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The Highways of South Carolina SC 10 to 19 
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SC 10
From: SC 28 McCormick (McCormick County)
To: US 25BUSUS 178BUS Greenwood (Greenwood County).
Total Length: 54.3 miles  
ROUTE LOG
SC 28: 0 - 0
Greenwood-McCormick Line: 3.5 - 3.5
US 221 SB: 4.7 - 8.2
US 221 NB: 2.3 - 10.5
SC 225: 11 - 21.5
US 25 Bus, US 178 Bus: 1.5 - 23
Creation: An original state highway. In 1922 SC 10 ran from SC 20 (today's US 221-378 split) McCormick north to Troy, Greenwood, Laurens, Enoree, Woodruff, Spartanburg (used Church St all the way through), and Chesnee, before exiting into NC at today's US 221 ALT crossing.
Adjustments: In 1925 or 1926, SC 10 was rerouted at Troy to end north of McCormick like today, leaving behind a secondary route that eventually became SC 104 (US 221 today).
In 1932, SC 10 north was truncated to Waterloo, replaced by the new US 221. Today this is still mostly US 221 except Chesnee to NC is now US 221 ALT.
In 1938, SC 10 north was truncated to Greenwood, leaving behind a secondary route which became SC 409 later. Today it is S-24-39 and S-30-33. SC 10 went directly from Greenwood to Waterloo, unlike US 221 which takes the right angle method.
In 1954, SC 10 north was truncated to Troy, replaced by an extended US 221.
In 1968 or 1969, SC 10 was re-extended north back to Greenwood, replacing a rerouted US 221.
Improvements: SC 10 was paved from Spartanburg to Chesnee in 1928.
In 1931, SC 10 was paved from Laurens to Spartanburg.
In 1932, SC 10 was paved from Troy to Greenwood.
In 1934, SC 10 was paved from Troy to McCormick.
SC 10 above Greenwood to Waterloo did not get paved until after SC 10 was dropped.
No multilane segments shown on the 2005 Official Map.
Comment: SC 10 is a minor route today, passing through sparse parts of Sumter National Forest.
SC 11
From: I-85 Fair Play (Oconee County)
To: US 29SC 18SC 150 Gaffney (Cherokee County).
Total Length: 121.7 miles  
ROUTE LOG
I-85 (exit 1): 0 - 0
SC 24: 9.6 - 9.6
US 76, US 123: 3.3 - 12.9
SC 28: 6.3 - 19.2
SC 183: 4.2 - 23.4
SC 130: 9 - 32.4
Pickens-Oconee Line: 4.9 - 37.3
SC 133: 1.5 - 38.8
US 178: 8.5 - 47.3
SC 8 SB: 9.2 - 56.5
SC 8 NB: 0.5 - 57
Greenville-Pickens Line: 1.3 - 58.3
US 276 NB: 0.2 - 58.5
US 276 SB: 5.7 - 64.2
US 25: 4.5 - 68.7
SC 101: 7.2 - 75.9
SC 14: 7.7 - 83.6
Spartanburg-Greenville Line: 0.5 - 84.1
US 176: 3.7 - 87.8
I-26 (exit 5): 3.4 - 91.2
SC 9: 3.8 - 95
US 221, US 221 ALT Begin: 12.7 - 107.7
Cherokee-Spartanburg Line: 0.3 - 108
US 221 ALT NB, SC 110: 1.9 - 109.9
I-85 (exit 92): 9.9 - 119.8
US 29, SC 18, SC 150: 1.9 - 121.7
Creation: An original state highway. In 1922 SC 11 ran from SC 9 (jct of SC 18 and S-44-382 Barnado Rd) near Union north to Jonesville and Gaffney before heading west to end at SC 10 (current US 221- ALT-SC 11-SC 110 jct) Cowpens Battlefield.
Adjustments: As early as 1928, SC 11 may have been extended slightly south to downtown Union, when SC 9 was rerouted away from Union. This extension was a multiplex with SC 92 and US 176.
