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GILES PELLERIN

IN THE NEWS

from September 23, 1987 to October 13, 2002

 

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AP Online

September 23, 1987

Section: Sports News

 

HERSCHEL NISSENSON

 

Giles Pellerin, an 80-year-old retired phone company executive from San Marino, Calif., may be the most rabid college football fan - ever.

 

Pellerin has seen EVERY Southern Cal game, home and away, since the start of the 1926 season. That adds up to 656 CONSECUTIVE games. He has traveled more than 600,000 miles by plane, train and automobile and has spent more than $60,000 in following his beloved Trojans.

 

Pellerin was a sophomore at USC - Howard Jones was the coach - when he began his streak. Southern Cal won the 1926 opener 74-0 over Whittier and has compiled a 445-176-35 record since then.

 

''You have to remember in the early '20s the Trojans were the only major team in the state,'' Pellerin says. ''There were no professional teams there and UCLA was a junior college branch.

 

''There was no TV, you could see Knute Rockne every other year and the Rose Bowl was always at stake. So I started going to games as a student at USC and just never stopped.''

 

There have been some near-misses. In 1949, Pellerin was hospitalized four days before a home game for an emergency appendectomy.

 

''Right away, I asked the doctor if I could go that week and he told me, 'No chance.' I was about 10 miles away from the Coliseum so I called my brother, Oliver. Then I got dressed and told the nurses I was taking a little walk.

 

''Oliver picked me up, we went to the game and he drove me right back. I got back in my hospital bed before they knew it.

 

''I've been lucky. I've been able to schedule vacations around USC football.''

 

Pellerin has company in his pursuit of the Trojans. Oliver, 78, hasn't missed a USC game since 1947 - that's 438 in a row - and another brother, Max, 76, had a 300-plus string interrupted several years ago when his job called for him to go to Alaska.

 

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9/24/87 Miami Herald 7D

Miami Herald (FL)

September 24, 1987

 

Section: SPORTS

 

HERSCHEL NISSENSON Associated Press

 

USC'S SUPER FAN

 

Giles Pellerin, an 80-year-old retired phone company executive from San Marino, Calif., may be the most rabid college football fan -- ever.

 

Pellerin has seen every Southern Cal game, home and away, since the start of the 1926 season. That adds up to 656 consecutive games. He has traveled more than 600,000 miles by plane, train and automobile and has spent more than $60,000 in following his beloved Trojans.

 

Pellerin was a sophomore at USC -- Howard Jones was the coach -- when he began his streak. Southern Cal won the 1926 opener 74-0 over Whittier and has compiled a 445-176-35 record since then.

 

"You have to remember in the early '20s the Trojans were the only major team in the state," Pellerin says. "There were no professional teams there and UCLA was a junior college branch.

 

"There was no TV, you could see Knute Rockne every other year and the Rose Bowl was always at stake. So I started going to games as a student at USC and just never stopped."

 

There have been some near-misses. In 1949, Pellerin was hospitalized four days before a home game for an emergency appendectomy.

 

"Right away, I asked the doctor if I could go that week and he told me, 'No chance.' I was about 10 miles away from the Coliseum so I called my brother, Oliver. Then I got dressed and told the nurses I was taking a little walk.

 

"Oliver picked me up, we went to the game and he drove me right back. I got back in my hospital bed before they knew it.

 

"I've been lucky. I've been able to schedule vacations around USC football."

 

Pellerin has company in his pursuit of the Trojans. Oliver, 78, hasn't missed a USC game since 1947 -- that's 438 in a row -- and another brother, Max, 76, had a 300-plus string interrupted several years ago when his job called for him to go to Alaska.

 

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AP Online

September 24, 1987

Section: Sports News

Undated tx

 

College Football Today=

 

By The Associated Press=

 

Calling Lou Gehrig=

 

Giles Pellerin, an 80-year-old retired phone company executive from San Marino, Calif., has been to every Southern Cal football game, home and away, since the start of the 1926 season. USC has a record of 445-176-35 in the 656 games Pellerin has seen.

 

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10/21/87 Orlando Sentinel D4

Orlando Sentinel

October 21, 1987

 

Section: SPORTS

 

NOTRE DAME-FLORIDA POSSIBLE CITRUS MATCH

Barry Cooper of the Sentinel Staff

 

How's this for loyalty: Giles Pellerin, an 80-year-old retiree, has been to every Southern Cal football game -- home and away -- since 1926.

 

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4/17/88 Newsday 16

Newsday (USA)

 

April 17, 1988

 

Section: SPORTS

 

TIMEOUT

 

Edited by Leon H. Carter

 

Giles Pellerin, 81, Pasadena: He has attended 666 consecutive USC football games, traveling more than 600,000 miles since the streak began in 1926. In 1949, he had surgery to remove his appendix five days before a home game. On game day, he told the nurses he was going for a walk. Instead he went to the Coliseum and returned several hours later.

 

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11/17/88 South Florida Sun-Sentinel 1C

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

November 17, 1988

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC STUDENTS OF TROJANS FOOTBALL LEARN GREAT HISTORY LESSONS.

ROBES PATTON, Staff Writer

 

University of Southern California football, like Hollywood starlets, brought glamour and prestige to Los Angeles long before the Rams, Dodgers or Lakers moved west.

 

For USC's legendary leading men and bit players, Trojan heritage is deep- rooted.

 

Frank Gifford's early lessons about the University of Southern California were imparted by a former Trojan who was football coach at Bakersfield High School. Gifford was partial to USC while attending junior college in Bakersfield as a freshman and was an usher at the 1948 Rose Bowl when Michigan beat USC 49-0.

 

The ties already had started to bind.

 

Growing up east of Los Angeles, Pat Haden's best friend was J.J. McKay, whose father, John, engineered the return of USC to national prominence and glory in the 1960s. ''When I was a kid, sitting at home watching the Rose Bowls on Jan. 1, seemingly every year USC was in the Rose Bowl,'' Haden said.

 

As a star running back at Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles in the early 1960s, Mike Garrett knew enough about USC to make a goal to someday play in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

 

Tim Shannon, who was recruited heavily by Southern Cal and Notre Dame while a high school standout in the St. Louis area, first felt a tug toward USC when Anthony Davis scored six touchdowns in a 45-23 USC victory against Notre Dame in 1972. Davis punctuated each touchdown by sliding onto his knees and doing a mini-dance in the end zone. ''After that game, I used to get on my knees in junior football,'' Shannon said.

 

Dolphins guard Roy Foster didn't care about football while growing up in Los Angeles. ''I wasn't a football person, (but) I learned to love the sport,'' Foster said.

 

And like most major figures in the rich and storied history of Trojan football, Foster developed an appreciation and devotion for USC that is deeper than the Pacific Ocean.

 

A PAST AND PRESENT POWER

 

USC, which sits on the outskirts of downtown Los Angeles, marks its athletic centennial this season. It isn't just a football celebration -- Southern Cal has won more national team championships than any university -- but football is the No. 1 game at Troy.

 

The Trojans have won eight national championships and have the highest winning percentage in bowl games among teams that have at least 12 bowl appearances. USC is 18-7 in a record 25 Rose Bowls, and four Trojan tailbacks have won the Heisman Trophy. Thirty-six Trojans have been named consensus All- Americans; 48 have been first-round draft picks.

 

Giles Pellerin hasn't missed a USC football game -- home or away -- since 1926, when he was a student at Troy. His streak will reach 676 when USC plays UCLA Saturday in the Rose Bowl, just 2 miles from Pellerin's Pasadena home.

 

''When I started my string, the Trojans were the major sporting event in Southern California,'' Pellerin said.

 

USC, founded in 1880 as a small Methodist school in a distant Western community, fielded its first football team in 1888 and, fittingly, was undefeated in two games.

 

It wasn't until the 1920s, however, that USC became a major power under coaches Elmer C. ''Gloomy Gus'' Henderson and Howard Jones. From 1919-1924, Henderson coached the Trojans to a 45-7 record, including 10-1 records in 1921 and 1922 and a 14-3 victory against Penn State in USC's first Rose Bowl appearance in 1923. During Henderson's tenure, the Trojans began playing in the Coliseum and began actively recruiting against West Coast powers Stanford and California.

 

Henderson, whose .865 winning percentage is still the best in USC history, was succeeded by Jones in 1925. Under Jones, USC compiled a .750 winning percentage, won three national championships, had its first consensus All- American (Mort Kaer in 1926) and its first 1,000-yard rusher (Morley Drury in 1927).

 

Southern Cal wouldn't have another 1,000-yard rusher until 1965, when Garrett wrapped up his career by gaining 1,440 yards and winning the Heisman.

 

GREAT PLAYERS AND COACHES

 

Although there were scattered highlights in the post-Jones era, it wasn't until John McKay took over in 1960 that national glory returned.

 

McKay-coached teams were 127-40-8, won four national championships, nine conference titles, and finished in the Top 10 nine times from 1960 to 1975. He implemented the I formation, used big, fast offensive linemen and harvested many of the best players from Los Angeles-area high schools.

 

When McKay left to take over the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 1976, he left a legacy for John Robinson similar to those of Bear Bryant at Alabama or Woody Hayes at Ohio State.

 

Robinson, who now coaches the Rams, authored his own impressive chapter of USC history.

 

From 1976-1982, Robinson's teams went 67-14-2 with three Rose Bowl victories and a national championship in 1978.

 

It was under McKay and Robinson that Southern Cal played some of its most memorable games with its most famous names.

 

Garrett and O.J. Simpson won Heisman trophies playing for McKay; Charles White and Marcus Allen won Heismans under Robinson.

 

McKay and Robinson also presided over a program that became a virtual farm system for the NFL. Three times -- Ron Yary in 1967, Simpson in 1968 and Ricky Bell in 1977 -- a Trojan was the No. 1 pick overall in the NFL draft, and 10 times two or more Trojans were first-round selections.

 

EXPECTING ONLY THE BEST

 

Larry Smith, who took over for Ted Tollner last year, can carve a niche in Trojan history by winning the national championship this season. But standing between second-ranked USC (9-0) and the national title are games against UCLA Saturday, Notre Dame in the Coliseum Nov. 26 and Michigan in the Rose Bowl.

 

A ninth national title for the Trojans wouldn't be unexpected by Smith. ''I told (the players) that I came here to win championships,'' Smith told the Chicago Tribune recently. ''There's all that pride and tradition at USC. The people here have high expectations and so do we. They want to get another national championship. That's not pressure. That's motivation. I feel I have one of the finest football jobs in the country. I want to make it the best.''

 

The pride and tradition of which Smith speaks is about winning -- and losing -- big games. It's about playing Notre Dame, UCLA and other top teams every year. It's about running through the tunnel into the Coliseum, the band playing Fight On and Hollywood-level glamour.

 

''It's a matter of playing in big games in front of packed crowds and a national TV audience when you are a kid 18, 19 or 21 years old,'' Haden said.

 

Students attending Southern Cal take pride in their education and the success of the athletic programs, particularly football. And when they leave, most have a great affinity for the Trojans, according to Haden.

 

''I knew (the tradition) was big, but I didn't realize how big until I got there,'' said Brad Anderson, a backup wide receiver who lettered in 1981. ''The support people give to that school is unreal.''

 

Shannon, who had an injury-plagued career at USC from 1979-1983 and is a sports attorney in the Newport Beach area, said he is still learning about the impact Trojan football has on Southern California.

 

''Coming from Missouri, I really didn't grasp it,'' Shannon said. ''It took me until my junior or senior year, but to tell you the truth, I'm still learning about the tradition and that bond. As I go out in the business world, it's amazing how much (USC) means to people in the Southern California area.''

 

Gifford, who played on teams that were a combined 14-11-3 from 1949-1951, said much of the devotion to the university can be traced to the number of alumni in the Los Angeles area.

 

''So many of the athletes that go to USC are from Southern California. They grew up there and they stay there,'' he said. ''It's not a bad place to live. Take Notre Dame, for instance. How many people are going to live in South Bend?''

 

One of those local athletes is Jason Simpson, a redshirt freshman at USC, who recalls standing on the sideline with his father, O.J., and watching Ricky Bell. ''I remember focusing on Bell because I didn't know much about football. That was my first real knowledge of football, a running back at USC.''

 

UNFORGETTABLE MEMORIES

 

Roy Foster didn't get caught up in Trojan heritage until his junior year -- after he had been a member a national championship team and blocked for Heisman Trophy winner Charles White.

 

''I just started playing more and realized the impact of each game,'' Foster said. ''The legends would watch practice. Anthony Davis, O.J., Haden (and) all the oldies. They took a lot of pride in what they did.''

 

Foster's ties grew stronger after the Trojans beat Notre Dame 14-7 in South Bend in 1981, his senior season. ''(Assistant coach) Marv Goux took all the seniors back on the field fully dressed and told us to look at the scoreboard,'' Foster said. ''We'd beaten them four years in a row and no other class had ever done it.''

 

It was Goux's way of providing an indelible memory for a group of players that made a mark on Troy.

 

Foster remembers.

 

The colors, the stadium and the tradition still mean a lot.

 

When Miami beat the Raiders 24-14 Oct. 9 in the Coliseum, Foster may have been more pumped up than any other Dolphin.

 

''It was a great feeling because the locker room was all decked out in cardinal and gold,'' Foster said. ''It was an awesome feeling. I had a decent game and I think it made me play a lot better.''

 

MANY MOMENTS OF TRUTH

 

Favored memories of Troy often center on major victories.

 

Pellerin recalls the 1939 Rose Bowl victory against Duke as the game that stands out among the 675 he has attended. Duke was undefeated and hadn't allowed a point; USC's fourth-string quarterback Doyle Nave led a late rally and threw a touchdown pass to Al Krueger to clinch a 7-3 victory.

 

For Gifford, who endured two losing seasons at USC, a victory against Cal and Bob Karpe, Gifford's co-captain at Bakersfield High, was the highlight of his career. Cal was 38-4-1 from 1947-1950 and 4-0 in 1951 when the Trojans traveled north to Berkeley and came back for a 21-14 victory.

 

When the Trojans rallied from a 24-0 first-half deficit to beat Notre Dame 55-24 -- a victory that propelled the Trojans to the national title in 1974 -- Haden had no plans for a career in pro football. ''It was my last regular- season game and my best friend, Johnny McKay, had a great game,'' Haden said. ''That was a magical moment.''

 

But not all the precious USC memories surround Notre Dame games or Rose Bowls.

 

Garrett cherishes a 13-10 victory against Michigan State early in his sophomore season.

 

It was a moment that dashed self-doubts of one of the great runners in college football history.

 

Before that game, Garrett wondered if he had the talent of players like Jon Arnett, C.R. Roberts and Lindon Crow, who left an imprint on USC tradition in the 1950s. ''I said, 'I don't know if I'm as good as those guys,''' Garrett recalled.

 

But on a Saturday evening in the Coliseum, Garrett trampled the Spartans for 118 yards on 10 carries.

 

''That night, I realized, 'I'm as good as those guys.' I said to myself, 'I can play here.'''

 

He wasn't the only one.

 

USC'S CAREER RUSHING LEADERS

 

Tot. Net

 

Player Att. Yds. Yds. Avg.

 

Charles White 1147 6517 6245 5.44

 

Marcus Allen 932 5047 4810 5.16

 

Anthony Davis 784 3928 3724 4.75

 

Ricky Bell 710 3857 3689 5.20

 

O.J. Simpson 674 3540 3423 5.08

 

Mike Garrett 612 3314 3221 5.27

 

Fred Crutcher 670 2912 2815 4.20

 

Clarence Davis 511 2518 2323 4.54

 

Orv Mohler 359 2093 2025 5.63

 

Jon Arnett 336 2019 1898 5.66

 

FIRST-ROUND DRAFT PICKS FROM USC

 

(Since 1968; overall draft position in parentheses)

 

1968 -- Ron Yary, Vikings (1), Mike Taylor, Steelers (10); Tim Rossovich, Eagles (14); Mike Hull, Bears (16); Earl McCullouch, Lions (24).

 

1969 -- O.J. Simpson, Bills (1); Bob Klein, Rams (21).

 

1970 -- Al Cowlings, Bills (5); Sid Smith, Chiefs (26).

 

1971 -- Marv Montgomery, Broncos (12); Tody Smith, Cowboys (25).

 

1973 -- Charlie Young, Eagles (6); Sam Cunningham, Patriots (11); Pete Adams, Browns (22).

 

1974 -- Lynn Swann, Steelers (21); Steve Riley, Vikings (25).

 

1977 -- Ricky Bell, Buccaneers (1); Marvin Powell, Jets (4); Gary Jeter, Giants (5).

 

1978 -- Clay Matthews, Browns (12).

 

1980 -- Anthony Munoz, Bengals (3); Brad Budde, Chiefs (11); Charles White, Browns (27).

 

1981 -- Ronnie Lott, 49ers (8); Keith Van Horne, Bears (11); Dennis Smith, Broncos (15).

 

1982 -- Chip Banks, Browns (3); Marcus Allen, Raiders (10); Roy Foster, Dolphins (24).

 

1983 -- Bruce Matthews, Oilers (9); Joey Browner, Vikings (19); Don Mosebar, Raiders (26).

 

1985 -- Duane Bickett, Colts (5); Ken Ruettgers, Packers (7).

 

1986 -- James FitzPatrick, Chargers (13).

 

1988 -- Dave Cadigan, Jets (8).

 

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11/19/88 L.A. Times 19

 

Los Angeles Times

November 19, 1988

 

Section: Sports

 

BATTLE FOR THE ROSE BOWL: USC vs. UCLA

Neuheisel, as a Sub, Steals Show

BILL DWYRETimes Sports Editor

Times Sports Editor

 

Coach Terry Donahue of UCLA wasn't able to attend Friday's traditional Rotary Club football luncheon rally for the UCLA-USC game, so he sent Rick Neuheisel instead. And Neuheisel stole the show.

 

The 27-year-old quarterback coach for the Bruins, who threw 4 touchdown passes for the Bruins in their 45-9 win over Illinois in the 1984 Rose Bowl, said Donahue couldn't attend because he had more pressing business.

 

"He's over on campus," Neuheisel said. "He's standing in a long line at a pay phone, waiting to call his mom to find out if he's had measles."

 

Neuheisel said he had special memories of USC-UCLA games, but mostly of the 1979 game. At the time, he wasn't anywhere near the star quarterback status he achieved later.

 

"I was a walk-on, about 170 pounds," he said. "I eventually ended up as a special teams player, on the kickoff return team.

 

"Only my job didn't have anything to do with carrying the ball. I didn't have any speed. That was well documented later. No, my job was to be part of the blocking wedge in front of the ballcarrier, all 170 pounds of me.

 

"That year, in the USC game, I was told to go out on the field, line up for the kickoff and count to get my man to block from USC. I was to count from the left: 1, 2, 3, 4, and the fourth USC guy was mine.

 

"So I did. I counted: 1, 2, 3, 4. No. 4 turned out to be Larry McGrew, 6-4 and 240 pounds. He's still playing with the New England Patriots, I think.

 

"So they kick off, I get in the wedge, run at McGrew, hit him, bounce off and he makes the tackle. Not a good start.

 

"Next time out, I count again, 1, 2, 3, 4. It's him again. I try it over. This time, I count 1, 2, 3, damn! But I get lucky. The ball is kicked in the end zone and we have no return.

 

"Pretty soon, I've got to go out there again. I start counting, but before I get to 4, I look up and McGrew has beat me to it. He's pointing at me.

 

"So I get real determined and I run down and I hit him as hard as I can and the lights go out. You know how the test signal on your TV sounds? Well, that's what's going through my head. Kind of a steady hum.

 

"I pick myself up, finally, and I realize that I used to have a face mask. No more. I look at it and it's gone. McGrew has hit me so hard he has blown the bolts off my helmet."

 

The next season, Neuheisel was a quarterback, and happy to be one.

 

Coach Larry Smith of USC did attend the luncheon and took the opportunity to have some fun, too.

 

"I would just like to wish UCLA all the best of luck," Smith said, "in whichever bowl game it chooses to attend."

 

Mike Walden, the master of ceremonies, attempted to get Smith to say, or even hint in some way, what the ailing Rodney Peete's status was for Saturday.

 

"Coach Smith," Walden said, "right now, at 1:11 p.m., as we stand here, what is Rodney Peete's status?"

 

To which Smith replied: "He's resting."

 

Giles Pellerin, 81, of Los Angeles, hasn't missed a USC football game, home or away, since 1926. Saturday's game will be his 676th USC game in a row.

 

Walden told Neuheisel that USC has a tackle named John Guerrero who is 6-4 and 320 and another tackle named Derrel Marshall who is 6-4 and 305.

 

"Rick, just how will the gutty little Bruins deal with that?"

 

Said Neuheisel: "I'm just happy to say I'm not playing tomorrow."

 

Walden pointed out that Neuheisel's loyalties, although clearly with UCLA, are somewhat strained. Not only is Neuheisel UCLA's quarterback coach, but he also is a third-year law student at USC.

 

Rod Sherman of USC and Gary Beban of UCLA, stars from past great Trojan and Bruin teams, were featured guests and shared the podium for a few minutes.

 

Sherman fired the first volley, saying, "I am truly hopeful that we can be back here, at this luncheon a year from now, still honoring Gary Beban as the only Heisman Trophy winner in UCLA's history."

 

Sherman than talked about a scenario that had USC winning the game but UCLA getting an academic scholarship in the name of quarterback Troy Aikman. Which gave Beban his chance to get in the last word.

 

"If you are talking about academic scholarships, USC probably better keep that, because it might need it more," he said.

 

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1/1/90 L.A. Times 3

 

Los Angeles Times

 

January 1, 1990

 

Section: SP-Sports

 

Notes on a Scorecard

AN MALAMUD

 

Giles Pellerin will attend his 690th consecutive USC game and 27th Rose Bowl today. Under Pellerin's eyes since 1926, the Trojans are 470-183-36. . . .

 

Ticket brokers aren't doing brisk Rose Bowl business despite Bo Schembechler's retirement announcement. One reason is that Michigan fans can't afford to come out two consecutive years. . . .

 

You know the weather will be beautiful this afternoon in Pasadena. And people watching TV in the frigid east will think about moving here. Why can't there be a rainstorm like there was in 1955? . . .

 

Heisman Trophy campaigns for 1990 are well under way. A "Detmer For The Heisman" banner was on display at the Holiday Bowl where BYU's Ty Detmer threw for 576 yards against Penn State. And USC safety Mark Carrier said on a show about this year's All-Americans that he wants to become the first defensive player to win the Heisman. . . .

 

Look for Colorado to win the national championship, Larry Smith to send his old boss Bo out a loser and Miami and Florida State to show that two of the three best teams in the nation hail from the same state.

 

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9/15/90 Pitt. Post-Gazette B3

 

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (PA)

 

September 15, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC FAN, 83, KEEPS GAMES STREAK ALIVE

 

MIKE DECOURCY, THE PITTSBURGH PRESS

 

LOS ANGELES It is an old story, the athlete who rises from his sickbed to save his teammates with a heroic, inspiring performance and lead them to victory. Except that's not Giles Pellerin's story.

 

When Pellerin got out of his sickbed on that day in 1949, it was merely to watch someone else's heroic performance. Pellerin couldn't stand to miss seeing Southern Cal play Washington because he hadn't missed a Trojans game in the previous 23 years.

 

And he hasn't missed one since. "You might say I'm addicted to it." That's 64 years of uninterrupted spectating, 690 games, home and away, every fall weekend since 1926.

 

"The week of that Washington game, I had an appendix attack on a Tuesday, and they operated Tuesday night," Pellerin said. "I asked the doctor if I could get out in time to see that Saturday's game, and he said, 'No chance at all; you're going to be here another couple weeks.'

 

"On Saturday morning, I got up and dressed and told the nurse I was taking a short walk. I went to a pay phone, called my brother Oliver and he picked me up and we went to the game. When it was over, I went back to the hospital. That was the closest call I had."

 

The streak began when Giles was a Southern Cal student, continued through 41 years as an executive with a phone company and in his 20-year retirement. He is 83 and living in Pasadena, the city he saw his first Trojans game in 1923.

 

That game is of particular interest this week because it involved the Penn State Nittany Lions in their first and only trip to the Rose Bowl. To have the Lions return to Southern California to play the Trojans this afternoon at 3:30 at the Los Angeles Coliseum has stirred some fond memories for Pellerin.

 

He was a sophomore at Huntington Park High School near Los Angeles in 1923. His interest piqued by newspaper hype surrounding what was the Trojans' first Rose Bowl.

 

Pellerin got one to that game, and to every Trojans home game the next three years. In 1926, there were only two road games, at California and Oregon State. He took time off from the "part-time" job he was working while an engineering student -- only eight hours a day six days a week -- and went along.

 

His streak will reach 700 games when the Trojans visit Oregon State Nov. 10.

 

One of the few difficult times he remembers was a 1964 trip. The Trojans played at Oklahoma and then were to visit Michigan State, so rather than come back to California, Giles and Oliver -- who hasn't missed a game since 1947 -- chose to drive to East Lansing.

 

Their car's water pump blew out on Sunday, and there was concern whether it would be repaired quickly enough. A 24-hour garage took care of the job, and they were on their way to watch the Trojans lose, 14-7.

 

"We always made plans that left us with plenty of time so that if something went wrong, we'd still make the game."

 

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9/21/90 USA TODAY 08C

USA Today (USA)

September 21, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

TOP 25 WEEKEND PREVIEW

 

ALL TIMES EDT GAMES/Sheridan's line

 

GAMES/Sheridan's line

 

No. 4 Southern Cal (2-0)

 

at No. 19 Washington (2-0)

 

- When/kickoff: Sat., 6: 30 p.m.

 

- Surface: Artificial turf

 

- Line: Southern Cal by 5 1/2

 

GAME ANALYSIS

 

Huskies have work cut out for them as Trojans begin run for 4th consecutive Rose Bowl: USC hasn't lost Pac-10 game since 1987. Washington defense, led by E Travis Richardson, must contain QB Todd Marinovich, No. 4 in USA in passing efficiency. He's protected by line featuring G Mark Tucker, who bench-presses 415 pounds.

 

FAST FACTS

 

Pasadena superfan Giles Pellerin, 83, has attended 692 consecutive USC games, streak he began as USC sophomore in 1926. ... USC QBs coach Ray Dorr held same position under Huskies coach Don James at Kent State (1970-74) and Washington (1975-83). ... USC leads series 39-20-3 but has lost 3 of last 4 in Seattle.

 

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9/25/90 Rocky Mtn. News 49

Denver Rocky Mountain News (CO)

 

September 25, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

HISTORIC MISMATCH TAKING SHAPE SATURDAY IN LINCOLN

 

B.G. BROOKS ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS STAFF WRITER

 

Last and short - North Texas State's Major Greene, a senior, and DeLon Greene, a sophomore, are the sons of "Mean Joe" Greene, a prominent North Texas alum you might have heard of. Like dad, both are defensive linemen . . . Georgia alumnus Becky Allen had babies on June 9, 1990, when the Bulldogs won the NCAA baseball title, and on Jan. 1, 1981, when they won the national championship in football . . . Missouri tight end Tim Bruton offered this presason assessment of the Tigers: "Last year, we were 2-9. This year we'll be 4-9." Uh, Tim, does the NCAA know about your schedule? . . . Giles Pellerin, an 83-year-old retired telephone company executive from Pasadena, Calif., had viewed 692 consecutive (home and away) USC games. His streak began at the start of the 1926 season, and he hopes it will hit 700 this season against Oregon State . . . CU reserve outside linebacker Rodell "House" Guest isn't the Big Eight's only basketball-player-turned-football-player. Billy Ray Smith, a forward last year at K-State, is now a second-team defensive end. LIB4

 

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10/3/90 St. Petersburg Times 7C

St Petersburg Times

 

October 3, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

CITRUS BOWL COULD GET JUICY MATCHUP WITH VIRGINIA

 

BOB HARIG

 

Notes: Giles Pellerin, 83, a retired phone company executive in California, has seen 694 Southern Cal games in a row, home and away. The streak started when he was a sophomore in 1926. Florida State's 14-game winning streak, the longest in the country, doubles the next closest. Georgia Tech and Houston have won seven in a row. Bo Schembechler's first three games away from college football have been tough, but the former Michigan coach says he will stay away. ''I'm not ready to go,'' he said. ''The thing about it is you won't have a chance to see the game without being constantly disturbed. Once you get in, even if you have your own booth, you're going to be bothered a lot. I'd rather not do that.''

 

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10/31/90 L.A. Times 3

 

Los Angeles Times

 

October 31, 1990

 

Section: SP-Sports

 

Notes on a Scorecard

AN MALAMUD

 

Giles Pellerin, 83, will watch his 699th consecutive USC game Saturday when the Trojans play California at the Coliseum. The streak began in 1926 when Pellerin saw USC edge Whittier College, 74-0. . . .

 

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11/5/90 Seattle Times E2

Seattle Times (WA)

 

November 5, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

OREGON IN PACK OF BOWL HOPEFULS

 

CRAIG SMITH

 

Oregon, which never has been to bowl games two years in a row, appears headed for the Freedom Bowl, probably to face Wyoming.

 

Although bowl invitations can't be formally extended until Nov. 24, the word in Eugene and throughout the Pac-10 is that the Ducks (7-2) will be invited to the postseason game in Anaheim, Calif.

 

That's fine with Coach Rich Brooks, who figures it can help recruiting in Southern California. The Ducks didn't lure many recruits out of Shreveport, La., where they beat Tulsa 27-24 in last year's Independence Bowl.

 

USC (6-2-1) appears headed for the John Hancock Bowl in El Paso, Texas, to face Michigan State. Arizona (6-3) is expected to play Syracuse in the Aloha Bowl in Honolulu.

 

USC drew Cotton, Cirtrus and Sugar Bowl scouts to its 31-31 tie Saturday against California. However, the Trojans are considered out of the running for a big-name bowl.

 

The Pac-10 is trying to get California invited to the Copper Bowl in Tucson, Ariz., where a possible opponent would be Colorado State. Cal (5-3-1) hasn't been to a bowl game since the Garden State Bowl in 1979.

 

If Cal gets invited to a bowl this year, that would put five Pac-10 teams, including Pasadena-bound Washington, in postseason games. The league high is six, in 1986.

 

LOYAL TROJAN

 

-- Giles Pellerin, 83, a retired telephone company executive, will watch his 700th consecutive USC game Saturday when the Trojans play at Oregon State.

 

Pellerin's streak began in 1926 when he was a sophomore at USC.

 

The Pasadena, Calif., resident almost missed the 1949 USC-UW game when he was hospitalized for an appendectomy.

 

He told nurses he was going for a walk on hospital grounds and headed for the Coliseum, where the Trojans won 40-28. He returned to the hospital after the game.

