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Defending Linux 
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By Cynthia L. Webb, washingtonpost.com Staff Writer 

How deep are The SCO Group's pockets? The answer to that question could be key to the little Utah software firm's struggle to enforce its copyright claims on the Linux (news - web sites) open-source operating system.





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Today's New York Times and Wall Street Journal (along with tech site News.com) report that two of the heaviest hitters in the tech world -- IBM and Intel -- are contributing big bucks to a new Linux user legal defense fund. The Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) announced the contributions today. OSDL, a Beaverton, Ore.-based global consortium that works to advance the adoption of Linux, will spearhead the fund. The group said it has already received $3 million and is angling to raise $10 million total. OSDL did not specify how much money Intel and IBM contributed.



"The fund will defray legal expenses of Linux users involved in litigation with The SCO Group on issues that affect the Linux community and industry. OSDL aims to raise $10 million for this fund and will accept donations from individuals, organizations and companies," OSDL said in its statement.



The SCO Group plans to pursue copyright-infringement lawsuits against companies and organizations using and supporting Linux, demanding that a long list of companies pony up licensing fees or face legal action. If Linux users pool their financial resources, however, it will almost certainly make it more difficult for SCO to win in the courtroom.



"The legal defense fund is an effort to allay the worries and reduce the risk to corporations, which increasingly use Linux as an operating system to run data-serving computers that power big networks and Web sites," The New York Times reported today. "Linux is distributed free, and is debugged and improved by a global community of programmers. Technology companies do charge for providing technical support for Linux, and manufacturers sell a lot of server computers that run the Linux system. In corporate data centers, Linux has emerged as a strong alternative to Unix (news - web sites) and Microsoft Windows."
The New York Times: Fund Planned To Defeat Users of Linux (Registration required)



The creation of the fund, The Wall Street Journal noted, is "the latest in a series of efforts by Linux supporters to counter SCO's moves to collect licensing fees from users of the open-source software." But SCO appears unfazed by the new, high-powered Linux defense fund. "Darl McBride, chief executive of SCO, said in an interview that the company has Check out the NEW Hotbot Tell me when this page is updated Defending Linux 44 minutes ago Add Technology - washingtonpost.com to My Yahoo! By Cynthia L. Webb, washingtonpost.com Staff Writer How deep are The SCO Group's pockets? The answer to that question could be key to the little Utah software firm's struggle to enforce its copyright claims on the Linux (news - web sites) open-source operating system. WorldCom Wraps Up Restatements Paratek's Technologies Adapt Wireless Signals to Work in Smaller, More Efficient Packages How to Gadget Shop Today in photos -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Search news on washingtonpost.com Today's New York Times and Wall Street Journal (along with tech site News.com) report that two of the heaviest hitters in the tech world -- IBM and Intel -- are contributing big bucks to a new Linux user legal defense fund. The Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) announced the contributions today. OSDL, a Beaverton, Ore.-based global consortium that works to advance the adoption of Linux, will spearhead the fund. The group said it has already received $3 million and is angling to raise $10 million total. OSDL did not specify how much money Intel and IBM contributed. "The fund will defray legal expenses of Linux users involved in litigation with The SCO Group on issues that affect the Linux community and industry. OSDL aims to raise $10 million for this fund and will accept donations from individuals, organizations and companies," OSDL said in its statement. The SCO Group plans to pursue copyright-infringement lawsuits against companies and organizations using and supporting Linux, demanding that a long list of companies pony up licensing fees or face legal action. If Linux users pool their financial resources, however, it will almost certainly make it more difficult for SCO to win in the courtroom. "The legal defense fund is an effort to allay the worries and reduce the risk to corporations, which increasingly use Linux as an operating system to run data-serving computers that power big networks and Web sites," The New York Times reported today. "Linux is distributed free, and is debugged and improved by a global community of programmers. Technology companies do charge for providing technical support for Linux, and manufacturers sell a lot of server computers that run the Linux system. In corporate data centers, Linux has emerged as a strong alternative to Unix (news - web sites) and Microsoft Windows." The New York Times: Fund Planned To Defeat Users of Linux (Registration required) The creation of the fund, The Wall Street Journal noted, is "the latest in a series of efforts by Linux supporters to counter SCO's moves to collect licensing fees from users of the open-source software." But SCO appears unfazed by the new, high-powered Linux defense fund. "Darl McBride, chief executive of SCO, said in an interview that the company has Check out the NEW Hotbot Tell me when this page is updated Defending Linux 44 minutes ago Add Technology - washingtonpost.com to My Yahoo! By Cynthia L. Webb, washingtonpost.com Staff Writer How deep are The SCO Group's pockets? The answer to that question could be key to the little Utah software firm's struggle to enforce its copyright claims on the Linux (news - web sites) open-source operating system. WorldCom Wraps Up Restatements Paratek's Technologies Adapt Wireless Signals to Work in Smaller, More Efficient Packages How to Gadget Shop Today in photos -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Search news on washingtonpost.com Today's New York Times and Wall Street Journal (along with tech site News.com) report that two of the heaviest hitters in the tech world -- IBM and Intel -- are contributing big bucks to a new Linux user legal defense fund. The Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) announced the contributions today. OSDL, a Beaverton, Ore.-based global consortium that works to advance the adoption of Linux, will spearhead the fund. The group said it has already received $3 million and is angling to raise $10 million total. OSDL did not specify how much money Intel and IBM contributed. "The fund will defray legal expenses of Linux users involved in litigation with The SCO Group on issues that affect the Linux community and industry. OSDL aims to raise $10 million for this fund and will accept donations from individuals, organizations and companies," OSDL said in its statement. The SCO Group plans to pursue copyright-infringement lawsuits against companies and organizations using and supporting Linux, demanding that a long list of companies pony up licensing fees or face legal action. If Linux users pool their financial resources, however, it will almost certainly make it more difficult for SCO to win in the courtroom. "The legal defense fund is an effort to allay the worries and reduce the risk to corporations, which increasingly use Linux as an operating system to run data-serving computers that power big networks and Web sites," The New York Times reported today. "Linux is distributed free, and is debugged and improved by a global community of programmers. Technology companies do charge for providing technical support for Linux, and manufacturers sell a lot of server computers that run the Linux system. In corporate data centers, Linux has emerged as a strong alternative to Unix (news - web sites) and Microsoft Windows." The New York Times: Fund Planned To Defeat Users of Linux (Registration required) The creation of the fund, The Wall Street Journal noted, is "the latest in a series of efforts by Linux supporters to counter SCO's moves to collect licensing fees from users of the open-source software." But SCO appears unfazed by the new, high-powered Linux defense fund. "Darl McBride, chief executive of SCO, said in an interview that the company has