In 1939, SC 11 west was extended to Chesnee (multiplex with US 221) and then replaced SC 112 to SC 9, then was extended as new primary routing to US 176 Campobello. At this point, SC 11 began and ended at US 176, which was 20 miles shorter.
In 1940, SC 11 was extended west again as new primary routing to US 276 Cleveland.
In 1947, SC 11 west was truncated to US 25, leaving behind S-23-25.
In 1949, SC 11 was re-extended west to US 276. Also in 1949, the other end of SC 11 was truncated to US 176-SC 9 Jonesville, replaced by US 176 (current SC 18).
In 1956, SC 11 west was extended along US 276, then south replacing SC 183 to pumpkintown, then west replacing SC 288 west through Jocasee and Salem before ending at SC 28 (current S-37-5) West Union. This brought SC 11 to its max length of 130 miles.
In 1960 or 1961, SC 11 was truncated to its current end in Gaffney, replaced by SC 18.
In 1970, SC 11 was essentially closed between Pumpkintown and West Union for re-construction. A TEMP SC 11 was established that followed SC 183 to Pickens and across Lake Keowee to meet back up with SC 11 near Walhalla.
In 1971, SC 11 underwent its permanent rerouting west of US 178: upgrade of S-39-49 to Sunset; new construction west directly to the north side of Salem to Tamassee; replaced SC 271 down to meet up with original SC 11, 2 miles east of West Union. The old route became: 3 miles of US 178 remained; S-39-100 to Eastatoe; part of Lake Jocassee; S-37-25; S-37-190 into Salem; S-37-24 Salem down to near West Union (2 miles of this is now part of SC 130). TEMP SC 11 was disestablished, as well as SC 288 TEMP from Pumpkintown to US 178, which was briefly in place while SC 11 TEMP proceeded south from Pumpkintown.
In 1972, SC 11 was placed on mostly new alignment between US 178 and US 276 as it runs today. This left behind SC 8 from US 276 to Pumpkintown and SC 288 from Pumpkintown to US 178.
In 1975, SC 11 was extended southwest as new construction to US 76-123.
In 1976, SC 11 was extended south again as new construction to SC 24.
In 1978, SC 11 was extended as new construction south to S-37-85, where it comes very close to touching SC 182.
In 1979, SC 11 was completed to I-85 Fair Play.
Improvements: SC 11 was paved from Union to Jonesville in 1928.
By 1932, SC 11 was paved over about 15 miles centered around Gaffney.
In 1934, SC 11 was paved from Jonesville to Gaffney.
In 1937, SC 11 was paved from Gaffney to Cowpens Battlefield. This made SC 11 totally paved for its routing in 1937.
In 1939, SC 11's extension westward was NOT paved for 8 miles centered around SC 9 New Prospect.
In 1940, SC 11's second extension was ONLY paved around Gowensville.
Between 1943-48, SC 11 was fully paved except US 25 to Gowensville.
In 1949, SC 11 was paved from US 276 to US 25.
In 1951 or 1952, SC 11 was paved between US 25 and Gowensville, again making SC 11 100% paved. But wait...
When SC 11 was extended west again in 1956, the stretch between Jocassee and Eastatoe was not paved.
SC 11 was finally 100% paved to stay in 1959.
SC 11 was multilaned from I-85 to Gaffney in 1974. No other multilane segments shown on the 2005 Official map.
Comment: SC 11 is also known as Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway for its entire length except I-85 to Gaffney.
SC 11 passes right by Table Rock State Park, a picturesque locale in what little mountanous area South Carolina has.
SC 11 also serves Cowpens Battlefield.
SC 11 follows the edge of the mountains without ever getting into them, on a modern fast-paced route which passes through no actual towns west of Gowensville.
SC 11 has grade-separated junctions with SC 24, US 76-123, SC 28, SC 183, and US 25.

 
 
SC 12
From: US 1 West Columbia (Lexington County)
To: I-20US 601 (Kershaw County).
