, short or long, this Fire continues. The personal man is the fuel, and the fuel, in greater or less measure, does suffer. But fire does not destroy; it simply transforms. This fact can be realized by an analysis of what takes place through the action of ordinary fire. If a log is burning, the fuel is principally, if not wholly, in the form of carbohydrates, and the fire transforms these into carbon dioxide and water vapor. There remains a small amount of ashes, the persistently earthy portion of the log. The carbohydrate in the log was a fixed form, partaking for a long time, of the earthy solidity of the mineral associates in the log. But as the carbohydrates become carbon dioxide and water vapor, they take on new form in the freer world of the air. So too, does the Fire which descends and consumes the personal man but Transform him. Only the ash of the personal nature is left behind, while the rest, the best of the personality, is taken up to be conscious, in airy spaces. The ultimate state is one of a far, far greater Joy. It is possible for the man passing through the ordeal so to shift his center of self-identity that the pain, instead of being strong, becomes but a shadowy undertone of a Melody that is Joy. He who identifies himself with the fuel predominantly suffers much and keenly, but if, on the other hand, he unites himself with the Fire, all is changed. The Flame of the Fire is a dance of Joy. There is no pain on this level of Consciousness. The transforming man does not then wait until after the Burning to Know the Joy, but feels It through and through while in the midst of the ordeal, which now has almost completed ceased to be an ordeal at all. (PTS, 38-9.)

In the days immediately following the Transition, I clearly felt the Fire; and because I did identify myself mostly with this Fire, those were grand days, despite the fact that there were brief periods of reaction when life seemed low in the physical body and it was difficult to assert the will-to-live. But now, these periods of reaction are growing less, both in that they are shorter in duration and are less intense. Also I do employ more judgment in invoking the Current which is Bliss. There exists a throttle, command of which gives to man the power to control this Current. It is but a due exercise of wisdom so to adjust the flow of the Current that Its action is balanced to meet the strength of the personal man. (PTS, 39.)

In the old days when I read of this Fire, I supposed that It had but a figurative meaning. But while the Fire is figurative, in a sense, yet It is also a quite real and even a sensuously felt and manifested fact. Not only have I felt this Fire, but It has been induced in those who live near me. They report feeling It as genuinely as the heat of the sun and manifest some of the effects of the sun’s heat as it acts upon the human body. The Inner Fire does reach down to the outermost of the man. This does imply that, looked at aright, the metaphysical is not utterly divorced from the physical. (PTS, 39.)

Enlightenment – Recognitions can be different

I say ‘Recognition’ rather than ‘experience’ for a very definite reason. Properly it was not a case of experiential knowledge, which is knowledge from the senses whether gross or subtle, nor knowledge from deduction, though both forms, particularly the latter, have helped in a subsidiary sense. It was an Awakening to a Knowledge which I can best represent by calling it ‘Knowledge through Identity’ and thus the profess – in so far as we can speak of process in this connection at all – is best expressed by the word ‘Recognition.’ (PTS, 4.)

Not all Recognition carries in Its train the profound and, sometimes, intense Joy. There are Recognitions in which the element of Joy is not conspicuous and, though present, may be too hidden to be revealed to the gaze of the observer, unless the latter is unusually acute in his perceptions. (PTS, 34.)

<>P Among the earmarks of Illumination that Dr. Bucke hhas noted, Kant does not reveal, at least not conspicuously, the Joy and the ‘subjective Light.’ But on the other hand the moral elevation is marked. (PTS, 37.)

Enlightenment – Partial enlightenment

I Recognize, in ever increasing numbers, signs of the Supreme Light. While there are Few for Whom the Sun has risen in Its full Glory, the number who have known the Twilight before the Sun appears above the horizon, or have perhaps glimpsed the Sun as Its rays barely surmount the barrier, is much greater than I had thought, There is also another and more mysterious class of which the members were born with the Sun above the horizon, but the Rays were obscured by a cloud-filled sky. For These, the Sun first rose in other lives, but for one reason or another They have taken incarnation under obscuration. The clouds may or may not break for Them during the current life-time. It depends primarily upon the original purpose. It is sometimes necessary to drive through from below in order to force new Doors and, in such cases, the Pioneer is very apt to be one who first broke through in some other life. Sometimes the obscuration may serve the purpose of rest, for the Inner Life, if the Final Rest is refused, is considerably more intense than life within the egoistic consciousness. (PTS, 79.)

Enlightenment – Recognition by thought

Immanuel Kant is a great example among western peoples, of a man who attained something of Recognition through Manas. As a result, his philosophy clears the Way in the West in a sense analogous to that achieved by the thought of Shankara in the Orient but, unlike the latter, it is incomplete on the metaphysical side. (PTS, 36.)

Enlightenment – Nirvikalpa Samadhi

The very genus of the West seems to be foreign to ‘Nirvikalpa Samadhi.’ (PTS, 14.)

Enlightenment – Paranirvana

Hence the approach – for from the relative point of view it seems like an approach – to the SELF from consciousness posited within the cosmos takes on the form of progressive negation of all identity with form until finally Identity in the Formless breaks forth as Recognition. At this stage Recognition may well take the form of ‘I am Formlessness.” But this is really an incomplete Recognition, as Shankara has shown by his acute logic. The final Recognition is “I am not form and I am not formless.” This standpoint is neutral with respect to the cosmos and the truly Transcendental or Formless. What this really means is that beyond Nirvana there is a Paranirvana which is a state of metaphysical indifference with respect to the states of manifestation or non-manifestation. (PTS, 13.)

And what I'll say now goes beyond the literature. Whether this is the door open to all who take this step, whether this of which I am about to speak is the door open to all, I know that it came to me and there walked into my consciousness THAT which transcended the nirvanic as the nirvanic transcended the sangsaric [sic]. Its quality was totally different. Not one of this delight, but a Principle of Equilibrium that united all pairs of opposites including Samsara and Nirvana. In some ways a kind of neutral Consciousness that knew that it could enter the nirvanic state and leave it at will, enter the sangsaric state and leave it at will. Nowhere in literature did I find any reference to anything of this sort. And then, at its peak, the sense of I vanished and the object of consciousness, which now had appeared as the Robe of the Divine, also vanished, and only Consciousness remained. Not the consciousness of some entity, but Consciousness Self-existent, and the Source of all selves and all worlds. This is Enlightenment. This is the KEY to the Buddhist scriptures, the Doctrine of the Voidness, and so forth. (“The Induction,” 24 January 1970. http://www.selfdiscoveryportal.com/arInduction.htm . Downloaded 2 January 2006.)

The final Recognition is “I am not form and I am not formless.” This standpoint is neutral with respect to the cosmos and the truly Transcendental or Formless. What this really means is that beyond Nirvana there is a Paranirvana which is a state of metaphysical indifference with respect to the states of manifestation or non-manifestation. (PTS, 13.)

Enlightenment – We must want only God

The Joy is not the end-in-itself to be sought.
Seek Me first, and then My Knowledge and My Joy will also be thine.
Seek me for My own sake and not for any ulterior motive.
I and I alone am the worthy end of all endeavor.
So lay down all for Me, and My Wealth will be thy wealth, My power thy power, My Joy thy joy, My Wisdom thy wisdom. (PTS, 24.)