 

HERE AND THERE

 

-- Nice ending. Oregon quarterback Bill Musgrave's final pass at Autzen Stadium was a touchdown that beat UCLA 28-24. Musgrave finished his career with a 19-1 won-lost record in Eugene as the Ducks completed their first unbeaten home season since the stadium was built in 1967. After the game, fans uprooted a goal post, passed it over a six-foot fence and hauled it away, injuring three security guards and several onlookers.

 

-- Oregon Coach Rich Brooks was amused by talk about how slippery the Autzen Stadium turf is. In past seasons, he said, "nobody ever complained when they were beating us."

 

-- The Trojan horse, Traveler, bolted during a TD ride in USC's 31-31 tie with Cal, dumping rider Tim Nolan. He was treated for a nose cut.

 

-- Ivan Maisel of The Dallas Morning News, on fears of Washington fans that pollsters might underrate the Huskies: "Don't be paranoid. Anybody who can read a score has got to understand how good they are."

 

PAC-10 NOTEBOOK

 

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11/8/90 L.A. Times 3

Los Angeles Times

 

November 8, 1990

 

Section: SP-Sports

 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL REPORT / WEEKDAY UPDATE

USC

RY CROWE

 

With 46 receptions for 792 yards this season, senior flanker Gary Wellman is on pace to become USC's first 1,000-yard receiver.

 

He needs 23 receptions to break Erik Affholter's school record of 68 in one season. That also would move him into third place on USC's all-time receiving list. And if he maintains his average of 88 yards a game, he will break Jeff Simmons' school record of 973 yards in one season.

 

Wellman made 45 catches in his first three seasons at USC.

 

Linebacker Brian Tuliau tore ligaments in his left ankle in Saturday's 31-31 tie with California and may be out for the season, Coach Larry Smith said.

 

Giles Pellerin, a retired phone company executive from Pasadena who has attended 699 consecutive USC football games, is expected to extend his streak to 700 when the Trojans play Oregon State Saturday at Corvallis, Ore.

 

The streak started in 1926, when Pellerin was a sophomore at USC. Pellerin, 83, will be given a game ball if USC beats the Beavers, Smith said.

 

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AP Online

November 8, 1990

 

Section: Sports,Sports Scores

 

Super Fan

 

LOS ANGELES Ask Giles Pellerin to describe last Saturday's Southern Cal-California football game and he can offer an astute analysis of the 31-31 tie since he was at the game.

 

Ask Pellerin to detail the 1926 Southern Cal-Whittier game and he can recall the 74-0 Trojan romp vividly. He was at the game.

 

And Giles, 83, also has first-hand knowledge of all Southern Cal football games played between the season-opener in 1926 and last Saturday's contest.

 

He's been at all of them, home and away, a 64-year streak covering 699 games. And this weekend, the USC alumnus will log his 700th when the Trojans play at Oregon State.

 

''I never predict a victory,'' Southern Cal coach Larry Smith said. ''But, I will say if we win this Saturday, the game ball will go to Giles.''

 

Pellerin's astonishing streak almost got snapped though, back in 1949.

 

''I was at a Tuesday night service club meeting and I got sick to my stomach,'' Pellerin recalled.

 

He underwent an operation for a ruptured appendix that night and was hospitalized with no chance of being released before Saturday's home game against Washington State.

 

Come Saturday morning, he told nurses he planned to take a little stroll.

 

''Then I called my brother, Oliver, and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital. He picked my up and took me to the Coliseum,'' he said.

 

The nurses never figured out they were given the slip and, to boot, USC beat Washington, 40-28.

 

Has this fanatic behavior affected his personal life at all?

 

''Jesse and I were married in March of 1935, but postponed our honeymoon for eight months so we could go to Hawaii when USC played there,'' Pellerin recalled.

 

She attends some of the games with Pellerin, who has developed friendships over the years with some of Southern Cal's greatest players, including Lynne Swan, Pat Haden and Mike Garrett.

 

''We have no children of our own so I think of all the USC players as our family,'' said Pellerin, who has bequeathed his entire million-dollar estate to USC to create the Giles and Jessie Pellerin Football Memorial Scholarship.

 

Pellerin first became a Trojan fan when he was attending high school at Huntington Park High in the early 1920s, a time when a student could get into a game for 25 cents.

 

''After graduating from high school, I started working for the telephone company at night and went to school at USC during the day. Saturday was my only day off and I'd always go to the football games,'' he said.

 

He graduated from USC in 1929 and continued to work for the telephone company for 40 years until his retirement in 1970.

 

It's been estimated that he's travelled over 650,000 miles and spent $80,000 on his favorite pastime. But, it's the future that he looks to.

 

''I usually set goals for myself of 100-games at a time,'' he said. ''For instance, I'll always remember that the 1973 Rose Bowl game was my 500th game. I've set a new goal for myself 800 games which should happen in 1999, when I'll only be 92 years old.

 

''You see, I've always said that going to the USC games is the thing that has kept me alive, young and happy.''

 

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11/9/90 USA TODAY 10C

USA Today (USA)

 

November 9, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

ULTRA-LOYAL FANS LIVE BY ONE MOTTO: HAVE GAME, WILL TRAVEL

 

Karen Allen

 

Nothing not rain, nor snow, nor decades of Saturday afternoon traffic jams - deters two of the USA's most dedicated football fans from following their teams. On Saturday:

 

- Giles Pellerin will attend his 700th consecutive Southern California game when the Trojans play at Oregon State. His streak began in September 1926 with a 74-0 victory against Whittier College.

 

- Dick Coffee will attend his 500th consecutive Alabama game at home against Louisiana State. His streak began in Boston in November 1946, a 13-7 loss to Boston College.

 

Both streaks include home, away and bowl games. Coffee, a 1950 Alabama graduate, estimates his string has taken him to 38 cities in 21 states. Pellerin, a '29 Southern Cal graduate, figures he has been to about 50 cities in 35 states.

 

Two of Pellerin's brothers, Max and Oliver, also have long streaks going. Oliver, 81, will attend his 482nd game this weekend. Max, 79, had a 300-plus streak broken when his job took him to Saudi Arabia several years ago.

 

Coffee, who jokingly gives his age as "29," was an Alabama fan long before his streak began. When he served in Europe with the Army's 10th Armored Division in World War II, he spent his spare time listening to the Tide over the Armed Forces Network.

 

"I grew up listening to them on a beat-up $6.95 Sears & Roebuck radio," said Coffee. "My dad died when I was 9, and I guess it filled a kind of void for me, became a kind of comforting thing."

 

Coffee's most memorable game was a 1960 16-15 win against Georgia Tech won with a late field goal.

 

"The ball was deflected on the way up," he said. "It hit the corner of the goal, and just sat there for the longest time. Then it just fell in."

 

In the 1920s, Pellerin attended Southern Cal by day and worked for the local telephone company by night. He watched the first Southern Cal-Notre Dame game in 1926 when the Knute Rockne-led Irish came back in the final two minutes to edge the Trojans, 13-12.

 

Four years later, one season after Rockne died in a plane crash, Pellerin saw the Trojans get their first victory in South Bend, in the newly built Notre Dame stadium.

 

Pellerin's streak should have come to an end in 1949 when he was hospitalized on a Tuesday with a ruptured appendix.

 

"I asked the doctor if I could go to the game, and he said, 'No chance, " said Pellerin. "Saturday, I got up in the morning, and told the nurse I was going to go for a walk. I called my brother and told him to pick me up at noon. After lunch, I went for another walk, right out the door."

 

Pellerin, who'll turn 84 Dec. 23, has been to 27 Rose Bowls, which are played 2 miles from his Pasadena home.

 

"I usually walk," he said. "I can walk it faster than I can drive it."

 

But this year, Southern Cal won't be in the Rose Bowl. Pellerin is pretty sure they are headed instead to El Paso for the John Hancock Bowl.

 

"It looks like this year instead of walking 2 miles I'll have to get in my car and drive more than 750," he said.

 

CUTLINE: GILES PELLERIN: Hasn't missed a game since 1926.

 

PHOTO

b/w,Rob Brown,USA TODAY

 

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11/9/90 S.F. Chron. D6

San Francisco Chronicle (CA)

November 9, 1990

Section: SPORTS

TOP OF THE SIXTH

TOM FITZGERALD

 

IRON-MAN FAN IS

 

A REAL TROJAN HORSE

 

Giles Pellerin once nearly missed a USC football game. He underwent surgery for a ruptured appendix on a Tuesday, but that Saturday morning, he told the nurses he was going for a stroll. His brother picked him up in the hospital lobby and drove him to Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum for the game.

 

His sneakiness kept an incredible streak alive. Pellerin, 83, has attended every USC game, home and away, since 1926. The streak will reach 700 games tomorrow at Oregon State. "I never predict a victory," USC coach Larry Smith says. "But I will say, if we win this Saturday, the game ball will go to Giles."

 

Pellerin retired in 1970 after 40 years with the phone company. It has been estimated that he has traveled more than 650,000 miles and spent $80,000 on his favorite pastime. Says Pellerin: "I've set a new goal for myself -- 800 games -- which should happen in 1999, when I'll only be 92 years old."

 

BUT WOULD THEY OBEY THE RULES? How about a basketball tournament for all the schools on NCAA probation: Missouri, Illinois, Nevada-Las Vegas, Maryland, North Carolina State, Kentucky, Florida, Drake, Southeastern Louisiana, Grambling State, South Carolina, Robert Morris, Marshall and Northwestern (La.) State? They could call it the Jim Valvano Invitational.

 

-- David Letterman says: "The Kuwaitis have said again they will never, ever, till the end of time, consider becoming a part of Iraq. However, they are entering final negotiations to join the Big Ten."

 

-- George Rogers, the New Orleans Saints' top draft pick in 1981, failed to complete a prescribed mile-and-a-half run upon reporting to rookie camp. Coach Bum Phillips, asked what he planned to do, said: "Well, when it's third and a mile and a half to go, we'll just give the ball to somebody else."

 

THROWING THEIR HATS INTO THE RING: The winner of a hotly contested race for district judge in Nevada on Tuesday knew what to do in the clinches. Mills Lane, referee in last month's Evander Holyfield-Buster Douglas fight and many other title fights, drew 68 percent of the votes in routing Shelly O'Neill.

 

An even more striking (so to speak) winner was ex-wrestler Jesse (The Body) Ventura, who became mayor of Brooklyn Park, Minn. Ventura, now a TV wrestling announcer, is known for defending chair-throwing and eye-gouging as "perfectly legitimate moves." While campaigning door to door, he said, "People would look at me as if they'd just stepped into the 'Twilight Zone.' "

 

-- When asked why he hadn't reported that his American Express card was stolen, former tennis star Ilie Nastase said: "Why should I? The guy who stole it is spending less than my wife was."

 

TOP OF THE SIXTH

 

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11/9/90 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S1

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

 

November 9, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

THIS USC FAN HAS SEEN IT ALL AS STREAK REACHES 700 GAMES

 

Tom Timmermann Daily News Staff Writer

 

Giles Pellerin has been there.

 

He's been to Honolulu and Iowa City. He's been to Tokyo and Pittsburgh. His trip to Moscow, U.S.S.R., fell through, but he's been to Moscow, Idaho. Eight times.

 

And every time Pellerin goes somewhere, darn if the USC football team doesn't seem to be there, too.

 

When Pellerin settles into his seat in Parker Stadium on Saturday - on his ninth trip to Corvallis, Ore. - it will be the 700th consecutive USC football game he has attended, a streak that dates back to the 83-year-old Pellerin's sophomore year at USC in 1926. Needless to say, this milestone has been a longtime coming and shows no sign of stopping.

 

''Now, I've set 800 as my objective,'' he said. ''If I get that, I'll be 92. Then I'll go for 850.''

 

The road to 700 has been surprisingly easy for Pellerin. He has had only a few close calls over the years in keeping his streak alive, once when he had appendicitis and once when he lost his tickets. And only rarely, like when the Trojans went 1-9 in 1957, has he considered just not going.

 

The closest Pellerin has come to losing his streak was in 1949, when he had to have an emergency appendectomy on a Tuesday night.

 

''On Friday, I asked the doctor if there was any chance of me getting out Saturday and he said no,'' Pellerin said. ''On Saturday morning, I told the nurse I was going for a walk and then I called my brother Oliver and told him to meet me in the lobby at 12 o'clock and we went to the Coliseum. The nurses got concerned because I missed lunch and dinner was coming up.''

 

To many, Pellerin's streak borders on the maniacal. For instance, in 1935 he pushed his honeymoon back eight months so that he and his wife could accompany the USC football team on a trip to Hawaii. But Pellerin, a retired telephone company executive, says his fanaticism is not that extraordinary.

 

''People say, 'How much does this cost you?' '' Pellerin said. ''I've never put down a dollar figure on it, but I figure I've spent $80,000 to $85,000 over a 65-year period. That works out to $1,200 to $1,500 a year. Some people spend that much money on golf on Fridays or poker with their friends on Saturdays. And I've made a lot of real good close friends.''

 

Among those friends are just about every USC football player of the past 65 years. Pellerin lists Lynn Swann, Vince Evans, Bob Chandler, Jim Sears and Jon Arnett among his favorites, but notes there have been ''500 to 600 football players. That's a lot to remember.''

 

Pellerin doesn't act like the stereotypical rabid booster. ''I'm not an exhibitionist,'' he said. ''I don't wear a cardinal shirt or a two-color pair of pants. I'm rather conservative.''

 

Pellerin didn't set out to see every USC football game, it just kind of happened. He became a USC fan when he saw the Trojans win the 1923 Rose Bowl over Penn State and in that year, while a student at Huntington Park High School, he attended every USC home game. After graduating high school, he worked at the phone company at night and went to USC during the day. He had Saturdays off and went to football games.

 

The last game Pellerin missed was the Trojans 12-0 win over St. Mary's in the final game of the 1925 season. Since then, he's seen 476 wins, 185 losses and 38 ties. He figures he's travelled 650,000 miles and has been to 48 cities outside of the greater Los Angeles area, from Tokyo to Miami.

 

There were only two road trips in the streak's first year, 1926, to Berkeley (the first of 32 trips there) and Portland (to play Oregon State). The streak picked up steam when Pellerin took a train to Chicago to see USC play Notre Dame in 1927. Back then, the special train that carried USC east took three days, with stops in Albuquerque, N.M. and Kansas City to let the team off to practice. The whole project took a week, and Pellerin used his vacation time to go. ''That's how it got started,'' he said.

 

It wasn't until 1935, the year he got married and went to his 100th straight game, that Pellerin realized he had a streak going.

 

''I was close to my 100th game and I think my wife pretty much recognized that I was a Trojan fan,'' Pellerin said.

 

The fanaticism runs deep in the Pellerin family. His brother Oliver, 81, has seen 482 straight games (World War II got in the way) and his brother Max, 79, had a 300-plus game string broken several years ago. Pellerin's wife, Jessie, goes to all USC home games and makes a few road trips a year. The family has had the same six seats in Tunnel 5, Row 32 of the Coliseum for the past 30 years.

 

Now that Pellerin has been retired for 20 years, the project is easier. Next year, when USC plays back-to-back games in Pullman, Wash., and Eugene, Ore., he will just stay up there. ''I already know what my schedule is for next year,'' he said. ''The fact that I'm in a good financial situation means I don't have to worry about the cost or anything like that.''

 

In fact, his financial situation is good enough that Pellerin has bequeathed his entire million-dollar estate to USC to set up the Giles and Jessie Pellerin Football Memorial Scholarship.

 

''We have no children of our own, so I think of all the USC players as our family,'' he said.

 

Pellerin recently moved from his home in San Marino to a condominium in Pasadena, which forced him to put much of his USC memorabilia in storage. But he will have to find room for a new memento. USC coach Larry Smith has promised that if the Trojans beat Oregon State on Saturday, they'll give Pellerin the game ball.

 

FIGHT ON AND ON

 

Giles Pellerin, who will see his 700th consecutive USC football game on Saturday, reflects on his favorite USC games of the past 65 years:

 

1931, USC 16, Notre Dame 14 at South Bend, Ind.: ''That was the first game played at the present Notre Dame Stadium and it was our first victory over Notre Dame away from the Coliseum.''

 

1939 Rose Bowl, USC 7, Duke 3: ''Duke came into the game undefeated and unscored on and they led us 6-3. USC put in a couple of sophomores, Doyle Nave and Al Krueger, and we beat Duke and broke their string.''

 

1963 Rose Bowl, USC 42, Wisconsin 35: ''If the game had lasted another five minutes, Wisconsin would have tied us or beat us.''

 

1964, USC 20, Notre Dame 17 at the Coliseum: ''They were beating us 17-6 at halftime, we came back to beat Notre Dame and knocked them out of the national championship.''

 

1975 Rose Bowl, USC 18, Ohio State 17: ''We went for the two-point conversion to Sheldon Diggs to win.''

 

PHOTO

CHART

(Color) Giles Pellerin, standing in USC's Heritage Hall, hasn't missed a USC football game since 1926. John McCoy/Daily News FIGHT ON AND ON (See Text)

 

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11/10/90 Pitt. Post-Gazette C2

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (PA)

 

November 10, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

SUPERFAN

 

Ask Giles Pellerin to describe last Saturday's Southern Cal-California football game and he can offer an astute analysis of the 31-31 tie since he was at the game.

 

Ask Pellerin to detail the 1926 Southern Cal-Whittier game and he can recall the 74-0 Trojans' romp vividly. He was at the game.

 

Giles, 83, has first-hand knowledge of all Southern Cal football games played between the season-opener in 1926 and last Saturday's contest. He's been at all of them, home and away, a 64-year streak covering 699 games. Today, he will log his 700th when the Trojans play at Oregon State.

 

"If we win, the game ball will go to Giles," USC Coach Larry Smith said.

 

Pellerin's astonishing streak almost was broken in 1949 when he underwent an emergency appendectomy before a home game with Washington State. Saturday morning, he told nurses he was going for a little stroll. His brother picked him up and took him to the game. The nurses never knew he was gone.

 

NAMES & GAMES

 

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11/10/90 Rec. N. N.J. b02

New Jersey Record (NJ)

 

November 10, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

SPORTS TALK

 

John Brennan

 

NO. 1 ANY WAY YOU LOOK AT IT: Let's get this straight: Notre Dame is No. 1, but the Fighting Irish lost to Stanford, which lost to San Jose State, which lost to California, which lost to Washington State, which lost to Wyoming, which lost to Colorado State, which lost to Arkansas, which lost to Rice, which lost to Tulane, which lost to Southwestern Louisiana, which lost to Louisiana Tech, which lost to Western Michigan, which lost to Eastern Michigan, which lost to Youngstown (Ohio) State, which is No. 1 in Division I-AA.

 

USC'S NO. 1 FAN: Giles Pellerin can give you details on every Southern Cal football game since 1926. But Pellerin's no bookworm _ he remembers each one because he attended all 699 of them, home and away, since the season opener in 1926. He will log No. 700 today when the Trojans play at Oregon State.

 

Pellerin's astonishing streak almost was snapped in 1949.

 

"I was at a Tuesday night service club meeting and I got sick to my stomach," said Pellerin. He underwent an operation for a ruptured appendix that night and was hospitalized before a home game against Washington State. That Saturday morning, he told nurses he planned to take a little stroll.

 

"Then I called my brother, Oliver, and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital. He picked me up and took me to the [Los Angeles] Coliseum," he said.

 

Pellerin graduated from USC in 1929 and worked for the telephone company for 40 years until his retirement in 1970. He married his wife, Jesse, in 1935, postponing his honeymoon for eight months so they could go to Hawaii when USC played there.

 

"We have no children of our own, so I think of all the USC players as our family," said Pellerin.

 

SPORTS TALK

 

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11/10/90 Atlanta J. - Const. C02

 

Atlanta Journal and Constitution (GA)

 

November 10, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

GAMES & FACES\QUICK START MAKES SPURRIER POPULAR MAN AT BALLOT BOX

 

Tom Whitfield

 

CALL HIM SUPERFAN

 

There are college football fans. And then there is Giles Pellerin, 83, who has seen every Southern Cal game since the 1926 season opener. Today at Oregon State, he will run his streak to 700 games.

 

"I never predict a victory," said Southern Cal coach Larry Smith. "But I will say if we win, the game ball will go to Giles."

 

It has been estimated Pellerin has traveled more than 650,000 miles and spent $80,000 watching USC football.

 

"I usually set goals for myself of 100 games at a time," said Pellerin, a retired telephone company worker. "For instance, I'll always remember that the 1973 Rose Bowl game was my 500th game. I've set a new goal for myself - 800 games - which should happen in 1999, when I'll only be 92 years old."

 

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11/11/90 St. Paul Pioneer Press (Minn.) 9B

St. Paul Pioneer Press (MN)

 

November 11, 1990

 

Section: Sports

 

SOUTHERN CAL FAN NEVER MISSES A TROJAN GAME

 

Associated Press

 

LOS ANGELES Ask Giles Pellerin to describe last Saturday's Southern Cal-California football game and he can offer an astute analysis of the 31-31 tie since he was at the game.

 

Ask Pellerin to detail the 1926 Southern Cal-Whittier game and he can recall the 74-0 Trojan romp vividly. He was at the game.

 

And Giles, 83, also has first-hand knowledge of all Southern Cal football games played between the season-opener in 1926 and last Saturday's contest.

 

He's been at all of them, home and away, a 64-year streak covering 699 games. And this weekend, the USC alumnus will log his 700th when the Trojans played at Oregon State.

 

"I never predict a victory," Southern Cal coach Larry Smith said. "But, I will say if we win this Saturday, the game ball will go to Giles."

 

Pellerin's astonishing streak almost got snapped though, back in 1949.

 

"I was at a Tuesday night service club meeting and I got sick to my stomach," Pellerin recalled.

 

He underwent an operation for a ruptured appendix that night and was hospitalized with no chance of being released before Saturday's home game against Washington State.

 

Come Saturday morning, he told nurses he planned to take a little stroll.

 

"Then I called my brother, Oliver, and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital. He picked my up and took me to the Coliseum," he said.

 

The nurses never figured out they were given the slip and, to boot, USC beat Washington, 40-28.

 

Has this fanatic behavior affected his personal life at all?

 

"Jesse and I were married in March of 1935, but postponed our honeymoon for eight months so we could go to Hawaii when USC played there," Pellerin recalled.

 

She attends some of the games with Pellerin, who has developed friendships over the years with some of Southern Cal's greatest players, including Lynne Swan, Pat Haden and Mike Garrett.

 

"We have no children of our own so I think of all the USC players as our family," said Pellerin, who has bequeathed his entire million-dollar estate to USC to create the Giles and Jessie Pellerin Football Memorial Scholarship.

 

Pellerin first became a Trojan fan when he was attending high school at Huntington Park High in the early 1920s, a time when a student could get into a game for 25 cents.

 

"After graduating from high school, I started working for the telephone company at night and went to school at USC during the day. Saturday was my only day off and I'd always go to the football games," he said.

 

He graduated from USC in 1929 and continued to work for the telephone company for 40 years until his retirement in 1970.

 

It's been estimated that he's traveled over 650,000 miles and spent $80,000 on his favorite pastime. But, it's the future that he looks to.

 

"I usually set goals for myself of 100-games at a time," he said. "For instance, I'll always remember that the 1973 Rose Bowl game was my 500th game. I've set a new goal for myself - 800 games - which should happen in 1999, when I'll only be 92 years old.

 

 

"You see, I've always said that going to the USC games is the thing that has kept me alive, young and happy." Ask Giles Pellerin to describe last Saturday's Southern Cal-California football game and he can offer an astute analysis of the 31-31 tie since he was at the game.

 

Ask Pellerin to detail the 1926 Southern Cal-Whittier game and he can recall the 74-0 Trojan romp vividly. He was at the game.

 

And Giles, 83, also has first-hand knowledge of all Southern Cal football games played between the season-opener in 1926 and last Saturday's contest.

 

He's been at all of them, home and away, a 64-year streak covering 699 games. And this weekend, the USC alumnus will log his 700th when the Trojans played at Oregon State.

 

"I never predict a victory," Southern Cal coach Larry Smith said. "But, I will say if we win this Saturday, the game ball will go to Giles."

 

Pellerin's astonishing streak almost got snapped though, back in 1949.

 

"I was at a Tuesday night service club meeting and I got sick to my stomach," Pellerin recalled.

 

He underwent an operation for a ruptured appendix that night and was hospitalized with no chance of being released before Saturday's home game against Washington State.

 

Come Saturday morning, he told nurses he planned to take a little stroll.

 

"Then I called my brother, Oliver, and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital. He picked my up and took me to the Coliseum," he said.

 

The nurses never figured out they were given the slip and, to boot, USC beat Washington, 40-28.

 

Has this fanatic behavior affected his personal life at all?

 

"Jesse and I were married in March of 1935, but postponed our honeymoon for eight months so we could go to Hawaii when USC played there," Pellerin recalled.

 

She attends some of the games with Pellerin, who has developed friendships over the years with some of Southern Cal's greatest players, including Lynne Swan, Pat Haden and Mike Garrett.

 

"We have no children of our own so I think of all the USC players as our family," said Pellerin, who has bequeathed his entire million-dollar estate to USC to create the Giles and Jessie Pellerin Football Memorial Scholarship.

 

Pellerin first became a Trojan fan when he was attending high school at Huntington Park High in the early 1920s, a time when a student could get into a game for 25 cents.

 

"After graduating from high school, I started working for the telephone company at night and went to school at USC during the day. Saturday was my only day off and I'd always go to the football games," he said.

 

He graduated from USC in 1929 and continued to work for the telephone company for 40 years until his retirement in 1970.

 

It's been estimated that he's traveled over 650,000 miles and spent $80,000 on his favorite pastime. But, it's the future that he looks to.

 

"I usually set goals for myself of 100-games at a time," he said. "For instance, I'll always remember that the 1973 Rose Bowl game was my 500th game. I've set a new goal for myself - 800 games - which should happen in 1999, when I'll only be 92 years old.

 

 

"You see, I've always said that going to the USC games is the thing that has kept me alive, young and happy."

 

Ask Giles Pellerin to describe last Saturday's Southern Cal-California football game and he can offer an astute analysis of the 31-31 tie since he was at the game.

 

Ask Pellerin to detail the 1926 Southern Cal-Whittier game and he can recall the 74-0 Trojan romp vividly. He was at the game.

 

And Giles, 83, also has first-hand knowledge of all Southern Cal football games played between the season-opener in 1926 and last Saturday's contest.

 

He's been at all of them, home and away, a 64-year streak covering 699 games. And this weekend, the USC alumnus will log his 700th when the Trojans played at Oregon State.

 

"I never predict a victory," Southern Cal coach Larry Smith said. "But, I will say if we win this Saturday, the game ball will go to Giles."

 

Pellerin's astonishing streak almost got snapped though, back in 1949.

 

"I was at a Tuesday night service club meeting and I got sick to my stomach," Pellerin recalled.

 

He underwent an operation for a ruptured appendix that night and was hospitalized with no chance of being released before Saturday's home game against Washington State.

 

Come Saturday morning, he told nurses he planned to take a little stroll.

 

"Then I called my brother, Oliver, and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital. He picked my up and took me to the Coliseum," he said.

 

The nurses never figured out they were given the slip and, to boot, USC beat Washington, 40-28.

 

Has this fanatic behavior affected his personal life at all?

 

"Jesse and I were married in March of 1935, but postponed our honeymoon for eight months so we could go to Hawaii when USC played there," Pellerin recalled.

 

She attends some of the games with Pellerin, who has developed friendships over the years with some of Southern Cal's greatest players, including Lynne Swan, Pat Haden and Mike Garrett.

 

"We have no children of our own so I think of all the USC players as our family," said Pellerin, who has bequeathed his entire million-dollar estate to USC to create the Giles and Jessie Pellerin Football Memorial Scholarship.

 

Pellerin first became a Trojan fan when he was attending high school at Huntington Park High in the early 1920s, a time when a student could get into a game for 25 cents.

 

"After graduating from high school, I started working for the telephone company at night and went to school at USC during the day. Saturday was my only day off and I'd always go to the football games," he said.

 

He graduated from USC in 1929 and continued to work for the telephone company for 40 years until his retirement in 1970.

 

It's been estimated that he's traveled over 650,000 miles and spent $80,000 on his favorite pastime. But, it's the future that he looks to.

 

"I usually set goals for myself of 100-games at a time," he said. "For instance, I'll always remember that the 1973 Rose Bowl game was my 500th game. I've set a new goal for myself - 800 games - which should happen in 1999, when I'll only be 92 years old.

 

 

"You see, I've always said that going to the USC games is the thing that has kept me alive, young and happy." Ask Giles Pellerin to describe last Saturday's Southern Cal-California football game and he can offer an astute analysis of the 31-31 tie since he was at the game.

 

Ask Pellerin to detail the 1926 Southern Cal-Whittier game and he can recall the 74-0 Trojan romp vividly. He was at the game.

 

And Giles, 83, also has first-hand knowledge of all Southern Cal football games played between the season-opener in 1926 and last Saturday's contest.

 

He's been at all of them, home and away, a 64-year streak covering 699 games. And this weekend, the USC alumnus will log his 700th when the Trojans played at Oregon State.

 

"I never predict a victory," Southern Cal coach Larry Smith said. "But, I will say if we win this Saturday, the game ball will go to Giles."

 

Pellerin's astonishing streak almost got snapped though, back in 1949.

 

"I was at a Tuesday night service club meeting and I got sick to my stomach," Pellerin recalled.

 

He underwent an operation for a ruptured appendix that night and was hospitalized with no chance of being released before Saturday's home game against Washington State.

 

Come Saturday morning, he told nurses he planned to take a little stroll.

 

"Then I called my brother, Oliver, and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital. He picked my up and took me to the Coliseum," he said.

 

The nurses never figured out they were given the slip and, to boot, USC beat Washington, 40-28.

 

Has this fanatic behavior affected his personal life at all?

 

"Jesse and I were married in March of 1935, but postponed our honeymoon for eight months so we could go to Hawaii when USC played there," Pellerin recalled.

 

She attends some of the games with Pellerin, who has developed friendships over the years with some of Southern Cal's greatest players, including Lynne Swan, Pat Haden and Mike Garrett.

 

"We have no children of our own so I think of all the USC players as our family," said Pellerin, who has bequeathed his entire million-dollar estate to USC to create the Giles and Jessie Pellerin Football Memorial Scholarship.

 

Pellerin first became a Trojan fan when he was attending high school at Huntington Park High in the early 1920s, a time when a student could get into a game for 25 cents.

 

"After graduating from high school, I started working for the telephone company at night and went to school at USC during the day. Saturday was my only day off and I'd always go to the football games," he said.

 

He graduated from USC in 1929 and continued to work for the telephone company for 40 years until his retirement in 1970.

 

It's been estimated that he's traveled over 650,000 miles and spent $80,000 on his favorite pastime. But, it's the future that he looks to.