Total Length: 28.7 miles  
ROUTE LOG
US 1: 0 - 0
US 378: 2.8 - 2.8
Richland-Lexington Line: 0.3 - 3.1
US 21, US 176, US 321: 0.5 - 3.6
SC 48: 0.6 - 4.2
US 76: 0.4 - 4.6
SC 555: 0.6 - 5.2
US 1: 0.3 - 5.5
SC 16: 1.6 - 7.1
I-77 (exit 13): 3.9 - 11
I-77 (exit 15): 1 - 12
Kershaw-Richland Line: 9.3 - 21.3
I-20 (exit 92), US 601: 7.4 - 28.7
Creation: Appeared in 1940 as new primary routing. Ran from US 21-SC 5 (current SC 48) Columbia east through Fort Jackson and ending at SC 26 (current US 601) English about 5 miles north of SC 262, all within Richland County. This is the 3rd SC 12.
Adjustments: In 1948, SC 12 was truncated on both ends - the west end was moved to US 1, leaving behind Taylor St - the east end was truncated to SC 760 (current Jackson Ave) Fort Jackson, leaving behind Johnson Rifle Road and Division Rd within Fort Jackson (S-40-28 then) and all of S-40-25 east of Fort Jackson (some of this is S-40-268 today).
In 1953, SC 12 was rerouted to avoid Fort Jackson and extend northeast to its current end at US 601, leaving behind more Johnson Rifle Rd (some of this is Strom Thurmond Blvd).
In 1957 or 1958, SC 12 was re-extended west over S-40-103 Taylor St to end at SC 555.
In 1959, SC 12 was extended west to US 76 Bull St.
In 1977, SC 12 was extended west to 12th St (current SC 35) West Columbia.
In 1977, SC 12 was placed on split one-way streets (Hampton/Taylor Sts) between Williams St and Park St.
In 1980 or 1981, SC 12 was extended west to US 1 in West Columbia.
Improvements: SC 12 was paved from Columbia out to SC 760 upon designation.
In 1941 or 1942, SC 12 was paved several miles further east into Ft. Jackson.
All parts of SC 12 have been paved since 1948.
In 1963, SC 12 was multilane from US 76 east out through Forest Acres to its old route into Fort Jackson.
The 1977 and later extensions west from US 76 were multilane, including limited/controlled access west of US 21-176-321 to US 1.
The 2005 Official map shows no other multilaning.
Comment: SC 12 serves as a quick way to access Downtown Columbia from US 1 in West Columbia, as well as provide access to Fort Jackson.
SC 12's routing to US 601 from Columbia doesn't make much sense with I-20 very close by, and even before that US 1 is not far north.
Previous SC 12's: SC 12 #1: An original state route. It entered South Carolina from Georgia at Augusta using the 5th St Bridge. SC 12 proceeded east to Aiken, then northeast to Monetta, Batesburg, Leesville, and Lexington before ending at SC 2 (current SC 602) West Columbia.
In Between 1924-26, SC 12 was rerouted to avoid Moneta and central Batesburg and Leesville. The old route eventually became SC 392 and SC 23.
In 1927, US 1 was assigned to the entirety of SC 12.
In 1928, SC 12 was dropped from the route. Today this route is a little US 1-78, most of SC 421, most likely S-2-225 to Aiken, and US 1 from Aiken to West Columbia.
SC 12 #2: The earliest direct confirmation I have for this is the 1931 SC Official Map, but this could date to 1928. Ran from SC 26 (current US 521) Hancock east 2 miles to the North Carolina line where it became NC 25.
North Carolina changed their side to NC 75 in 1934, and SC 12 was renumbered as SC 75 in 1938, as it remains today.
SC 13  not currently assigned
Previous SC 13's: SC 13 #1: An original state highway, running from SC 14 (current US 178) Pickens southeast through Easley, then ending at SC 8 (current SC 81).
It appears that by 1923, SC 13 was extended southeast to end at SC 20 Pelzer.
In 1928, SC 13 was renumbered as SC 8, which it remains today.
SC 13 #2:Appeared in 1928 as a renumbering of SC 17. SC 13 began at SC 2 (current SC 28) near Sencea and ran west to Westminster before exiting into Georgia as GA 13.
In 1933, SC 13 was extended east to Seneca, Clemson, Liberty, Easley, and ended at Pendleton and US 29 (current SC 81) Anderson St in Greenville. This was a replacement of part of SC 2.