Enlightenment – Seek it only for the sake of humanity

The seeking of this Attainment is not simply for the sake of one’s own individual Redemption, but for the sake of the Redemption of humanity as a whole and, in addition, of all creatures whatsoever, however humble they may be. He who forgets his own Attainment and his own Redemption in seeking for the Attainment and Redemption of all creatures is following the Path which is most certain to involve that very Attainment and Redemption for himself. The motive should always be the good of all creatures, not one’s own private good. (PTS, xii.)

Enlightenment – It is ever an act of Grace

As the lower cannot command the Higher, the individual ego is not lord over the Universal SELF. Hence, from the individual standpoint, the Realization is spontaneous and thus is often called an act of Grace. The SELF, which it must be remembered is Identical with Divinity, does not stand within the causal sequence. Consequently, strictly considered, Realization of the SELF is never an effect of causes set up by the individual man acting in space and time. The later through his efforts prepares the candle, as it were, but the Flame is lighted through a spontaneous act of Spirit. (PTS, 23.)

Enlightenment – Dr. Wolff’s first Premonitory Recognition

I can distinguish three distinct Recognitions that produced lasting effects. As I look back I can discern a progressive quality in the three which, it seems, should be noted. (PTS, 27.)

In the past, two important [premonitory] Recognitions have come to me. First, nearly fourteen years ago, in a setting which it is not necessary to delineate, I suddenly recognized “I am Atman.” This effected immediate changes of outlook that persisted. (PTS, 4.)

About fourteen years ago an old college friend called upon Sherifa and me and the time was devoted to the discussion of Theosophical subjects. (My friend was an earnest student of the Theosophia.)

At one stage in the conversation he outlined the various steps of a very old discriminative technique in which it is shown, progressively, that the Self is not the body nor the various other principles of man, but that it can be only that final principle – i.e., the Atman or pure subjectivity. I was familiar with the method, was already convinced of the soundness of the logic and had previously employed it myself. But in this case I suddenly seemed to Realize, with certainty, that, in fact, ‘I am Identical with the Atman.’ There was a sense of a new Light which made clear much of what had been obscure, but this was not a light seen in the form of a subtle sensuous perception. The effect upon the relative consciousness persisted. There was a definite enrichment, but I was not aware of the Current of Joy.

The most significant consequence, within the individual consciousness, was a certain change in the base of thought. As an example, it may be noted that, whereas prior to that date I had read the “Bhagavadgita” because it was one of the important Theospophic books, I did not like it, and it seemed to inculcate a veritable repression of the life-interest I then cared for; on the other hand, immediately after the Recognition of my Identity with the Atman. I found myself spontaneously thinking, as my own thought, many of the ideas contained in the “Gita.” I Realized them as obviously true, and instead of their carrying a repressive value, they were a source of / Light and expansion. I have never forgotten this Recognition and never felt disposed to question the fact I then saw so clearly. In the intellectual sense that Recognition was, and is, persistent. But other aspects of the personal nature were not included or were sufficiently included. So, in the intervening years I have often felt and acted contrary to that Recognition. (PTS, 27-8.)

Enlightenment – Dr. Wolff’s second Premonitory Recognition – “Nirvana”

Second, less than one year ago, while engaged in the public work mentioned [earlier], and while deeply interested in a book giving a report of a living Indian Sage, I also suddenly recognized that Nirvana is not a field, or space, or world which one entered and that contained one as space might contain an external object, but rather that “I am identical with Nirvana, and always have been and always will be so.” This Recognition likewise had its persistent effects upon the personal consciousness. (PTS, 4.)

The second occasion occurred somewhat less than a year ago. I had been reading with deep interest a book by Paul Brunton in which, among other experiences, he told of his contact with a certain Sage in Southern India [Sri Ramana Maharshi?]. I felt a sympathetic rapport with this Sage and repeatedly read His words with profound attention. Once, while thus engaged, it suddenly dawned on me that Nirvana is not a field or place where man enters and is enclosed, as in a space which envelops bodies, but I Recognized that “I am Nirvana.” In other words, the Real Self is not other than Nirvana, never has been other, and never will be other. All that the individual man achieves is Recognition of this eternal fact. With this Transition in consciousness Joy was realized. Even at that time I sensed It as a current, though in modified form as compared with the more recent Recognition. I once spent a whole day immersed within It; and, for a period, within certain limits, I could invoke It. (PTS, 28.)

Nirvana is pure creativeness and, consequently, cannot be captured within fixed definition. On the other hand, genuine objects of consciousness can be defined, since they are forms. Nirvana is inconceivable but It is ceaselessly Conceiving. Herein is a partial explanation of the Nirvanic Bliss that can fall within the understanding of the more common consciousness. Creative activity, even on the lower levels, such as begetting, does awaken a degree of bliss, though of progressively inferior and grosser quality as we approach the physiological. Usually such minor blisses last but for a moment, or, at best, for brief periods with subsequent depression and exhaustion. Conceive of the intensity of the bliss raised beyond all relative imagination, and far beyond the power of any physiological organism to endure, and then regard it as not lasting merely for a moment or a brief period, but extending with unbroken continuity indefinitely; then something of the Bliss-aspect of Nirvana may be apprehended. Is it so surprising that many become 'God-intoxicated' and fail to go to the winning of real Mastery? (PTS, 29-30.)

At the time, I was engaged in lecturing and class-work concerned with metaphysical subjects. A greater Light came into this work. While previously I had employed a considerable degree of formal organization in lecturing and classwork, I then began to relax the formal aspect so that it stood more in the background as something automatic in its action. I dared to leave a larger room for spontaneity on the platform, and found by repeated experimenting that I could trust the spontaneity, provided I could secure a certain attitude in the audience. Lacking that attitude, I could rebound to the more formal preparation. Since then I have continued to be able to operate between these two modes. I found that a conceptual coordination, produced while one stood or sat before an audience, released, concomitantly, a current-like quality that had, among other features, the effect of holding the audience in a kind of stillness which I would describe as possessed of depth. The attention of the individual member of the audience was held even though he did not understand the ideas developed, as was often found to be the case in subsequent conversations. A simple repetition of the same conceptual coordination did not have the same power in the same degree. I thus found a definite correlation between the Current and creativeness. From the relative standpoint the Current requires a progressive disintegration and reintegration of forms. Once a form becomes relatively fixed, the Current subsides. And yet, in a very curious way, this disintegration and reintegration leaves a certain subtle master-form unaltered, The result is essential consistency between all formal integrations produced in the Current, provided the individual understands the art of language, that consistency still remains, though in a deeper sense which is not so easily recognized. (PTS, 28-9.)

Enlightenment – After the second premonitory Recognition

Returning to the record, … the second Recognition had produced a change that was persistent, yet, at the same time, certain aspects of my relative nature, principally below the intellectual, were not taken up. There were outer desires that still had strength, although they had become perceptibly weakened. After the period of lectures and class-work there was a sort of partial ‘clouding of the sky.’ At the time I could not invoke the Current, though the force of Knowledge remained unbroken, as far as attained. Subsequently, lectures and class-work were continued in the Middle West. For the first three weeks of this work in Chicago I had what, for me, was a most unusual experience. I felt the consciousness of the city as an almost unsupportable weight which enveloped my mind with a sort of lethargy so that I could not really think. Prior to this experience nothing had ever been able to suffocate the power of thought that I could not, fairly readily, will my way to thought-action. I was on the platform nearly every day throughout this period, although during the greater part of the twenty-four hours of each day my consciousness was so gripped with heaviness that I desired to sleep all the time. I spoke, as it were, with the momentum of past thought, but it seems my state was not realized, at least not generally by others. After three weeks I broke through with a deep sense of elation and victory. Once again, I found myself moving in a stream of genuine thought and, finally, gave a lecture on the “Crest Jewel” of Shankara which represented the highest point I had attained on the platform up to that time. In subsequent work in the smaller cities I had no further experience of the obscuration. (PTS, 30-1.)

