REVIEWS

                            
CREEPY A LA WEEPY

"Side-Line.com"
Mark Lane "Creepy a la Weepy"
8-song CD
August 6, 2004

    The material on this album dates already back from 1999-2002 and has only been released now. The CD contains 7 new original Mark Lane tracks and a cover version of Gary Numan's electro classic "I'm Praying To The Aliens." Although Lane has remained an active force in the European minimal electro/industrial underground the recordings are the first full LP of new solo material released by Mr. Lane since the release of "Male Nymph", and the first release of new tracks since the "Shadow Merger" CD Maxi in 1997. Mark Lane is not a debutant, in the past he worked with 256 different musicians from all around the world including Conrad Schnitzler founding member of Tangerine Dream and Cluster, Guy Van Meighem (Vomito Negro and Blok 57), Andy Szava-Kovats of Data-Bank-A, Richard Van Dellen of De Fabriek, Peter van Fliet of Mechanic Kommando, Sandy Nys of Hybryds, Martin Bowes of Attrition, Chez Voz of Afterimage, Hidden Agenda et al, Dirk Ivens, Eric van Wonterghem, and Marc Verhaeghem of the Klinik/Dive/Sonar chain and so on. It resulted in material that mixes all of these influences and ends in wave electropop with a minimal edge. Recently the German label Metawaveclassix has started issuing new releases from Lane such as the 2001 recording “Who’s Really Listening?+” and now “Creepy a La Weepy”. The material itself reminds me of Absolutely Body Control but with a much more wave edge. Having said that, a track like “The Walloon Love Song” will please Erasure fans as it has this very airy feeling around it with fat analogue sounds. An entertaining 8-track release that is some of the best to get in its genre I might say. For those that have searched for earlier Mark Lane material, bad luck, it is all sold out. So get your hands on this one as soon as you can.(BVI:7)BVI at Music Non Stop.


"Chaindlk.com"
Mark Lane "Creepy a la Weepy"
8-song CD
August 5, 2004

    It's the first time I have listened to Mark Lane's music and I've got to say that I'm pleasantly surprised. Even if he was active in early eighties I never had the occasion of trying his music and this is strange, because his tunes sometimes remember me of early John Foxx stuff (see the vocal use and the melodies on "Creepy a la Weepy"). I know that I should give you more references but listening to "Creepy a la Weepy" I realize that even if you can hear here and there echoes of The Residents (because of the oblique approach Mark has with melodies and sounds) and early Thomas Leer, Mark has his own style. Also listening to his version of Gary Numan's "Praying to the Aliens," his personal music made of few synthetic sounds and his voice which sounds as he's an alien in a foreign land make it sound like the song isn't a cover. The album like the old vinyl records lasts only thirty seven minutes but the listener has got all the time he needs to appreciate this particular musician who's able of experimenting with melodies while keeping the song structure personal and fresh. Maurizio Pustianaz


"Zillo"
Mark Lane "Creepy a la Weepy"
8-song CD
July 2004

    Wow! It has been long since I have listened to such a refreshingly freaky electro-album as this new CD from the eternal cult-electronic musician Mark Lane. “Creepy a la Weepy” chirps, screetches, rattles and drones, sounding like the best analogue-synthesizer-era, aptly combining electronic music in early 80s style with more recent influences. Lane skillfully includes elements from all stages of his musical career, which has already lasted for more than twenty years. From experimental sound collages, via oblique synthie-pop to the early industrial experiments from the mid 80s. Overall it is entertaining and refreshing throughout the whole album, unlike most of the recent releases in the electro-scene. Lane also presents fittingly beautiful and strange song titles and lyrics, such as the title track or tracks like “Walloon Love Song” or “Taffeta For You”. If you desperately need a category, you could call it a modernized version of the music on the first two Fad Gadget albums, but this is not completely fitting. “Creepy a la Weepy” impressingly proves that electronic music can be a big adventure, even in the year 2004.Marty Kasprzak


"Gothtronic.com"
Mark Lane "Creepy a la Weepy"
8-song CD
June 27, 2004

    For years Mark Lane has been producing minimal electronic music with a strong 80’s retro element. Comparisons with Gary Numan or The Normal are easy to make, especially because Mark Lane has also covered ‘Praying to the Aliens’ for this cd. The material for this disc was produced over the last 5 years. Mark Lane selected 7 tracks out of a total of 40, to recieve a slot in the tracklist for this "Creepy a la Weepy" album. However, Mark Lane has been an electronic musician since the late 70’s. This is the first cd of new material, after a series of re-releases of older material of this underestimated original sound artist through the Metawave Classix label. The music of Mark Lane is fully electronic, minimal and strongly rooted in the 80’s. Still, it never sounds outdated. The tracks often have a sharp edge, but also contain nice harmonic melodies. Highlights are "Feed Me Underground" and "Creepy a la Weepy" as these are the two tracks a DJ could use. The other tracks are too stubborn and experimental to use in a club. Out of these tracks "Taffeta for You" is the highlight, followed by "Praying to the Aliens" cover track, which is a bonus song.Gothronic.com