SC 13 was replaced by US 123 around 1946. Today SC 13 would be approximated by US 123 from Georgia to Westminster; US 76/123 and S-37-13 to near Seneca; SC 59 to Seneca; SC 130 to Newry; S-37-1, a little US 76/123, and SC 93 to Clemson; SC 93 from Clemson to Easley; a little US 123; all of SC 124 into Greenville.

 
SC 14
From: BUS US 76 Laurens (Laurens County)
To: I-26 near Landrum (Spartanburg County).
Total Length: 54 miles  
ROUTE LOG
US 76 Bus: 0 - 0
US 76 EB: 0.5 - 0.5
US 76 WB: 0.2 - 0.7
SC 101: 8 - 8.7
I-385 SB (exit 19): 2.2 - 10.9
I-385 NB (exit 22): 2.7 - 13.6
Greenville-Laurens Line: 1.3 - 14.9
SC 418: 0.3 - 15.2
SC 417 EB: 5.1 - 20.3
SC 417 WB: 1.5 - 21.8
SC 296: 2.8 - 24.6
SC 146: 1.7 - 26.3
Spartanburg-Greenville Line: 3.4 - 29.7
I-85 (exit 56): 1.2 - 30.9
Greenville-Spartanburg Line: 0.4 - 31.3
SC 80: 2 - 31.5
SC 101 SB: 1.4 - 32.9
SC 101 NB, SC 290: 0.5 - 33.4
US 29: 0.7 - 34.1
SC 414: 10.6 - 44.7
SC 11: 2.3 - 47
Spartanburg-Greenville Line: 2 - 49
US 176: 3 - 52
I-26 (exit 1): 2 - 54
Creation: SC 14 was created as new primary routing in 1942, running from US 276 (current SC 417) Mauldin to US 176 Landrum via Greer. This is the 2nd SC 14.
Adjustments: In 1957 or 1958, SC 14 was extended south to end at US 276 Fountain Inn. This replaced some of US 276 which was routed onto what is now part of I-385.
In 1960 or 1961, SC 14 was again extended south to its current end in Laurens, replacing more of US 276.
Between 1965-67, SC 14 was extended north replacing some of S-42-128 to I-26.
Improvements: SC 14's initial routing was paved upon inception except below SC 296.
US 276 to SC 296 was paved in 1949.
SC 14 was multilaned on its US 276 multiplex in 1960 or 1961.
The only other mulitlane segment shown on official maps is from I-85 south to Pelham, starting in 2005.
Comment: SC 14 is the only state route to multiplex with an interstate - I-385.
SC 14 skirts the west side of Greenville-Spartanburg Airport.
Below Mauldin SC 14 follows the routing of old SC 2.
Previous SC 14's: SC 14 #1: An original state route. Ran from SC 2 (current SC 93) Liberty northeast through Pickens before entering North Carolina near Mt. Sassafrass as NC 283.
In 1923, SC 14 was extended south to SC 15 (current US 76-178 split) Anderson.
In 1938, SC 14 was eliminated when US 178 was extended over it.
US 15

 
 
SC 15  not currently assigned
Previous SC 15's: SC 15: An original state highway, running from SC 2 (current SC 93) Clemson southeast to Anderson, then east to Belton and Honea Path before ending at SC 2 (current SC 14 ) in Laurens.
In 1929 or 1930, SC 15 west was truncated to SC 20-24 (current US 76-178 split) Honea Path and SC 15 east was extended as new routing northeast to SC 92 near Cross Anchor. The old route from Clemson to Honea Path became part of SC 24. Today it is mostly US 76, except SC 88 and SC 187 through Pendleton.
In 1932, US 76 was assigned to SC 15 from Honea Path to Laurens.
In 1933, SC 15 was truncated to run only from US 221 Watts Mill to SC 92 near Cross Anchor.
In 1935, SC 15 was renumbered as SC 30. Today it is part of SC 49.

 
SC 16
From: US 176 Columbia (Richland County)
To: SC 48 Columbia (Richland County).