Enlightenment – Dr. Wolff’s reinterpretation of substantiality

It is, perhaps, pertinent to note in passing that a few days previously [i.e., previous to 7 August 1936], as a result of thought stimulated by my readings, I had developed an interpretation of the nature of ponderable matter that seemed to me to clear away certain logical difficulties which always have seemed to persist in the efforts to reconcile Transcendent Being with the physical universe. The idea is that ponderable matter – meaning by that term all things sensed whether gross or subtle – is, in fact, a relative absence of substance, a sort of partial vacuum. … Habitually we regard the material filling of sensation as being substantial. To offset this, we may have been theoretically convinced that so-called empty space is not only filled but actually more substantial than the portions of it occupied by ponderable matter. This idea is not new to metaphysics, and much in the literature of modern physics is not incompatible with it. But I have found that ideas received from outer sources, even though in convincing form, lack the power over consciousness possessed by an original idea. The effect of this idea with me was a far more effective acceptance of substantial reality where the senses reported emptiness, and a greater capacity to realize unreality – or merely dependent and derivative reality – in the material given through the senses. (PTS, 2-3. Emphasis is the author’s.)

Enlightenment – Dr. Wolff’s first Fundamental Recognition of 7 August 1936

By the time the work was drawing to a close, I had a feeling as of being emptied, and the desire grew strong to return to the West and live for a time under conditions where I could have complete solitude. This condition was met in July [1936] on one of the tributaries of the American River near Michigan Bluff. Two purposes conjoined at this time. It was desirable that some cross-cut work should b3 done on a gold-prospect for further sampling and, in addition, I found a curious value in underground activity in association with inward penetration toward depth. So, during the latter half of July, I had some days of solitude combined with underground physical work, plus meditative readings in the “System of the Vedanta,” as noted previously. Much clarification was achieved in my consciousness during this period, but two facts, one a correlating idea and the other an experience, stand out above the rest. The experience was a spontaneous development in the Current, but this time in a form that was more sensuously evident than on any prior occasion. Here, for the first time, I submitted It to analysis, in so far as It was reflected in the organism. ….

During the first week of August we returned to San Fernando and, on or about the 7th of the month, the Glorious Transition came. (PTS, 31.)

August 17, 1936. The ineffable Transition came, about ten days ago. (PTS, 1.)

I had been sitting in a porch swing, reading as previously stated. Ahead of the sequence in the book, I turned to section devoted to “Liberation,” as I seemed to feel an especial hunger for this. I covered the material quickly and it all seemed very clear and satisfactory. Then, as I sat afterward dwelling in thought upon the subject just read, suddenly it dawned upon me that a common mistake made in the higher meditation – i.e., meditation for Liberation – is the seeking for a subtle object of Recognition, in other words, something that could be experienced. Of coruse, I had long known the falseness of this position theoretically, yet had failed to recognize it. (Here is a subtle but very important distinction.)

At once, I dropped expectation of having anything happen. Then, with eyes open and no sense stopped in functioning – hence no trance – I abstracted the subjective moment – the ‘I AM’ or ‘Atman’ element – from the totality of the objective consciousness manifold. Upon this I focused. Naturally, I found what, from the relative point of view, is Darkness and Emptiness. But I Realized It as Absolute Light and Fullness and that I was That. Of course, I cannot tell what IT was in Its own nature. The relative forms of consciousness inevitably distort non-relative Consciousness. Not only can I not tell this to others, I cannot even contain it within my own relative consciousness, whether of sensation, feeling, or thought. Every metaphysical thinker will see this impossibility at once. I was even prepared not to have the personal consciousness share in this Recognition in any way. But in this I was happily disappointed. I felt the Ambrosia-like quality in the breath with the purifying benediction that it casts over the whole personality, even including the physical body. I found myself above the universe, not in the sense of being above space, time, and causality, My karma seemed to drop away from me as an individual responsibility. I felt intangibly, yet wonderfully, free. I sustained this universe and was not bound by it. Desires and ambitions grew perceptibly more and more shadowy. All worldly honors were without power to exalt me. Physical life seemed undesirable. … I looked, as it were, over the world, asking: “What is there of interest here? What is worth doing?” I found but one interest: the desire that other souls should also realize this that I had realized, for in it lay the one effective key for the solving of their problems. The little tragedies of men left me indifferent. I saw one great Tragedy, the cause of all the rest, the failure of man to realize his own Divinity. I saw but one solution, the Realization of this Divinity. (PTS, 4-5.)

We had just returned to our Southern California home after a few weeks stay in a small town in the Mother Lode country in the northern part of the State, and I was resting from the fatigue induced by the all-night driving of the automobile. At the time I was engaged in the reading of portions of “The System of the Vedanta” by Paul Deussen, as I had been doing more or less systematically during the preceding three weeks. This work is an interpretation in western philosophic form of the Vedanta as it is developed in the commentaries of Shankara on the Brahmasutras. … I had found him always clear and convincing, at least in all matters relative to the analysis of consciousness, while with the other Sages I either found obscurities or emphases with which I could not feel complete sympathy. For some months I had resolved to delve more deeply into the thought of Shankara in so far as it was available in translated form. It was in pursuance of this purpose that I was slowly reading and meditating upon “The System of the Vedanta.”

I had been following this course while completing a cross-cut in a gold-prospect near the small town of Michigan Bluff. Much of this time I was completely alone and was more than usually successful in penetrating the meaning and following the logic of what I was reading. One day, after the evening meal and while still sitting at the table, I found that, by gradual transition, I had passed into a very delightful state of contemplation. (PTS, 1-2.)

One day, after the evening meal and while still sitting at the table, I found that, by gradual transition, I had passed into a very delightful state of contemplation. … My breath had changed, but not in the sense of stopping or becoming extremely slow or rapid. It was, perhaps, just a little slower than normal. The notable change was in a subtle quality associated with the air breathed. Over and above the physical phases of the air there seemed to be an impalpable substance of indescribable sweetness which, in turn, was associated with a general sense of well-being, embracing even the physical man. It was like happiness or joy, but thee words are inadequate. It was of a very gentle quality, yet far transcended the value of any of the more familiar forms of happiness. (PTS, 2.)

Introspective analysis revealed the fact that the elixir-like quality was most marked during the exhalation, thus indicating that it was not derived from the surrounding air. Further, the exhaled breath was not simply air expelled into the outer atmosphere, but seemed to penetrate down through the whole organism like a gentle caress, leaving throughout a quiet sense of delight. It seemed to me like a nectar. Since that time I have learned that it is the true Ambrosia. (PTS, 2.)