 

"I usually set goals for myself of 100-games at a time," he said. "For instance, I'll always remember that the 1973 Rose Bowl game was my 500th game. I've set a new goal for myself - 800 games - which should happen in 1999, when I'll only be 92 years old.

 

 

"You see, I've always said that going to the USC games is the thing that has kept me alive, young and happy."

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

11/11/90 South Florida Sun-Sentinel 3C

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

November 11, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC FAN JOINS 700 CLUB

 

Ask Giles Pellerin to describe last Saturday's Southern Cal-California football game and he can offer an astute analysis of the 31-31 tie since he was at the game.

 

Ask Pellerin to detail the 1926 Southern Cal-Whittier game and he can recall the 74-0 Trojan romp vividly. He was at the game.

 

And Pellerin, 83, also has first-hand knowledge of all Southern Cal football games played between the season-opener in 1926 and last Saturday's contest.

 

He's been at all of them, home and away, a 64-year streak covering 699 games. And this weekend, the USC alumnus logged his 700th when the Trojans played at Oregon State.

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

11/11/90 S.F. Examiner (Cal.) C5

 

San Francisco Examiner (CA)

November 11, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

WHEN IT COMES TO BEING A TROJAN FAN, HE'S BEEN A HORSE SATURDAY'S GAME AGAINST OREGON ST. THE 700TH STRAIGHT FOR GILES PELLERIN

 

ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

LOS ANGELES Ask Giles Pellerin to describe last Saturday's Southern Cal-California football game and he can offer an astute analysis of the 31-31 tie since he was at the game.

 

Ask Pellerin to detail the 1926 Southern Cal-Whittier game and he can recall the 74-0 Trojan romp vividly. He was at the game.

 

And Giles, 83, also has first-hand knowledge of all Southern Cal football games played between the season-opener in 1926 and last Saturday's contest.

 

He's been at all of them, home and away, a 64-year streak covering 699 games. And this weekend, the USC alumnus will log his 700th when the Trojans play at Oregon State.

 

"I never predict a victory," Southern Cal coach Larry Smith said. "But, I will say if we win this Saturday, the game ball will go to Giles."

 

Pellerin's astonishing streak almost got snapped though, back in 1949.

 

"I was at a Tuesday night service club meeting and I got sick to my stomach," Pellerin recalled.

 

He underwent an operation for a ruptured appendix that night and was hospitalized with no chance of being released before Saturday's home game against Washington State.

 

Come Saturday morning, he told nurses he planned to take a little stroll.

 

"Then I called my brother, Oliver, and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital. He picked my up and took me to the Coliseum," he said.

 

The nurses never figured out they were given the slip and, to boot, USC beat Washington, 40-28.

 

Has this fanatic behavior affected his personal life at all?

 

"Jesse and I were married in March of 1935, but postponed our honeymoon for eight months so we could go to Hawaii when USC played there," Pellerin recalled.

 

She attends some of the games with Pellerin, who has developed friendships over the years with some of Southern Cal's greatest players, including Lynne Swan, Pat Haden and Mike Garrett.

 

"We have no children of our own so I think of all the USC players as our family," said Pellerin, who has bequeathed his entire million-dollar estate to USC to create the Giles and Jessie Pellerin Football Memorial Scholarship.

 

Pellerin first became a Trojan fan when he was attending high school at Huntington Park High in the early 1920s, a time when a student could get into a game for 25 cents.

 

"After graduating from high school, I started working for the telephone company at night and went to school at USC during the day. Saturday was my only day off and I'd always go to the football games," he said.

 

He graduated from USC in 1929 and continued to work for the telephone company for 40 years until his retirement in 1970.

 

It's been estimated that he's travelled over 650,000 miles and spent $80,000 on his favorite pastime. But, it's the future that he looks to.

 

"I usually set goals for myself of 100-games at a time," he said. "For instance, I'll always remember that the 1973 Rose Bowl game was my 500th game. I've set a new goal for myself - 800 games - which should happen in 1999, when I'll only be 92 years old.

 

 

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11/11/90 Hous. Chron. 8

 

Houston Chronicle

November 11, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Southern Cal fan attends 700th straight game

 

WOODY WOODBURN

 

Who is the greatest football player in Southern Cal history? That's a tough one.

 

For starters, you've got four Heisman Trophy winners, Mike Garrett, O.J. Simpson, Charles White and Marcus Allen. There are NFL Hall of Famers named Red Badgro, Frank Gifford, Ron Mix, O.J. and Willie Wood. And don't forget Brad Budde, Ron Yary and Anthony Munoz, to name but a few of the Trojan horses.

 

It's an impossible question. But there is no question who is the greatest fan in Trojan history. That's Giles Louis Pellerin. He might be the greatest fan in sports history.

 

Giles Pellerin is the Lou Gehrig of sports fans. He has seen 699 consecutive Southern Cal football games, home and away.

 

A former telephone company executive, Giles has lived by the postman's credo: "Neither rain nor snow nor an emergency appendectomy will keep him from his appointed stadium seat at kickoff."

 

Saturday, The Streak reached 700 when USC played at Oregon State.

 

Lou Gehrig played in a whopping 2,130 consecutive games - but his ironman streak lasted only 14 years. Giles' streak started in 1926 when Southern Cal routed Whittier 74-0 to open the season.

 

Giles, a white-haired, bespectacled, 83-year-old saw his first football game three seasons earlier, in 1923, the year Gehrig broke in with the New York Yankees. Another historical note: For the 1923 Rose Bowl, Giles, 17, paid $1.70 for his ticket.

 

He now has a shoe box full of ticket stubs - and a head full of memories. He has seen eight national championship teams, 27 Rose Bowls and six other bowls involving his beloved Trojans. He saw USC play Notre Dame when Knute Rockne was coach. In fact, Giles has seen all 61 games of the storied Southern Cal-Notre Dame rivalry.

 

He saw the 7-3 upset win over previously unbeaten and untied Duke in 1939. He saw O.J.'s 64-yard run to beat UCLA in 1967. He even saw "The Phantom Touchdown." He saw Howard Jones, Sam Barry, Jeff Cravath, Jess Hill, Don Clark, John McKay, John Robinson, Ted Tollner and Larry Smith pace the sideline.

 

During the early years of The Streak, Giles worked for the telephone company from 4 p.m. until midnight and went to classes at Southern Cal during the day.

 

"Saturday was my only day off and I'd always go to the football games," he said. "Back then, USC was the only major game in town. There was no pro baseball or pro football here yet."

 

After he graduated in 1929, Giles continued to work for the phone company. For 40 years, before retiring in 1970, he planned vacations to keep The Streak alive. A train trip to Chicago for the Notre Dame game used to be a one-week adventure.

 

Indeed, The Streak required the complicated planning of a moonshot - and almost as much money and miles. Giles estimates he has logged between 750,000 and a million miles and spent nearly $80,000.

 

"Over 65 years that's only about $1,000 a year. Guys spend more than that playing golf."

 

While Giles didn't have his bride's wedding vows altered to "love, honor and attend all USC football games," he did ask his wife, Jessie, to delay their honeymoon eight months so it could coincide with a trip to Hawaii to see USC play in 1935.

 

The Streak survived gas rationing during World War II, broken fuel pumps, flat tires, bad directions and an emergency appendectomy.

 

Giles proved he was The Ironfan - a loony tune, some say - in 1949. He underwent an operation for a ruptured appendix on a Tuesday night. On Saturday, Washington State was at Southern Cal. That was back when a hospital stay for such an operation was routinely two weeks.

 

"On Friday I asked the doc if I could go to the game," Giles said. "He said, 'No chance."'

 

The doctor underestimated Giles. He wasn't about to stop at a measly 243 games.

 

"Saturday I got up and called my brother, Oliver, and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital at 12 o'clock," Giles said. "Then I told the nurses I was going for a walk with Oliver.

 

"The Coliseum was only a couple miles away. When Oliver brought me back, the nurses were hunting for me. I'd missed lunch and was about to miss dinner. I just told them, 'The sunshine was so nice all day, I stayed outdoors."'

 

Despite a painful belly, it had been a beautiful day in Giles' eyes - USC beat Washington State, 40-28.

 

"Seven-hundred games! I'm pretty excited," Giles said while packing. "The Streak is quite meaningful to me. I look forward to keep on going as long as I can."

 

Kidnapping probably couldn't stop him.

 

"I'd find a way to get loose," he said with a laugh.

 

Giles, who will turn 84 two days before Christmas, credits The Streak for his wondrous health.

 

"I've always said that going to USC games is the thing that has kept me alive, young and happy."

 

He has already typed up a chart leading to 800.

 

"I usually set goals for myself of 100 games at a time," Giles said. "Now I'm looking forward to 800 games, which should happen in 1999. I'll only be 92 years old. But I doubt if I'll make it to 900."

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

11/11/90 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S1

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

 

November 11, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

FOLEY SPARKS USC Backup QB leads Trojans to 56-7 win

 

Tom Timmermann Daily News Staff Writer

 

CORVALLIS, ORE. USC handily defeated Oregon State, 56-7, on Saturday and at the same time, USC quarterback Shane Foley handily defeated Todd Marinovich.

 

So as USC heads into Saturday's game with UCLA, it has a 7-2-1 record and a big question mark as to who its starting quarterback will be.

 

The relevant stats on a surprisingly pleasant Saturday afternoon at Parker Stadium: Foley, a senior, completed 9 of 9 passes for 115 yards and two touchdowns and ran for a third; Marinovich, a sophomore, completed only 3 of 8 for 23 yards, career lows in every department. Foley was in for six series and produced three touchdowns; Marinovich was in for five series and produced two touchdowns. Even the never-seen Pat O'Hara, who hadn't played in a game since 1988, had a better completion percentage than Marinovich, going 1 for 1.

 

USC coach Larry Smith, who picked up his 100th career win, said that the decision as to who will start against UCLA will be decided in practice this week.

 

''I don't want to make that decision now,'' he said.

 

Ever since the Arizona loss, Smith has decided the starters based on the week's practice. Smith made it clear that he still stands behind Marinovich.

 

''Todd probably had one of those off-days,'' said Smith. ''I never would have guessed this would happen because I'd never seen him so sharp in practice this week. It's one of those things that athletes go through. . . . He'll be all right. He'll be back.''

 

But it may be tough to go against Foley, who led three nice scoring drives, including one in the closing minutes of the first half that put the game away permanently, and who was perfect throwing the ball.

 

''Shane played an outstanding game. Todd had graded out a little higher in practice this week, but Shane was right up there,'' said Smith. ''And we told them they would both play but we'd start Todd. Whichever guy moved the ball the best would stay in. We started the second half with Shane and if he didn't move the ball, we'd put the other guy back in.''

 

Marinovich played the first three series and produced a touchdown on the final one. Foley came in for a short drive that went backward and after the teams swapped kick returns for touchdowns, Marinovich was back in. But on Marinovich's second series, he threw three straight incompletions, two deep passes to open receivers that were overthrown and one that was almost intercepted, and he was back on the bench for the rest of the afternoon.

 

According to Marinovich, Smith was upset with his decision on second down, when he threw incomplete on a deep route to Curtis Conway.

 

''I felt fine throwing the ball, it was nothing out of the ordinary,'' Marinovich said. ''On second and 10 I went deep. I was thinking big play and he was upset. He wanted me to throw in the flat to fullback (Scott) Lockwood. That was all that happened. . . . Eight of 10 times I'll hit that pass. I missed it. . . . I've never been pulled out for not throwing the ball in the flat before.''

 

Foley, who was willing to throw in the flat, was, as always, diplomatic.

 

''I'm working to get better each week,'' said Foley, who doesn't think he's competing with Marinovich. ''My competition is the other team.''

 

Marinovich doesn't think he's competing either.

 

''I feel I'm the best guy. I have to prove it in practice. That's the only thing,'' he said.

 

The size of the rout was enough that after Foley was done, Smith could put in O'Hara, and on the last possession of the game, Reggie Perry got in. O'Hara produced a touchdown and Perry very well may have had time not run out.

 

The smallest thing in the game, other than 1-8 OSU's offensive production, was the attendance: 18,795. That's the smallest crowd to see a USC game since 14,500 watched the Trojans play Washington State in Spokane in 1970.

 

Just about everyone from USC was a success in this game. Conway returned a punt 71 yards for a touchdown, his first of the year. Freshman cornerback Jason Oliver returned an interception 66 yards for a touchdown. Travis Hannah had six receptions, including his first two touchdown catches of the season. The defense would have posted a shutout if not for a kickoff return by Dwayne Owens that he took 93 yards for a touchdown. Of Oregon State's first six possessions in the first half, it went three-and-out on five of them.

 

''Our defense played well,'' said Smith. ''They made the big plays when they had to and they put pressure on the quarterback. The only thing that killed us was field position.''

 

Owens had six returns for 237 yards, as USC's not-so-special teams struggled again. Serious repairs will have to be done by the time Notre Dame and Raghib Ismail hit town in two weeks.

 

''I want to go out for the kickoff team,'' said USC linebacker Scott Ross. ''Maybe we should put the whole line up there. Every game, the defense runs out there on the 40-yard line. It's hard to keep points off the board.''

 

Not if USC's defense plays the way it did Saturday, as it held Oregon State to 157 yards of total offense, the fewest it has allowed this season.

 

''It's a great feeling to finish the game and you're not tired,'' said Ross.

 

The telling blow in the game came just before halftime. USC led 21-7 and Oregon State had the ball near midfield. On first down, quarterback Fred Schweer scrambled and was hit by Matt Willig and fumbled. Ross recovered and with 1:04 to go, USC had the ball at the OSU 47.

 

Foley completed two straight passes, kept the ball for a nine-yard gain and then completed a pass to Hannah who went out of bounds at the 15 with eight seconds left in the half. Foley then threw a fade into the right corner that Hannah caught with four seconds to play that put the Beavers to rest.

 

NOTES:

 

After coming close several times this season, Curtis Conway returned a punt for a touchdown. It was USC's first punt return for a touchdown since Joey Browner went 54 yards against Indiana in 1982. . . . Jason Oliver's interception return was the second of the year for the Trojans (Calvin Holmes had one against Arizona) and one of four for USC in the game. . . . Ricky Ervins' comeback was short-circuited when he got hit on the ankle by an Oregon State defender's helmet and had to leave the game. He was in for one play in the first half (he didn't touch the ball) and then carried twice in the second half for 13 yards before coming out. He expects to be ready for the UCLA game. . . .

 

Oregon State is having problems with its quarterbacks. Starter Matt Booher was suspended during the week for violating a team rule and it was learned on Friday that his replacement, Fred Schweer, had troubles of his own. Schweer was arrested for shoplifting a copy of Penthouse magazine from the Oregon State student store. He started anyway, but completed only 2 of 12 passes and threw two interceptions. . . .

 

After the game, coach Larry Smith was given a game ball by university president James Zumberge in commemoration of his 100th coaching win and Smith gave a game ball to USC fan Giles Pellerin, who attended his 700th straight USC game. . . . USC freshman Gidion Murrell, filling in for Brian Tuliau at inside linebacker, made a strong debut with eight tackles. . . . In all, seven quarterbacks were used in the game, four by USC, three by Oregon State. . . . The bowl representatives present were from the John Hancock Bowl.

 

USC REPLAY GAME AT A GLANCE

 

HERO: USC quarterback Shane Foley completed all nine of his passes for 115 yards and two touchdowns. He also rushed for a touchdown.

 

GOATS: Three Oregon State quarterbacks were a combined 7 of 29.

 

KEY PLAY: With 1:04 to go in the first half, OSU quarterback Fred Schweer was hit by Matt Willig and fumbled, Scott Ross recovering. That set up a touchdown that made it 28-7 at halftime.

 

KEY STAT: Oregon State had 11 first downs, two in the first half.

 

QUOTABLE: ''The key is the team went out and did we wanted them to do: Win convincingly.'' - USC coach Larry Smith.

 

TROJANS' LOG

 

Aug. 31: USC 34, Syracuse 16

 

Sept. 15: USC 19, Penn State 14

 

Sept. 22: Washington 31, USC 0

 

Sept. 29: USC 35, Ohio State 26

 

Oct. 6: USC 30, Washington St. 17

 

Oct. 13: USC 37, Stanford 22

 

Oct. 20: Arizona 35, USC 26

 

Oct. 27: USC 13, Arizona St. 6

 

Nov. 3: USC 31, California 31

 

Nov. 10: USC 56, Oregon St. 7

 

Nov. 17: at UCLA, 12:30 p.m.

 

Nov. 24: NOTRE DAME, 5 p.m.

 

Home games in CAPS

 

CHART

USC REPLAY (See Text)

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

11/16/90 Star Trib. (Minneapolis-St. Paul) 06C

Star Tribune: Newspaper of the Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN)

November 16, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Major bowls make Big Ten feel small

 

Curt Brown; Staff Writer

 

My, how the Big Ten has fallen. Every team has lost at least two games. None is ranked among the top dozen in the Associated Press poll. And the bowl games are acknowledging the conference's lousy year with lousy bids.

 

As it looks now, No. 13 Iowa will go to the Rose Bowl despite losing last week to Ohio State and by 27 points to Miami. The Michigan-Ohio State winner probably will finish in second place and the Gator Bowl. The loser of that finale will finish in third place and the Liberty Bowl, with Michigan State in the John Hancock, Illinois in the Hall of Fame and Indiana, perhaps, in the Peach.

 

"We won't have any of our players in the ocean," Ohio State coach John Cooper said. "No, I'm not happy with it. I'd like to see the Big Ten runner-up in the Sugar, Cotton or Orange Bowl on New Year's Day, but that's not going to happen. It didn't work out. I guess it's one of those years."

 

One of those off years. Hurry up, Penn State. You're needed. Heck, why not Georgia Tech? Georgia Tech (8-0-1), the nation's only unbeaten Division I-A team, just might win the national championship. "I think we have a shot," coach Bobby Ross said.

 

Don't laugh. Here's the scenario: Penn State runs its winning streak to eight with a victory over Notre Dame on Saturday. Notre Dame then beats Colorado again in the Orange Bowl. No. 4 Georgia Tech finishes with victories over Wake Forest and Georgia and whips Nebraska in the Citrus Bowl, winning a national title the way Miami did last season.

 

If the Yellow Jackets go undefeated and don't win it all, it won't be the first time. Or the second time. In 1952, Georgia Tech was 12-0, outscored opponents 325-59, and finished second to Michigan State (9-0). In '51, Tech was 11-0-1 and finished fifth, way south of No. 1 Tennessee. Anecdotes of the Week

 

Outside Iowa's Kinnick Stadium last week, roses were sold for $1.50 apiece. After a last-play loss to Ohio State, they were going for 50 cents.

 

Make it 700 Southern Cal games in a row for Giles Pellerin, 83. His streak nearly ended in 1949, when he underwent an appendectomy on a Tuesday and doctors said there was no chance he would be out of the hospital by game time. He told nurses Saturday morning he felt up to a little walk, sneaked out of the hospital, called his brother Oliver, and they watched the Trojans beat Washington 40-28. Oliver, 81, has been to only 483 straight games.

 

Georgia has fallen so far, Bulldogs fans are joking: "Hear about the drug problem on Georgia's defense? They've been drug up and down the field all year." Notes of the Week

 

Notre Dame has won five times this season when it gave up more yards than it gained.

 

Northwestern's Bob Christian recently eclipsed Greg Boykin as the Wildcats' all-time career rushing leader with 2,499 yards. Goats of the Week

 

Road hogs: Wisconsin has lost 19 consecutive games on the road, dating from Oct. 24, 1986.

 

Iowa's locker room is closed. Reporters must request which players they want to interview in writing. Only four of the dozen requested players came to the interview room after the loss to Ohio State.

 

Pity Pittsburgh, which has lost to Oklahoma, Notre Dame and Miami by a combined 128-32 this season and had to give away 5,000 tickets to boost the crowd to 16,375 for last week's 28-18 loss to Temple. Showboats of the Week

 

When Army's Mike Mayweather rushed for 129 yards against Air Force, it gave him eight 100-yard games this season and 21 during his largely overlooked career.

 

Virginia's other Moore, wide receiver Herman, has caught a touchdown in every game this season. Quotes of the Week

 

"The general consensus is that it's preposterous to hold the Fiesta Bowl accountable for the actions of the voters," said SEC commissioner Brad Davis, whose conference likely will send a team to play Louisville in Tempe, Ariz., despite the flap over Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday. "Those of us here in the south are used to the broad swath of indicting everyone for the actions of some people. You've got to cut through the grandstanding and look at the facts."

 

"A lesser athlete would still be down," Wisconsin coach Barry Alvarez said after a ball carrier and tackler decked him on the sidelines, injuring his knee last week.

 

Asked how he can possibly win tomorrow, Gophers coach John Gutekunst said: "Having Michigan not show up would help."

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

11/18/90 S.F. Examiner (Cal.) C1

San Francisco Examiner (CA)

 

November 18, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC SUPERFAN'S STREAK AT 700 AND COUNTING FOOTBALL FANATIC, 83, HAS SEEN EVERY GAME SINCE 1926

 

Woody Woodburn SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

 

Who is the greatest football player in Southern Cal history? That's a tough one.

 

For starters, you've got four Heisman Trophy winners, Mike Garrett, O.J. Simpson, Charles Whtie and Marcus Allen. There are NFL Hall of Famers named Red Badgro, Frank Gifford, Ron Mix, OlJ. and Willie Wood. And don't forget Brad Budde, Ron Yary and Anthony Munoz, to name but a few of the Trojan horses.

 

It's an impossible q uestion. But there is no question who is the greatest fan in Trojan history. That's Giles Louis Pellerin. He may be the greatest fan in sports history.

 

Giles Pellerin is the Lou Gehrig of sports fans. He has seen 700 consecutive Southern Cal football games, home and away.

 

A former telephone company executive, Giles has lived by the postman's credo: "Neither rain nor snow nor an emergency appendectomy will keep him from his appointed stadium seat at kickoff."

 

Last Saturday, the streak reach 700 when USC routed Oregon State, 56-7, and the game ball was awarded to this white-haired, bespectacled, 83-year-old who never scored a touchdown or made even one game-saving tackle.

 

Lou Gehrig played in a whopping 2,130 consecutive games - but his ironman streak lasted only 14 years. Giles' streak started in 1926, when Southern Cal routed Whittier, 74-0, to open the season.

 

Giles saw his first football game three seasons earlier, in 1923, the year Gehrig broke in with the New York Yankees. Another historical note: For the 1923 Rose Bowl, Giles, 17, paid $1.70 for his ticket.

 

He now has a shoe box full of ticket stubs - and a head full of memories. He has seen eight national championship teams, 27 Rose Bowls and six other bowls involving his beloved Trojans. He saw USC play Notre Dame when Knute Rockne was coach. In fact, Giles has seen all 61 games of the storied Southern Cal-Notre Dame rivalry.

 

He saw the 7-3 upset win over previously unbeaten and untied Duke in 1939. He saw O.J.'s 64-yard run to beat UCLA in 1967. He even saw "The Phantom Touchdown," Charles Whtie's three-yard plunge for a disputed score against Michigan in the 1979 Rose Bowl, won by Troy, 17-10. He saw Howard Jones, Sam Barry, Jeff Cravath, Jess Hill, Don Clark, John McKay, John Robinson, Ted Tollner and Larry Smith pace the sideline.

 

During the early years of The Streak, Giles worked for the telephone company from 4 p.m. until midnight and went to classes at Southern Cal during the day.

 

"Saturday was my only day off and I'd always go to the football games," he says. "Back then, USC was the only major game in town. There was no pro baseball or pro football here yet."

 

After he graduated in 1929, Giles continued to work for the phone company. For 40 years, before retiring in 1970, he planned vacations to keep The Streak alive. A train trip to Chicago for the Notre Dame game used to be a one-week adventure.

 

Indeed, The Streak requird the complicated planning of a moonshot - and almost as much money and miles. Giles estimates he has logged between 750,000 and a million miles and spent nearly $80,000.

 

"Over 65 years that's only about $1,000 a year. Guys spend more than that playing golf."

 

While Giles didn't have his bride's wedding vows altered to "love, honor and attend all USC football games," he did ask his wife, Jessie, to delay their honeymoon eight months so it could coincide with a trip to Hawaii to see USC Play in 1935.

 

The Streak survived gas rationing during World War II, broken fuel pumps, flat tires, bad directions and an emergency appendectomy.

 

Giles proved he was The Iron-fan - a loony tune, some say - in 1949. He underwent an operation for a ruptured appendix on Tuesday night. On Saturday, Washington State was at SDouthern Cal. That was back when a hospital stay for such an operation was routinely two weeks.

 

"On Friday I asked the doc if I could go to the game," Giles recalls. "He said, "No chance.' "

 

The doctor underestimated Giles. He wasn't about to stop at a measly 243 games.

 

"Saturday I got up and called my brother, Oliver, and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital at 12 o'clock," Giles continues. "Then I told the nurses I was going for a walk with Oliver.

 

"The Coliseum was only a couple miles away. When Oliver brought me back, the nurses were hunting for me. I'd missed lunch and was about to miss dinner. I just told them. "The sunshine was so nice all day, I stayed outdoors.' "

 

Despite a painful belly, it had been a beautiful day in Giles' eyes - USC beat Washington state, 40-28.

 

Rain or shine, Saturdays are always beautiful the way Giles Pellerin sees them.

 

"Seven-hundred games! I'm pretty excited," Giles said. "The Streak is quite meaningful to me. I look forward to keep on going as long as I can.

 

Kidnapping probably couldn't stop him.

 

"I'd find a way to get loose," he says with a laugh.

 

Giles, who will turn 84 two days before Christmas, credits The Streak for his wondrous health.

 

"I've always said that going to USC games is the thing that has kept me alive, young and happy."

 

He has already typed up a chart leading to 800.

 

"I usually set goals for myself of 100 games at a time," Giels explains. "Now I'm looking forward to 800 games, which should happen in 1999. I'll only be 92 years old. But I doubt if I'll make it to 900."

 

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11/22/90 Seattle Times G4

Seattle Times (WA)

 

November 22, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

WILD, WEIRD AND WACKY PAC-10 SEASON MARCHES TO A CLOSE

 

CRAIG SMITH

 

This was the season the Huskies marched through the Pac-10, Cal players marched through the student section before beating UCLA and the Stanford band marched its way into a suspension.

 

Funny and unpredictable were the bywords for the 1990 Pac-10 season, which will end with five conference teams in bowl games.

 

Some of the highlights and lowlights:

 

BAND OF THE YEAR

 

-- The Stanford band was banned by its school administration for a week after putting on an anti-logging halftime show at Oregon. Controversy is nothing new for Stanford musicians. The theme of one halftime show in the 1970s was the kidnapping of Patty Hearst.

 

QUOTES OF THE YEAR

 

-- USC quarterback Todd Marinovich after 31-0 loss at Washington: "All I saw was purple. No numbers, no faces, just purple."

 

-- Denny Schuler, Oregon defensive coordinator, after the Ducks beat dangerous BYU 32-16: "I felt like the guy who goes in and defuses bombs. You know you're sitting on a powder keg that can go off at any time."

 

-- Hal Cowen, Oregon State sports information director, when asked if any Beavers were injured in the 55-24 loss to WSU: "No. You have to hit someone to get injured."

 

-- Cal quarterback Mike Pawlawski on the USC band, which always plays the same passage from the song, "Tribute to Troy":

 

"I can't stand hearing it. They play it every touchdown, every first down, every timeout. They play it when the clock starts and when it stops. It stinks. I've hated USC since I was 4 years old."

 

-- Arizona Coach Dick Tomey, who loves baseball, on which quarterback he would start: "We'll start either the left-hander (George Malauulu) or the right-hander (Ronald Veal)."

 

ENTRY OF THE YEAR

 

-- Cal players entered Memorial Stadium in Berkeley for their game against UCLA by walking down two aisles of the student rooting section. Then they walked on the field to beat the Bruins, 38-31, for the first time since 1971.

 

SHIRTS OF THE YEAR

 

-- Cal Coach Bruce Snyder stripped a few layers and displayed a T-shirt with the message: "The Streak Ends Here, Oct. 20, 1990" after his team ended its 18-year losing streak to UCLA.

 

-- Some Washington State students wore shirts with a drawing of an intoxicated Cougar to the Washington game. The shirt read: "Apple Cup, 1990. Too Drunk to Care."

 

SCORES OF THE YEAR

 

-- Stanford 36, Notre Dame 31.

 

-- Oregon State 35, Arizona 21.

 

CRIME OF THE YEAR

 

-- Oregon State quarterback Fred Schweer was arrested for shoplifting a copy of Penthouse magazine.

 

PLAYS OF THE YEAR

 

-- WSU quarterback Drew Bledsoe completed a scoring pass to himself against Arizona. The pass was deflected off an Arizona helmet, it bounced back to Bledsoe, and he ran for a touchdown.

 

-- Arizona scored on the "fumble-

 

rooski" play against Illinois and used it to set up a touchdown against USC. In the play, the center puts the ball on the ground, the quarterback runs a phantom option play, and the left guard picks up the ball and takes off with it.

 

SECOND-GUESSED

 

DECISION OF THE YEAR

 

-- Cal went for a one-point conversion and tied USC 31-31 instead of attempting the two-point conversion that would have won the game.

 

FAN OF THE YEAR

 

-- Giles Pellerin, 83, has watched 701 consecutive USC games -dating to 1926, when he was a Trojan sophomore.

 

PERFECT ENDING

 

-- Bill Musgrave's final pass in Autzen Stadium as Oregon quarterback was a touchdown that beat UCLA 24-20. The Ducks were 19-1 at home with Musgrave as quarterback.

 

HORSING AROUND

 

-- The Trojan horse, Traveler, dumped Tommy Trojan during the 31-31 tie against Cal.

 

CHANCELLOR OF THE YEAR

 

-- ABC cameras caught UCLA Chancellor Charles E. Young ranting at officials from the sideline when the Bruins' tying touchdown pass against Arizona was called back because freshman quarterback Tommy Maddox had crossed the line of scrimmage. Replays showed it was the correct call.

 

BEAVER WOES

 

-- How bad did it get for Oregon State, where Coach Dave Kragthorpe stepped down yesterday?

 

Immediately after scoring a touchdown in their opening loss to Montana, three Beaver kickoffs went out of bounds and No. 4 was headed out when a Montana player touched it.

 

The next week, Beaver quarterbacks were sacked eight times at Kansas.

 

On Sept. 15, Portland State, playing at home, outdrew the Beavers, who were losing in Corvallis, this time to Nevada-Las Vegas. In that game, the Beavers fumbled 10 times, losing the ball on the first six possessions of the second half. UNLV was nothing special in the 45-20 victory, failing on all six of its conversion attempts.

 

After the Beavers' 34-9 loss at Arizona State, Kragthorpe didn't allow reporters to interview his players.

 

"They've embarrassed themselves enough," he said.

 

HOW'S THAT AGAIN?

 

-- Tyrone Rodgers of Washington was nominated for the Outland Trophy even though he wasn't starting for the Huskies.