Total Length: 9.4 miles  
ROUTE LOG
US 176: 0 - 0
US 21, US 321: 0.8 - 0.8
SC 277: 0.5 - 1.3
SC 555: 0.6 - 1.9
US 1: 1.2 - 3.1
SC 12: 1.7 - 4.8
US 76, US 378: 2.2 - 7
SC 48: 2.4 - 9.4
Creation: Resurrected as a state route in 1964 - the latest resurrection of a state route eliminated in 1948. Ran from US 176 around to US 76-378, SC 760. This is the 2nd SC 16.
Adjustments: SC 16 originally appeared in 1939, running from SC 48 east to US 76.
In 1940, SC 16 was extended from US 76 to SC 12.
In 1948, SC 16 was downgraded to S-40-21 and S-40-26.
In 1964, SC 16 emerged running from US 176 to US 76-378, replacing S-40-26, S-40-29, and S-40-35.
In 1982, SC 16 was extended west to SC 48, replacing S-40-21. This also left behind a US 76-SC 16 CONN, and SC 16 no longer touched SC 760.
Improvements: SC 16 was fully paved upon designation. The 1940 extension was not paved, but it was paved before 1946. All other SC 16 segments have been paved since.
SC 16 was 4-laned between US 21-321 and US 1 when re-established in 1964.
Between 1965-67, SC 16 was 4-laned from US 1 to SC 12.
In 1968 or 1969, SC 16 was 4-laned from SC 12 to US 76-378.
The 1982 extension to SC 48 was 4-laned at that time.
The segment between US 176 and US 21-321 is still shown as 2-lane on the 2005 Official.
Comment: SC 16 serves as a Beltline around 3 sides of Columbia.
Previous SC 16's: SC 16 #1: An original state route. It ran from SC 2 (current US 176) Columbia north to Ridgeway, then west to Winnsboro, north to Chester, York, and Clover before heading into North Carolina, continuing as NC 16.
In 1927, US 21 was assigned to SC 16 from Chester to Columbia.
In 1928, SC 16 was dropped from the Chester to Columbia routing. Today this is US 321, SC 34, and US 21.
In 1931, SC 16 was eliminated when US 321 was routed over it. Today it is still US 321 except from Chester it was S-12-1 and SC 909 to Lowrys.
US 17

 
 
SC 17  not currently assigned
Previous SC 17's: SC 17: An original state highway, running from SC 2 (current SC 28) near Seneca west through Westminster before heading into Georgia, continuing as GA 13.
In 1928, SC 17 was renumbered as SC 13. Today it is US 123 and also S-37-13 in the Richland area.
SC 18
From: US 176SC 215 Union (Union County)
To: North Carolina State Line above Gaffney (Cherokee County).
Total Length: 38.2 miles. Continues as NC 18 to NC 89 at the Virginia State Line. (SC + NC 18 = 183 miles)  
ROUTE LOG
US 176, SC 215: 0 - 0
SC 49: 1.3 - 1.3
SC 114: 5.5 - 6.8
SC 9 EB: 2.5 - 9.3
SC 9 WB: 1.1 - 10.4
SC 114: 4 - 14.4
Cherokee-Union Line: 0.5 - 14.9
SC 211 EB: 3 - 17.9
SC 211 WB: 0.7 - 18.6
SC 105 EB: 9.6 - 28.2
SC 105 WB: 0.3 - 28.5
SC 150 SB: 1 - 29.5
US 29 SB, SC 11: 0.2 - 29.7
US 29 NB: 0.2 - 29.9
SC 150 NB: 0.2 - 30.1
I-85 (exit 95): 1.9 - 32
SC 329: 1.4 - 33.4
I-85 (exit 96): 0.1 - 33.5
SC 5: 3.1 - 36.6
NC STATE LINE: 1.6 - 38.2
Creation: Appeared in 1938, running only from US 29 Gaffney north to the Tar Heel State. This replaced SC 111. This is the 2nd SC 18.
Adjustments: In 1940, SC 18 was extended south as new routing to SC 9 Pacolet.
In 1942, SC 18 was extended south again as new routing to SC 56 below Glenn Springs.