This third Recognition was much profounder than the others. The Recognitions as expressed in the forms, ‘I am Atman’ and ‘I am Nirvana,” were not devoid of an objective element. Each of these forms is a complete judgment or proposition involving, therefore, a subject and a predicate. In the use of relative language, such a form is unavoidable. But in my own consciousness, in addition to this fact, I also actually retained a degree of the objective element. Hence, the Recognition in each case, fell short of genuine identification. In the third instance, I isolated the subjective moment from the relative manifold of consciousness, as already stated, and the result was Emptiness, Darkness, and Silence, i.e., Consciousness with no object. It should be borne in mind, however, that relative consciousness by its own momentum continued to function all this time, so that I never for one moment lost sight of my environment or the ceaseless train of thoughts. It was simply a discriminative abstraction of the pure subjective moment and Recognizing myself as That. At this moment, I found Myself above space, time, and causality, and actually sustaining the whole universe by the Light of Consciousness which I AM. Almost at once, there followed the Nectar-like Current and the gentle, yet so powerful Joy. Now, always heretofore with me, as a practical working principle, thought was life, even though theoretically I had for some time recognized that thought itself, no matter how abstract, required a matrix. But with the third Recognition I found myself more than content in a world above thought, since It comprehended thought with all else. I was tempted to abandon thought and draw Inward. All the outer effort and worked seemed so useless. But on this point I had been already warned by literature, such as the “Voice of the Silence”; and, further, it did not seem like good sportsmanship to have received an inward aid making possible the Attainment of the most precious Value of all and fair to carry It to others. So I looked over the world, as it were, to find what value there remained to hold my interest. It seemed to me that I had garnered, at least in seed-form, enough relative knowledge. I had no real interest in the grosser construction, such as the tangible forms,, institutions, societies, governments, and arts. But there was one thing that did remain: a humanity, also part of Myself, that was almost famished for that saving Knowledge and the Divine Nectar that I had found so precious. So, for me, there was a commission to be fulfilled, to ‘carry on’ in the objective effort so that these others might be brought nearer to the Goal. (PTS, 31-3.)

From the relative point of view, the final step may be likened to a leap into Nothing. At once, that Nothing was resolved into utter Fullness, which in turn gave the relative world a dreamlike quality of unreality. I felt, and knew myself to have arrived, at last, at the Real. I was not dissipated in a sort of spatial emptiness, but on the contrary was spread out in a Fullness beyond measure. The roots of my consciousness, which prior to this moment had been (seemingly) more or less deeply implanted in the field of relative consciousness, transplanted into a supernal region. The sense of being thus transplanted has continued to the present day, and it seems to be a much more normal state of emplacement than ever the old rooting had been. (PCWO, 38.)

The critical stage in the transformation is the realization of the ‘I’ as zero. But, at once, that ‘I’ spreads out into an unlimited “thickness.” It is as though the ‘I’ became the whole of space. The Self is no longer a pole or focal point, but it sweeps outward, everywhere, in a sort of unpolarized consciousness, which is at once self-identity and the objective content of consciousness. It is an unequivocal transcendence of the subject-object relationship. (PCWO, 39.)

Enlightenment – After Dr. Wolff’s first Fundamental Recognition

Late yesterday afternoon [i.e., August 21, 1936] I awakened again to the deeper Consciousness, though not so profoundly as upon the first occasion. The immediate inducing cause was the reading of a portion of Shankara’s “Direct Realization.” The inciting occasion each time seems to be a new turn in Recognition, combined with a certain creative act of the relative consciousness. The moment of creative discovery is the crucial one. There is then a deepening of consciousness, a sort of retreat of the relative world, in a subtle sense, and then the quality of Bliss flows over the personality. From a profound level thought is stimulated, or, perhaps more correctly, felt. (PTS, 7.)

Enlightenment - The High Satisfaction

I first became aware of being enveloped in an extraordinary State of Consciousness when I found myself seemingly surrounded by, and interpenetrated through and through with, a quality for which there is no adequate word but which is most nearly represented by calling is “Satisfaction.” I do not mean simply that the State was satisfactory. It was Satisfaction. … I do not mean merely an abstraction, such as a state of being satisfied, but, rather, a substantial Actuality. … He who is enveloped in this Satisfaction is in need of nothing whatsoever to satisfy him. The Satisfaction I realized is a real and substantial Existence prior to all experiencing. … It was the essence of aesthetic, emotional, moral, and intellectual satisfaction at the same time. There was nothing more required, so far as desire for myself was concerned, for at that time I had the full value of everything that could possibly be desired. It might be called the culminating point, the highest to which desire, individually centred, could reach. (PTS, 116-7)

Enlightenment - The High Indifference

As time went on there was a gradual dimming, or fusing, or being enveloped, on the part of the [High] Satisfaction, by another and considerably more profound State. The only expression that reasonably well represents this higher State is the term ‘High Indifference.’ Along with this was a sense of simply tremendous Authority … of such stupendous Majesty as to reduce the power of all Caesars relatively to the level of insects. The Caesars may destroy cultures and whole peoples, but they are utterly powerless with respect to the Inner Springs of Consciousness, and in the domains beyond the river Styx they are as impotent as most other men. But the Authority of the High Indifference has supreme dominion over all of this, as well as being the Power which permits the Caesars to play their little games for brief seasons. The Caesars, as well as many who are greater than they, are capable of reaching only to some goal well within the limits of Satisfaction. They certainly do not know the Powers lying beyond the utmost sweep of individual desire. But there is such a region of Authority, supreme over all.

In this State I was not enveloped with satisfaction, but there was no feeling, in connection with that fact, of something having been lost. Literally, I now had no need of Satisfaction. This state or quality rested, as it were, below Me, and I could have invoked it if I had so chosen. But the important point is that on the level of the High Indifference there is no need of comfort or of Bliss, in the sense of an active Joy or Happiness. If one were to predicate Bliss in connection with the High Indifference, it would be correct only in the sense that there was an absence of misery or pain. But relative to this State even pleasurable enjoyment is misery. I am well aware that in this we have a State of Consciousness which falls quite outside the range of ordinary human imagination. … now, deep within me, I feel that I am centered in a Level from which I look down upon all objects of all possible human desire, even the most lofty. It is a strange, almost a weird, Consciousness when viewed from the perspective of relative levels. Yet, on its own Level, It is the one State that is really complete or adequate. What there may be still Beyond, I do not Know, but this State I do know consumes all others of which I have had any glimpse whatsoever. …

The High Indifference is to be taken in the sense of an utter Fullness that is even more than a bare Infinity. (PTS, 118-20.)

Evolution, Spiritual

A certain Sage..., speaking of unfolded Conscousness above the level of the highest human Adepts, said: "We attain glimpses of Consciousness so Transcendent, rising level upon level, that the senses fairly reel before the awe-inspiring Grandeur."

Here, certainly, is space for evolution far beyond the highest possibility of man as man. (PTS, 17.)

Truly, within the Infinite there are Mysteries within Mysteries, Deeps beyond Deeps, Grandeurs beyond Grandeurs. … Mystery of Mysteries, reaching inward and outward, but ever Beyond! And from that Beyond ever there come new whisperings of other imponderable Glories. Ah! How little is this world at the beginning of the Trail, barely a point in a Space of unlimited dimensions! (PTS, 115.)

Beyond [the sage's] attainment, whatever it may be, there lie further mysteries awaiting his resolution. In other words, We find no conceivable end to evolution. (PTS, 43.)

Fire, Inner – See Enlightenment – Burned up in the inner Fire and released

God

… the Grand Abstraction … is the one Concrete Reality…. (PTS, 33.)

The Silence is Full and Pregnant, and out of It flows the Stream of all formations in endless variety: symphonies, philosophies, governments, sciences, arts, societies, and so on and on and on. (PTS, 34.)