 

-- Oregon won the coin toss against San Diego State and chose to defer its choice until the second half. For unexplained reasons, San Diego State chose to kick off, which wasn't real bright because Oregon chose to receive in the second half.

 

FINISH OF THE YEAR

 

-- Stanford beat Cal 27-25 in the Big Game with a remarkable comeback with 12 seconds to play.

 

Cal appeared to have the game won when John Hardy intercepted Stanford's two-point conversion pass after the Cardinal closed to 25-24. Cal fans rushed onto the field to celebrate and the result was a delay-of-game penalty that moved the point-of-kickoff to near midfield.

 

Stanford recovered the onside kick, but the game appeared lost again when Stanford quarterback Jason Palumbis threw an incompletion. However, a late-hit penalty on Cal's John Belli kept Stanford alive, setting up the winning 39-yard field goal by John Hopkins.

 

HOT NEWCOMERS

 

-- New names who made an impact in the league: Stanford back Glyn Milburn, Cal back Russell White, UCLA quarterback Tommy Maddox, WSU quarterback Drew Bledsoe and his favorite receiver, Phillip Bobo, Oregon State kick-returner Dwayne Owens, USC running back Mazio Royster, Arizona State running back Leonard Russell, Arizona wide receiver Terry Vaughn and Oregon running back Sean Burwell.

 

NICE GUY AWARD

 

-- Earl Johnson, Arizona defensive lineman, comes from a low-income, one-parent family and lost his mother to illness in August. A week later, his brother was killed in an auto accident.

 

Johnson's heart wasn't in football and he approached Coach Dick Tomey a few days into fall practice and said he was quitting.

 

"You can quit football but you can't quit school," Tomey said. "We'll keep you on scholarship."

 

Johnson reconsidered and decided to stick with the team, where he has been a valuable reserve.

 

CONTROVERSY OF THE YEAR

 

-- Should California, which hasn't been to a bowl since 1979, reject a berth to the Copper Bowl in Tucson because Arizona voters turned down a ballot proposition to make Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday a paid state holiday? The Bears voted to play in the bowl.

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES

 

-- Husky Greg Lewis rushed for 205 yards against California.

 

-- Oregon's Bill Musgrave threw for 443 yards and three touchdowns against San Diego State. He wasn't intercepted and also rushed for a score.

 

-- Stanford's Glyn Milburn set a Pac-10 record for all-purpose running with 379 yards against Cal. He rushed for 196, caught passes for 66 yards, returned kickoffs for 123, and lost six yards on punt returns.

 

-- Arizona State safety Nathan LaDuke made 23 tackles (11 solo) against USC.

 

-- Arizona cornerback Darryl Lewis had two interceptions against Oregon, returning one 52 yards for the go-ahead touchdown. He broke up a pass in the end zone and tackled Musgrave at the goal line on fourth-and-one with nine seconds to play to save a 22-17 victory. In the same game, he had a 62-yard punt return for a touchdown nullified by a penalty away from the play.

 

-- USC sophomore tailback Mazio Royster rushed for 203 yards against Washington State in his first Pac-10 start.

 

BEST GAME OF THE YEAR

 

-- USC 45, UCLA 42. Six lead changes in the final 13 minutes.

 

WORST GAME

 

-- Oregon 6, Oregon State 3.

 

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12/11/90 St. Louis Post-Dispatch 3C

St. Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

 

December 11, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

DUBIOUS HONORS: THE REST OF THE BEST FROM 1990

 

Jim Thomas

Of the Post-Dispatch Staff

 

Fan Of The Year: Giles Pellerin, an 83-year-old retired phone company executive from Pasadena, Calif., attended his 700th consecutive Southern Cal game Nov. 10, when the Trojans played at Oregon State.

 

The streak began in 1926, Pellerin's sophomore season at USC, but almost ended in 1949 when he was operated on for a ruptured appendix four days before the Trojans played host to Washington.

 

"Saturday morning, I told the nurse I was going to take a little walk," Pellerin said. "Then I called my brother Oliver and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital. He picked me up and took me to the Coliseum."

 

The Trojans won 40-28, and outside of Pellerin missing lunch, no one at the hospital suspected a thing.

 

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12/19/90 Seattle Times E7

Seattle Times (WA)

December 19, 1990

 

Section: SPORTS

 

PACIFIC-10 AMEN: 75 REASONS TO HAIL CONFERENCE'S 75TH

 

CRAIG SMITH

 

The Pac-10 Conference celebrated its 75th anniversary this football season and to commemorate the occasion here is a list of 75 reasons, in no particular order, why the league is special.

 

Yes, the conference has had three other names in its history and has lost two members (Idaho, Montana) and gained two (Arizona, Arizona State). It also had some brief divorces (Oregon, Oregon State and Washington State) and remarriages. But the league has entered the 1990s with strong football tradition and special flavor. As proof, the 75 reasons:

 

-- 1. Cal's five-lateral kickoff return through the Stanford band to win in 1982.

 

-- 2. "Wrong Way" Riegels (Cal player Roy Riegels who ran the wrong way with a fumble in 1929 Rose Bowl).

 

-- 3. Fans arriving by boat at Husky Stadium.

 

-- 4. Giles Pellerin, 83, who has seen every USC Trojan game (702) since 1926.

 

-- 5. The undefeated 1972 USC squad, considered by many experts to be the best college team in history. The Trojans finished their season with a 42-17 blowout over Ohio State in the Rose Bowl in which Sam "Bam" Cunningham scored four touchdowns.

 

-- 6. The six-TD game of USC's Anthony Davis against Notre Dame in 1972. The headline in the Los Angeles Times the next day read: "Davis! Davis! Davis! Davis! Davis! Davis!"

 

-- 7. Terry Baker, Oregon State's 1962 Heisman Trophy winner and the only Northwest player to win the Heisman.

 

-- 8. The rivalries: (The Big Game - Stanford vs. Cal, The Apple Cup, USC vs. UCLA, The Civil War, Oregon vs. Oregon State, Arizona vs. ASU.)

 

-- 9. Hugh McElhenny, the elusive king of UW running backs who ruled in the early 1950s.

 

-- 10. USC song girls.

 

-- 11. Stanford's famous quarterbacks (Frankie Albert, John Brodie, Jim Plunkett, John Elway).

 

-- 12. USC's Heisman-winning tailbacks (Mike Garrett, O.J. Simpson, Charles White, Marcus Allen).

 

-- 13. The "Stanford Walk" - seniors leading the team in a quarter-mile walk on game day from Encina Gym to Stanford Stadium.

 

-- 14. The unpredictable (and often crude) Stanford band.

 

-- 15. Stanford's Vow Boys, who vowed as freshmen in 1932 never to lose a varsity game to USC. They didn't.

 

-- 16. Heritage Hall and the Tommy Trojan statue at USC.

 

-- 17. Former USC Coaches Howard Jones, John McKay and John Robinson.

 

-- 18. WSU's comeback from trailing 42-14 to beat Stanford 49-42 in 1984.

 

-- 19. The Los Angeles stadiums, the Coliseum and the Rose Bowl.

 

-- 20. California quarterbacks (Craig Morton, Joe Roth, Rich Campbell, Steve Bartkowski).

 

-- 21. The McKeever twins, Marlin and Mike, who played with abandon at USC from 1958-60.

 

-- 22. Traveler, the USC horse.

 

-- 23. USC holding off the comeback of Wisconsin and Badger quarterback Ron Vanderkelen to win the 1983 Rose Bowl 42-37.

 

-- 24. Cal taking undefeated records into the 1949, 1950 and 1951 Rose Bowl and losing each time.

 

-- 25. Tim Rossovich, USC's wildman linebacker of the 1960s who once put shaving cream all over his nude body and ran outside and waved at passing motorists.

 

-- 26. Stanford great Ernie Nevers, who played in the 1925 Rose Bowl with broken ankles.

 

-- 27. Stanford Coaches Walter Camp, Pop Warner and Clark Shaughnessy, father of the T-formation offense.

 

-- 28. Oregon's logo of Donald Duck.

 

-- 29."Jaguar" Jon Arnett, the celebrated USC running back of the mid-'50s.

 

-- 30. UW quarterback Bob Schloredt, who was blind in one eye but led the UW to Rose Bowl victories in 1960 and 1961.

 

-- 31. Jackie Robinson, the UCLA running back who made a bigger name for himself in baseball.

 

-- 32. UCLA's Heisman winner Gary Beban (1967).

 

-- 33. The Rose Bowl game.

 

-- 34. Fight songs at USC, WSU, UW, Oregon and Oregon State.

 

-- 35. Tommy Prothro, successful coach at OSU and UCLA.

 

-- 35. WSU's Jim Walden, probably the most quotable coach in Pac-10 history.

 

-- 36. UW Coach Don James, career leader in Pac-10 victories.

 

-- 37. Pre-World War II UW Coaches "Gloomy" Gil Dobie, who never lost a game (58-0-3), and Jim Phelan.

 

-- 38. Rhodes scholar Pat Haden of USC.

 

-- 39. OSU Coach Dee "The Great Pumpkin" Andros, who directed the Beavers to their most recent winning season (1970).

 

-- 40. Oregon Coach Len Casanova.

 

-- 41. USC's 21-20 victory over UCLA in 1967 on a 64-yard run in the fourth quarter by O.J. Simpson.

 

-- 42. Tightwad Hill above Cal's Memorial Stadium in Strawberry Canyon, where you can watch a game for free.

 

-- 43. Cal Coach Pappy Waldorf.

 

-- 44. Joe Kapp, Cal player and coach who was involved in the famous "zipper" incident in Seattle in 1986.

 

-- 45. The 1983 0-0 Civil War tie in a year when Oregon finished 4-6-1 and OSU 2-8-1.

 

-- 46. Sonny Sixkiller, the UW's cover-boy quarterback, 1970-72.

 

-- 47. UCLA's Kenny Easley, whose pro career with the Seahawks was shortened because of failing kidneys.

 

-- 48. ASU's Camp Tontozona, the gridiron boot camp where Coach Frank Kush earned his reputation as one of the toughest coaches in America.

 

-- 49. Stanford's 7-0 loss to Columbia in the 1934 Rose Bowl, one of the biggest upsets in U.S. sports history.

 

-- 50. The kicking Zendejas family, notably Luis of ASU and Max of Arizona.

 

-- 51. The view of San Francisco from west side of Cal's Memorial Stadium.

 

-- 52. The recent WSU tradition of players singing fight song with fans before leaving field after a victory.

 

-- 53. Ex-Huskies lined up on the field with their blankets at homecoming.

 

-- 54. The "Bear Down" legacy at Arizona honoring the death-bed words of quarterback Button Salmon to the 1926 team.

 

-- 55. The four-touchdown Rose Bowl performance of Eric Ball of UCLA in 1986.

 

-- 56. The grass at Arizona Stadium, which was transplanted from Tucson National Golf Course.

 

-- 57. The school-color loyalty of Arizona fans who attend home games decked in red.

 

-- 58. George Wilson, UW running back great of the 1920s. Some oldtimers say he was the greatest Husky of all.

 

-- 59. Don Heinrich, UW quarterback, 1949-52.

 

-- 60. The UW Purple Gang of 1959-60, which won two straight Rose Bowls and halted Big Ten dominance of the Rose Bowl.

 

-- 61. Stanford amassing 693 yards against Arizona State in 1981 and losing, 62-36, as ASU gained 743 yards.

 

-- 62. Joe Steele, UW running back, 1976-79.

 

-- 63. Jim Owens, UW coach who took three teams to the Rose Bowl.

 

-- 64. Oregon quarterbacks (George Shaw, Norm Van Brocklin, Dan Fouts and Chris Miller).

 

-- 65. Cal Tech's clever sabotaging of UW card stunts at 1961 Rose Bowl so that cards spelled out "Cal Tech" instead of "Washington."

 

-- 66. Cal Tech trickery in 1984 Rose Bowl when its students used a computer to change the scoreboard that read UCLA 38, Illinois 9, to Cal Tech 38, MIT 9.

 

-- 67. WSU receiver Hugh Campbell.

 

-- 68. Bobby Moore of Oregon, who became Ahmad Rashad of the NFL and network television.

 

-- 69. Chuck Nelson's NCAA-record streak of 30 field goals that ended in 1982 Apple Cup in the Cougars' 24-20 upset that kept the Huskies out of the Rose Bowl.

 

-- 70. UCLA's Bob Stiles, a 170-pounder, stopping Bob Apisa, Michigan State's 212-pound running back, on a two-point conversion attempt to secure the Bruins' 14-12 upset over the Spartans in the 1966 Rose Bowl.

 

-- 71. The flip-flop games between Oregon and Washington in 1973-74. Oregon beat the UW 58-0 in 1973 and the Huskies clobbered the Ducks 66-0 in 1974.

 

-- 72. Jack Thompson, WSU's "Throwin' Samoan," who had one of the best nicknames and arms of the 1970s.

 

-- 73. Oregon State's 21-20 upset over Washington in 1985 after being 37-point underdogs.

 

-- 74. Coach Red Sanders' single-wing UCLA teams of the 1950s.

 

-- 75. WSU's RPM backfield in 1985 of future pros Mark Rypien, Kerry Porter and Rueben Mayes.

 

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2/12/91 St. Petersburg Times 1C

St Petersburg Times

 

February 12, 1991

 

Section: SPORTS

 

COMMENTS, CAUSES AND QUESTIONS

 

Whatever happened to John Zook?

 

Before christening the next so-called ''super fan,'' let's compare stats with Giles Pellerin, a retired phone company guy who at 83 hasn't missed a home or road football game of the USC Trojans since 1926. Bill Parcells, coach of the Super Bowl champ New York Giants, agrees with me on Buddy Ryan, saying, ''He is a Neanderthal, and Buddy attracts Neanderthal players. Neanderthals win certain kinds of wars, but they lose some they should win if you find a way to force them to make enough choices.'' Broderick Thomas has often been accused of being in the wrong place as a Tampa Bay Bucs linebacker, but nothing to approach last Friday night when he wound up in an off-season spot that got him shot twice.

 

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6/7/92 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S1

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

June 7, 1992

 

Section: SPORTS

 

FANS HAVE REASONS FOR CONCERN

 

Eric Sondheimer Daily News Staff Writer

 

LACK OF LOYALTY

 

Coming off a 9-3 season, UCLA's football team would seem to be in an ideal position to improve a full-price season-ticket fan base that once stood at 27,000 after the 1988 season, when the Bruins won the Cotton Bowl. But some 3,000 ticket holders have not renewed for next season, according to school officials, dropping the number to a little more than 21,000.

 

The decision of sophomore quarterback Tommy Maddox to defect early for the NFL combined with a home schedule that starts out with lightly regarded Cal State Fullerton is blamed for the plunge in UCLA season ticket interest.

 

The Bruins had placed much emphasis on promoting Maddox last season. His departure leaves UCLA without a marketable star player in a Los Angeles sports market that demands big-name players to attract fans.

 

There's also no telling what kind of negative effect Maddox's absence will have on UCLA's record. USC learned last season what happens when a star quarterback suddenly bolts early for the NFL. The Trojans, without Todd Marinovich, stumbled to a 3-8 record.

 

Longtime USC fan Giles Pellerin, 85, said it's understandable when a college athlete leaves early for the pro ranks. But he's not happy about it. "As an ardent, devoted fan, you kind of anticipate the team developing and you're disappointed when a kid leaves," he said. "The fact they dangle that money in front of these kids, it's a temptation."

 

It's clear that player loyalty has shifted from the days when the good of the team received top priority. Much more emphasis is placed by players on financial security. Fans sense the changes taking place. They yearn for the old days, when baseball players came up through one farm system and ended up playing most of their career with the same team. The movement of players from team to team is leaving fans frustrated.

 

Don Alder, 75, a Lakers and Dodgers season ticket holder from Hidden Hills, said, "Players have become very transitory, and it's all a matter of money. I dislike that. I have a problem with identifying money and loyalty. Everyone exists economically on what they can produce. The problem is that loyalty may take a secondary spot when it comes to a free agent moving. I can't keep track of the players anymore. It seems they can transfer their loyalty from one team to another depending on how much money is paid."

 

TELEVISION

 

Giles Pellerin has attended every USC football game since 1926. That's 714 in a row. Pellerin is already making plans for the 1992 season, but he's finding it difficult to finalize travel arrangements because of undetermined game times.

 

"TBA has become the starting time," he said.

 

TBA stands for "To Be Announced," which has become the standard starting time pending decisions by TV networks concerning which college games will be televised.

 

The growth of sports on cable television is startling. Sports fans can rise early in the morning, turn on their TV, sit in a chair with their remote control and watch sporting events all day long. Viewers who don't own cable are missing out on numerous events that in the past might have been shown on local channels.

 

The expansion of cable television has paved the way for pay-per-view not only for boxing but major team sports. ABC Sports will unveil regional college football games on a pay-per-view basis this fall, permitting fans to pay less than $10 to see games outside their regular viewing area. Fans like the idea of having the option to purchase games from different geographical areas, but they worry that championship games might one day be limited to pay-per-view.

 

"I see pay-per-view as a threat to baseball fans," said Robert Godfrey, founder of the New Jersey-based National Baseball Fan Association. "I think we'll have to pay to see the World Series. That's what I think it's going to come to. The only justification is that the owners are greedy. So far, the commissioner has stemmed the tide in that area."

 

Sports bar owners were in an uproar in 1990 when the NFL discussed scrambling its network football signals. A boycott threat by bar owners against a major beer sponsor of NFL telecasts caused the NFL to shy away from scrambling signals. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said there are no plans to scramble signals this season. "Someday, who knows? TV is changing rapidly," Aiello said.

 

Controlling satellite feeds of sporting events and deciding who has to pay are issues not likely to disappear. Congress has warned of injecting itself into the controversy should pay-per-view supporters try to move prestigious championship events from free television. But with much money at stake, no one knows what the future holds.

 

"The technology is now here to follow your favorite team no matter where you are, but the technology is being withheld for proprietary reasons in order to generate revenues," Meagher said.

 

FAN BEHAVIOR

 

In September 1990, a Raiders fan attacked a Pittsburgh Steelers fan during the Raiders-Steelers game at the Coliseum, causing serious injury. The incident raised concerns about stadium security and the wisdom of selling alcohol at football games. It also ignited a debate about fan behavior.

 

There's no doubt that fans are more willing to boo and challenge players and each other than their predecessors years ago. Oscar Gordon, chairman of a Raiders booster club, observed, "Fans 20 years before were fans but weren't rowdy people. We were a different breed of people. We were more laid back."

 

Ficker, the 49-year-old Washington Bullets fan, certainly can't be considered laid back. The Maryland attorney has gained national attention for his loud encounters with Bullets opponents. He believes he has a right with his price of admission to say what he wants as long as it doesn't disturb the peace.

 

"One of my concerns is that the small group of wealthy men that control the NBA and the NFL want to control the individual fan's action while he's at the stadium or arena," Ficker said. "Even though that fan may be Disney rated, if he's not conforming to (the owners') image, they are going to innovate rules which control his behavior and make him conform to the images they like.

 

"They discourage individuality. They discourage players from thinking. A player can't even criticize a referee's decision in the press after the game without getting fined. This is supposed to be the United States. It's absurd.

 

"The general counsel of the NBA has told me if I said, 'I love you,' 20 times toward the huddle of the Lakers, that's verbal abuse because it interferes with communication between coaches and players."

 

Ficker plans to keep cheering and heckling even if the NBA is watching him closely. He said he'll be disappointed if Larry Bird retires, because he's one of Ficker's favorite verbal targets. But Ficker said, "Well, there's always Papoose Parrish and Kevin McSnail."

 

Fans have obvious concerns about the future, but in the end, they figure to keep showing up at arenas and stadiums in steady numbers because there's no substitute for the sports entertainment they have come to treasure.

 

As Goldberg said, "It's still a wonderful American tradition."

 

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9/1/92 Atlanta J. - Const. E2

Atlanta Journal and Constitution (GA)

 

September 1, 1992

 

Section: SPORTS

 

NORMAN AREY'S SPORTSCENE\WILKINS-BERRY WEDDING GETS HELP FROM PR FIRM

 

Norman Arey

 

PENTHOUSE PUTS MINNESOTA IN BASEMENT

 

The world's greatest college football fan may be L.A.'s Giles Pellerin, 85, a retired telephone company employee who has seen 714 consecutive Southern Cal games. He hasn't missed since 1925, home or away, and says he's racked up 600,000 miles and spent $75,000 following his Trojans. Giles says his kid brother Oliver, 83, is just catching on. He's seen only 496 straight.

 

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9/5/92 S.F. Examiner (Cal.) B7

San Francisco Examiner (CA)

September 5, 1992

 

Section: SPORTS

 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL BY THE NUMBERS SPORTS VOICES A LOOK AT THE SIGNIFICANT FIGURES FOR THE '92 SEASON

 

John Adams KNOXVILLE NEWS SENTINEL

 

NO. 1 COUNTS the most in college football. But it won't be the only newsworthy number this season.

 

For example, how about 714? That's the number for Giles Pellerin, perhaps the most-devoted college football fan in the country.

 

Southern Cal, which was No. 1 twice in the 1960s and three times in the 1970s, hasn't won a national championship since 1978. That hasn't affected Pellerin's loyalty.

 

He has been to 714 consecutive USC games. A retired phone company executive, Pellerin, 85, hasn't missed a USC game, home or away, since 1925. He has logged more than 600,000 miles and spent over $75,000 in following the Trojans.

 

His streak was imperiled in 1949 when he underwent an emergency appendectomy five days before the USC-Washington game. On game day, he told nurses he was going for a walk on the hospital grounds. He didn't return until he had been to the Coliseum, where USC defeated the Huskies 40-28.

 

Here are a few other noteworthy numbers for the 1992 season:

 

0 - Although the Memphis State press guide says differently, that's the number of bowl invitations Memphis State has received. The press guide devotes two pages to the school's bowl history. One page is for the Burley Bowl, played against East Tennessee State in Johnson City, Nov. 22, 1956. The other page is for the Pasadena Bowl (Dec. 18, 1971) in which the Tigers capped a glorious 5-6 season with a 28-9 rout of San Jose State.

 

If they are going to count those bowls, they might as well count every game they play at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

 

2 - Most coaches say defensive linemen are the scarcest commodity on the recruiting market. Yet the University of Kansas, which hasn't won a Big Eight championship in 24 years, has not one, but two, outstanding defensive tackles.

 

Dana Stubblefield, a 6-3, 280-pound senior from Cleves, Ohio, was a first-team all-Big Eight pick last season; Gilbert Brown (6-2, 305) from Detroit was a second-team pick two years ago. They are two large reasons why Kansas has a shot at consecutive winning seasons for the first time in 16 years.

 

3 - The number of points Nebraska has scored in its last two bowl games against Miami.

 

4 - LSU coach Curley Hallman's goal is to avoid that number. The Tigers have had three consecutive losing seasons. They have never had four in a row.

 

7 - The number of times Nebraska has lost to national championship teams since 1981.

 

24 - That's where TCU's losing streak to Texas might end if quarterback Leon Clay can stay healthy. Clay, one of TCU's 17 returning starters, has played in only nine games the last two seasons. However, in those nine games, he accounted for 27 touchdowns (22 passing, five rushing).

 

28 - The number is worth staying up for those late night Western Athletic Conference telecasts on ESPN. You can see it on the back of San Diego State running back Marshall Faulk, who rushed for 1,429 yards and scored 23 touchdowns last season. Based on what he accomplished on the field, Faulk should be the frontrunner for the Heisman Trophy.

 

29 - It has been that many years since Rice had a winning season. But with 15 starters returning, including All-America running back Trevor Cobb, six victories are not impossible.

 

100 - The number most coaches would like to score against John Jenkins' Houston Cougars.

 

496 - The number of consecutive USC games seen by Giles Pellerin's kid brother, 83-year-old Oliver.

 

PHOTO ASSOCIATED PRESS San Diego State's Marshall Faulk will be worth watching in 1992.

 

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11/18/92 L.A. Times 1

Los Angeles Times

November 18, 1992

 

Section: SP-Sports

 

Fans or Fanatics?

UCLA-USC Game Day Is Approaching and Spirits Are High, but Some Are Nearly Out of Control

MAS BONKTIMES STAFF WRITER

TIMES STAFF WRITER

 

There is a major disagreement this week in the Guerra household in Downey. It involves loyalty and revulsion, love and hatred, blind faith and abject misery. Yes, it's all about football.

 

Every year, the week before the UCLA-USC football game, Mario Guerra, 33, and Ann Guerra, 31, cease being simply husband and wife. They become schools, institutions, football teams, Bruins, Trojans, combatants. It's not a pretty picture. And with USC playing UCLA at the Rose Bowl on Saturday, this is the week.

 

The Guerras' big problem, although simple in origin, can never be corrected. They graduated from different schools--rival schools--Mario in 1980 from UCLA and Ann in 1982 from USC.

 

You can tell by their license plates: "USC 4 Ann," and "UCLA 4 MG." You can tell by the 6-foot-high lights on the roof at Christmas that spell either UCLA or USC, depending on which team won that year.

 

You can tell by the topiary bushes in the back yard that Mario planted, all of them cut to resemble bears. Mario has named each one after UCLA defensive linemen. His favorite is the Jamir Miller bush.

 

You can tell by the swimming pool. Without telling Ann, Mario had several UCLA tiles put into the bottom and side of the pool when it was being built. His feelings are warm, deep and true, and Ann Guerra pays the price.

 

"We don't have sex the week leading up to the game," Mario said. "After a week, I let her out of the garage."

 

Ann termed her husband "a little bit eccentric" and said she rejects the garage treatment.

 

"He'll hold me in there a few minutes, but I won't spend the night in there," she said. "I put up with him. I tell him the outcome of the game is all that matters to me. And in recent years, he's gotten his comeuppance from me."

 

Guerra, an insurance broker, said he loses his ability to think rationally when the subject is USC.

 

"I just can't stand the guys," he said. "I hate them with a passion. If you look at it, half the players there wanted to go to UCLA but couldn't get in, so they bought their way into USC."

 

Said Ann Guerra: "Yeah, yeah, yeah."

 

And so it goes in the Guerra house, and for that matter, in who knows how many otherwise normal homes across Southern California? We're not talking about normal fans here, but rather your rabid, all-out, obsessive, borderline disturbed type.

 

Mario Guerra may be typecast. He said he will refuse to permit any of his four children, ranging in age from 3 months to 13 years, to attend USC.

 

"I'll tell you, there will never be a day in my life when I will write a check out to USC with my name on it," he said.

 

Guerra added that, in time, his children will understand, just as 13-year-old Mario Jr. knows that Dad has missed more than half his youth soccer games because they conflict with Bruin football games.

 

"He knows UCLA comes first," said Guerra. "There's not much else that's more important than UCLA."

 

But not every obsessive fan wears blue and gold the week before UCLA-USC. Actually, only about half of them do. The other half wear cardinal and gold.

 

One of those is 85-year-old Giles Pellerin of Huntington Park, who has seen every USC football game, home and away, since 1926.

 

Pellerin's streak will reach 724 Saturday, but only because he wouldn't follow doctor's orders the day of the USC-Washington game in 1949. He sneaked out of Queen of Angels Hospital, where he was to have his appendix removed.

 

"I said, 'Hey, Doc, any chance of getting out of here?' " Pellerin said. "He said 'No chance at all,' so I called my brother and told him to meet me in the lobby of the hospital. We took off for the game with tape holding me together."

 

USC beat Washington, 40-28, and Pellerin returned to the hospital for his surgery.

 

His appendix may be gone, but his heart still beats to the USC fight song. Four years ago, Pellerin entered the "America's Nuttiest Sports Nuts" contest, conducted by Fisher Nuts, and finished as the runner-up.

 

"I think I got rooked in that deal," Pellerin said. "That former umpire, what's his name, Luciano, Ron Luciano? He was one of the judges. I think he made sure that some guy won who had seen every one of the Baltimore Oriole games that season. But I got a nice prize anyway, a 21-inch RCA TV set."

 

To each USC game he attends with brothers Oliver, 83, and Max, 81, Pellerin wears a cardinal coat and gold trousers.

 

"We are not exhibitionists," said Pellerin, certainly not a fan who would paint his face as some fans do.

 

"I think they're a bunch of kooks," he said. "But I guess everybody to his own liking."

 

*

 

In the wild, wacky world of sports fans, people doing their own thing while together at a football game may be the norm. It's all good, clean fun, isn't it?

 

Maybe, but according to experts, fan obsession ought to come with its own warning label.

 

"Fans are obsessive because they don't have much of a life of their own," said Mark Goulston, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. "They are drawn to sports figures who are larger than life in their minds, and they think they have a personal contact--some sort of magical bond with these sports figures. When a team wins or loses, it can make the obsessive fan feel that he is a winner or loser himself."

 

Goulston said that obsessive fans who live their lives through the actions of sports figures may stunt emotional growth.

 

"When a sports figure has feet of clay, or a team doesn't do well, the obsessive fan doesn't have anything to fall back on, so he is prone to depression, anger or hatred directed at the object of his obsession. . . . He is disappointed, feels devastated.

 

"I guess the advice one should give to an obsessive fan is to, 'Come on. Get a life.' "

 

Michael Messner of the USC sociology department said that what many call obsessive fan behavior is actually male-bonding behavior.

 

"Men use sports talk and sports viewing in a way that keeps them from having to deal with any intimate matters with each other, to keep those issues at a distance," he said.

 

*

 

Last Saturday, a couple of hours before the USC-Arizona game, Ron Ellico, 59, drove his van to the Coliseum, pulled in, parked and got out. He was wearing a toga.

 

Those who know Ellico by more than just an impressive handlebar mustache, well, they probably weren't at all surprised. The 1962 USC graduate from Alhambra, past president of the San Gabriel Valley Trojan Club, has arrived at other USC games wearing a grass skirt, dressed as Tommy Trojan and in an 1890s-style wool bathing suit.

 

Ellico happens to be the three-time defending champion in the best-of-theme category in USC's annual tailgate party contest.

 

He notched his latest victory at the "Wide World of Sports" theme weekend. Ellico decorated the outside of his van with structures resembling the Roman Colosseum, complete with Doric columns, a fountain and a chariot. Since he didn't have any chariot tires handy, Ellico improvised. He used the racing slicks from his son's Volkswagen.

 

The person responsible for the tailgate contest at USC is Ron Orr, an assistant athletic director, who said there was only one reason he decided to start it.

 

"I wanted to taste all the food," Orr said.

 

Some fans just want to hear the music. Bob Brandt, coordinator of alumni relations at USC, was amazed that some 1,500 Trojan faithful waited in the lobby of the team hotel in the Bay Area before the USC-California game.

 

"You'd think that after all these years, people would get tired of the band," Brandt said.

 

But even after posting four consecutive victories in the highly competitive field of tailgate party themes, Ellico doesn't get tired of winning. Maybe this is because of his devotion to duty, not to mention his son's Volkswagen tires.