"Sonic Seducer"
Mark Lane "Creepy a la Weepy
8-song CD
July 2004

    “Who’s Really Listening?” – the sound of this title warms the hearts of quite a few collectors and minimal electronic fans, since this is the title of the most wanted Mark Lane album, which also includes the dance floor – evergreen “Sojourn”. Afterwards Mr. Lane resurfaced in the mid-90s with two CD-Eps. The MWC-Label from Heidelberg, who had also rereleased “Who’s Really Listening?” on CD, has released the first completely new material of the grandmaster after years. Still in the year 2004, wonderfully oblique analogue-compositions dominate the sound creations of Mark Lane. The opening “Feed Me Underground” could even work in a few selected clubs, whereas one has to listen closely to the playful sounds of “Taffeta For You” to really explore all the details. A real gem for all fans and freaks. Thomas Thyssen


"MeltingClose"
Mark Lane "Creepy a la Weepy"
8-song CD
July 2004

    We had to be patient for more than a year until Mark Lane released the "Creepy a la Weepy" CD but now it is finally is available.The first track "Feed me Underground" gives the lite motif for the whole EP. The first song is fine minimalistic pop with the unique and fantastic voice of Mark Lane, and immediately invites one to listen and drift away. The song "The Concert Wheel" is similarily exciting and proves Mark Lane being a true master of electronic pop. The track "Opus" is a little bit more experimental, convincing with a slow rhythm and many tuned sweepy synth-sounds, showcasing Mark’s ability as a synth-sound-creator. The following title-track "Creepy a la Weepy" is a nice ballad with many oblique sounds. "The Walloon Lovesong" is a typical synth-pop song from the eighties, which I definitely would have liked as much then as I do now. "Taffeta For You" is typical for Mark Lane. "Your Shadow’s Eye – Pt. 1" is beautifully freaky. Where is the second part? With the ballad "Praying to the Aliens", this wonderful and unique LP ends. Mark Lane proves with this little masterpiece of minimal pop that electronic music outside of the musical mainstream still has validity and he adds a new pearl to my record-collection. Result: I would like to have more music of artists who have something to say. Grade: 92% Karsten/MeltingClose


"Equinoxe"
Mark Lane "Creepy a la Weepy"
8-song CD
July 2004

    Colorful but dark at the same time, and similar to the colors that are used on the cover, Mark Lane presents himself musically on his new album, which he has been working on for at least three years. Unconventional rhythms and in some places even eccentric minimal sounds build the foundation for Lane’s sound. When the American uses appealing vocals and harmonic melodies, as in the opener "Feed me Underground", the album almost gains pop-qualities. Mark Lane likes much more to show his difficult and inaccessible side and through doing this, he successfully rejects the impression that he would care about traditional listening habits. His frequent almost bizarre sounds earn respect. The album is a bit edgy in places but for the conoisseur of the unusual it definitely is a happy feast.www.equinoxe-magazin.de


"Medienkonverter"
Mark Lane "Creepy a la Weepy"
8-song CD
June 2004

    What is the first thing one associates with Ventura, California? Endless sandy beaches, Beach Boys, surfing... In this coastal village north of L.A. Mark Lane recorded this current album. And this really does have nothing to do with Margaritas and tanned beach beauties. The eight songs mirror Mark Lane’s versatile and dark personality. The album unites, as he himself states, all the different characters, which he has hitherto created in his musical career. "Creepy a la Weepy" is not an album you can listen to while doing housework or driving a car. Minimalistic soundscapes demand full attention from the listener. Mark Lane borrows the dominant analogue sounds from the electronic 1980s. The album starts with the two most catchy tunes ‚"Feed me Underground" and , "The Concert Wheel". You could call them electro-pop. At any rate, Mark Lane presents two good openers for the album. The first challenge for the listener immediately follows with the instrumental "Opus". This sound-piece, you can’t call it a traditional "song," shows the experimental side of Mark Lane. By the way, the same can be said about the second instrumental piece "Your Shadow’s Eye". Martin Gore would definitely like the title track "Creepy a la Weepy" and "Taffeta for You". Unconventional, edgy sounds and well organised disharmonies build the foundation. The moog-based "The Walloon Love Song" transports Lane’s inspirations from the New Romantic movement. Finally, the 38 minute opus ends with a cover version of Gary Numan’s "Praying to the Aliens". Mark Lane followers and fans of more extraordinary electronic music are going to appreciate this album. However, I am in doubt as to whether Mark Lane is going to attract new listeners with this album, as it is predicted on his homepage. "Creepy a la Weepy" authentically transports the experimental and electronic 80s into the new millenium. It lacks a straight line, though, and therefore will have difficulty to attracting a broader audience. Grade: 3,5 stars – for fans one more…Ralf/Medienkonverter.