The ultimate reality is Nameless, though word-signs have been devised that point toward but do not define It. Among these is the word SAT, designating, but not defining, THAT which is neither Being nor non-Being. This is the One Reality, or, rather, THAT which is neither One nor not-One. I, the Atman, am identical with THAT; hence, the statement, “The Atman is identical with Brahman.” (PTS, 34-5.)

God – As Satchitananda; Humanity as Atman-Buddhi-Manas

This One Reality is Absolute Consciousness and Absolute Motion. Its highest representation is, therefore, a triad and this has been called in Sanskrit “SAT-CHIT-ANANDA.” CHIT is Consciousness or Knowledge in the highest sense. ANANDA is Bliss or Love, again in the highest sense. But, as already shown, pure Bliss is pure Creativeness, and, as creativeness is motion in the sense of disintegrating and reintegrating form ceaselessly, we can see how Ananda becomes identical with Ceaseless Motion. Below this highest Triad there is a lower reflection, though still on a metaphysical level. This reflection abides in man as his highest aspect. It is known as Atman-Buddhi-Manas; ‘Atman’ corresponding to ‘SAT,’ ‘Buddhi’ to ‘ANANDA,’ and ‘Manas’ to ‘CHIT.’ (PTS, 35.)

God – God is the One in the Many

Upon this space I cast My Shadow in numberless variations, yet ever remain One – apart. (PTS, 18.)

God – God is the unitive Reality

Beside Me there is none other. (PTS, 18.)

God – God is a Void, Emptiness – See also Enlightenment - Paranirvana

This Emptiness is Absolute Fullness but, as such, never can be comprehended from the perspective of egoistic consciousness. (PTS, 12.)

I cannot conceive of anyone who has glimpsed the beauty of the Transcendent Formlessness ever preferring cosmic beauty. (PTS, 14.)

One should aim at the Emptiness as the highest, but … the consequence in relative consciousness is a new richness developing along the lines of the natural bent of the individual consciousness. On the other hand, if one aimed at a conceivable goal he sets that goal as an arbitrary limit. The advantage of aiming beyond all possible limits lies in rendering more nearly realizable the fullest possibilities of the individual. The Emptiness is thus the real Philosopher’s Stone which transforms all things to new richnesses; It is the Alkahest that transmutes the base metal of inferior consciousness into the Gold of Higher Consciousness. (PTS, 15.)

Guru

Thus the Guru, if He is in fact a Guru in the true spiritual sense, is Divinity. Such a Man can light the Flame. The aspirant should seek his Guru in his inner consciousness and turn to Him as to Fivinity Itself. (PTS, 23.)

High Indifference – See Enlightenment – The High Indifference

High Satisfaction – See Enlightenment – The High Satisfaction

Indifference – See Enlightenment – The High Indifference

Isolation of Essential Element

Repeatedly I have tried stopping thought and closing out the senses, but the artificial state thus effected was barren of results. Heretofore, the rich values have come to me through or while thinking. I finally took this fact as a key and abandoned all effort to stop thought or interfere with the reports of sensation. … Through the larger part of my life the thought-world has naturally dominated the sensation-world so that sensation had come to mean little more than do small waves to an ocean liner. The issue thus lay between thought-consciousness and Transcendent-Consciousness while the rest, I found, could be neglected. Now, with a process or manifold, a given phase or aspect may be isolated for special attention without stopping the process or eliminating the balance of the manifold. When I recalled this fact and applied it, I found at once a really effective method of meditation. In fact, I realize, I have done this for many years without regarding it as a meditative technique. It was by applying this method of isolation of the essential element in the midst of a complex, without trying to restrain the other components, that the Transition was effected during the early part of this month. (PTS, 10.)

Jesus

“No man cometh unto the Father but by Me.” Thus spake Jesus. But many heard, though few understood, and so they sought the Father through belief in a man who dwelt for a short time upon this earth. But no man is ‘I,’ since ‘man’ is an object while I AM [is] always the subject. Hence, to translate the above quotation as meaning, ‘no man cometh unto the Father but by Jesus,’ is completely to change its meaning.

While both the subjective and objective factors are blended in Absolute Consciousness, yet the unitary quality is carried in the subjective moment. There is but one ‘I’ or subject. Again, this is the most immediate and intimate of all facts. Hence, only through the ‘I’ is Identity realized. Approached in any other way, God is ever something other than the seeker and, therefore at a distance. To come to the Father is to be one with the Father, and this can be achieved only through the pure Subject or the SELF. (PTS, 19.)

Kant, Immanuel

I, for one, am profoundly indebted to [Immanuel Kant] and realize that debt more clearly than ever at the present time. Without him, I might have experienced, but I could not have understood nearly so well the Meaning unfolded through the Transition, being born, as I am, in a western body and nurtured in a western current of thought. I take this opportunity to make my acknowledgment to this great philosopher who could recognize, and so well name, the pure subjective moment of Consciousness, i.e., Pure Apperception. Is there any greater phrase in all philosophy than this: “The synthetiuc, transcendental unity of pure apperception?” He who penetrates this phase and extracts freom it its ultimate Meaning will have attained the Recognition. (PTS, 36-7.)

Kant has made one of the most important contributions, if not the most important, to the theory of ethics of any thinker in our present culture. And his primary ethical principle is one of the most lofty ever formulated by man. The intellectual illumination is stupendous. Few men, if any, in history have ever surpassed the intellectual altitude attained by Immanuel Kant. (PTS, 37.)

Karma

My karma seemed to drop away from me as an individual responsibility. I felt intangibly, yet wonderfully, free. I sustained this universe and was not bound by it. (PTS, 5.)

Knowledge – Knowing all

I became aware that Mystery surrounded what we could, at present, comprehend intellectually. But one effect of the intense concentration was a kind of breaking-through the personal mental shell and, briefly, I seemed to possess a veritable universe of Knowledge. It seemed that then I knew all things that were to be known in this world. I simply could not contain this Knowledge within my personal mind. Presently, that Knowledge would have burned up and destroyed this brain and nervous system, had I remained in rapport with It for any appreciable period of time. So, before I could assimilate any of this Knowledge concretely, I had to withdraw the concentration. Still, I retained enough to know that I knew behind the Veil. (PTS, 40.)

Kundalini

I shall attempt an analysis of this Current of Joy as it affects the outer consciousness including the physiological man. To the sensuous consciousness It appears as of the nature of a fluid, for there is a sense of 'flowing through.' It penetrates all tensions with the effect of physical release. Spots that are not so well feel both rested and stronger. All over and through and through there is a quality that may well be described as physiological happiness. The organism feels no craving for sensuous distraction in order to find enjoyment. The external life of the individual could appear highly ascetic and austere to others, but all the while it would be profoundly happy. ...

I wish, by every means possible, to make the point clear that in the Current lies the highest possible value which, from the relative standpoint, we call enjoyment. (PTS, 20-1.)

The Current is clearly a subtle, fluid-like substance which brings the sense of well-being already described. Along with It, a more than earthly Joy suffuses the whole nature. To myself, I called It a Nectar. Now, I recognize It under several names. It is ... the 'Soma,' the 'Ambrosia of the Gods,' the 'Elixir of Life,' the 'Water of Life' of Jesus, and the 'Baptism of the Spirit' of St. Paul. It is more than related to Immortality; in fact it is Identical with Immortality. (PTS, 31)

Language

[Fundamental Recognition] is an unequivocal transcendence of the subject-object relationship. Herein lies the rationale of the inevitable ineffability of mystical insight. All language is grounded in the subject-object relationship, and so, at best, can only misrepresent transcendent consciousness when an effort is made to express its immediately given value. (PCWO, 39.)