 

Ellico said there are two rules for successful tailgating:

 

"You don't get married on game day, and you don't die on game day."

 

*

 

Ah, game day. It's that special day for UCLA zealot Geoff Strand. Weekdays, he is a mild-mannered vice president at Dean Witter, sitting calmly behind his desk in his Santa Monica office. But on UCLA game days in the Rose Bowl, Strand becomes something else entirely.

 

The guy in the eight-cornered hat and UCLA sweater, holding the poster boards and leading the eight-clap cheers while standing on a box? That's Geoff Strand, who described himself further: "This crazola jumping up and down on a platform leading cheers for the past 17 years."

 

A 1970 UCLA graduate from Culver City, Strand, 45, is a former Bruin head cheerleader who embarked on a mission to improve school spirit soon after he left school. Actually, Strand has never really left school, at least in his heart. For the reason, you need to go back to his upbringing.

 

As a student, Strand was a member of an order of Bruin fanatics called the Kelps, once banned from campus because of such activities as welding Tommy Trojan's sword to an anatomically awkward spot; capturing USC fans and handcuffing them to a fire hydrant on a street corner in Westwood and hiring a helicopter in an unsuccessful attempt to dump 500 pounds of manure on Tommy Trojan.

 

"Those are essentially my humble beginnings," Strand said.

 

Strand, though, refuses to be tagged as an obsessive fan. Instead, he classifies himself as a spirit organizer, someone who helped bring together the largely untapped base of UCLA fans in the mid-1970s and mold it into a group that can probably do eight-claps in their sleep.

 

"No, I don't consider myself to be a rabid fan," Strand said "I'm just enthusiastic."

 

Dorothy (Dottie) Reid, a 71-year-old USC football devotee from Long Beach, is a part-time volunteer in the Trojan athletic department. The day she began working in Heritage Hall is not a day she is likely to forget.

 

"I've been here since the day Mike Garrett's jersey was retired, Nov. 27, 1965," she said.

 

Reid is well-known by Trojan football players, who cannot fail to see her as she stands at the top of the Coliseum tunnel and waits for the team bus hours before the game each Saturday. Many players get a hug and a few words from her. And after road games, she is almost always at the airport, wearing cardinal and gold, waiting to greet the team when it returns home.

 

"I am with them all the way, win or lose," she said. "I get very close. When the kids call me 'Mom' or 'Hey, you,' or 'There's my second mom,' you get attached to them. It's an emotional thing."

 

Reid, whose family includes her husband George and two daughters, said her hobbies are knitting and needlepoint. But she does not call her attachment to USC football a hobby.

 

"I have a lot of football players who show me a lot of life," she said. "That's what keeps me going."

 

But rabid fans still leave their traces everywhere. John Kobara, UCLA's alumni director, sometimes finds evidence on his desk a few days after a Bruin football game.

 

"Let's just say I get a lot of interesting mail," Kobara said. "If we win, it's often a religious message. If we lose, it's a religious message, but the after-life they refer to is in an entirely different direction."

 

Kobara added that the kinds of Christmas cards obsessive fans send often reflect the score of the UCLA-USC football game.

 

"If we won, I get some that have the score in blue and gold--nothing else, except for maybe a poem," he said. "If we lost, then they're these Crayola-scrawled ransom note-type things."

 

Have a great game, fans.

 

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9/14/93 Long Beach Press Tele. (CA) D2

Long Beach Press-Telegram (CA)

September 14, 1993

 

Section: SPORTS

 

THE SPORTS WIRE: TARK FILES SUIT AGAINST UNLV ADMINISTRATORS

 

NAMES IN THE NEWS

 

Giles Pellerin, who has viewed 729 consecutive USC football games - home and away - dating to 1926, is listed in critical condition in a Harrisburg, Pa., hospital after suffering a ruptured aortic abdominal aneurysm. Pellerin, 86, was stricken Sunday morning while preparing to leave a Harrisburg hotel after watching USC's loss to Penn State Saturday.

 

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9/15/93 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S5

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

September 15, 1993

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC NOTES Robinson liked USC's fight Quarterback Johnson took a fierce pounding from Penn State

 

Tim Brown Daily News Staff Writer

 

He is thrilled that his football players managed to show a little character.

 

He was angered to the point of violence that they were thrilled, too.

 

Call it coach's prerogative. His privilege. Only he can see the victories when the scoreboard claims otherwise.

 

"I thought it would be the defining factor of our season," USC coach John Robinson said, "how we played in the second half, how hard we'd fight."

 

In USC's first game, against North Carolina, the Trojans turned a 14-3 halftime deficit into a 31-9 loss. The following week, they beat Houston, an inferior team, by 42 points, hardly a test at all.

 

On Saturday, given Penn State's 21-7 lead, USC lost by a few inches 21-20, when quarterback Rob Johnson's final pass skipped into the end zone.

 

USC did fight.

 

"We did that, and I was happy," Robinson said. "We have to get back to believing we are going to win these games.

 

"It isn't hope. It's real. We can win. We don't have any reason to doubt ourselves."

 

The Trojans have a bye this week then on Sept. 25 play host to Washington State, a 41-14 loser to Michigan and a 54-14 winner over Montana State.

 

Battered and bruised: Johnson was sacked four times against Penn State, but that hardly tells the story of the beating he took.

 

Rare was the pass play in which Johnson wasn't clobbered before he released the ball, as he released it or after he released it.

 

Penn State picked on sophomore Kyle Ramsay, a last-minute replacement for starter Joel Crisman at left guard, and the result was a harried Johnson, who admittedly was "a little shell-shocked."

 

"I was getting hit a lot more than I was used to," Johnson said.

 

He woke up Sunday morning "really sore. Depressed. Sad.

 

"I've never felt that way after a game before. It was such a big game for us. It hurt."

 

Johnson said that breaking down those game films and preparing for Washington State has helped take the pain away, at least the emotional pain.

 

"I gave it my all," he said. "I left everything I had on the field. I was so mentally and physically exhausted when it was over."

 

The rankings: Johnnie Morton, who had six receptions for 109 yards against Penn State, is ranked seventh in the nation with 8.3 catches per game and 18th with 110.3 yards per game. Johnson is 24th in passing efficiency, at 148.1.

 

USC is ranked 14th in pass-efficiency defense.

 

Pellerin improved: Giles Pellerin, noted for his streak of attending 729 consecutive USC football games, was hospitalized Sunday morning in Harrisburg, Pa., hours after watching Penn State defeat USC.

 

Pellerin, 86, suffered a ruptured aortic abdominal aneurysm and underwent surgery. On Tuesday he was upgraded from critical condition to satisfactory condition.

 

Since USC's 1926 season, when he was a sophomore at the school, Pellerin claims to have traveled more than 600,000 miles following the Trojans. He has seen every game USC has ever played against Notre Dame and UCLA.

 

Notes: Willie McGinest, who had 15 tackles against Penn State, was nominated as the Pac-10 defensive player of the week. Cal linebacker Jerrott Willard, who had nine tackles in the Bears' 45-25 win over San Diego State, was selected. . . . USC is ranked 36th by AP, 34th in the CNN/USA Today poll. . . . Pressed for a standout against Penn State, coach John Robinson mentioned cornerback Jason Sehorn. New to the position, Sehorn has found his size - 6-foot-3, 220 pounds - to be an equalizer against receivers, most of whom are much smaller.

 

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9/16/93 L.A. Times 5

Los Angeles Times

September 16, 1993

 

Section: SP-Sports

 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL / DAILY REPORT

USC

L GUSTKEY

 

Giles Pellerin , USC's "Superfan," had a message Tuesday for his friends from a Harrisburg, Pa., hospital: "Don't count me out."

 

In other words, the 86-year-old Pellerin's streak of having attended 729 consecutive USC football games--that's every game since the 1926 opener--isn't necessarily over.

 

Pellerin collapsed after suffering a ruptured abdominal aneurysm Sunday, as he was preparing to check out of a Harrisburg hotel.

 

"When the ambulance arrived, the paramedics told me he had no pulse," said Oliver Pellerin, Giles' brother.

 

"After surgery, the doctors told me he'd lost two liters of blood. We almost lost him."

 

Pellerin, listed in critical condition Monday, was upgraded to satisfactory Tuesday.

 

Pellerin is intent on keeping his streak alive by making the Washington State game Sept. 25 at the Coliseum, his brother said Wednesday.

 

If Pellerin's streak ends at 729, Oliver, 84, will carry on. He has been to 532 in a row, or every game since 1945.

 

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9/26/93 Seattle Times C1

Seattle Times (WA)

 

September 26, 1993

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC PAIR THROWS COUGARS FOR A LOSS JOHNSON-TO-MORTON PASS CONNECTION LIFTS TROJANS TO 34-3 WIN

 

DICK ROCKNE

 

LOS ANGELES Unable to effectively challenge USC's record-setting pass-catch duo of Rob Johnson and Johnnie Morton, the mistake-prone Washington State Cougars fell behind early, never caught up and added another chapter to their book of Coliseum despair last night.

 

The 34-3 Pac-10 Conference football loss before 48,471 fans was the 14th straight for the Cougars at the Coliseum. The last time Cougars won here was during the Eisenhower Administration (second term), in 1957.

 

Johnson, a 6-foot-4, 220-pound junior, completed 21 of 26 passes for a school-record 392 yards and three touchdowns for the Trojans (1-0 Pac-10, 2-2 overall).

 

Morton, a 6-foot senior, had 229 receiving yards for another USC record. He broke the USC single-game record of 201 receiving yards, set by by Hal Bedsole in 1962 against California.

 

Johnson, who threw touchdown passes of 7 yards to tailback David Dotson, 19 yards to wide receiver Edward Hervey and 69 yards to Morton, bettered the school record of 380 yards by Paul McDonald against Arizona in 1979. USC's 413 total passing yards bettered the Trojan record of 397, against Arizona State in 1987.

 

Morton scored on a 69-yard reception in the third quarter after making seven catches for 160 yards in the first half.

 

USC's other touchdown was scored by tailback Scott Fields, on a one-yard run.

 

Cornerback Mike Salmon, brother of the California Angels' Tim Salmon, made his kicking debut for the Trojans in place of the injured Cole Ford. Salmon made all four of his PAT kicks and was 2 for 3 in field goals, missing a 35-yarder and making kicks from 38 and 36 yards.

 

WSU (1-1 Pac-10, 2-2 overall) avoided a shutout with 10:56 to play when Aaron Price kicked a 32-yard field goal. Until then, the Cougars were on the verge of being blanked for the first time in 101 games, since 1984.

 

"Basically, we didn't execute and they did," WSU Coach Mike Price said. "They made some great individual plays and I don't think we made any. Our offense was off-stride from the beginning. They did a nice job of changing coverages and we were not clicking very well."

 

Cougar quarterback Mike Pattinson, who had 15 pass completions for 187 yards and two interceptions in 30 attempts, said Trojan coverage schemes were confusing.

 

"But we can't make mistakes like that against a team like SC," Pattinson said. "Too many mistakes hurt us."

 

The Cougars' repertoire of errors included:

 

-- Keven Hicks' fumbled kickoff that went out of bounds at the WSU 3 after the Trojans' first touchdown.

 

-- A drive-ending, third-down sack of Johnson by Brian Ford in the midst of USC's next series that was nullified by a personal-foul penalty against the Cougars and led to the Trojans' second touchdown.

 

-- Interceptions of Pattinson passes that ended two WSU series (including one on first down from the USC 6); a fumbled center snap by Pattinson that ended another one.

 

Also, Price missed a 30-yard field goal with USC leading 24-0.

 

But most of the Cougars' problems centered around their inability to stop Johnson and Morton. Ironically, it might have been the Cougars' defensive game plan that was designed to force the Trojans to pass that contributed to USC's success. The Trojans gained only 104 yards rushing.

 

"Games like this, where you have a defense that overplays, tend to get lopsided sometimes," USC Coach John Robinson said. "It's feast or famine. They couldn't handle our passing game so we got the jump on them. The same thing happened to them against Michigan.

 

"That kind of thing seems to happen nowadays when you play that kind of a defense."

 

NOTE

 

Not even a ruptured aortic abdominal aneurysm could keep 86-year-old Giles Pellerin from attending a USC game. Despite his medical problems, Pellerin, who has attended every Trojan game since 1926, extended his streak to 730 straight games last night.

 

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9/26/93 Long Beach Press Tele. (CA) E9

Long Beach Press-Telegram (CA)

September 26, 1993

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC 34, WASHINGTON STATE 3

 

FIRST QUARTER

 

WASHINGTON ST. 0 0 0 3 - 3

 

USC 14 13 7 0 - 34

 

Att. - 48,471. HOW THEY SCORED

 

USC 7, Washington St. 0: Fields 1 run (Salmon kick), 7:15 elapsed. Trojans went 80 yards in 11 plays. Key plays: Dotson 5 run; Morton 8 pass from Johnson; Banta 12 pass from Johnson; Fields 24 run; Fields 7 run; Hervey 9 pass from Johnson on 3rd-and-3 at Washington St. 11.

 

USC 14, Washington St. 0: Dotson 7 pass from Johnson (Salmon kick), 13:12. Trojans went 75 yards in 7 plays. Key plays: Morton 11 pass from Johnson; Dotson 11 pass from Johnson; 15-yard personal foul penalty on Cougars; Morton 40 pass from Johnson.

 

SECOND QUARTER

 

USC 17, Washington St. 0: Salmon 36 field goal, 5:47. Trojans went 1 yard in 4 plays after McDaniels recovered Pattinson's fumble at the Cougar 19. Key play: McWilliams 14 pass from Johnson.

 

USC 24, Washington St. 0: Hervey 19 pass from Johnson (Salmon kick), 8:30. Trojans went 70 yards in 4 plays after Sehorn intercepted Pattinson's pass at the USC 30. Key plays: Johnson 12 run; Morton 38 pass from Johnson.

 

USC 27, Washington St. 0: Salmon 38 field goal, 4:22. Trojans went 60 yards in 8 plays. Key plays: Dotson 7 run; Morton 45 pass from Johnson.

 

THIRD QUARTER

 

USC 34, Washington St. 0: Morton 69 pass from Johnson (Salmon kick), 4:10. Trojans went 84 yards in 4 plays. Key play: Strother 10 pass from Johnson.

 

FOURTH QUARTER

 

USC 34, Washington St. 3: Price 32 field goal, 4:04. Cougars went 65 yards in 11 plays. Key plays: Johnson 9 run; Johnson 19 run; USC 15-yard personal foul penalty; Carolan 15 pass from Pattinson.

 

USC NOTES

 

Key play: With USC holding a 14-0 lead, cornerback Jason Sehorn intercepted a Mike Pattinson pass in the end zone to thwart the Cougars' best first-half scoring opportunity.

 

Key players: USC quarterback Rob Johnson set a school single-game record with 392 yards passing and senior wide receiver Johnnie Morton set a Trojan single-game record with 229 receiving yards on eight catches.

 

Key stat: USC set a school record with 413 yards passing, eclipsing the old mark of 397 set against Arizona State in 1988.

 

Key quote: "For teams who play all-out defense (like Washington State), it's sometimes feast or famine. Tonight it was famine. Like Michigan, we got a big jump on them early." - USC coach John Robinson.

 

Next: at Arizona, Saturday, 4 p.m. TV: Channel 7.

 

Notes: Trojan place-kicker Cole Ford did not suit up because of back spasms. Senior strong safety Mike Salmon, who had not kicked since high school when he made 8 of 10 attempts his senior year at Phoenix's Greenway High, filled in admirably by kicking field goals of 36 and 38 yards as well as all four of his PATs. ... Trojan "superfan" Giles Pellerin extended his streak of USC football games to 730. Pellerin had been hospitalized much of the week in Harrisburg, Pa., after undergoing surgery for a ruptured aortic abdominal aneurysm following USC's loss at Penn State two weeks ago. The 86-year-old Pellerin claims to have seen every Trojan football game since 1926. ... Senior defensive tackle Terry McDaniels, who missed the first three games because of academic problems, played his first game of the season for the Trojans and recovered a second quarter fumble by Washington State quarterback Mike Pattinson to set up a field goal. ... Lombardi Award semifinalist Willie McGinest had five tackles, a quarterback sack and deflected four passes for the Trojans. ... The 31-point margin of victory was USC's largest since defeating Oregon State, 56-7, in 1990.

 

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9/26/93 Long Beach Press Tele. (CA) E1

Long Beach Press-Telegram (CA)

 

September 26, 1993

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC PASSES ON THE RUN AND ROLLS; JOHNSON-TO-MORTON COMBO STUNS WASHINGTON STATE

Steve Guiremand

Staff Writer

 

Notes: Trojan place-kicker Cole Ford did not suit up because of back spasms. Senior strong safety Mike Salmon, who had not kicked since high school when he made 8 of 10 attempts his senior year at Phoenix's Greenway High, filled in admirably by kicking field goals of 36 and 38 yards as well as all four of his PATs. ... Trojan "superfan" Giles Pellerin extended his streak of USC football games to 730. Pellerin had been hospitalized much of the week in Harrisburg, Pa., after undergoing surgery for a ruptured aortic abdominal aneurysm following USC's loss at Penn State two weeks ago. The 86-year-old Pellerin claims to have seen every Trojan football game since 1926. ... Senior defensive tackle Terry McDaniels, who missed the first three games because of academic problems, played his first game of the season for the Trojans and recovered a second quarter fumble by Washington State quarterback Mike Pattinson to set up a field goal. ... Lombardi Award semifinalist Willie McGinest had five tackles, a quarterback sack and deflected four passes for the Trojans. ... The 31-point margin of victory was USC's largest since defeating Oregon State, 56-7, in 1990.

 

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9/26/93 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S7

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

September 26, 1993

 

Section: SPORTS

 

NOTES Salmon, Sehorn savor exploits

 

Tom Timmermann Daily News Staff Writer

 

Back on the case: USC fan Giles Pellerin, who hasn't missed a USC football game since 1926, was in attendance at the game. He had been hospitalized in Harrisburg, Pa., after the Penn State game with a ruptured aortic abdominal aneurysm, but he was released on Thursday and was back in Los Angeles for the game. It was his 730th in a row.

 

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9/29/93 L.A. Times 3

Los Angeles Times

 

September 29, 1993

 

Section: SP-Sports

 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL DAILY REPORT

Trojans Are Seen as First Key Test

L GUSTKEY

 

Starting left guard Joel Crisman's big toe injury will cause him to miss his third straight game Saturday. . . . USC "superfan" Giles Pellerin attended his 730th consecutive USC game Saturday, two days after he was released from a hospital in Harrisburg, Pa. Pellerin, 86, collapsed and nearly died of a ruptured abdominal artery Sept. 12, the morning after watching USC lose at Penn State.

 

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5/30/94 L.A. Times 1

Los Angeles Times

 

May 30, 1994

 

Section: Main News

 

COLUMN ONE

L.A.'s Old Warrior Battles Back

DAVID FERRELLTIMES STAFF WRITER

TIMES STAFF WRITER

 

Like a fallen fighter, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum lies busted up and immobile.

 

Architects and hard hats are toiling around the clock to revive it. Where January's earthquake unleashed its fiercest blows, scores of seats are being replaced. Fissures two inches wide are being patched in walkway tunnels. The peristyle is a latticework of cracks, like the shell of a smashed egg.

 

The quake exposed the vulnerability of the 71-year-old stadium. For a time, it even seemed possible that the end had come--that after all the touchdowns, car races, political rallies, revival meetings, concerts and more, the Coliseum was headed the way of its Roman counterpart--into ruin.

 

Now, there is a pulse; it appears that in coming months the old warrior will once again struggle to its feet. Yet its future is uncertain. The Los Angeles Raiders, a vital tenant, are threatening to move. The stadium's $35-million restoration project has become a race against the clock--on schedule, so far--to offer the Raiders and USC Trojans a home for the fall football season.

 

Not only are jobs and tax dollars at stake, but so are such intangible notions as history and civic identity. To many, the task of rebuilding the Coliseum is a metaphor of renewal, even self-love, in a metropolis beset by despair and calamity.

 

Except for the Hollywood sign, the Coliseum is perhaps Los Angeles' most universal emblem. It is the city in microcosm: huge, imperfect, a monolith whose legacy is short but jampacked with the extraordinary. It is a place where the past lives on, where the world turned to watch, where Los Angeles strutted its best stuff and the crowds screamed and cried and lit matches in the dark for their heroes.

 

"It has become one of those intangibles, a symbol that is much more important than the physical realities of the place," said Dallas Willard, a professor of philosophy, sports and society at USC. "It's there as a kind of promise--a stage of potentialities, of things that can be done."

 

To generations young and old, from the city core to the most distant suburbs, the hulking gray structure is an immense jewel box of shared recollections--the place where O. J. Simpson ran for daylight, where Mary Decker fell, where Sandy Koufax struggled through early seasons of wildness.

 

It is where Jack Dempsey climbed into the ring against Bull Montana. It is where Bob Waterfield threw long to Tom Fears. It is where Evel Knievel came roaring down from the west rim on a motorcycle and leaped 50 cars.

 

Memories reach far beyond sports: Col. Charles A. Lindbergh stood before the Coliseum throngs in 1927, only months after his transatlantic crossing, and urged the city to build itself an airport.

 

On a sweltering summer evening in 1960, Sen. John F. Kennedy accepted the Democratic nomination for President, warning of the growing Communist threat in Asia and then jumping into a blue sedan to escape the surging crowds.

 

"I was worried about his safety," said Jack Tobin, 73, who was there that night as a writer for the old Los Angeles Mirror. Tobin had spoken beforehand to a police lieutenant who voiced exasperation over the young senator's apparent disdain for crowd control. "He's breaking all the security rules," Tobin recalled the officer complaining. "We can't protect him."

 

Incandescent moments, now colored by time and destiny, still burn with a ghost-like afterglow in the minds of those who spun the turnstiles and walked the pedestrian tunnels. Like tangled vines, the recollections go on and on, the new overlaying the old.

 

Nearly lost in the undergrowth are spectacles that once galvanized the city, now so remote and outlandish that it scarcely seems possible that they happened at all.

 

In the waning days of World War II, 105,000 people welcomed home conquering heroes Gen. George S. Patton Jr. and Lt. Gen. James H. Doolittle. Forty-two searchlights encircled the stadium, sending pillars of light into the sky to illuminate passing warplanes. Inside, land mines were detonated and tanks rolled through the noise and darkness to simulate Patton's 3rd Army thrust toward Berlin.

 

After the mock battle, Patton delivered a speech peppered with obscenities, according to a Times account. "What you have just seen," the hard-charging general boasted, "is not phantasma, but damn near reality and, God forgive me, I love that kind of war."

 

 

Bold moments. Fiery personalities. Raucous fans. Former Dodgers pitcher Larry Sherry, the hero of Los Angeles' first World Series in 1959, remembers how the monstrous bowl filled to the lip with more than 92,000 spectators--still the largest crowds ever to witness baseball's showcase.

 

They made such a din that players had to communicate using hand signals.

 

In the West's first big-time professional football game, Red Grange, the legendary "Galloping Ghost," drew 65,270 to the Coliseum in 1926. Sonja Henie came to ice skate, Jesse Owens to run. Los Angeles stepped onto the world stage by playing host to the 1932 Summer Olympics.

 

Fans who stood to cheer at those events, or at countless others, often found themselves returning year after year, like members of an informal brotherhood.

 

Bud Furillo is one. In 1940, he was a teen-ager taking the bus to college football games. More than half a century later, the onetime Herald Examiner columnist talks with encyclopedic recall about flickering instants in time--UCLA's Jackie Robinson going 87 yards with a punt return; Rams games that drew 100,000 in the 1950s; Mickey Mantle staring in awe as 93,000 fans lit matches in the blacked-out Coliseum, creating a surreal, pointillist tribute to Dodger Roy Campanella, who had been disabled in an auto accident.

 

Duke Snider. Jim Ryun. Pele. The first Super Bowl. The 14-14 tie between USC and Notre Dame in 1948, punctuated at the final gun by a jarring earthquake felt from Colorado to the Mexico border. The day that Harry S. Truman showed up in the press box, causing a radio announcer to inquire about how one should properly address a former chief executive.

 

Truman, fully in character, gave him hell, as Furillo recalled. "He said: ' Mr. President, you stupid son of a bitch!' "

 

Furillo convulsed with laughter.

 

"Memories? Oh, God. . . ."

 

*

 

As a new century opened, the juncture of what is now Figueroa Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard was a hub of decadence. There was a dog track, several bars and at least one brothel.

 

Gussied-up in their hats and plumes, the floozies would race horse-drawn buckboards from Olvera Street south to the track, said restaurateur Julie Kohl, 93.

 

A Sunday school teacher--Judge William M. Bowen--tried to clean it up, joining with a USC board member to propose a stadium for university football games and civic events. Despite the failure of a $900,000 bond measure, financing was arranged; the Coliseum became chattel of the city, county and state, each represented equally on the commission that still runs it.

 

Completed in 1923, the structure contained enough miles of plank benches to seat 13% of the city's population--or 76,000 people. The peristyle, designed to evoke the splendor of ancient Greek and Roman arenas, was an original feature. Eight years later, during an expansion for the Olympics that boosted seating to 102,000, outer walls were cast with sharp angles and squared-off, arch-like apertures--"probably a hybrid between neoclassical and Art Deco (architecture)," the latter then a rage in America, said Scott Field, who owns the firm founded by original architect John Parkinson.

 

From the outset, the Coliseum brought stupendous events to a city growing in relative isolation. Post-World War I Los Angeles did not have major league sports, or TV, or jet travel, so the populace turned its attention to what it did have: Tinseltown and USC football.

 

Wizards of filmmaking played bit parts in some of the Coliseum's gaudiest extravaganzas. They joined the Shriners in 1935 in staging a electrical pageant that drew a fez-topped multitude of 115,000; disdaining a tone of idle detachment, the Los Angeles Evening Herald proclaimed it "the greatest crowd ever assembled behind walls in the history of the world."

 

Who was to disagree? Civic pride ran rampant, fueled by the USC Trojans, the fabled "Thundering Herd" of Coach Howard Jones. During the 1920s and '30s, the Trojans won five Rose Bowls and two national championships, founding one of the richest traditions in college athletics.

 

Crowds reached 90,000 and 100,000. Super-fans emerged, men such as Giles Pellerin, who began going to games as an undergraduate in 1926.

 

Pellerin, 87, is still going. The Pasadena man has been to every USC football game, home and away, for nearly 70 years. "It's up to 739 (games in a row) now," Pellerin said. "When we play Notre Dame in November, the last game of the year, it'll hit 750."

 

Football became the Coliseum's mainstay, a war of modern gladiators. The UCLA Bruins arrived in 1929 and stayed for 52 years. The Rams came west from Cleveland in 1946, winning the pro championship five years later, when Tom Fears caught a touchdown pass in the closing moments.

 

Among die-hard fans, such names and moments of decades past are recited like the shibboleths of some secret club. A play to remember: 1951, USC versus Stanford, a Rose Bowl berth on the line. Back for the kickoff is Stanford's lanky Bob Mathias--already the winner, as a teen-ager yet, of Olympic gold in the decathlon. Mathias takes the ball, veers right and races 96 yards for the pivotal touchdown. A lunging Frank Gifford is the last Trojan with a chance to stop him.

 

Certainly Mathias has not forgotten: "Every time I see (Gifford), I say, 'Hey Frank, you remember that '51 game?' He says, 'No, I don't.' "

 

Big games? When USC played UCLA, its intra-Coliseum rival, in 1967, a national championship was at stake. The frenzy that surrounded it was apparent to Bruins quarterback Gary Beban the moment he trottedout to warm up. "You literally could not put your foot on the (running) track because of all the cables that were there for television and radio," Beban said, recalling also, but less fondly, two long, twisting runs by O. J. Simpson that gave USC the victory.

 

If there is magic to football at the Coliseum, the stadium's former general manager, Jim Hardy, claims to have harnessed its fickle power during a game there in 1974.

 

USC was playing its archrival, Notre Dame. Hardy, a Trojans star from the 1940s, was watching from the press box. After Notre Dame's first touchdown, Hardy changed seats, hoping by some sort of voodoo to bolster the Trojans' luck. Notre Dame scored again. Hardy moved once more, to the press box roof. Notre Dame scored again. Hardy then descended to the field. Notre Dame went ahead, 24-0.

 

Just before halftime, Hardy found himself in the Coliseum's west tunnel when Anthony Davis caught a pass for USC's first score. "Physics tells us . . . that every heavenly body has an effect on every other heavenly body," said Hardy, who therefore stayed in the tunnel for the second half kickoff.

 

Which Davis returned for a touchdown.

 

"Now there's no way I'm going to leave the tunnel," said Hardy, who out of devotion to the cause saw not one moment of a comeback that ranks among the greatest in football: The Trojans scored 55 points in just 17 minutes to win, 55-24, while the huge crowd rocked the old stadium as it had seldom been rocked before.

 

*

 

With the Coliseum a home to USC, UCLA and the Rams, the stadium was drawing 2 million fans a year in the 1950s.

 

Then came the Dodgers.

 

Brooklyn's Boys of Summer were the first major league baseball team to move west. Configuring the giant oval stadium for baseball was a puzzle of Euclidean dimension. Under one scheme, home plate was to be placed near the peristyle, with the resulting sun problems obliterated by a movable balloon suspended on cables above the west rim.

 

Instead, home was placed on the opposite end, tempting right-handed batters with a short left-field fence 251 feet away. A 40-foot left-field screen was erected to make home runs more difficult. That became the diamond's dominant feature, a looming target for power hitters like Wally Moon and his "Moon shots."

 

For four years, 1958 through 1961, before moving to their own stadium, the Dodgers ushered in a bi-coastal era at the major leagues' biggest, oddest ballpark. It was a time of Sputnik, beatniks, the pill, hot rods and, most conspicuously, transistor radios.

 

Fans embraced the tiny marvels. Writer Tobin noticed that he could walk from the stratospheric heights of Row 72 down to the Coliseum floor and, because of transistors, never miss a word of the Dodgers' play-by-play.

 

The sound rose and became amplified, filling the stadium the way pagan chants might have filled an extinct volcano. If Vin Scully told a joke, "suddenly, you'd hear a great, good-natured chuckle out of this vast saucer," the announcer remembered. "It was amazing . . . a strange feeling to have your voice come back to you in such a great volume.

 

"Whenever I think of the Coliseum, I think of the transistor radio."

 

*

 

As times changed, so too did the stadium. A new scoreboard, installed in 1936, was hailed as an electronic wonder--it had 12,000 light bulbs. That gave way, two generations later, to a new wonder costing $1.6 million, but which went on the blink for months.

 

A huge press box was added in 1948; then came floodlights, theater seats and escalators. A year ago, the running track was removed and the field lowered by 11 feet. That made room for premium seats with better viewing angles.

