Cult of Calvinism

Nothing in all creation shall separate us

What then shall we say to this? If God is for us, who is against us? He who indeed did not spare his own Son but gave him up for us all, will he not also give us all things with him? Who shall bring any charge against God's elect? It is God who justifies; who is to condemn? Is it Christ Jesus, who died, yes, who was raised from the dead, who is at the right hand of God, who indeed intercedes for us? What shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written, "For thy sake we are being killed all the day long; we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered." No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.

This passage is a perfect example of pitiful Calvinistic interpretation. In their eagerness to serve their creedal idol, Calvinists are so blind they cannot see the forest for the trees.

The thrust of Paul's argument here began back at the beginning of chapter 8 and in continuing his argument he tells the Roman Christians that if they do not put to death the misdeeds of the body they will die (8:13). Obviously, he is not talking about physical death any more than John who discusses the sin that leads to death (1 Jn 5:16-17) especially in view of that fact the Calvinist himself claims that one who is not born again is dead in sin (Eph 2:1-3). One dead in sin can hardly commit a sin leading to death can he? It is clear by the context that Paul is telling them to put to death by the Spirit by which they cry 'Abba Father,' the misdeeds of the body, and if they don't, they will die. Paul does not have much of a point there if that could not happen.

And then he continues by telling them that they are heirs with Christ and will inherit the glory of the resurrection body when he comes if indeed they do suffer with Christ. (8:17-25). Then he tells them that God works out all things to those who love him and are called according to his purpose. Paul is here obviously referring to the resurrection again and exhorting them to be confident that God will turn all their sufferings into the joy of glory and we can know this for certain since we see again in verse 30 that those Christians he calls to glory, he justifies and he glorifies and conforms these Christians he foreknew to be conformed to the image of his Son in resurrection glory so that Jesus, the firstborn of the dead, might be the firstborn among many brothers. And again when we get to verse 32, Paul asks if God will not give them all things with Christ and again, it is obvious to the thinking mind that Paul is referring again to the inheritance of resurrection glory that Christ the firstborn already has and they will share with him if indeed they suffer with him. And this is again the reason Paul says,

What shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written, "For thy sake we are being killed all the day long; we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered." No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.

Again we see Paul on the subject of suffering. One must suffer in the flesh with Christ to be glorified with him. And Paul's point here is that suffering will not separate anyone from God but indeed the Romans are even conquerors in this respect. The entire point Paul is making here is that the Law, which he has been arguing about for several chapters, is not contingent upon whether or not one is in the love of God. God's love is in his Son.

The Calvinist with his TULIP glasses on, eisegetically reads, "you cannot lose your salvation" into this passage. But the passage is not even about whether one can apostasize or not or even whether or not one can be severed from Christ. The passage is about whether or not one who is suffering with Christ can be separated from the love of God. And the answer is NO. As Paul says, if the sheep suffer with Christ they will be glorified with him and this suffering is not worth comparing to the glory that will be revealed in us. God who did not spare his own Son will most certainly give them all these things with his Son if indeed they suffer with his Son and are conformed to his suffering in order that they may share in his glory. Paul makes a similar statement about himself at Philippians 3:10-11 where he says he needs to know the suffering of Christ so that somehow he might obtain the resurrection of the dead.

This passage, so often quoted by Calvinists as a "proof text" of their "Once saved always saved" doctrine, is one more pitiful example of their blindness to the truth of Scripture.


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