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Our new Domain:

PLAIN VIEW HERITAGE FARM WEBSITES ON WWW.PLAINVIEWHERITAGE.COM

PLAIN VIEW HERITAGE FARM,

RURAL BRYANT, SD, PRESENTS:


A BIG LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN ON EARTH!

Where the Gate Grandpa Alfred Stadem Lovingly Created

Is Always Open to Childlike Hearts of Love and Wonder!

"You must become like a small child,"

the Father's Son said most plainly.

"Unless you're trusting, humble, mild--

Heaven's gate will close to thee."

ANGELS CAN DANCE ON A PIN, BUT HERE ARE NORSKIES DANCING ON A REAL TABLE NAPKIN!


Special thanks go to the Lakota Indian Tribe kids at St. Joseph's school, Chamberlain, S.D., for furnishing, whether they know it or not, the picture we used to greet you.


But first a Gospel Message to all Five Scandinavian Countries!

Sorry, no flag for Denmark at present!

Because Scandinavians colonized and created the Kingdom of Normandy, a fief, later a province of France, they are "honorary Scandinavians" though they speak French today of course.

No Flag at Present Available for Scandinavian Normandy

Note: If you would like to copy any of these attractive moving flags, do so, and the addresses are given on this page, but be advised Angelfire will not let you take from their pages for use elsewhere on the Web unless you are an Angelfire account and use it there:

"http://www.angelfire.com/sd2/PLAINVIEWFARM/flagdanish.gif"

"http://www.angelfire.com/sd2/PLAINVIEWFARM/flagfinish.gif"

"http://www.angelfire.com/sd2/PLAINVIEWFARM/flagsweden.gif"

"http://www.angelfire.com/sd2/PLAINVIEWFARM/flagnorway.gif"

"http://www.angelfire.com/sd2/PLAINVIEWFARM/iceland.gif"

"http://www.angelfire.com/sd2/PLAINVIEWFARM/french2.gif"

Scandinavia's John 3:16 Verses in Scandinavian languages


Velkommen! How VERY GOOD to see you! We love to have you come and visit us on Plain View Heritage Farm! Come on in and let's go into the parlor, where family and friends all gather! Have some refreshments. Mama's wonderful Lemon Cake is ready to serve with fresh, hot coffee, and rich farm cream and sugar as you like. The doughnuts are hers too, and go well with the Norske coffee! Now, everybody please give full attention, so the great-grandkids can hear about our golden Norwegian heritage and our legacy of faith in Christ of Plain View Farm from Papa and Mama's daughter Estelle. She is going to give us her exciting account in "God's Little Acres"! God bless you as you all join us in the Parlor to hear Estelle. Listen! She's just starting...

Please Enter Here to the Parlor

All Nine Stadem Children--(L to R, by Age) Pearl, Bernice, Myrtle, Cora, Alida, Estelle, Arthur, Ruth, Leroy

Stadem Grandson Darrell R. Ginther's special account is now on-line. Please go to both parts for what life was like on the Dakota prairie and how folks and kids amused themselves in homespun ways in the Good Old Days:

"The Old Horse and Buggy Days," by Darrell R. Ginther

"The Old Horse and Buggy Days," Part II, by Darrell R. Ginther

Please check out the Tribute to Myrtle Stadem-Svanoe, which has now been illustrated. A most remarkable person, her legacy lives on in manifold ways. Check out this tribute find out some of the many ways she made a big difference in the world! The Svanoe Central page has all the Svanoe family listings.

Tribute to Myrtle Stadem Svanoe, by Nephew Ronald Ginther

Svanoe Central


The 2008 Reunion was a great success! The picture shows it, as there were more than 70 attending (some not at the same time or as long as others, so not all made it in the group picture. Pearl Stadem Ginther, seated at center, was 99 years of age, the Matriarch of the Clan. She turned 100 Sept. 13, 2009! Then 101 Sept. 13, 2010!

FOR THE UPDATE ON THE PLAIN VIEW FARM REUNION 2009, GO TO THE PLAIN VIEW FARM HOME PAGE ON OUR NEW DOMAIN, OR USE OARING IN THE RIVER.COM. THE REUNION WAS A RESOUNDING SUCCESS, AND YOU WILL WANT TO PREPARE NOW FOR THE 2010 REUNION, AS PEARL GINTHER WILL BE 100 YEARS OLD IN SEPTEMBER, AND SHE PLANS TO COME, LORD WILLING!