Language is the creation and vehicle of egostic consciousness. It is imbedded in the subject-object relationship. Speech or writing as from the perspective of the SELF involves unavoidable obscurity, analogous to that which would be found in attempting to express abstract thought in the very concrete language of a primitive people, but in the former case the difficulty is very much greater. Only in the Silence can the SELF be known as It is, and this is not ‘knowing’ in the subject-object sense. Now, from the egoistic or ‘self-conscious’ standpoint language can be used correctly. But in the case the expression is about the event or reality as seen from the outside; it is not the event or reality itself. Expression as from the SELF, which is expression in the Current, IS the Reality. Necessarily there is a mystical quality in the latter, but not implying irrationality in the sense of anti-rationality. In fact the SELF is REASON, while all external reasoning is but a reflection of that REASON and, in most cases a very poor reflection indeed. (PTS, 25.)

The rules of literary form will have to be sacrificed when they interfere with the main purpose. At times I write in the midst of the Current, yet at other times more or less out of It. The Current carries Authority, and in the face of this literary rules must be discarded when they act as barriers to Meaning. (PTS, 26.)

Longing for Liberation

One here and one there, and We hope, many may be stirred to a desire to Know in the Inner sense. And that desire must be planted in the soul before the Awakening can take place. (PTS, 25.)

Merrill-Wolff, Franklin

I am exploring a new world. There is so much which requires to be thought into clarity that there seems not to be time enough for the writing, setting aside all more external activities. But it is necessary that a record should be kept as far as the inner events and ideas can be captured. My thought is extraordinarily clear. An increasing amount of it is now within the range of formulation, but my actual thought is in the form of a sort of shorthand which takes much less time than the completed expression on paper or the spoken word. The writing process seems so slow! I shall place down what I can in this record as the material comes to the foreground, leaving systematic formulation to the future. (PTS, 9.)

Today, I find that in a deep sense I understand Walt Whitman, for I, too, have Awakened. But heretofore Whitman was not at all clear to me, and his words have not helped me to the Awakening. In contrast, the writings of Shankara have proved of the highest potency, while among Western writers it is Immanuel Kant who did most to prepare the Way for me. This is clearly a matter related to individual temperament. Whitman’s Recognition is unquestionably genuine, but for me his words did not clarify but served, rather, to obscure the Way. Of Mohammed’s expression this would have been even truer had I tried to make serious use of it. Yet Mohammed did attain some degree of mystical insight. It seems clear that no man can effectively illumine the Way for all men. There is more than one main Road and a great number of sub-roads. On all these, men who can serve as beacons are needed. (PTS, 14.)

There is a growing compulsion to write. At first I did not care to bother with writing or with any other form of expression. Even the world of thought, hitherto always a rich one with me, became inferior tot the Consciousness induced by the Recognition wherein I found Myself sustaining the universe. But I have accepted duty in the relative world and that duty has become, first, thought, and then as complete an exposition of it as its racing current will permit. At first I made myself write but now there is a growing compulsion that sends me to the typewriter. (PTS, 15.)

I looked over the world, as it were, to find what value there remained to hold my interest. It seemed to me that I had garnered, at least in seed-form, enough relative knowledge. I had no real interest in the grosser construction, such as the tangible forms,, institutions, societies, governments, and arts. But there was one thing that did remain: a humanity, also part of Myself, that was almost famished for that saving Knowledge and the Divine Nectar that I had found so precious. So, for me, there was a commission to be fulfilled, to ‘carry on’ in the objective effort so that these others might be brought nearer to the Goal. But then the question arose: Ho was this to be done? I placed this question before One who has given me much excellent advice and asked for a formula of action. He said, in effect: “None of us knows such a formula. All other compartments of nature under the Sun we can act with and mold nature according to Our wills. But the human soul is a mystery, and its inner depths lie beyond Our penetrations. We try many ways to reach these human souls, often disappointed where We expect much, and yet surprised at times beyond Our expectations. Find your own way and try.” – Well, this book is such an attempt. (PTS, 32-3.)

I have a sense of Grand Adventure, the most glorious of all.

A veritable world looms before my inner gaze unfolding hour by hour, and day by day, so that I cannot begin to record on paper what is being unfolded within the mind by the shorthand of thought.

Such Joy and Freedom shed their luster about that even this remaining bondage of action is losing, progressively, the sense of restriction. (PTS, 33.)

The Mystery Sage

About eighteen months ago [prior to August 17, 1936] there began a series of conversations with one whom I recognized as a Sage. I checked the validity of my recognition of this One in every way that I could and proved His genuineness to my complete satisfaction. I acted on His word when I could not see clearly and found that clarity gradually unfolded. Acting upon His suggestions, Sherifa – my wife – and I undertook a phase of public work not hitherto attempted. Both of us found as we progressed in the work a gradual growth of understanding that has steadily brought Light where there had been obscurity. Among other things the Sage suggested my correlation with a previous incarnation of special importance. He advised me that He was not, and could not be, my personal Guru, as that relationship was dependent upon alignments that are not arbitrary. (PTS, 3.)

At the time, I was engaged in lecturing and class-work concerned with metaphysical subjects. (PTS, 28.)

Nirvana – See Enlightenment – Second premonitory Recognition – Nirvana

Objects

Here "Objects" must be understood in that most general sense of any modification of consciousness whatsoever. It is not only objects as seen and thought, but, as well, any feeling-toned state of consciousness. (PCWO, 186.)

Other Communities

Within the Grand Abstraction, which is the one Concrete Reality, there is a silent Communion, wordless, thoughtless, utterly formless; yet within it I barely discern, like the dim paling that heralds a new dawn, the silent Voices of Others, separated here by both space and time – even distant time.

There are other Communities beyond this.

There are far more satisfying Companionships than are possible within the veil of gross matter. (PTS, 33.)

Paranirvana – See Enlightenment – Paranirvana

Past Lives

Among other things the Sage suggested my correlation with a previous incarnation of special importance. (PTS, 3.)

Paths

… there are innumerable roads leading toward Recognition; but at the level of Buddhi and Manas there are two contrasting routes, and a third which is a combination of the two. If a man reaches first to Buddhi and then to Atman – the I AM – but has attained little unfoldment of Manas – Intellectual Principle – the Recognition will manifest predominantly through Joy and Love. All such tend to see the Supreme as Love and this, apparently, is the more frequent development. But, on the other hand, he who reaches Atman through Manas, and with but minor development of the Love Principle, will be Illumined in terms of Knowledge, but will know relatively little of the Joy. For such a one the Supreme is seen as Knowledge or Wisdom. The third, a combined Road, is through Manas, thence through Buddhi to full Recognition in the Atman. The Supreme then stands forth equally as Wisdom-Knowledge and Love-Bliss. The latter is, of course, the most completely balanced Road. But if the Atman is reached through Manas, then Buddhi can be awakened quite readily, or vice versa, if the appropriate effort is put forth. Thus, finally, the culminating completeness is also attained. Buddha is the outstanding examples of the balanced Recognition within historic times, and this He is One equally great in Knowledge and Compassion. (PTS, 36.)