 

Yet the improvements never seemed to be enough. Fans in higher levels still have views inferior to those in modern, multitiered stadiums. Spectators in some sections have to brush past 50 knees just to get to a snack bar--where, for decades, they could not even buy beer, a circumstance that spawned an era of bootlegging in which liquor was smuggled in via hollow walking canes, ersatz binoculars and even oranges injected with vodka.

 

Pressure from team owners ended Prohibition at the Coliseum in the 1971, but important tenants have since fled. The Rams departed for Anaheim in 1980, grousing over the seats, the aging escalators and other problems.

 

Filling the vacuum were the Raiders, who, under restless owner Al Davis, grumbled about returning to Oakland, or relocating in an empty Irwindale gravel pit. In limbo now over quake repairs and improvements, Davis is still looking elsewhere.

 

To run the Coliseum has never been easy, its managers point out. Not only are there demanding tenants and political pressures, but also more mundane troubles--crowds, traffic snarls, crime. When filled, the arena is a small city. Fans get sick. Toilets overflow.

 

In 1972, a woman was stabbed to death in a restroom. After a Raiders' game in 1983, two gunmen locked up seven employees and absconded with bushel-size bags containing the day's food and drink receipts: $280,000 in cash.

 

Over the years, the surrounding neighborhood has changed--losing its affluence, later falling into neglect. The Coliseum has felt the sting of that, despite sizable security forces and police patrols.

 

One night, one of the stadium's guard dogs, a German shepherd, had puppies. While the miracle of birth was taking place near the peristyle, a drunken man scaled the fence with a hammer and smashed the scoreboard computer, causing $250,000 in damage before passing out.

 

"They caught the guy--he was still in there (when the damage was discovered)," recalled former general manager Hardy. "The one night in the whole bloody year that the dog is having pups, that's the night that this guy climbs the fence and wrecks the place."

 

*

 

The Coliseum's one advantage over multitiered rivals is acoustics. It is a giant kettledrum. "The bowl effect makes the sound much better," said Peter Luukko, an arena manager who in 1989 helped put on a show there that was one of the top-grossing rock concerts in U.S. history: Guns N' Roses opening for the Rolling Stones.

 

For the first of four shows, 70,173 fans watched Mick Jagger levitate to the sky on a 100-foot elevator and wail, "Paint It Black," a volley of reverberating Angst that had more than a few sleepless homeowners in Baldwin Hills singing the old can't-get-no - satisfaction refrain.

 

Luukko was summoned to a city councilman's office, where he was told to lower the volume.

 

On the premise that the Coliseum must generate adequate revenue to support itself, its governing commission grudgingly endorsed rock music and booked all manner of other events to fill idle dates. Bruce Springsteen, The Who and U-2 came to play. Pope John Paul II drew 100,000 worshipers in 1987, despite heat, metal detectors and lines so long that dozens required medical aid. The largest crowd ever, 134,254 people, saw the Rev. Billy Graham in 1963, filling the entire field and overflowing beyond the gates, where 20,000 more listened on portable speakers.

 

In 1967, former heavyweight boxing champion Floyd Patterson rose from a knockdown to gain a draw with Jerry Quarry. Five years later, lightweight Chango Carmona knocked out Mando Ramos, igniting a melee that kept an ambulance from Ramos for more than 20 minutes.

 

In the 1970s, the stadium became an incomparable stage for motocross and off-road racing, mainly because tracks actually climbed off the arena floor and snaked through the peristyle arches. After the last arch, racers plummeted down a 70-foot ramp, all but weightless.

 

"It was like driving off a cliff," said off-road driver Roger Mears, who once bumped cars at the crest and took the plunge while flipping sideways.

 

Behind the events were always deeper stories--sensational images, stirring conflicts that have receded like reflections in a hall of mirrors, lost in myth and broken fragments. Look there: Off-road promoter Mickey Thompson watching trucks haul in 27 million pounds of dirt for a race track. Later mired in a financial dispute, Thompson wins in court, then is shot to death--a case never solved.

 

Look there: A track meet in 1964, the peak of the Cold War. The United States has never beaten the Soviet Union at 10,000 meters, and there, fed to the lions, is a small, pasty, 18-year-old high school kid from Spokane, Wash. And Gerry Lindgren is not just competing, he is racing to such a commanding victory that 50,519 people are standing and screaming, not least among them Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, who watches teary-eyed.

 

That was Rafer Johnson's most gripping Coliseum memory until 1984, when the 1960 decathlon gold medalist was selected to carry the torch to open the stadium's second Olympic Games. Johnson had to run half the track--he had cramped over a longer course in rehearsals--and climb scores of stairs to a rickety platform at the top of the peristyle, where he would lift the hand-held torch to ignite the great caldron above.

 

Johnson feared more cramps, feared not making it, feared falling. The athlete, still fit and proud at 49, watched every step. He remembers reaching that zenith and turning to face the crowd--a writhing bowlful of humanity, overwhelming his sight, bombarding his ears--while out there, all the world looked on.

 

And Rafer Johnson grabbed hold to steady himself.

 

"Right at that moment, I probably would have fallen off," he recalled. "The impact came-- bang! --at that moment."

 

*

 

Those crowds are gone now. While the contractors work their trowels and cranes, the city waits, pulling for the old fighter in large numbers--all those fans bound by memories:

 

Ice cream vendor Richard Aller, who sold 15-cent sodas at the Coliseum in 1959 . . . Larry Houston, 88, who was there when Paavo Nurmi drew 45,000 track fans in 1925 . . . church counselor Anna Kerr, 65, who bowed her head in Billy Graham's record crowd--an evening, she said, when the restrooms were impossible.

 

The roll call goes on.

 

Mickey Schaffer, 75, used to sneak in as a kid to see the Trojans, and Cary Agajanian, 52, watched his uncle, Ben, kick field goals for the Rams.

 

Francisco Gonzalez, 16, remembers Raiders' games and Trojans' games, but mostly he looks ahead--to events yet to be played, to moments of glory far on the horizon, when he, too, will inspire the roar of the crowd.

 

"That's my dream," said Gonzalez, shirtless and sweaty from a sunny spring day's tackle football game on the lawn near the peristyle. "I hope to play for the USC Trojans . . . probably go pro too. I want to play there."

 

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11/23/94 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S1

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

 

November 23, 1994

 

Section: SPORTS

 

A TEST OF ONE MAN'S INTEGRITY USC's Washington is finally vindicated

 

Tim Brown Daily News Staff Writer

 

Notes: Giles Pellerin, 87, will attend his 750th consecutive USC football game - home and away - Saturday at the Coliseum. He has seen every USC-Notre Dame and USC-UCLA game ever played. . . . Tight end John Allred, who broke his leg in practice just prior to USC's loss to Oregon, said Tuesday there is "a slight chance" he'll play Saturday against Notre Dame. More likely, Allred will be ready for USC's bowl game. . . . Representatives from the Sugar, Fiesta, Cotton, Sun and Alamo bowls plan to attend Saturday's game.

 

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11/25/94 USA TODAY 01A

USA Today (USA)

 

November 25, 1994

 

Section: NEWS

 

LOUD, WILD AND LOYAL FOR 'SUPER FANS,' IT'S NOT JUST A GAME

 

Gary Mihoces

 

A Minnesota Vikings fan painted himself purple. A Wisconsin couple got married at the 50-yard line. Some Penn State fans do their Christmas decor in team colors, including a blue and white Santa. "I get a kick out of all that," says Giles Pellerin of Pasadena, Calif. "It's interesting that people have different ways of showing enthusiasm."

 

Pellerin, 87, wouldn't dream of painting his face, but he stands out among college football fans. Saturday, he will attend his 750th consecutive University of Southern California football game - home and away - since 1926.

 

"I'm already looking forward to next year," he says.

 

Pellerin is among those cited when USA TODAY asked readers to write about folks whose fervor and allegiance rise above the sporting flock - making them "super fans."

 

We heard about those who've gone the extra mile - or extra thousands - taking fandom to the fringes of fanaticism.

 

One fan who has gotten physical about his favorite team is Frank Paradino, 25. He has a Denver Broncos logo tattooed on his shoulder. He has had the team logo shaved into his scalp. He wears his lucky Broncos jersey every Sunday and eats his lucky breakfast - pancakes and sausage.

 

The catch: He lives in Staten Island, N.Y.

 

"People tell me I'm in the wrong place," says Paradino, who has never lived in Colorado. "But I've been rooting for the Broncos since 1978. That year they played Dallas in the Super Bowl. My older brother was a Cowboys fan. I rooted for Denver just so Dallas would lose. Dallas won, but I've been rooting for Denver ever since."

 

Nancy Watson, 53, wrote from Huntington, W.Va., in tribute to her husband, Bob, 58. They're Marshall University football buffs. She told how he had a heart attack at Marshall's stadium during a 1992 game, was rushed to the hospital and received electric shocks.

 

"The first thing he wanted to know when he was back to life: 'What's Marshall's score now?' " she says.

 

Mike Strickland's allegiance is to the Orlando Magic of the NBA. His mode of transport is his "Magic Van," painted in team colors, right down to the blue bumpers and hubcaps.

 

Strickland travels eight months a year as a horse handler with the Clyde Beatty Cole Brothers Circus but attends Magic games during his winter break in Deland, Fla. "I have worn a Magic shirt every day for the past four years."

 

Sometimes it takes very little clothing to show loyalty.

 

Two years ago, Patrick Griffin of Kalamazoo, Mich., entered a radio station challenge of "what would you do?" to win a free trip to a Minnesota Vikings game in Philadelphia. He painted himself purple, donned only a yellow athletic supporter and went out in sub-freezing weather.

 

Then he got down on his hands and knees with a football balanced atop his backside. His wife, Cindie, dressed in an Eagles outfit, kicked the football. They won the contest.

 

"We beat out a couple that was wrestling in cow manure," says Griffin.

 

For many, following a team is like a marital commitment.

 

Brian and Nicole Campbell of Denver, alumni of the University of Florida, chose an open date, when the Gators weren't playing football, for their Sept. 24 marriage.

 

"We also changed our honeymoon plans," says Brian. "Originally, we were going to Hawaii, but that takes quite a bit of time. The weekend after the wedding we were playing Ole Miss. So we changed to a vacation in the Colorado mountains for four days and were back Saturday to see the game on TV."

 

Long distances don't mean missed games.

 

Don Chase, 61, of Omaha, a former B-52 bomber commander retired from the Air Force, isn't especially fond of flying. "I'm a backseat driver-type in an airplane," he says.

 

Chase, however, is fond of University of Nebraska football. He says he has attended every home and away game since 1980. And he has traveled to each by car - except for flights to Hawaii and Japan.

 

"I've got plenty of time. Driving is no big deal," says Chase, whose 1976 sports car has 489,000 miles on it.

 

New York Jets fan John Young of Morris Plains, N.J., who converted a 1974 ambulance into a vehicle he calls his Jetmobile, yearns to take it on a long trip even though it only gets seven miles to the gallon: "Someday, I hope to be driving it to a Super Bowl. It's going. I don't care where the game is."

 

While fans are quick to travel, they practice allegiance at home, and turn game rooms and bedrooms into team shrines.

 

"My husband is nuts. When we went to buy a new car it had to be blue. Everything has to be blue," says Diane Siderowicz of Eynon, Pa.

 

She and husband Frank are Penn State fans. Their Christmas decorations are blue and white. Their rec room decor is blue and white. They have blue and white toilet paper.

 

While Giles Pellerin's 68-year streak of attending every USC game started in 1926, the first football game he ever attended was the 1923 Rose Bowl (USC 14, Penn State 3).

 

After he graduated from Huntington Park (Calif.) High School in 1925, he went to work for the phone company.

 

For four years, he attended classes at USC by day and drove a truck for the phone company in the evening. "The only thing I really had to look forward to for relaxation were those Saturday afternoon football games," he says.

 

It was habit forming. He kept his string going despite an emergency appendectomy five days before a 1949 game. He says he told the nurses at the hospital he was going to take a walk, and instead went to the game with his brother Oliver.

 

Pellerin will be joined at Saturday's game, when USC hosts Notre Dame, by his brothers Oliver, 84, and Max, 82, who have their own streaks going.

 

Oliver hasn't missed a USC game since 1945 (539 in a row). Max had a 300-plus streak halted a few seasons back by an overseas business trip.

 

"I hate it when we beat ourselves," says Giles. "Last year when we played UCLA we had a chance to win and we threw an interception. I couldn't sleep that night thinking about that one play that went awry.

 

"But that's just all part of being a fan."

 

And a super fan.

 

PHOTO,color,Robert Hanashiro,USA TODAY

 

NOTES: They paint themselves purple, cut honeymoons short -- all for the team

See related stories: 06C

CATEGORY: Cover Story

 

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11/25/94 Hous. Chron. 8

Houston Chronicle

November 25, 1994

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Neuheisel, Tuberville head coaching material

 

JOHN P. LOPEZ

 

Now that's a streak -- If you see a 90ish-looking gentleman standing outside the Los Angeles Coliseum, holding two fingers up and saying, "Anyone need two?" you'll know how bad things have gotten for Southern Cal and Notre Dame.

 

Nothing has stopped Giles Pellerin, 87, a lifelong Trojans fan, from attending 749 consecutive USC football games -- home and away.

 

It is one of the most amazing streaks in college football. Pellerin has seen every USC-UCLA and Notre Dame-USC game played.

 

In all likelihood, not even struggling up-and-down times by both teams will keep Pellerin from reaching the landmark of 750 straight games Saturday.

 

Tell me, people. What's gotten into kids these days?

 

Notre Dame (plus-3) at USC: The 87-year-old ultra-fan -- Giles Pellerin -- reaches the landmark 750 straight USC games.

 

Asked what's kept him going all these years, Pellerin says, "I'm only one year away from getting on the priority list for parking."

 

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3/9/95 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S2

 

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

March 9, 1995

 

Section: SPORTS

 

BRIEFLY Harper jumps to Tampa Bay

 

Daily News Staff and Wire Services

 

The USC Athletic Hall of Fame has added 22 men including Tom Seaver, Marcus Allen (o)and Ronnie Lott, and two women.

 

In addition to Seaver, a member of baseball's Hall of Fame, and Allen and Lott, two longtime football stars still playing in the NFL, the men added to the USC Hall of Fame were Dean Cromwell, Morley Drury, John Ferraro, Mal Florence, Jess Hill, Marlin and Mike McKeever, Orv Mohler, John Naber, Charles Paddock, Mel Patton, Giles Pellerin, Erny Pinckert, Dennis Ralston, Gus Shaver, Dave Stockton, Brice Taylor, Irvine "Cotton" Warburton and Charles White.

 

The women honored were current USC women's basketball coach Cheryl Miller and Julie Kohl.

 

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5/16/95 L.A. Times 3

Los Angeles Times

 

May 16, 1995

 

Section: Sports

 

Notes on a Scorecard

ALLAN MALAMUD

 

The difference in the Laker-Spur series is that San Antonio has a superstar, David Robinson, and the Lakers don't. . . .

 

Robinson is averaging 28 points, 15 rebounds and four blocked shots, and is 25 for 29 from the free-throw line. . . .

 

How important are superstars in the playoffs? The last NBA team to win a title without such a player was the 1978-79 Seattle SuperSonics. . . .

 

Since then, the championships have been won by teams with Magic Johnson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Larry Bird, Julius Erving, Isiah Thomas, Michael Jordan and Hakeem Olajuwon. . . .

 

Of the eight remaining teams in the playoffs this season, only the Lakers and the Indiana Pacers are without superstars. . . .

 

You can fight the freeway traffic and still get home in time to see the tipoff between the Lakers and Spurs tonight at San Antonio. The game is starting at 6:30 our time, an hour later than usual. . . .

 

Chick Hearn was back in form Sunday after missing the second half Friday because of bronchitis. . . .

 

Jelani McCoy, the 6-11 center who could compete for a starting job at UCLA during his freshman year, was impressive in the Hoop Summit prep all-star game last week. McCoy is a shot blocker deluxe. . . .

 

Marcel Lachemann, who had no managerial experience before replacing Buck Rodgers with the Angels last May 17, may be the most improved manager in the major leagues. . . .

 

Baseball needs more fast workers such as Bob Gibson, the Hall of Fame pitcher who used to tell his St. Louis Cardinal teammates before a game, "An hour and 57 minutes, win, lose or draw, guys." . . .

 

Pacific 10 Conference Southern Division baseball champion USC will play Northern Division champion Washington State Thursday night at Dedeaux Field in the opening game of the best-of-three series for the conference title. . . .

 

The UCLA men's track and field team will be seeking its fourth consecutive Pac-10 title and the women their third starting Friday at Tucson. . . .

 

Tommy Prothro often was conservative, in the coaching mold of his mentor, Red Sanders, but wasn't afraid to concoct surprises. Among those that usually worked were onside kicks. However, one that didn't led to a wild and crazy 41-40 UCLA defeat by Oregon in 1970 at the Coliseum. . . .

 

Prothro was a terrific college coach, perhaps the best illustration being his 63-37-2 record at Oregon State. . . .

 

The Beavers had five consecutive losing seasons before Kip Taylor was replaced by Prothro in 1955. In his 10 years, they had only one losing season and made two New Year's Day appearances in the Rose Bowl. . . .

 

Oregon State hasn't been to any bowl since Prothro left. . . .

 

UCLA was coming off three consecutive losing seasons when he replaced Bill Barnes in 1965. . . .

 

Prothro coached the Bruins to an upset of top-ranked Michigan State in the 1966 Rose Bowl after the Spartans had beaten them in the opening game at East Lansing, and compiled a 41-18-3 record in six years. . . .

 

Some of his teams were undersized overachievers who became known as "the gutty little Bruins." . . .

 

*

 

The first 1995 Heisman Trophy campaign material I've received in the mail is from Minnesota. The Gophers are boosting running back Chris Darkins, who set a school single-season rushing record with 1,443 yards in 1994. . . .

 

Newport Beach sports enthusiast John Hamilton's impressive collection of memorabilia will be on permanent display starting Thursday at the Northern Trust bank building in Newport Center. . . .

 

Voted into the second class of the USC Athletic Hall of Fame were Marcus Allen, Dean Cromwell, Morley Drury, John Ferraro, Mal Florence, Jess Hill, Julie Kohl, Ronnie Lott, Marlin McKeever, Mike McKeever, Cheryl Miller, Orv Mohler, Charlie Paddock, Mel Patton, Giles Pellerin, Erny Pinckert, Dennis Ralston, Roy Saari, Tom Seaver, Gus Shaver, Dave Stockton, Brice Taylor, Cotton Warburton and Charles White. . . .

 

They will be honored at a black-tie dinner at Heritage Hall on June 17. . . .

 

The discovery of Afternoon Deelites' serious leg injury helps to explain his disappointing finish in the Kentucky Derby, in which he was in a contending position before fading to eighth place. . . .

 

Don't expect to get 24-1 odds again on Kentucky Derby winner Thunder Gulch. For the Preakness on Saturday, 2-1 will be more like it. . . .

 

A 2-year-old colt named Jimmy Hoofa finished out of the money in a race last week at Hollywood Park. . . .

 

Indy driver Scott Goodyear uses Firestone tires.

 

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7/10/96 AP Online 00:00:00

AP Online

 

July 10, 1996

 

Section: Sports,Sports Scores

 

Names In The Game

 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. At the end of the 1925 season, Giles Pellerin missed a Southern California football game. It was the last time he missed one.

 

The 89-year-old Pellerin has a 763-game attendance streak, never missing a USC game home or away.

 

That would include 26 trips to the Rose Bowl, as well as attending all 67 USC-Notre Dame games and all 65 USC-UCLA games. Pellerin has watched the Trojans play in 75 stadiums and more than 50 cities, including Tokyo.

 

His feat was acknowledged Wednesday when he became the first to receive the ''Diehard'' Fan Award presented by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

 

''I never played the game, but I always loved it,'' Pellerin said. ''It keeps me alive looking forward to the next season.''

 

Next season starts early for Pellerin, who plans to attend USC's opener on Aug. 25 against Penn State in the Kickoff Classic.

 

The award, sponsored by Sears, also was given to fans in divisions II, III and the NAIA. Jay Peck of Western State College (Colo.) was the Division II winner, Don Wilson of Calvin (Mich.) College and Paul DeJong of Northwestern (Iowa) College was the NAIA winner.

 

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7/11/96 Pitt. Post-Gazette D5

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (PA)

 

July 11, 1996

 

Section: SPORTS

 

THE FIGHTING IRISH FIGHTING LITTLE GUYS

 

FROM WIRE DISPATCHES

 

The Old Man and the USC

 

At the end of the 1925 season, Giles Pellerin missed a Southern California football game. It was the last time he missed one.

 

The 89-year-old Pellerin has a 763-game attendance streak, never missing a USC game home or away. Pellerin has watched the Trojans play in 75 stadiums and more than 50 cities, including Tokyo.

 

He became the first to receive the ''Diehard'' Fan Award presented by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

 

''It keeps me alive looking forward to the next season,'' Pellerin said.

 

Quoting 'em

 

Eric Green, after he was dumped by the Miami Dolphins: ''I'm eager to get back on the field and prove what everybody says about me is not true.''

 

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7/11/96 Lexington Herald Leader B2

Lexington Herald-Leader (KY)

 

July 11, 1996

 

Section: Sports

 

FAITHFUL UK FAN GETS NATIONAL HONOR

 

Herald-Leader Wire Services

 

Kentucky superfan Bob Wiggins was named the first runner-up for the 1996 Sears DieHard Fan Award at the national conference of Collegiate Sports Information Directors held last week in Boston. Wiggins won a $500 Sears gift certificate. The 67-year-old native of Falmouth has attended 614 consecutive UK basketball games, home and away. He hasn't missed a game since 1977, and he hasn't missed a home game since 1961. He's seen 468 wins and 146 losses, including two national titles, seven Southeastern Conference Championships and six SEC Tournament crowns.

 

Giles Pellerin was awarded first place at the conference. He hasn't missed a Southern California football game since the end of the 1925 season. Pellerin, 89, has a 763-game attendance streak, never missing a USC game home or away. Jordan a 100-1 shot: It's not often that Michael Jordan is the underdog at something, but that's the case this week at the Isuzu Celebrity Golf Championship. The odds on the Chicago Bulls star winning are 100-1. Jordan is one of more than 70 sports and entertainment stars in the field for the this week's event at Edgewood Tahoe (Nev.) Golf Course Friday through Sunday. The tournament, televised by ESPN on Friday and NBC on the weekend, also includes Johnny Bench, Dan Quayle, Mario Lemieux, Bryant Gumbel and Pete Sampras. The favorite at 7-5 in Tahoe, where gambling is legal, was former major-league pitcher Rick Rhoden, who has won the 7-year-old event three times and is the all-time leading money winner on the CGA tour. The last word: Several golfers were asked what they would be doing if not playing pro golf: Arnold Palmer: "I'd be a golf superintendent somewhere, or flying airplanes. That's it. I fly myself everywhere. I love it." Chi Chi Rodriguez: "I would have to be a minister that lived in the ghetto, and give people some peace." Frank Conner: "I'd be homeless. I can't do anything else but play golf."

 

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7/11/96 Lexington Herald Leader B2

 

Lexington Herald-Leader (KY)

 

July 11, 1996

 

Section: Sports

 

FAITHFUL UK FAN GETS NATIONAL HONOR

 

Herald-Leader Wire Services

 

Kentucky superfan Bob Wiggins was named the first runner-up for the 1996 Sears DieHard Fan Award at the national conference of Collegiate Sports Information Directors held last week in Boston. Wiggins won a $500 Sears gift certificate. The 67-year-old native of Falmouth has attended 614 consecutive UK basketball games, home and away. He hasn't missed a game since 1977, and he hasn't missed a home game since 1961. He's seen 468 wins and 146 losses, including two national titles, seven Southeastern Conference Championships and six SEC Tournament crowns.

 

Giles Pellerin was awarded first place at the conference. He hasn't missed a Southern California football game since the end of the 1925 season. Pellerin, 89, has a 763-game attendance streak, never missing a USC game home or away. Jordan a 100-1 shot: It's not often that Michael Jordan is the underdog at something, but that's the case this week at the Isuzu Celebrity Golf Championship. The odds on the Chicago Bulls star winning are 100-1. Jordan is one of more than 70 sports and entertainment stars in the field for the this week's event at Edgewood Tahoe (Nev.) Golf Course Friday through Sunday. The tournament, televised by ESPN on Friday and NBC on the weekend, also includes Johnny Bench, Dan Quayle, Mario Lemieux, Bryant Gumbel and Pete Sampras. The favorite at 7-5 in Tahoe, where gambling is legal, was former major-league pitcher Rick Rhoden, who has won the 7-year-old event three times and is the all-time leading money winner on the CGA tour. The last word: Several golfers were asked what they would be doing if not playing pro golf: Arnold Palmer: "I'd be a golf superintendent somewhere, or flying airplanes. That's it. I fly myself everywhere. I love it." Chi Chi Rodriguez: "I would have to be a minister that lived in the ghetto, and give people some peace." Frank Conner: "I'd be homeless. I can't do anything else but play golf."

 

Sport People

 

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7/11/96 Balt. Sun 2D

 

Baltimore Sun (MD)

 

July 11, 1996

 

Section: Sports

 

COLLEGES

 

FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP GAME COULD BE REALITY IN 60 DAYS

 

The oft-tabled attempt to assure a true national title game in football appears closer to reality.

 

"We're very close to some kind of a proposal that will integrate the Big Ten and Pac-10 into the national championship," John H. B. French, executive director of the Tournament of Roses Association, said.

 

The issue arose again this week in Chicago at meetings between conference and bowl alliance officials. French says a deal could be done "within 60 days."

 

More football: Giles Pellerin, who hasn't missed a Southern California game since 1925, won the first "Diehard" Fan Award presented by the College Sports Information Directors of America. Pellerin, 89, has a 763-game attendance streak, home and away.

 

Basketball: Fred Quartlebaum was named assistant coach at Towson State. Quartlebaum, a Navy assistant the past four years, replaces Adrian Dantley, who resigned last month.

 

Swimming: Two Johns Hopkins seniors have won NCAA postgraduate scholarships worth $5,000 each. Ann Girvin was an All-American in four events. She had a 3.28 grade-point average in neuroscience and has been accepted to Northwestern's Institute of Neuroscience. Brian Ronson earned All-America honors in seven events. He had a 3.60 GPA in premed and will attend Hopkins or Maryland medical school.

 

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7/11/96 Akron Beacon J. (Ohio) D2

 

Akron Beacon Journal (Ohio) (KRT)

July 11, 1996

 

Section: SPORTS

 

**********

 

TROJAN FOR LIFE

 

At the end of the 1925 season, Giles Pellerin of Louisville, Ky., missed a Southern California football game. It was the last time he missed one.

 

The 89-year-old Pellerin has a 763-game attendance streak, never missing a USC game home or away.

 

That would include 26 trips to the Rose Bowl, as well as attending all 67 USC-Notre Dame games and all 65 USC-UCLA games. Pellerin has watched the Trojans play in 75 stadiums and more than 50 cities.

 

His feat was acknowledged yesterday when he became the first to receive the "Diehard" Fan Award presented by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

 

"I never played the game, but I always loved it," Pellerin said. "It keeps me alive looking forward to the next season."

 

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7/15/96 St. Petersburg Times 2C

St Petersburg Times

 

July 15, 1996

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Fan for the ages

 

At the end of the 1925 season, Giles Pellerin missed a Southern California football game. It was the last time he missed one.

 

Pellerin, 89, has a 763-game attendance streak, never missing a USC game, home or away.

 

That would include 26 trips to the Rose Bowl, as well as attending all 67 USC-Notre Dame games and all 65 USC-UCLA games. Pellerin has watched the Trojans play in 75 stadiums and more than 50 cities, including Tokyo.

 

His feat was acknowledged Wednesday when he became the first to receive the ""Diehard'' Fan Award presented by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

 

""I never played the game, but I always loved it,'' Pellerin said. ""It keeps me alive looking forward to the next season.''

 

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7/28/96 Com. Appeal (Mem. TN) D8

 

Memphis Commercial Appeal (TN)

 

July 28, 1996

 

Section: Sports

 

USC has 1 'real fan'

 

At the end of the 1925 season, Giles Pellerin missed a Southern California football game. It was the last time he missed one.

 

The 89-year-old Pellerin has a 763-game attendance streak, never missing a USC game home or away.

 

That would include 26 trips to the Rose Bowl, as well as attending all 67 USC-Notre Dame games and all 65 USC-UCLA games. Pellerin has watched the Trojans play in 75 stadiums and more than 50 cities, including Tokyo.

 

His feat was acknowledged Wednesday when he became the first to receive the ''Diehard'' Fan Award presented by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

 

''I never played the game, but I always loved it,'' Pellerin said. ''It keeps me alive looking forward to the next season.''

 

Next season starts early for Pellerin, who plans to attend USC's opener on Aug. 25 against Penn State in the Kickoff Classic.

 

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9/4/96 Seattle Post-Intelligencer D5

Seattle Post-Intelligencer (WA)

 

September 4, 1996

 

Section: Sports

 

PAC-10 GLORY, WHERE HAVE YE GONE? CONFERENCE TEAMS TRY TO REBOUND FROM '95 BOWL DISASTERS

 

BUD WITHERS P-I Reporter

 

A new postseason arrangement is finally in place. Playing fields have been gussied up, coaches' office lights are on until midnight, players' tongues are dragging as they push themselves to exhaustion.

 

Nothing like the anticipation of another college field hockey season, is there?

 

Oh, you came to this space for Pac-10 football? Bless you. Your resilience is appreciated in these lean times.

 

Used to be, the Pac-10 played as truculent a brand of football as anybody outside the cast of ''The Longest Yard.'' Once, they used to lament on the West Coast how news out here never made it back in time to make deadlines of Eastern papers.

 

That was then and this is now. Today, publicists would just as soon word never leaked out of their stadiums.

 

Alas, it does. And last year, it revealed atrocities like this: Washington, which used to drop to its knees hoping for Iowa in a bowl game, sustained its ugliest bowl loss ever, 38-18, against the Hawkeyes.

 

But misery loves company, and the Huskies had plenty. UCLA allowed 51 points to Kansas in a bowl game. Stanford lost to East Carolina, of all people, in the postseason. Oregon got schooled by Colorado, 38-6.

 

For the first time in history, the Pac-10 lost four bowl games. The only winner, USC, did so after a confounding season of underachievement.

 

So it's now a conference bowl record of 14-14 in the '90s. No Pac-10 team has finished in the final AP Top 10 the past two years. It's enough to make Pac-10 basketball look good.

 

But hey, they still play great water polo and volleyball out here.