PLAIN VIEW FARM HERITAGE CENTER: Now please go to Plain View Heritage Farm on Yahoo for the truly exciting news on the Plain View Farm Heritage Center Fund Drive! We hope and pray for this to be a reality by the next reunion, so we can all gather and dedicate a wonderful new facility, which will replace the barn which fell down a few years ago. We always needed something about that size to accommodate our activities, crafts, and special productions and memorials--but now we Stadem Families are at last getting underway, with Steve Stadem's picture of the barn, which he did in watercolor, and will frame and put in glass, with the money for it going to help the Heritage Center fund. You can read about his fund raising project on the Plain View Farm site on Yahoo too (and the Buffalo Mound website as well). The direct link is:

Plain View Farm Website, with Heritage Center Project and Steve Stadem's Beautiful, Nostalgic Watercolor Rendition of Grandpa's Old Barn

Contributions to the Plain View Farm Heritage Fund, and contact information for Steve Stadem, contact information is given on the Plain View Farm site and the Buffalo Mound site, both found on:

OARINGINTHERIVER.COM for the Heritage Center and Steve Stadem's Barn Picture

Pearl Stadem Ginther, at age 99 (September 13, 2008) the Eldest Stadem of the Alfred and Bergit Stadem clan, was taken right after the Reunion to see the all wood Norwegian stav church over in the Black Hills, re-created after the original over in Norway which goes back hundreds and hundreds of years. Some stav churches are 800 to 900 years old! This one shows its young age, for the wood is still light of color and not weathered. The all-wooden gift house (which the food storage was in, originally, over in Norway) was sent direct from Norway, and was built in the 1800s, but it hardly shows any age yet. But the stav church, of course, is the star attraction, and thousands see it each year. Pearl Ginther is in the center of the family, pictured with some of her great grandchildren.

We still have Stadem relatives over in Norway, and living on one of the Stadem Farms! Brita Stadem was Sjur Stadheim's sister, and descended from her are cousins who still reside in one of the Stadheim farms. Aalaug Ese is Brita's descendant, and she has an actual working farm pictured on their website, producing various delicious berry crops, sheep, eggs, and garden produce. The website has not been worked on since 2008 or so, so the non-functioning part at the top can be ignored, and just go to what is working further down the page, which has pictures for you to enjoy from the Stadheim Farm, as well as contact information, which can be accessed at:

The Stadheim Farm in Vik, Norway

Stadem/Vorseth Cousin Barbara Benson and her husband visited Aslaug Ese and her husband Oddbjorn in 2000, and conducted genealogy research in Vik and other sites of the Stadem roots and our ancestors. They took pictures of the Eses' beautiful farm over in Vik, and included them in the Stadem Genealogy book that Barbara Benson compiled dealing with the line of Sjur and Oline Stadheim and their descendants.

Our ancestors, the pioneering emigrants Sjur and Oline Stadheim and their family sailed bravely (with faith in God enabling them to make this great venture) from Norway on one of those sailed boats in the early 1860s and traveled via Quebec to Northwood, Worth County, Iowa, where they settled for a time. They then moved from there to South Dakota, where, a generation later or so, Alfred Stadem, grandson of Sjur, was born and married and raised the family that is chiefly featured on these Plain View Farm websites, as Alfred Stadem is the founder of Plain View Farm in rural Bryant South Dakota, together with his beloved wife Bergit Holbeck Stadem. Cousin Barb's genealogy book is a wonderful labor of love, and only a limited edition was produced, but enough for the Stadems and her own Vorseth line to each have a copy if they requested one. Each copy now is offered at copying cost, plus shipping and handling. Please pay her before she ships it, that way she is sure to be paid for the copying and S & S costs at least if not for all her work! Copying Cost and Putting It in a Book for you is $20, but remember S&H with $5 more, please. She'll do all the rest for free. Contact her via email for your own copy(s): BvorsethB@prodigy.net

Everything costs an arm and a leg and a lefse in hand today? Yes, these times are costly! But here is a Scandinavian freebie for you: Unique-y, farm-style stationery from PVF On Our Domain WWW.PLAINVIEWHERITAGE.COM on Yahoo. Just download/copy!

HILSEN FRA PLAIN VIEW HERITAGE FARM STATIONERY, Two Kinds

New Page Linking Section:

"Ballad of the Voyage of Faith," Centennial Tribute (1903-2003) to the Voyage of Bergit and Katrine (Tena) Holbeck from Norway to America, by Grandson and Grandnephew Ronald Ginther


Links to other pages in our Family of websites

Stadem Family Saga Home Page--The Back Door!


Photo Album Master Directory


Directory to God's Little Acres by Daughter Estelle


Plain View Farm Road Map Directory


Tributes to Stadem Family Members


"Ivory Palaces," Song and Lyrics that so well describe the spirit of Plain View Heritage Farm



Mama Bergit Stadem's Recipes & Personal History


Mama Bergit's "No Omtrint" Cusine and Plain View Farm Cooking


Central for "Giant Footprints" Tribute to Bryant, SD, Pioneers


PVF's Praying for You! Page


Butterfly Productions Home Page


Pearl's Carding & Quilting Page

THE OLD NORWEGIAN CALENDAR:

Ever wonder what the Norwegians did before the invention of paper calendars?