Personal man – See Enlightenment – The price exacted on the personal man

Plan, Divine

This space I produce that My Glory shall be revealed; yet I alone Realize that Revelation.

Upon this space I cast My Shadow in numberless variations, yet ever remain One – apart. (PTS, 18.)

Power

I have failed to note the sense of Power that permeates Consciousness when in the Transcendental State. When I was enveloped with the sense that I sustained the universe, there also came a feeling of unlimited Power. It seemed that I could command in whatever direction I might choose and that that which stood below me must obey in accordance with the causal sequences which are My own Self-Imposed forms. At the same time there was no wish to will things to be different from what they are. (PTS, 16.)

Recognition(s) – They can be different – See Enlightenment – Recognitions can be different

Recognition by Thought (Manas) – See Enlightenment – Recognition by thought

Relative Consciousness – See Consciousness, Relative

Religion

As we look upon the record of traditional religion it must be judged that traditional forms of religion have failed egregiously. This applies to all the religions that we know, less to some than to others, but so far the record of traditionalistic religion is one of essential failure. As it appears to me, that which is needed is a seeking for the ultimate Attainment on the part of as many people as possible – Attainment which is the very Essence of the religious search. (PTS, xii.)

Sages – Their position

And supposing the Wanderer has at last arrived, is there nothing more than a ceaseless consciousness without content? No, before him there stand all possibilities, both those of the universe of objects, in every sense, and also of Nirvana, likewise in every sense. But the arrived Wanderer is now Enlightened and is secure against all dangers and all possible entanglements in all kingdoms or states of consciousness from the heavens to the Hells. He may produce creatively or not, but in any case He is superior to either action or refraining from action. In a word, He moves upon the plane of a higher order of evolution. This is the meaning of Consciousness-without-an-object. (PCWO, 174.)

It seems clear that no man can effectively illuminate the Way for all men. There is more than one main Road and a great number of subroads. On all these, men who can serve as beacons are needed. (PTS, 14.)

Sages – Not ascetic

The real Sage is anything but ascetic, however much he may appear to be so to the sensual man. … The Sage in his withdrawn life is not imposing hardship on himself. Actually He faces more hardship moving in public places, administering large affairs, attending the ordinary amusements of men, etc., for in all this there is a distraction that makes the deeper enjoyment difficult and, for many, practically impossible. It is entirely natural for me to prefer gold to base metal, and He who has Realized the Spiritual Gold enjoys more, not less. (PTS, 21.)

Satisfaction – See Enlightenment - The High Satisfaction

Science of Recognition

There is a science of recognition, though in large part it remains esoteric. But some of the knowledge may be uncovered by the uninitiated student if he seeks in the right place. Among the various races, the East Indians form the chief repository of this science, and the language employed, the Sanskrit, involves terms corresponding to concepts for which there are no real equivalents in our current western languages. (PTS, 34.)

Self – Dividing point between two worlds of consciousness

That which appears in man as the persistent Self – the Witness of the universe-drama – is the dividing and uniting point of two worlds of consciousness. Before our consciousness lies the universe of objects, but behind is the hinterland of the Self, and this is Nirvana. (PCWO, 163.)

Senses

I find that there is a decided intellectual enrichment, but the outer sensuous life is poorer, at the present time (22 August 1936]. (PTS, 8.)

Sleep

It is not enough to reach the Self in sleep. (PTS, 8.)

Spiritual Evolution – See Evolution, Spiritual

Subjective Moment in Consciousness

The plan [of the book was] to have the emphasis placed upon the extraction of the subjective moment in consciousness. (PTS, 9.)

Substantiality

The idea is that ponderable matter – meaning by that term all things sensed whether gross or subtle – is, in fact, a relative absence of substance, a sort of partial vacuum. … Habitually we regard the material filling of sensation as being substantial. To offset this, we may have been theoretically convinced that so-called empty space is not only filled but actually more substantial than the portions of it occupied by ponderable matter. This idea is not new to metaphysics, and much in the literature of modern physics is not incompatible with it. But I have found that ideas received from outer sources, even though in convincing form, lack the power over consciousness possessed by an original idea. The effect of this idea with me was a far more effective acceptance of substantial reality where the senses reported emptiness, and a greater capacity to realize unreality – or merely dependent and derivative reality – in the material given through the senses. (PTS, 2-3. Emphasis is the author’s.)

Tantra

Tantra lends itself to misuse because, like drugs, it can force a condition for which the Sadhaka is not yet prepared morally, mentally or spiritually. I'm strongly anti-Tantric. (The Induction, 24 January 1970.)

Thought (Egoistic Consciousness) – See also Consciousness, Relative; Language; and Enlightenment – Recognition by thought

Through this whole period [21 August 1936] I am engaged in thought of a degree of profundity unprecedented in my previous experience [7 August 1936]. While, in one sense, the ‘I AM’ is the uttermost of simplicity, yet there is involved along with the direct presence of It a new view of the universe that requires to be thought through and the elaborations in this thought are greater than those that I have known heretofore, There is so much to be made clear in thought that there is hardly time to give it expression. There is also a difference in the thought-level. In the past, I seemed, in general, to reach deeper when putting forth the effort to express myself, particularly in writing. Now expression seems more a reaching downward into forms that are inadequate. My inward thought seems clearer in its relative formlessness than when I give it formulation, yet formerly it seemed to me that I could express myself almost beyond my genuine understanding. I have to resist a certain boredom in the effort to give expression. I can understand why the plans of learned men to compose systems sometimes fail to materialize when they break through to Liberation. The objective effort seems too poor in its results. However, the expression is needed, and it is necessary that the work be done.

I find that there is a decided intellectual enrichment, but the outer sensuous life is poorer, at the present time. (PTS, 7-8.)

I am exploring a new world. There is so much which requires to be thought into clarity that there seems not to be time enough for the writing, setting aside all more external activities. But it is necessary that a record should be kept as far as the inner events and ideas can be captured. My thought is extraordinarily clear. An increasing amount of it is now within the range of formulation, but my actual thought is in the form of a sort of shorthand which takes much less time than the completed expression on paper or the spoken word. The writing process seems so slow! I shall place down what I can in this record as the material comes to the foreground, leaving systematic formulation to the future. (PTS, 9.)

Repeatedly I have tried stopping thought and closing out the senses, but the artificial state thus effected was barren of results. Heretofore, the rich values have come to me through or while thinking. I finally took this fact as a key and abandoned all effort to stop thought or interfere with the reports of sensation. … Through the larger part of my life the thought-world has naturally dominated the sensation-world so that sensation had come to mean little more than do small waves to an ocean liner. The issue thus lay between thought-consciousness and Transcendent-Consciousness while the rest, I found, could be neglected. Now, with a process or manifold, a given phase or aspect may be isolated for special attention without stopping the process or eliminating the balance of the manifold. When I recalled this fact and applied it, I found at once a really effective method of meditation. In fact, I realize, I have done this for many years without regarding it as a meditative technique. It was by applying this method of isolation of the essential element in the midst of a complex, without trying to restrain the other components, that the Transition was effected during the early part of this month. (PTS, 10.)

By ignoring … thought it does tend to weaken in force and there is an increasing degree of inner calmness. As the inward Life takes hold, the thought becomes something like a subdued harmonic accompaniment to a strongly accentuated inner melody. Further, this accompaniment has a positive value. … If the thought-current remains active it can reflect, in some measure, the inner Reality, and thus the personal man has a share in the Awakening. In addition, this correlation is necessary if any of the value of the Illumination is to be conveyed to the intelligence of other individuals. (PTS, 11.)