 

On the theory that what goes around comes around, however, Pac-10 football teams will keep hacking away, while the following sub-plots take place in the shadows:

 

Most heated rivalry: Oregon-Washington. You remember last fall, when Husky coach Jim Lambright said everything about Washington was better, and Oregonians said Husky players' mamas had exposed nostril hair. Some believe the reason each team got torched in bowl games is that they were looking ahead to Oct. 26 in Eugene, when they meet again.

 

Worst mascot: Sparky the Sun Devil at Arizona State. Sparky-bashers had their day in the sun a few years back in Pullman when, with Arizona State leading big, a tipsy Cougar fan came out of the deserted stands, appropriated Sparky's wood pitchfork, began flogging the AstroTurf with it and disappeared out a tunnel. He was shortly apprehended - the fan, not Sparky, unfortunately - by campus cops.

 

Happiest scribes in the country: The writers who cover Pac-10 football. After assaulting their computer spell-checks for four years, Cal receiver Iheanyi Uwaezuoke has graduated.

 

A rivalry that had to happen: Northeast Louisiana at UCLA, Sept. 14.

 

America's Coach: Homer Smith, 64, has joined the Arizona staff as offensive coordinator, after coaching stops at Stanford, Air Force, Davidson, Pacific, UCLA, Army, UCLA, the Kansas City Chiefs, Alabama, UCLA and Alabama. He is being asked to rejuvenate the Wildcat offense, which should be no more difficult than making jambalaya out of pea gravel.

 

The strangest silence ever: Smith has been declining to talk to the press about the Arizona offense. He is believed to be clinging to the hope that the public will assume the Wildcats still have none.

 

Reach out and fleece someone: Nine Oregon State freshmen were indicted in the offseason for alleged fraudulent use of a telephone credit card. It is not true that, given the opportunity to make one more phone call, they used the card again.

 

Newest weapon: With Oregon State switching from a wishbone offense to a more diversified attack, Sylvester Green is the only returning wide receiver to have caught a pass. In fact, OSU researchers have determined that Green is the only returning Beaver player ever to have seen a pass.

 

Worst debut: USC at Penn State. Duped by the Nittany Lions on the reason for coming to East Rutherford, N.J., Trojans practiced the Macarena for three weeks.

 

Oh, no, not that: Join us in beseeching the Almighty to limit USC's television appearances, because every time the Trojans are on, ABC insists on interviewing octogenarian Giles Pellerin, who has seen in person four million USC games in a row.

 

Then again, Pellerin provides a convenient timeline, inasmuch as he was in grammar school when USC last beat Notre Dame.

 

Where Pac-10 teams will finish

 

TEAM COMMENT

 

1. USC Penn State embarrassment will wake Trojans up

 

2. Arizona State Doesn't hit road until Oct. 12

 

3. Washington Third would put UW in New Zealand's Haka Bowl

 

4. Stanford Nucleus returns, but must find a quarterback

 

5. Washington State Some talent here, and no contenders on road

 

6. Oregon QB Graziani back, but many key parts gone

 

7. Arizona Plays hard and offensive changes will help

 

8. UCLA Changed coaches; defensive mind Rocky Long a plus

 

9. California Offense, led by QB Barnes, could be potent

 

10. Oregon State Pettibone 6-34 in Pac-10 games

 

- Bud Withers

 

Photo

AP: Most Pac-10 gazers say Brad Otton, the QB from Tumwater, will throw USC's hat into the Rose Bowl ring again.

 

Football 1996

 

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9/8/96 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) 3

 

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

 

September 8, 1996

 

Section: SPORTS

 

COMMENTARY : THESE DAYS, PACIFIC-10'S NEWS IS ALL BAD

 

Mike Freeman The New York Times

 

SEATTLE A new postseason arrangement is finally in place. Playing fields have been gussied up, coaches' office lights are on until midnight, players' tongues are dragging as they push themselves to exhaustion.

 

Nothing like the anticipation of another college field hockey season, is there?

 

Oh, you came to this space for Pacific-10 football? Bless you. Your resilience is appreciated in these lean times.

 

Used to be, the Pac-10 played as truculent a brand of football as anybody outside the cast of ''The Longest Yard.'' Once, they used to lament on the West Coast how news out here never made it back in time to make deadlines of Eastern papers.

 

That was then and this is now. Today, publicists would just as soon word never leaked out of their stadiums.

 

Alas, it does. And last year, it revealed atrocities like this: Washington, which used to drop to its knees hoping for Iowa in a bowl game, sustained its ugliest bowl loss ever, 38-18, against the Hawkeyes.

 

But misery loves company, and the Huskies had plenty. UCLA allowed 51 points to Kansas in a bowl game. Stanford lost to East Carolina, of all people, in the postseason. Oregon got schooled by Colorado 38-6.

 

For the first time in history, the Pac-10 lost four bowl games. The only winner, USC, did so after a confounding season of underachievement.

 

So it's now a conference bowl record of 14-14 in the '90s. No Pac-10 team has finished in the final AP Top 10 the past two years. It's enough to make Pac-10 basketball look good.

 

But hey, they still play great water polo and volleyball out here.

 

On the theory that what goes around comes around, however, Pac-10 football teams will keep hacking away, while the following subplots take place in the shadows:

 

Most heated rivalry: Oregon-Washington. You remember last fall, when Husky coach Jim Lambright said everything about Washington was better, and Oregonians said Husky players' mamas had exposed nostril hair. Some believe the reason each team got torched in bowl games is that they were looking ahead to Oct. 26 in Eugene, when they meet again.

 

Worst mascot: Sparky the Sun Devil at Arizona State. Sparky-bashers had their day in the sun a few years back in Pullman, Wash., when, with Arizona State leading big, a tipsy Cougars fan came out of the deserted stands, appropriated Sparky's wood pitchfork, began flogging the AstroTurf with it and disappeared out a tunnel. He was shortly apprehended - the fan, not Sparky, unfortunately - by campus cops.

 

Happiest scribes in the country: The writers who cover Pac-10 football. After assaulting their computer spell-checks for four years, Cal receiver Iheanyi Uwaezuoke has graduated.

 

A rivalry that had to happen: Northeast Louisiana at UCLA, Sept. 14.

 

America's Coach: Homer Smith, 64, has joined the Arizona staff as offensive coordinator, after coaching stops at Stanford, Air Force, Davidson, Pacific, UCLA, Army, UCLA, the Kansas City Chiefs, Alabama, UCLA and Alabama. He is being asked to rejuvenate the Wildcats offense, which should be no more difficult than making jambalaya out of pea gravel.

 

The strangest silence ever: Smith has been declining to talk to the press about the Arizona offense. He is believed to be clinging to the hope that the public will assume the Wildcats still have none.

 

Reach out and fleece someone: Nine Oregon State freshmen were indicted in the offseason for alleged fraudulent use of a telephone credit card. It is not true that, given the opportunity to make one more phone call, they used the card again.

 

Newest weapon: With Oregon State switching from a wishbone offense to a more diversified attack, Sylvester Green is the only returning wide receiver to have caught a pass. In fact, OSU researchers have determined that Green is the only returning Beavers player ever to have seen a pass.

 

Oh, no, not that: Join us in beseeching the Almighty to limit USC's television appearances, because every time the Trojans are on, ABC insists on interviewing octogenarian Giles Pellerin, who has seen in person four million USC games in a row.

 

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10/27/96 Seattle Times D7

 

Seattle Times (WA)

October 27, 1996

 

Section: SPORTS

 

OTTON ONCE WAS COUGAR - BRIEFLY

 

DICK ROCKNE SEATTLE TIMES STAFF REPORTER

 

PULLMAN If things had worked out the way Brad Otton and Mike Price thought they would, Otton might have been quarterbacking for Washington State instead of USC last night at Martin Stadium.

 

When Otton, of Tumwater, decided to transfer from Division I-AA Weber State to a Division I-A university in 1994, he visited WSU, USC, Brigham Young and Fresno State.

 

"The truth is, I committed to Washington State," Otton said two years ago.

 

But the commitment only lasted about two hours.

 

That was how long it took for Price, the Cougar coach then and now, to hear from at least some of the scholarship quarterbacks already attending WSU. They contended that Price had promised not to recruit another quarterback.

 

Price backed down.

 

"It just didn't work out," Otton said. "It worked out with me and Coach Price, but it didn't work out with the other quarterbacks."

 

Otton, a late bloomer, received no major-college scholarship offers after leading Tumwater High School to a 13-0 record and the 1989 state Class AA football championship as a 6-foot-4, 175-pound senior.

 

Several Big Sky Conference schools showed interest, including Weber State, in Ogden, Utah. Weber State is the alma mater of Sid Otton, Brad's father and the coach at Tumwater.

 

Otton preserved his first year of eligibility by redshirting at Weber State in 1990, then went on a two-year Mormon mission to Italy. As a redshirt freshman in 1993, he set an NCAA Division I-AA single-game record by passing for 540 yards against Northern Arizona.

 

But there were signs of financial problems at Weber State.

 

"There were threats about cutting back on scholarships and coaches," Otton said at the time. "With three years of eligibility left, I didn't want to be sitting there as a senior on a team with 20 scholarship players."

 

So he decided to go to WSU . . . make that USC.

 

'SOUTHERN CAL' A NO-NO

 

Wherever the Trojans go, reporters are asked not to use "Southern Cal" in reference to USC.

 

"The following are preferred: USC, Southern California, So. California, Troy, Trojans and Women of Troy," according to the USC sports-information office.

 

Which, of course, resulted in the newspaper in Champaign, Ill., using "Women of Troy" when the Trojans played at Illinois this season.

 

USC got the last laugh, however. The score of the game was Women of Troy 55, Illiinois 3.

 

3 NIGHT GAMES, 3 SITES

 

Washington State has been the home team for three night games against USC, but last night's contest, was the first under the lights in Pullman. In 1974, the two teams played at Albi Stadium in Spokane; in 1976, they played at the Kingdome in Seattle.

 

NOTES

 

-- Giles Pellerin, 89, of Los Angeles attended his 771st consecutive Trojan game - home and away - last night. His streak began in 1926.

 

-- A total of 43 Californians play for Washington State, while two Washingtonians - Otton and offensive guard Travis Claridge of Vancouver - play for USC.

 

PHOTO

REED SAXON / AP: USC'S BRAD OTTON, WHO PLAYED AT TUMWATER HIGH SCHOOL, ALMOST WOUND UP AT WASHINGTON STATE.

 

COUGAR NOTEBOOK

 

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11/10/96 N.Y. Times 49

New York Times (NY)

 

November 10, 1996

 

The Game? What Game? The Ritual of Football

 

LOUISE LAGUE

 

College football ritual is changing, with conviviality, camaraderie and connection taking precedence over actual game for many; many alumni of Eastern schools continue to attend, but student attendance seems to be down; scene at Princeton game described; photos (M)

 

PRINCETON, N.J. IF it is a Saturday afternoon in the fall, there is no question where Thatcher Longstreth will be, what team he will be cheering for or even what he will be wearing.

 

The place is a seat on the 50-yard line. The team is Princeton, his alma mater. The outfit is a chunky white sweater with an orange P on the front, a threadbare orange-and-black bow tie and orange and black argyle socks.

 

Yes, Princeton's colors are orange and black.

 

Mr. Longstreth, a former City Councilman from Philadelphia who graduated from Princeton in 1941, is always on time ("I once missed 13 points in the first 57 seconds") and always stays to the end ("even if we're getting thumped"). And he has attended every Princeton game, home or away, for the last 47 years -- more than half his life.

 

"That's about 450 games," he said. "When it rains, it's not even fun. But I always come, even if I'm sick or it's foul weather, or even when I was running for Mayor. Now, I've got to keep coming because I have a record to maintain." (Mr. Longstreth, 75, may hold the attendance record for Princeton, but the national record belongs to Giles Pellerin, 89, of Pasadena, Calif., who has attended more than 730 University of Southern California games, and counting.)

 

Clearly, few fans are as devoted as Mr. Longstreth, showing the school colors year in and year out, week in and week out, and demonstrating the powerful role of college football as a ritual in American life. Jonathan Cole, the provost of Columbia University, says the idea of getting together to cheer is "a very good, unifying experience" for undergraduates who may not think they have much in common. It is certainly as instructive as anything that transpires in lecture halls. Where else can freshmen look at adults who have filled the same bleachers 10 or 20 years and wonder: Is this what we will look like? Is this what we will act like?

 

But in an age of grinding business schedules and intense academic pressures, the college football ritual is not what it used to be. For many, it seems that conviviality, camaraderie and connection are taking precedence over actually attending the game. Many alumni of Eastern schools still fit in Saturday afternoons at the stadium, but attendance among students seems to be down. That has some colleges worried, because the school spirit whipped up by athletic events has traditionally provided a tail wind for financial contributions in later years.

 

Harvard has fought to keep its football games off television in hopes of bolstering attendance, and even formed a committee to study why the university had so little school spirit. At Dartmouth, undergraduates attend home games wearing special shirts with their class numerals. But the number of shirts in evidence have been falling off after freshman year.

 

At Princeton, Michael Witte, a prominent illustrator, has watched the graying of the crowd in the 28 years since he graduated. "As a student, I used to look down the bleachers and see rows of brown and blond heads," he said. "Now I see rows of silver or bald heads." His son Griffin, a freshman at -- where else? -- Princeton maintains that "a lot of kids are sort of on their way to the game, but get waylaid by the tailgate parties."

 

Ah, yes, the tailgate parties: they are almost as much a part of the ritual of college football as anything that happens on the field. Some Princetonians (or their spouses) still aspire to be the Elsa Maxwells of the tailgate set. Never mind that they do not even own a station wagon or that they rarely make it to the opening kickoff because they are still packing up their tablecloths. For them, the game itself is mainly a place to rest between the lunchtime gathering and the postgame party.

 

And then there are those who never quite make it to the game at all. "I watch college football on television every weekend," said Michael Davis, who graduated from Princeton in 1990 and now attends the tailgate parties. "I'm just going to hang around and visit with my friends."

 

The routine is different at Columbia, where tailgating is limited by the shortage of urban parking spaces. "Our idea of tailgating is coming up on the subway, grabbing a sandwich at the deli, and eating it in the stands," said Virgil Renzulli, the associate vice president for public affairs at Columbia. And at Dartmouth College, the weather at gametime at Hanover, N.H., can be so cold that the principal homecoming event is the pep rally around the bonfire the night before the game. The highlight is when the freshmen run around the fire the same number of times as the last two digits of their graduation year. This year, the class of 2000 put in a dizzying 100 laps. Next year's freshmen will have it easy: they will stop at one.

 

Even here at Princeton, the party rituals are not what they once were. Madelon DeVoe Talley, a commissioner of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, who joined friends for a filet mignon-and-Champagne lunch before Princeton played Harvard, remembers the days when her uncle brought his butler along to serve the pre-game meal, complete with silver candlesticks.

 

As for students, parties are only one element of the competition for their time on Saturday afternoons. Many prefer to play or watch the autumn sport they grew up with -- soccer. The admission of women to all-male schools in the 1970's also made a difference. When Mr. Cole of Columbia visited his daughter at Brown University last month, "We went to women's club rugby, which is what all her friends were doing."

 

It is the Princeton graduates who are the most unselfconsciously mushy about their old school. They and their spouses and children collect orange, black and tiger-striped clothes and accessories to wear only on campus. "I thought it would be far too corny to wear school colors," said one new Princeton spouse after her first game. "But I found out you feel uncomfortable if you don't wear orange and black." Extra points go to those who find a flattering way to wear the school colors of orange and black, which are alien to most skin tones.

 

Ellie Erdman, who was sporting a designer jacket in a flattering shade of poached peach, said: "It cost the earth. But I had to have it, if only to wear once a year."

 

The writer John McPhee is not surprised by that kind of loyalty. Mr. McPhee graduated in 1953, but his father was the team doctor in the 1930's and 1940's. "I stood on the sidelines with him in a little Princeton football uniform," he said. Though Mr. McPhee now sits way back in Row 47, every home game makes him "9 years old again."

 

Other than that, he said, "What is most remarkable is how little has changed about this ritual since then."

 

But next month, Princeton's 82-year-old Palmer Stadium will be razed -- it has been worn and loved until its edges have all rounded off, giving it the look of a fuzzy sand castle. Some Princetonians have quipped that the university should sell small chunks of it after it is demolished -- the Ivy League equivalent of a pet rock, with its own nostalgic history.

 

Mr. McPhee has a different idea, though. "My brother thinks the old stadium should be towed out to sea as a reef for fish," he said. "And I think I would like to go with it."

 

Photos: Saturday at Princeton's Palmer Stadium attracts all age categories: above, Thatcher Longstreth, in sweater; right, Alexandra Lebenthal, class of '86, and her husband, Norman, and children; below, a tailgating party. (Photographs by Laura Pedrick for The New York Times) (pg. 49); For some Princetonians, tailgating is more important than the game. (Laura Pedrick for The New York Times) (pg. 52))

 

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12/27/96 L.A. Times 2

Los Angeles Times

December 27, 1996

 

Section: Sports

 

THE INSIDE TRACK

Snyder Will Leave First Saxophone to the President

 

MAL FLORENCE

 

And finally: Giles Pellerin, 90, who reportedly hasn't missed a USC football game in 70 years, won't be an idle fan over the holidays.

 

He'll travel to New Orleans to watch Florida State play Florida in the Sugar Bowl on Thursday. Pellerin won an all-expenses-paid trip by winning the first Sears DieHard Fan Award.

 

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9/5/97 L.A. Times 1

 

Los Angeles Times

September 5, 1997

 

Section: Sports

 

It's Two Big

Los Angeles Has a Rich College Football History, but the Southland Hasn't Seen a Day Like Saturday in a Long Time

CHRIS DUFRESNE

TIMES STAFF WRITER

 

Saturday's college football day-night deluxe won't be the first time USC and UCLA have played critical nonconference games in the Southland on the same day.

 

Perhaps you've forgotten Oct. 9, 1920, the afternoon the Trojans dusted Caltech, 46-7, at Bovard Field, while the second-year cub team over at UCLA was getting waxed by Occidental at Moore Field, 21-0.

 

That was five years before USC "Super Fan" Giles Pellerin began his ongoing streak of 775 consecutive USC games attended, and nine years before UCLA joined USC as a Coliseum co-tenant.

 

Saturday's won't even be the most unusual doubleheader. Three times when USC and UCLA shared the same field from 1929 through 1981, the schools played day-night games at the Coliseum. The last was 1942, when UCLA defeated Idaho, 40-13, in the opener and USC polished off Montana in the nightcap, 38-0.

 

Yet, you can argue that Saturday's UCLA-Tennessee, USC-Florida State daily double is potentially the most exciting single-day college football proposition in Southland history.

 

One day, two stadiums, two top-10 opponents, enough angles to keep a geometry major happy--and a chance to go to both games.

 

"What better place do you get an inside view on college football than Sept. 6 in L.A.?" asked former UCLA quarterback Tom Ramsey, now a Pac-10 analyst for Fox Sports West. "Everyone knows where they stand. UCLA's going to have a very good gauge; after the SC-Florida State game, Southern Cal's going to have a wonderful idea of how good they are."

 

Ramsey is one of many frothing at the prospect of being able to attend both games.

 

"I don't think people can take families to both games, that's a little cost prohibitive," Ramsey said. "But anyone who is real passionate about football and sports, they're going to go to both."

 

At 12:30 p.m, Tennessee enters theRose Bowl with national championship aspirations and his-to-lose Heisman Trophy candidate Peyton Manning, maybe the best college quarterback since John Elway.

 

At 5 p.m., Florida State takes on USC at the Coliseum. Story lines? The Seminoles have finished in the top four of the final Associated Press poll for each of the last 10 seasons. Last year, Florida State lost the national title game to rival Florida in the Sugar Bowl and returns with what Coach Bobby Bowden calls his best freshman class.

 

USC is coming off a 6-6 season in which the Trojans probably had to beat Notre Dame in the season finale to save Coach John Robinson's job.

 

Robinson has returned, opening with the most daunting first game imaginable.

 

Mood swings?

 

An upset propels USC into the top 10 and maybe the national title picture. A blowout sets an ugly tone for the season.

 

"You say, 'Ah, these are two nonconference games,' " Ramsey said. "These games don't count in Pac-10 standings, but you need six [wins] to go to a bowl game. For UCLA, this game is imperative."

 

Not counting the annual cross-town affair, Saturday will mark the 23nd time the schools have played in L.A. on the same day since UCLA moved from the Coliseum to the Rose Bowl in 1982. Most of the others were conference games.

 

The Southland has never hosted two nonconference teams so highly ranked.

 

The only day comparable was Sept. 23, 1989, when No. 12 USC defeated No. 20 Ohio State at the Coliseum while No. 5 Michigan beat No. 23 UCLA at the Rose Bowl.

 

"I cannot recall a single day like this," former USC and Ram quarterback Pat Haden said. "Man, it's a heck of a day."

 

Haden's regret is that his weekend job as a NFL analyst for TNT won't allow him to attend either game, although he says his two teenage sons are going to both games.

 

How did Saturday's doubleheader come to pass?

 

Television, of course. Florida State and Tennessee have actually been on the local schools' schedules for years.

 

Originally, though, USC was supposed to play Washington State at the Coliseum on Sept. 6 and Florida State on Sept. 13. But, a few years ago, ABC asked USC and Florida State to switch to Sept. 6 so the game could be paired with UCLA-Tennessee as part of television doubleheader.

 

USC plays Washington State at home next week.

 

With no professional football teams in L.A., Saturday is as big as it gets.

 

Of course, calling anything the "biggest" makes longtime Southland sports historians cringe.

 

Bud Furillo, the former Los Angeles Examiner sports editor now in his sixth decade of chronicling Southern California sports, rattled off half a dozen stupendous collegiate football days in Los Angeles:

 

* The 1967 UCLA-USC game, in which the No. 4 Trojans beat the No. 1 Bruins, 21-20, on O.J. Simpson's famous run.

 

* The 1988 game in which No. 1 Notre Dame beat No. 2 USC before 93,829 at the Coliseum.

 

* The 1947 game in which No. 1 Notre Dame defeated No. 3 USC before a record Coliseum crowd of 104,953.

 

* Nov. 20, 1954, when No. 2 UCLA defeated No. 7 USC, 34-0, and finished 9-0 under Red Sanders, winning the Bruins' only national championship.

 

* Nov. 30, 1974, when USC rallied from a 24-0 deficit to beat Notre Dame, 55-24.

 

* What about 1981, and No. 1 USC defeating No. 2 Oklahoma before 85,691? Or the Todd Marinovich-Tommy Maddox shootout in 1990?

 

Yet, even Furillo was hard-pressed to find a day like Saturday.

 

"It's going to be great," said Furillo, who now has a sports talk show on radio in Palm Springs.

 

Such a day would be hard to duplicate elsewhere, since L.A. is the only city with two major college programs in such close proximity.

 

Stanford and California could logistically stage such a doubleheader, although getting from Palo Alto to Berkeley does involve a bridge crossing.

 

With both of Saturday's games televised nationally, Los Angeles will no doubt again come under fire as a sports town.

 

The fan watching in Knoxville or Tallahassee will wonder how it is possible that neither the Coliseum nor the Rose Bowl will be filled to capacity:

 

No wonder you lost the Rams and Raiders.

 

Yes, it's true. USC officials are estimating a crowd of 70,000 for the Florida State game, while the UCLA-Tennessee game at the Rose Bowl will be lucky to draw 60,000.

 

USC officials said midweek that about 6,000 tickets were sold to Florida State. Tennessee purchased roughly the same number for the UCLA game.

 

Ramsey predicted more than a week ago that neither game would be a sellout.

 

"You know why?" Ramsey said. "Because Sept. 6 is going to be a great beach day. I'll go out on a limb, Sept. 6 is going to be a beautiful day. The beach will be packed."

 

So what does this say about L.A. as a sports town?

 

It says, basically, that L.A. is not Charlotte.

 

It says that L.A. does not support its teams unconditionally, that it does not allow stadium-deal proposals to be jammed down its throat.

 

It says that, in L.A., there are numerous and wondrous other things to do on a sunny September Saturday.

 

Angelenos prefer to see their stadiums as being half full, not half empty.

 

"I don't think we're bad fans at all," said Haden, born and raised in the Southland. "It's a very discriminating population."

 

Actually, with the Dodgers also at home Saturday against the Florida Marlins, as many as 180,000 fans could be attending local sporting events, enough to almost fill Tennessee's Neyland stadium twice.

 

Yet, L.A. is fickle. Gone are the glory days of the 1950s, when the Rams, UCLA and and USC were kings and often drew crowds of 100,000 at the Coliseum. The arrival of the Dodgers, Lakers, Angels, Kings, Mighty Ducks and Raiders diluted the market.

 

The televising of home games has further reduced attendance.

 

Winning became a component in attendance figures, as Al Davis found out.

 

That Saturday's games won't be sellouts is no doubt influenced by the fact that UCLA and USC are coming off nonwinning seasons.

 

"I think there's going to be a fear from both home crowds that their team is going to lose," Haden said.

 

But a bad sports town?

 

"This is a great sports town," Furillo argued. "Nothing's different. If you win in L.A., you're going to draw. It is Hollywood. Let something happen where it's an 'in' thing. Let the Trojans start winning again. Just go back to '88 against Notre Dame. You saw all the people there when they were playing for the national championship."

 

Still, Haden sees Saturday in L.A. as a sporting comet, a flash in the sky that will soon fade.

 

"I've grown up here, going to games as a kid with my father, and only on rare occasions do you find people really get worked up for a game," Haden said. "Talking about games on Tuesday, getting to the game early, getting to the park early to barbecue.

 

"It's a rare occasion."

 

(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC)

 

Going Gaga in La-La Land

 

Arguably, the 10 best college football days in the Southland:

 

* 1. Dec. 6, 1947: No. 1 Notre Dame beats No. 3 USC, 38-7. Coliseum crowd: 104,953.

 

* 2. Nov. 30, 1974: No. 6 USC defeats No. 5 Notre Dame, 55-24. Coliseum crowd: 83,552.

 

* 3. Nov. 26, 1988: No. 1 Notre Dame beats No. 2 USC, 27-10. Coliseum crowd: 93,829.

 

* 4. Nov. 20, 1954: No. 2 UCLA beats No. 7 USC, 34-0, to win only national title. Coliseum crowd: 102,548.

 

* 5. Nov. 18, 1967: No. 4 USC beats No. 1 UCLA, 21-20. Coliseum crowd: 90,772

 

* 6. Jan. 1, 1969: No. 1 Ohio State beats No. 2 USC, 27-16. Rose Bowl crowd: 102,063.

 

* 7. Nov. 17, 1990: No. 19 USC beats UCLA, 45-42. Rose Bowl crowd: 98,088.

 

* 8. Sept. 26, 1981: No. 1 USC defeats No. 2 Oklahoma, 28-24. Coliseum crowd: 85,691.

 

* 9. Jan. 1, 1963: No. 1 USC beats No. 2 Wisconsin, 42-37, to win national title. Rose Bowl crowd: 98,698.

 

*10. Sept. 23, 1989: No. 12 USC beats No. 20 Ohio State, 42-3. Coliseum crowd: 69,876; No. 5 Michigan beats No. 23 UCLA, 24-23. Rose Bowl crowd: 71,797.

 

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9/14/97 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S1

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

 

September 14, 1997

 

Section: SPORTS

 

THEY MAY BE HISTORY BEFORE THEY MAKE ANY

 

KAREN CROUSE

 

Even when they fell behind 14-0 and 21-6, even though they couldn't muster a run of longer than 8 yards, even as their offensive line continued its painful retreat, the USC Trojans believed they'd beat Washington State Saturday because . . . well, because they're USC.

 

There was a time when the school's storied history was a gorilla of a 12th man on the field that was capable of psyching out a team that couldn't match the eight national titles, four Heisman Trophy winners and 28 Rose Bowl appearances. Next to the aura, the actual matchups seemed almost secondary.

 

But no longer. The primary lesson the Trojans should carry from their stunning 28-21 upset loss to the Cougars at the Coliseum is that history fills the pages of a media guide quite nicely but it can't plug all the gaps in execution.

 

The Trojans were clawed into submission by the Cougars for the first time at home since few people other than 90-year-old ''Super Fan'' Giles Pellerin can remember because they waited, however subconsciously, for the ghosts of Trojan lore to ride in on Traveler 4 and save the day.

 

Now they know, history helps those who help themselves. In their Pac-10 opener, the Trojans inexplicably came armed only with a stalwart defense and a few big plays.

 

The end result left them numb while their fans were left to nosh on some very bitter historical tidbits. It was USC's first loss to WSU since 1986, its first lost at home to WSU since 1957 and it beget its first 0-2 start in 37 years.

 

''It's becoming very apparent,'' said subdued center Jonathan Himebauch, ''that you can't depend on Trojan lore of old. We have to come to play every week.''

 

The USC defense came ready for battle but was worn down by the time the offense finally showed up in the second half. The Trojans battled back from 14- and 15-point deficits to tie the game at 21 early in the fourth quarter. Receiver R. Jay Soward seemed to awaken the slumbering beast that was the Trojans' offense with a 95-yard kickoff return at the start of the third quarter that brought the Trojans to within 21-13.

 

''After that I felt we were going to kill them,'' said Soward, who could have forced overtime if he had been able to snare either of two catchable balls thrown his way in the shadows of the end zone in the Trojans' final series. He, like the rest of the offense on this day, was slightly out of sync.

 

''If you're going to point any fingers you have to point the finger at me because I dropped both balls,'' Soward said. Asked what he was thinking as each pass eluded his grasp, he replied, ''You mean, what I really was thinking? I suck.''

 

The Cougars, meantime, fell on the opposite end of Soward's performance spectrum.

 

''Washington State is better than I thought,'' he admitted. ''I thought we were going to come in and run them over. But we came out flat and I guess it was the other way around. ''

 

Well, yes. For the second week in a row, the new-and-improved USC running game was unable to establish any footing, netting 31 yards. Two weeks into the season, the Trojans have a total of 56 yards on the ground. That's 6 fewer yards than Michael Black, who attended nearby Dorsey High, finished with for the Cougars.

 

The senior had rubbed the Trojans raw even before he helped turned them Black and blue by brashly predicting earlier in the week that he'd run for 200 yards.

 

He may have fallen short of his goal but he showed some nice slash and dash on a 16-yard scoring run in the second quarter that gave the Cougars a two-touchdown lead with less than two minutes gone.

 

In another era, Black might have been wearing the cardinal-and-gold colors of the home team. He was recruited by USC out of West L.A. College in 1994. But the recruiting pitch abruptly fell silent, ostensibly because of academic concerns and lingering worries over the player's checkered past. The latter included a 20-month stay in the California Youth Authority facility following a robbery that came on the heels of a car theft.

 

''All I can say is I gave them the opportunity to recruit me,'' said a reformed and repentant Black, who rushed for 948 yards last season. ''For whatever reason they stopped recruiting me and look at what I'm doing for WSU.''

 

Forgive the partisan crowd if it couldn't get past what the Trojans' offensive line wasn't doing, namely, creating holes.