Really, you never thought of that? You always assumed people had paper calendars? Not so, my friend! They didn't have such modern inventions until maybe the 19th century came along! They had to know when to let the animals out of the barns, when best to plant, when to marry, when to harvest, when to take in the animals from the fields, when to shear the sheep, when to gather in the hay to feed them over the winter, etc., etc. So what did they do for a thousand years, go without knowing what day it was? Hardly! They made calendars out of stone, first, those lasted a long time then. But then they decided stone wasn't necessary and turned to the every-present, handy, easily-worked wood that was Norway's chief asset after cod, cod, and more cod!

Maybe a lot of old-fashioned Norsk kept to stone calendars, but others turned to wood as it was extremely plentiful and cost nothing but the labor to cut it from a tree and could be easily worked with a simple knife every man and boy (and many a woman!) carried on his person.

Imagine, carrying a stone calendar around in your pocket! You couldn't do it, it weighed more than you did! So they carved their calendars on flat sticks! These were portable, and you could hang them on a peg in the house too, for easy reference. And it had other ancilliary uses too--for domesticating the younger Norsk! Was that because they could use them, in a pinch, for a handy little paddle for disciplining children for some nifty piece of misbehavior during the long winter season spent virtually housebound? They certainly could be handy in that way. Imagine getting whacked on the bottom with the burning Summer Side or the Winter Side of the year afterwards to cool you down a bit! But wouldn't both halves of the calendar feel pretty much the same, or would one feel warmer (the Summer Side), and the other side (the Winter Side) feel colder? We don't know if we haven't had the experience of them in that way. But we can know how else they were used: Janet Smith's REPLICA of the ancient Norwegian Primstav, and explanations of the dates of the Ancient Norwegian Calendar Stick, called the Primstav, "Winter or Summer Side"

We will be restoring the often beautiful symbols or Norwegian signs for each month, so please return to see them when they are on-line again.

Primstav: The Old Norse Calendar Stick, Winter & Summer Sides, with Janet Smith's Explanation

BE SURE TO CHECK OUT THE ERLING JORDAHL ACCOUNT OF THE OLD BRYANT LUTHERAN CHURCH OF BYGONE TIMES BUT STILL CHERISHED IN MEMORY. MR. JORDAHL HAS KEEP INSIGHTS TO SHARE WITH YOU ABOUT WHAT IS VALUABLE ABOUT THE CHURCH OF YESTERYEAR BUT HAS BEEN LEFT OUT OF TODAY'S PRACTICES AND CHURCH SOCIETY, THINGS WE MIGHT WELL WANT TO SEE RESTORED IF POSSIBLE:

"The Bryant Church," by Erling Jordahl, friend of the Stadem Family


Valentine's Day Central



The Stadem Families Genealogy

OUR LATEST PAGES OFFERING A UNIQUE, STEREOSCOPIC TOUR OF NORWAY (WITH NOTRE DAME THROWN IN FOR AN ENCORE), IN CASE YOU MISSED THE TOURS AROUND THE TURN OF THE CENTURY ENJOYED IN COUNTLESS PARLORS ACROSS RURAL AMERICA:

Page 1, STEREOSCOPIC TOUR OF NORWAY


Do return to TAKE A PEEK at "Pearl's Lacery," which features the first of fifty or more laces from Pearl Ginther's collection!

"Pearl's Lacery," Part I


Pearl Stadem-Ginther (age 100, September 13, 2009) is still very active in the Tacoma Seafarers Center in the Port of Tacoma, after a long service as financial supporter and attendee of the Ladies Auxiliary every month at the Center, as well as providing over 30 Christmas gift boxes to the Center for giving out to sailors at Christmas. Please go to the tribute page to the Center, which is a vital ministry to sailors coming to the Port from all over the world--a unique opportunity to show them we care, and then they will care what we know about the Lord! Like his mother, Darrell R. Ginther, eldest in the family, has served as a volunteer worker in the Center for many years too. Comments about both Mrs. Ginther and son are included in the following tribute page devoted to the Center for Seafarers.

Tacoma Seafarers Center, Port of Tacoma, and Ginthers' parts in its ministry

Augustana Academy lives on--in lives, memories


Our New Master Directory for Ten Sites:

WWW.OARINGINTHERIVER.COM Master Directory


(c) 2010-2013, Butterfly Productions,

All Rights Reserved

Click for Bryant, South Dakota Forecast

Last but not least, as the Bible instructs us: pray for the peace of Jerusalem! And for Israel too--which is God's Miracle and Blessing to the nations on the earth!