This study constitutes a real clarification of the problem of the relationship between ordinary consciousness and the kind of consciousness commonly called mystical. (PTS, 12.)

Turn from Object to Subject

In principle there is no need of denying any phase of external action, save as a temporary discipline, so that the necessary inward concentration may be effected. The Man who has made the Ineffable Transition is Free. Outwardly He lives the life that He chooses. (PTS, 21.)

Actually the Transition is not so difficult. Yet a lot of hard work has been put forth in the wrong direction through defining the Search in terms of complexity. It is as simple as turning from the object of, to the subject to, all relative consciousness, plus the spontaneity of the Self. (PTS, 22.)

Worldliness

Disgust with the external world does help toward Liberation, but it is a barrier to the assertion of the continued will-to-live. (PTS, 8.)

Appendix 1. Aphorisms

1. Consciousness-without-an-object is.
2. Before objects were, Consciousness-without-an-object is.
3. Though objects seem to exist, Consciousness-without-an-object is.
4. When objects vanish, yet remaining through all unaffected, Consciousness-without-an-object is.
5. Outside of Consciousness-without-an-object nothing is.
6. Within the bosom of Consciousness-without-an-object lies the power of awareness that projects objects.
7. When objects are projected, the power of awareness as subject is presupposed, yet Consciousness-without-an-object remains unchanged.
8. When consciousness of objects is born, then, likewise, consciousness of absence of objects arises.
9. Consciousness of objects is the Universe.
10. Consciousness of absence of objects is Nirvana.
11. Within Consciousness-without-an-object lie both the Universe and Nirvana, yet to Consciousness-without-an-object these two are the same.
12. Within Consciousness-without-an-object lies the seed of Time.
13. When awareness cognizes Time then knowledge of Timelessness is born.
14. To be aware of Time is to be aware of the Universe, and to be aware of the Universe is to be aware of Time.
15. To realize Timelessness is to attain Nirvana.
16. But for Consciousness-without-an-object there is no difference between Time and Timelessness.
17. Within Consciousness-without-an-object lies the seed of the world-containing Space.
18. When awareness cognizes the world-containing Space then knowledge of the Spatial Void is born.
19. To be aware of the world-containing Space is to be aware of the Universe of Objects.
20. To realize the Spatial Void is to awaken to Nirvanic Consciousness.
21. But for Consciousness-without-an-object there is no difference between the world-containing Space and the Spatial Void.
22. Within Consciousness-without-an-object lies the Seed of Law.
23. When consciousness of objects is born the Law is invoked as a Force tending ever toward Equilibrium.
24. All objects exist as tensions within Consciousness-without-an-object that tend ever to flow into their own complements or others.
25. The ultimate effect of the flow of all objects into their complements is mutual cancellation in complete Equilibrium.
26. Consciousness of the field of tensions is the Universe.
27. Consciousness of Equilibrium is Nirvana.
28. But for Consciousness-without-an-object there is neither tension nor Equilibrium.
29. The state of tensions is the state of ever-becoming.
30. Ever-becoming is endless-dying.
31. So the state of consciousness of objects is a state of ever-renewing promises that pass into death at the moment of fulfillment.
32. Thus when consciousness is attached to objects the agony of birth and death never ceases.
33. In the state of Equilibrium where birth cancels death the deathless Bliss of Nirvana is realized.
34. But Consciousness-without-an-object is neither agony nor bliss.
35. Out of the Great Void, which is Consciousness-without-an-object, the Universe is creatively projected.
36. The Universe as experienced is the created negation that ever resists.
37. The creative act is bliss, the resistance, unending pain.
38. Endless resistance is the Universe of experience, the agony of crucifixion.
39. Ceaseless creativeness is Nirvana, the Bliss beyond human conceiving.
40. But for Consciousness-without-an-object there is neither creativeness nor resistance.
41. Ever-becoming and ever-ceasing-to-be are endless action.
42. When ever-becoming cancels the ever-ceasing-to-be then Rest is realized.
43. Ceaseless action is the Universe. 44. Unending Rest is Nirvana.
45. But Consciousness-without-an-object is neither Action nor Rest.
46. When consciousness is attached to objects it is restricted through the forms imposed by the world-containing Space, by Time, and by Law.
47. When consciousness is disengaged from objects, Liberation from the forms of the world-containing Space, of Time, and of Law is attained.
48. Attachment to objects is consciousness bound within the Universe.
49. Liberation from such attachment is the State of unlimited Nirvanic Freedom.
50. But Consciousness-without-an-object is neither bondage nor freedom.
51. Consciousness-without-an-object may be symbolized by a SPACE that is unaffected by the presence or absence of objects, for which there is neither Time nor Timelessness, neither a world-containing Space nor a Spatial Void, neither Tension nor Equilibrium, neither Resistance nor Creativeness, neither Agony nor Bliss, neither Action nor Rest, and neither Restriction nor Freedom.
52. As the GREAT SPACE is not to be identified with the Universe, so neither is It to be identified with any Self.
53. The GREAT SPACE is not God, but the comprehender of all Gods, as well as of all lesser creatures.
54. The GREAT SPACE, or Consciousness-without-an-object, is the Sole Reality upon which all objects and all selves depend and derive their existence.
55. The GREAT SPACE comprehends both the Path of the Universe and the Path of Nirvana.
56. Beside the GREAT SPACE there is none other. (PCWO, 101-117.)

Appendix 2. Poems

Compassion

O Compassion! More than the other loves of men, less than the High Indifference;
Calmly standing by and waiting; years, centuries, millennia;
Taking to Thyself the suffering of all; transforming toward Joy;
With Light restraining Darkness; with good, evil;
Refusing release while others are bound; melting differences;
Accepting impurity, giving purity;
Bound by no law, yet acquiescing in bondage;
Available for all as the light of the sun, yet forced on no man against his will;
Needing nought for Thyself, though giving to all in need;
The Base of all hope for this humanity so low;
Pure Radiance Divine.
Sweet art Thou, unutterably sweet; melting within me all hardness;
Stirring inclusion of the low as the high; the evil as the good; the weak as the strong;
the unclean as the pure; the violent as the considerate; none left out;
waking new understanding and patience beyond Time;
Arousing forgetfulness of the petty in the grand sweep of the noble;
Equalizing regard, yet exalting true worth;
Reaching beyond all contradiction.
To Thee I sing, glorious Spirit; grandest God mankind can know.

The Nameless

Above, below, to right, to left, all-encompassing,
Before and after and all between,
Within and without, at once everywhere,
Transforming and stable, ceaselessly;
Uncaused, while fathering all causes,
The Reason behind all reasoning,
Needing nought, yet ever supplying,
The One and Only, sustaining all variety,
The Source of all qualities, possessing no attributes,
Ever continuous, appearing discrete,
Inexpressible, the base of all expression,
Without number, making possible all number,
Containing the lover and the beloved as one,
Doing nought, remaining the Field of all action—
The actor and the action not different—
Indifferent in utter completion;
Diffused through all space, yet in the Point concentrated,
Beyond time, containing all time,
Without bounds, making bounds possible,
Knowing no change;
Inconceivable, yet through It all conceiving becoming;
Nameless ever and unmastered;
THAT am I, and so art Thou.

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