In 1960 or 1961, SC 18 south was rerouted at Gaffney to instead go to US 176-SC 9 Jonesville, replacing part of SC 11. The old route to Pacolet and beyond became part of SC 150.
In 1989, SC 18 was extended south through Union to its current end at US 176-SC 215, replacing some of US 176 and all of US 176 Business through Union.
Improvements: SC 18 has been paved in all segments since designation.
In 1954 or 1955, SC 18 became multilane on its US 29 (current I-85 corridor) multiplex. I don't think SC 18 stayed multiplex with the actual I-85 long, but it is shown that way through the 1981 Official Map. I believe the parallel SC 18 is still at least partially multilane.
No other multilane segments are shown on the 2005 Official Map.
Comment: SC 18 serves as the main way to get from I-85 NB to Shelby, NC.
The replacement of US 176 Business caused the removal of a US 176 cutout shield at SC 49.
Previous SC 18's: SC 18 #1: An original state route. In 1922, SC 18 ran from SC 17 (current US 76-123) Westminster directly to Anderson (via Market St), then south (via Main St) to Antreville before ending at SC 20 Abbeville.
In 1938, SC 18 was renumbered as all of today's SC 24 and part of SC 28 from Anderson to Abbeville, which it largely remains today.
SC 19
From: US 278 below New Ellenton (Aiken County)
To: US 25SC 121 Trenton (Edgefield County).
Total Length: 28.6 miles  
ROUTE LOG
US 278: 0 - 0
SC 118, SC 302: 9.6 - 9.6
US 1 NB, US 78 EB: 2.7 - 12.3
US 1 SB, US 78 WB: 0.2 - 12.5
SC 118: 1.4 - 13.9
I-20 (exit 18): 4.4 - 18.3
SC 191 SB: 0.9 - 19.2
SC 191 NB: 3.1 - 22.3
Edgefield-Aiken Line: 2 - 24.3
US 25, SC 121: 4.3 - 28.6
Creation: An original state route. The 1922 Rand McNally shows it running from SC 2 (current US 76) Newberry north to Whitmire and Union, then to Spartanburg via Buffalo, then northwest to Inman and Landrum before heading into North Carolina as NC 19.
Adjustments: In 1923, SC 19 was extended south as new routing to Saluda and ending at SC 21-27 (current US 25-SC 19/121 jct) Trenton. This brought SC 19 to 138 miles.
In 1927, US 176 was assigned to SC 19 from Newberry all the way to North Carolina.
In 1928, SC 19 was extended south replacing part of SC 27 to end at US 1-78 Aiken.
Also in 1928, SC 19 was removed from the US 176 segment. Today this is still US 176 from NC to north of Spartanburg, mostly SC 56 through the city and down to Pauline, SC 215 to Union, SC 18 through Union proper, US 176 south to Whitmire and SC 121 down to Newberry.
In 1929 or 1930, SC 19 was extended south to SC 28 (current SC 125) Ellenton.
In 1951 or 1952, SC 19 was extended north to US 176 south of Whitmire, replacing part of US 176. Also in this timeframe, SC 19 south was truncated to SC 781 (current US 278) as the Savannah River Plant was opened. The route down to today's SC 125 is not SRS Route 2.
In 1964, SC 19 north was truncated to its current end in Trenton, replaced by SC 121.
Improvements: SC 19 was only paved in the Spartanburg area by 1927.
In 1928, the remaining SC 19 was all unpaved.
In 1929 or 1930, SC 19 was paved on the north side of Aiken a few miles.
In 1932, SC 19 was paved from Trenton to Newberry.
In 1934, SC 19 was paved from Aiken to Trenton.
The remaining piece of SC 19 from Aiken to SC 28 (current SC 125) was paved in 1939.
SC 19 was 4-laned from Aiken south to the Savannah River Plant in 1954 or 1955.
Comment: SC 19 is the location of New Ellenton, which was created when the US Government created the Savannah River Plant. The town of Ellenton, near where SC 19 used to end at today's SC 125 was abandoned and resettled at New Ellenton.

Last Update: 23 May 2006

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