 

''We didn't knock anyone off the line,'' said coach John Robinson. ''The offense is just not doing it right now. It's the whole offense. If I could pinpoint (what's wrong), I would have done something about it.''

 

Added Himebauch: ''It's really hard to swallow when we've really looked forward to having a running game.''

 

USC fans were really looking forward to a fine season to compensate for last year's lackluster 6-6 campaign. You can bet many of the city's critics will jump off UCLA coach Bob Toledo's back in the wake of the Bruins' 66-3 thrashing of Texas and affix themselves to Robinson's neck, forming a human noose if you will.

 

Cornerback Brian Kelly, who had a masterful performance that included two interceptions and four pass break-ups, defended Robinson and the rest of the coaching staff with the same authority he had his turf.

 

''(Robinson) is the same guy who took us to the Rose Bowl two years ago. He's a great coach,'' Kelly said. ''It's not John, it's not (offensive coordinator) Hue Jackson. It's us. We've got to step up and play.

 

''In the first half we came out flat. In the second half we realized 'hey, we might lose this thing. Let's turn it around.' But it was too late.''

 

Karen Crouse's column appears in the Daily News four days a week. She can be reached at (818) 713-3619.

 

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10/16/97 Wall St. J. Abstracts (USA) B1

Wall Street Journal Abstracts (USA)

October 16, 1997

 

Section: B

 

FOR YARDAGE GAINED, NO PLAYER CAN BEAT SPRY USC GRIDIRON FAN

Sweet, David

 

Since 1926, 90-year-old Giles Pellerin has attended 780 consecutive University of Southern California football games; has traveled the equivalent of 26 times around the world attending home and away games; the 1929 USC graduate hopes to extend his streak to 800 straight games, a milestone attainable before his 93rd birthday (M)

 

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2/15/98 L.A. Times 3

Los Angeles Times

February 15, 1998

 

Section: Metro

 

A Party Ship's Last Voyage

 

But as USC alumnus Giles Pellerin, 92, who has not missed a Trojans game since 1926, recalls, the high price put the girls' services out of the reach of most student fans. Most of them contented themselves with nips from their hip flasks, less commercial shipboard romances and the strenuous consolations of the Charleston.

 

On the morning that disaster overtook the Harvard, in fact, its passengers were the sort who drove rum runners and hookers to distraction--if not bankruptcy. More than 200 men and women were returning from a PTA convention in San Francisco on May 30, 1931, when the speeding vessel, cutting through thick coastal fog, rammed a reef 2 1/2 miles north of Point Arguello.

 

It was in the same area where--on Sept. 8, 1923--nine Navy destroyers crashed because of a navigational error. Seven of the ships sank, taking 23 men to a watery grave in what was the worst peacetime disaster to hit the Navy.

 

The drama that ensued aboard the Harvard wasn't much like that tragedy--let alone the storied fate of the Titanic. Both the well-to-do on the promenade and the paupers in steerage survived. There was no pandemonium as the passengers were transferred to the Navy cruiser Louisville, which was quickly on the scene.

 

The entire event was observed by prominent aviator Roscoe Turner, who provided an eyewitness account of the passengers' orderly descent into the lifeboats. Photographers aboard Turner's plane snapped what became front-page pictures as the lifeboats methodically transferred their occupants to the Navy vessel.

 

Injuries were few, and minor. One of the worst casualties was a traumatized canary, Dixie, who refused to sing again after the stressful ordeal.

 

Two weeks after the Harvard's ill-fated voyage, wind and surf carried her to the bottom of the sea 200 yards offshore, where more than 50 shipwrecks have occurred in the treacherous currents of the "Graveyard of the Pacific."

 

For a few years, another ship teamed up with the Yale, but by 1935 a longshoremen's strike ended passenger and freight service on both vessels.

 

A Seattle firm bought the Yale before the Navy repurchased it for another tour of duty in World War II. The ship finally was broken up for scrap in 1949.

 

The Harvard, by contrast, still is providing fun in its own fashion. Fishing reportedly is unusually good in the wreck's vicinity.

 

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8/24/98 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S3

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

August 24, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

SUNDAY

 

USC ''superfan'' Giles Pellerin, who'll be attending his 787th straight Trojans game, doesn't remember when footballs were made of pigskin. Pigskin Classic: USC vs. Purdue, Channel 7, 11:30 a.m.

 

Photo

PHOTO no caption (Eric 'Butterbean' Esch)

Daily News file photo

 

SPORTS MONDAY

 

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8/30/98 Palm Beach Post 6

Palm Beach Post (FL)

August 30, 1998

 

Section: SPECIAL

 

CONFERENCE PREVIEW ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE

 

Elizabeth Clarke

 

DID YOU KNOW . . .

 

Just five schools in Division I-A - Air Force, Army, Navy, Boston College and the ACC's Georgia Institute of Technology - do not use ''University'' in their school names?

 

Giles Pellerin, 91, of Pasadena, Calif., has attended 786 consecutive USC games. That dates back to the 1926 season. Look for Pellerin in Tallahassee when the Trojans play the Seminoles on Sept. 26.

 

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AP Online

August 30, 1998

 

Section: Sports,Sports Scores

 

Optional

 

KEN PETERS

 

LOS ANGELES A new coach and a new quarterback debuted at USC in what the Trojans hope is the start of a new winning tradition.

 

The Trojans rallied in the second half to beat Purdue 27-17 Sunday in the Pigskin Classic, making Paul Hackett the first USC head coach to win his initial game since Jess Hill in 1951.

 

Freshman quarterback Carson Palmer came off the bench in the third quarter to guide USC to a pair of touchdowns and a field goal while playing just three series as the Trojans outscored Purdue 17-0 in the second half on a sweltering afternoon at the Coliseum.

 

''There have been some pretty good football coaches here that haven't won their first game,'' said Hackett, the seventh coach to make his debut since 1951. ''I told the players about that before the game and some of them said coming down the tunnel (before the game) that they were going to find a way to get me a win in my first game.

 

''I'm exhausted. It's exciting to win, but when you win coming from behind, you just have to feel good.'

 

Chad Morton scored on a 98-yard kickoff return early in the game, then sealed the victory with a 13-yard touchdown run with 3:02 left in the season-opening matchup.

 

Temperatures on the Coliseum field reached 110-plus degrees and several USC band members, a cheerleader and a number of fans fainted from the heat. The crowd of 56,623 also thinned out considerably as the game wore on, with about a third of the fans remaining in their seats by the middle of the final quarter.

 

''Holy Toledo, it was hot,'' Hackett said. ''We had some guys at halftime on IVs and we had been drinking a lot of water for four days.''

 

Among those who had to leave early was USC ''Super fan'' Giles Pellerin, 91, who has watched 786 consecutive Trojan games in person, home and away, dating back to the 1926 season. Pellerin, looking alert but weary, had to be carried out of the stadium at halftime.

 

Palmer, who replaced starter Mike Van Raaphorst with the Trojans trailing 17-10 early in the third quarter, needed just two possessions to help put his team ahead.

 

''I was just praying all day that if I got in, I wouldn't screw up,'' Palmer said. ''That playbook is huge. Coach Hackett basically said we'd just run a few plays so it wasn't too complex for me.''

 

Palmer came in with the Trojans at their own 32-yard line, and, after overthrowing the receiver on his first college attempt, threw a 9-yard completion. Then Palmer hooked up with Larry Parker for a 42-yarder, down to the Purdue 8.

 

Shortly afterward, Petros Papadakis punched into the end zone from the 1-yard line to tie the game with 1:57 left in the quarter.

 

The Trojans went ahead for the first time on Adam Abrams' 45-yard field goal in the opening minute of the fourth quarter. The score was set up by linebacker Chris Claiborne's interception at the Purdue 31.

 

With USC up by three, Van Raaphorst returned to replace Palmer for the next series, then Palmer came back with 3:54 left in the game and took the Trojans on a short drive that ended with Morton's second touchdown of the day, set up by David Gibson's fumble recovery at the Purdue 44.

 

''We wanted Mike in there in the fourth quarter in case we had to go to the two-minute offense,'' Hackett explained of putting Van Raaphorst back into the game. ''It all worked out the way I wanted it to work out.''

 

For the game, Palmer was 3-of-6 for 79 yards. Van Raaphorst, a sophomore who started two games before being hurt last season,was 11-of-22 for 89 yards, with one interception.

 

Drew Brees, a sophomore in his first start for Purdue, completed 30-of-52 for 248 yards and two TDs, with two interceptions. He was the dominant player in the first half, completing 18-of-27 for 148 yards and two scores.

 

''Drew did a good job,'' said second-year coach Joe Tiller, who led the Boilermakers to a 9-3 record last season and their first bowl since 1984. ''Even when things weren't going well offensively, it wasn't his fault. He was very accurate.

 

''We did not compete as well as we had to at the wide receiver position to get back into the game.''

 

Tiller added, ''When you have this many newcomers, it's tough. We have to remind ourselves that we had seven guys out there making their first start. I was pretty pleased with most of what they did.''

 

The fourth football meeting ever between the schools, and the first since 1976, marked a successful homecoming for Hackett, a member of John Robinson's staff in the late 1970s. After serving as the Kansas City Chiefs' offensive coordinator, Hackett was hired as by the Trojans last winter when Robinson was fired following a 6-5 season.

 

Although Purdue outgained USC 208 yards to 78 and had to punt just once in the first half, the Boilermakers led only 17-10.

 

Morton helped the Trojans stay close by running all the way on his first kickoff return for USC. As his teammates sealed off defenders on the outside, Morton darted up the middle almost untouched. Two would-be tacklers converged on him near the 25-yard line, but hit him at the same time and bounced off.

 

Morton then cut to the outside and sprinted all alone to the end zone.

 

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8/31/98 Star-Ledger (Newark N.J.) 53

Star-Ledger, The (Newark, NJ)

August 31, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Hackett off to fast start at USC

 

A new coach and a new quarterback debuted at USC in what the Trojans hope is the start of a new winning tradition.

 

The Trojans rallied in the second half to beat Purdue, 27-17, yesterday in the Pigskin Classic in Los Angeles, making Paul Hackett the first USC coach to win his initial game since Jess Hill in 1951.

 

Freshman quarterback Carson Palmer came off the bench in the third quarter to guide USC to a pair of touchdowns and a field goal - while playing just three series - as the Trojans outscored Purdue, 17-0, in the second half on a sweltering afternoon at the Coliseum.

 

"There have been some pretty good football coaches here that haven't won their first game," said Hackett, the seventh coach to make his debut since 1951. "I told the players about that before the game, and some of them said coming down the tunnel (before the game) that they were going to find a way to get me a win in my first game.

 

"I'm exhausted. It's exciting to win, but when you win coming from behind, you just have to feel good."

 

Chad Morton scored on a 98-yard kickoff return early in the game, then sealed the victory with a 13-yard touchdown run with 3:02 left.

 

Temperatures on the Coliseum field reached 110-plus degrees and several USC band members, a cheerleader and a number of fans fainted from the heat. The crowd of 56,623 also thinned considerably as the game wore on, with about a third of the fans remaining in their seats by the middle of the final quarter.

 

"Holy Toledo, it was hot," Hackett said. "We had some guys at halftime on IVs and we had been drinking a lot of water for four days."

 

Among those who had to leave early was USC "Super fan" Giles Pellerin, 91, who has watched 786 consecutive Trojan games in person, home and away, dating back to the 1926 season. Pellerin, looking alert but weary, had to be carried out of the stadium at halftime.

 

Palmer, who replaced starter Mike Van Raaphorst with the Trojans trailing, 17-10, early in the third quarter, needed just two possessions to help put his team ahead.

 

"I was just praying all day that if I got in, I wouldn't screw up," Palmer said. "That playbook is huge. Coach Hackett basically said we'd just run a few plays so it wasn't too complex for me."

 

Palmer came in with the Trojans at their 32-yard line and, after overthrowing the receiver on his first college attempt, threw a 9-yard completion. Then Palmer hooked up with Larry Parker for a 42-yarder, down to the Purdue 8.

 

Shortly afterward, Petros Papadakis punched into the end zone from the 1-yard line to tie the game with 1:57 left in the quarter.

 

The Trojans went ahead for the first time on Adam Abrams' 45-yard field goal in the opening minute of the fourth quarter. The score was set up by linebacker Chris Claiborne's interception at the Purdue 31.

 

Troy and Tim are back home in Louisiana and could sure use a rest after a record-setting performance against Nebraska.

 

But Louisiana Tech's dynamic duo of wide receiver Troy Edwards and quarterback Tim Rattay are preparing for their next wild adventure - Central Florida and Heisman Trophy hopeful Daunte Culpepper visit Ruston, La., on Saturday.

 

"Now we have two Heisman guys we're promoting," Brian Miller, Louisiana Tech's sports information director, said. "And they have one."

 

Edwards set the NCAA all-divisions record for receiving yards in Saturday's 56-27 loss to the fourth-ranked Cornhuskers, catching 21 passes for 405 yards. What appeared to be a slight knee injury for Nebraska quarterback Bobby Newcombe could be more serious than initially thought.

 

Quarterbacks coach Turner Gill said Newcombe is doubtful for next week's game against Alabama-Birmingham because of a slight tear to his posterior cruciate ligament.

 

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8/31/98 Pitt. Post-Gazette C3

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (PA)

August 31, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

HACKETT WINS IN USC DEBUT FRESHMAN QB TOO MUCH FOR PURDUE, 27-17

 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

LOS ANGELES A new coach and a new quarterback debuted at Southern California in what the Trojans hope is the start of a new winning tradition.

 

The Trojans rallied in the second half to beat Purdue, 27-17, yesterday in the Pigskin Classic, making Paul Hackett, formerly of Pitt, the first Southern California head coach to win his initial game since Jess Hill in 1951.

 

Freshman quarterback Carson Palmer came off the bench in the third quarter to guide Southern California to two touchdowns and a field goal in just three series as the Trojans outscored Purdue, 17-0, in the second half on a sweltering afternoon at the Coliseum.

 

The fourth football meeting between the schools, and the first since 1976, marked a successful homecoming for Hackett, a member of John Robinson's staff in the late 1970s. After serving as the Kansas City Chiefs' offensive coordinator, Hackett was hired by the Trojans last winter when Robinson was fired following a 6-5 season.

 

''There have been some pretty good football coaches here that haven't won their first game,'' said Hackett, the seventh coach since 1951. ''I told the players about that before the game and some of them said coming down the tunnel that they were going to find a way to get me a win in my first game. I'm exhausted. It's exciting to win, but when you win coming from behind, you just have to feel good.'

 

Chad Morton scored on a 98-yard kickoff return early in the game, then sealed the victory with a 13-yard touchdown run with 3:02 left in the season-opening matchup.

 

Temperatures on the Coliseum field reached 110-plus degrees and several Southern California band members, a cheerleader and several fans fainted from the heat. The crowd of 56,623 also thinned out considerably as the game wore on, with about a third of the fans remaining in their seats by the middle of the final quarter.

 

''Holy Toledo, it was hot,'' Hackett said. ''We had some guys at halftime on IVs, and we had been drinking a lot of water for four days.''

 

Among those who had to leave early was Southern California super fan Giles Pellerin, 91, who has watched 786 consecutive Trojans games in person, home and away, dating back to the 1926 season. Pellerin, looking alert but weary, had to be carried out of the stadium at halftime.

 

Palmer, who replaced starter Mike Van Raaphorst with the Trojans trailing, 17-10, early in the third quarter, needed just two possessions to put his team ahead.

 

''I was just praying all day that if I got in, I wouldn't screw up,'' Palmer said. ''That playbook is huge. Coach Hackett basically said we'd just run a few plays so it wasn't too complex for me.''

 

Palmer came in with the Trojans at their own 32-yard line, and, after overthrowing the receiver on his first college attempt, threw a 9-yard completion. Then Palmer hooked up with Larry Parker for a 42-yarder, down to the Purdue 8.

 

Shortly afterward, Petros Papadakis punched into the end zone from the 1-yard line to tie the game with 1:57 left in the quarter.

 

The Trojans went ahead for the first time on Adam Abrams' 45-yard field goal in the opening minute of the fourth quarter. The score was set up by Chris Claiborne's interception at the Purdue 31.

 

With Southern California up by three, Van Raaphorst returned to replace Palmer for the next series, then Palmer came back with 3:54 left in the game and took the Trojans on a short drive that ended with Morton's second touchdown of the day, set up by David Gibson's fumble recovery at the Purdue 44.

 

''We wanted Mike in there in the fourth quarter in case we had to go to the two-minute offense,'' Hackett explained of putting Van Raaphorst back into the game. ''It all worked out the way I wanted it to work out.''

 

PHOTO

 

PHOTO Michael Caulfield/Associated Press: Southern California players and Coach Paul Hackett, right, celebrate with the Pigskin Classic trophy.

 

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8/31/98 Rec. N. N.J. s06

New Jersey Record (NJ)

 

August 31, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

SOUTHERN CAL COACH WINS DEBUT

 

The Associated Press

 

LOS ANGELES A new coach and new quarterback debuted at Southern Cal in what the Trojans hope is the start of a new winning tradition.

 

The Trojans rallied in the second half to beat Purdue, 27-17, Sunday in the Pigskin Classic, making Paul Hackett the first USC head coach to win his initial game since Jess Hill in 1951.

 

Freshman quarterback Carson Palmer came off the bench in the third quarter to guide USC to a pair of touchdowns and a field goal - while playing just three series - as the Trojans outscored Purdue, 17-0, in the second half on a sweltering afternoon at the Coliseum.

 

"There have been some pretty good football coaches here that haven't won their first game," said Hackett, the seventh coach to make his debut since 1951. "I told the players about that before the game, and some of them said coming down the tunnel that they were going to find a way to get me a win in my first game.

 

"I'm exhausted. It's exciting to win, but when you win coming from behind, you just have to feel good."

 

USC's Chad Morton scored on a 98-yard kickoff return early in the game, then sealed the victory with a 13-yard touchdown run with 3:02 left.

 

Temperatures on the field reached 110-plus, and several USC band members, a cheerleader, and a number of fans fainted from the heat. The crowd of 56,623 also thinned out considerably as the game wore on, with about a third of the fans remaining in their seats by the middle of the final quarter.

 

"Holy Toledo, it was hot," Hackett said. "We had some guys at halftime on IVs, and we had been drinking a lot of water for four days."

 

Among those who had to leave early was USC super fan Giles Pellerin, 91, who has watched 786 consecutive Trojan games in person, home and away, dating to 1926.

 

Palmer, who replaced starter Mike Van Raaphorst with the Trojans trailing, 17-10, early in the third quarter, needed just two possessions to help put his team ahead.

 

"I was just praying all day that if I got in, I wouldn't screw up," Palmer said. "That playbook is huge. Coach Hackett basically said we'd just run a few plays so it wasn't too complex for me."

 

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8/31/98 Hous. Chron. 2

Houston Chronicle

August 31, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Hackett prevails in USC debut

 

LOS ANGELES LOS ANGELES - A new coach and a new quarterback debuted at USC in what the Trojans hope is the start of a new winning tradition.

 

The Trojans rallied in the second half to beat Purdue 27-17 on Sunday in the Pigskin Classic, making Paul Hackett the first USC head coach to win his initial game since Jess Hill in 1951.

 

Freshman quarterback Carson Palmer came off the bench in the third quarter to guide USC to a pair of touchdowns and a field goal - while playing just three series - as the Trojans outscored Purdue 17-0 in the second half on a sweltering afternoon at the Coliseum.

 

"There have been some pretty good football coaches here that haven't won their first game," said Hackett, the seventh coach to make his debut since 1951. "I told the players about that before the game and some of them said coming down the tunnel (before the game) that they were going to find a way to get me a win in my first game."

 

Chad Morton scored on a 98-yard kickoff return early in the game, then sealed the victory with a 13-yard touchdown run with 3:02 left in the season-opening matchup.

 

Temperatures on the Coliseum field reached 110-plus degrees and several USC band members, a cheerleader and a number of fans fainted from the heat. The crowd of 56,623 also thinned out considerably as the game wore on, with about a third of the fans remaining in their seats by the middle of the final quarter.

 

"Holy Toledo, it was hot," Hackett said. "We had some guys at halftime on IVs and we had been drinking a lot of water for four days."

 

Among those who had to leave early was USC "super fan" Giles Pellerin, 91, who has watched 786 consecutive Trojan games in person, home and away, dating to the 1926 season. Pellerin, looking alert but weary, had to be carried out of the stadium at halftime.

 

Palmer, who replaced starter Mike Van Raaphorst with the Trojans trailing 17-10 early in the third quarter, needed just two possessions to help put his team ahead.

 

"I was just praying all day that if I got in, I wouldn't screw up," Palmer said. "That playbook is huge. Coach Hackett basically said we'd just run a few plays so it wasn't too complex for me."

 

Palmer came in with the Trojans at their 32-yard line, and, after overthrowing the receiver on his first college attempt, threw a nine-yard completion. Then Palmer hooked up with Larry Parker for a 42-yarder, down to the Purdue eight.

 

Shortly thereafter, Petros Papadakis punched into the end zone from the one-yard line to tie the game with 1:57 left in the quarter.

 

The Trojans went ahead for the first time on Adam Abrams' 45-yard field goal in the opening minute of the fourth quarter. The score was set up by linebacker Chris Claiborne's interception at the Purdue 31.

 

With USC up by three, Van Raaphorst returned to replace Palmer for the next series, then Palmer came back with 3:54 left in the game and took the Trojans on a short drive that ended with Morton's second touchdown of the day, set up by David Gibson's fumble recovery at the Purdue 44.

 

"We wanted Mike in there in the fourth quarter in case we had to go to the two-minute offense," Hackett said of putting Van Raaphorst back into the game. "It all worked out the way I wanted it to work out."

 

For the game, Palmer was 3-of-6 for 79 yards. Van Raaphorst, a sophomore who started two games before being hurt last season,was 11-of-22 for 89 yards, with one interception.

 

Drew Brees, a sophomore in his first start for Purdue, completed 30 of 52 passes for 248 yards and two TDs, with two interceptions. He was the dominant player in the first half, completing 18 of 27 attempts for 148 yards and two scores.

 

"Drew did a good job," said second-year coach Joe Tiller. "Even when things weren't going well offensively, it wasn't his fault. He was very accurate."

 

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8/31/98 Hous. Chron. 2

Houston Chronicle

August 31, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Hackett prevails in USC debut

 

LOS ANGELES LOS ANGELES - A new coach and a new quarterback debuted at USC in what the Trojans hope is the start of a new winning tradition.

 

The Trojans rallied in the second half to beat Purdue 27-17 on Sunday in the Pigskin Classic, making Paul Hackett the first USC head coach to win his initial game since Jess Hill in 1951.

 

Freshman quarterback Carson Palmer came off the bench in the third quarter to guide USC to a pair of touchdowns and a field goal - while playing just three series - as the Trojans outscored Purdue 17-0 in the second half on a sweltering afternoon at the Coliseum.

 

"There have been some pretty good football coaches here that haven't won their first game," said Hackett, the seventh coach to make his debut since 1951. "I told the players about that before the game and some of them said coming down the tunnel (before the game) that they were going to find a way to get me a win in my first game."

 

Chad Morton scored on a 98-yard kickoff return early in the game, then sealed the victory with a 13-yard touchdown run with 3:02 left in the season-opening matchup.

 

Temperatures on the Coliseum field reached 110-plus degrees and several USC band members, a cheerleader and a number of fans fainted from the heat. The crowd of 56,623 also thinned out considerably as the game wore on, with about a third of the fans remaining in their seats by the middle of the final quarter.

 

"Holy Toledo, it was hot," Hackett said. "We had some guys at halftime on IVs and we had been drinking a lot of water for four days."

 

Among those who had to leave early was USC "super fan" Giles Pellerin, 91, who has watched 786 consecutive Trojan games in person, home and away, dating to the 1926 season. Pellerin, looking alert but weary, had to be carried out of the stadium at halftime.

 

Palmer, who replaced starter Mike Van Raaphorst with the Trojans trailing 17-10 early in the third quarter, needed just two possessions to help put his team ahead.

 

"I was just praying all day that if I got in, I wouldn't screw up," Palmer said. "That playbook is huge. Coach Hackett basically said we'd just run a few plays so it wasn't too complex for me."

 

Palmer came in with the Trojans at their 32-yard line, and, after overthrowing the receiver on his first college attempt, threw a nine-yard completion. Then Palmer hooked up with Larry Parker for a 42-yarder, down to the Purdue eight.

 

Shortly thereafter, Petros Papadakis punched into the end zone from the one-yard line to tie the game with 1:57 left in the quarter.

 

The Trojans went ahead for the first time on Adam Abrams' 45-yard field goal in the opening minute of the fourth quarter. The score was set up by linebacker Chris Claiborne's interception at the Purdue 31.

 

With USC up by three, Van Raaphorst returned to replace Palmer for the next series, then Palmer came back with 3:54 left in the game and took the Trojans on a short drive that ended with Morton's second touchdown of the day, set up by David Gibson's fumble recovery at the Purdue 44.

 

"We wanted Mike in there in the fourth quarter in case we had to go to the two-minute offense," Hackett said of putting Van Raaphorst back into the game. "It all worked out the way I wanted it to work out."

 

For the game, Palmer was 3-of-6 for 79 yards. Van Raaphorst, a sophomore who started two games before being hurt last season,was 11-of-22 for 89 yards, with one interception.

 

Drew Brees, a sophomore in his first start for Purdue, completed 30 of 52 passes for 248 yards and two TDs, with two interceptions. He was the dominant player in the first half, completing 18 of 27 attempts for 148 yards and two scores.

 

"Drew did a good job," said second-year coach Joe Tiller. "Even when things weren't going well offensively, it wasn't his fault. He was very accurate."

 

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8/31/98 Fresno Bee A3

Fresno Bee

August 31, 1998

 

Section: TELEGRAPH

 

L.A. RECORD HEAT TOO MUCH FOR SOME USC FOOTBALL FANS

 

MICHELLE DeARMOND ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

LOS ANGELES Watching the Purdue-USC football game in triple-digit weather proved too much for some fans Sunday as heat exhaustion sent nearly two dozen to the first aid station at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

 

At least one person was taken to a hospital for further treatment, but none of the fans appeared to have life-threatening injuries, city fire spokesman Brian Humphrey said.

 

The National Weather Service recorded a temperature of 101 degrees downtown, which is not far from the coliseum. That broke the record of 100 degrees that was set for the date in 1967.

 

Paramedics were called to the stadium shortly before 1 p.m. The fans complained of feeling dizzy, lightheaded, nauseous and lethargic, he said. The most severely affected victims had stopped sweating.

 

USC ''Super Fan'' Giles Pellerin, 91, although alert, had to be carried out at halftime. He has watched 786 consecutive Trojan games in person, home and away, dating to 1926.

 

Elsewhere in Los Angeles, a man collapsed and went into cardiac arrest while hiking with his wife in the heat near Temescal Canyon Park and later died at UCLA Medical Center, Humphrey said.

 

1 Photo

 

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Police officers help USC student Jenny Biyani, who was among two dozen fans suffering from heat exhaustion Sunday.

 

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8/31/98 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S2

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

 

August 31, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

THE WRITING ON (AND OFF) THE WALL : NCAA SHOULD TAKE HEAT

 

TOM HOFFARTH

 

The Coliseum heat was sooooo nasty Sunday afternoon that . . .

 

(Cough . . . gasp . . .)

 

They posted a sign outside telling fans not to bring in alcoholic beverages, glass bottles or cups, balls, Frisbees, boom boxes, coolers, picnic baskets, fireworks, inflatables, noisemakers, chairs, strollers or video cameras, but said nothing about an IV. . . .

 

The Olympic torch atop the peristyle entrance suddenly became lit in the third quarter - probably by spontaneous combustion. . . .

 

If Purdue quarterback Drew Brees couldn't draw a breeze throwing the ball 52 times, no one could. . . .

 

So here's an idea to the TV-money-hungry NCAAers who resist a postseason playoff 'cause it would cut too much into the athletes' academic pursuits but at the same time heartily endorse a special early-season game before some players even know their summer-school grades: It's not such a hot idea.

 

Next time, you get to watch 91-year-old USC ''superfan'' Giles Pellerin being carried out of the stadium at halftime in the middle of his 786th consecutive game. . . .

 

Or if you're bent on making the kickoff at 11:30, shoot for 11:30 p.m. . . .

 

Merchandise update at the USC student store: Plenty of jerseys with Nos. 10, 11, 24 and 55. Nuthin' with Carson Palmer's No. 15. Yet . . .

 

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8/31/98 Buff. News S5

Buffalo News (NY)

 

August 31, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC RALLIES TO GIVE COACH FIRST VICTORY

 

Associated Press

 

LOS ANGELES -- A new coach and a new quarterback debuted at USC in what the Trojans hope is the start of a new winning tradition.

 

The Trojans rallied in the second half to beat Purdue, 27-17, Sunday in the Pigskin Classic, making Paul Hackett the first USC head coach to win his initial game since Jess Hill in 1951.

 

Freshman quarterback Carson Palmer came off the bench in the third quarter to guide USC to a pair of touchdowns and a field goal -- while playing just three series -- as the Trojans outscored Purdue, 17-0, in the second half on a sweltering afternoon at the Coliseum.

 

"There have been some pretty good football coaches here that haven't won their first game," said Hackett, the seventh coach to make his debut since 1951. "I told the players about that before the game and some of them said coming down the tunnel (before the game) that they were going to find a way to get me a win in my first game.

 

"I'm exhausted. It's exciting to win, but when you win coming from behind, you just have to feel good."

 

Chad Morton scored on a 98-yard kickoff return early in the game, then sealed the victory with a 13-yard touchdown run with 3:02 left. Temperatures on the Coliseum field reached 110-plus degrees and several USC band members, a cheerleader and a number of fans fainted from the heat. The crowd of 56,623 also thinned out considerably as the game wore on, with about a third of the fans remaining in their seats by the middle of the final quarter.

 

Among those who had to leave early was USC "Super Fan" Giles Pellerin, 91, who has watched 786 consecutive Trojan games in person, home and away, dating back to the 1926 season.

 

Weinke relishes chance

 

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Even though Chris Weinke starts for the first time in nearly nine years, the Florida State quarterback knows exactly what to expect in tonight's Kickoff Classic.

 

"They will come after me. They know I have no game experience," said Weinke, the 26-year-old sophomore set to lead the No. 4 Seminoles against No. 14 Texas A&M at Giants Stadium (8 p.m., Ch. 7).

 

Weinke, though, has a team loaded with stars, such as wide receiver Peter Warrick and tailback Travis Minor, as well as the wisdom of Bobby Bowden, who begins his 23rd season as coach of the Seminoles.

 

The Aggies are coming off a 9-4 season that ended with losses to Nebraska in the Big 12 title game and UCLA in the Cotton Bowl. The Seminoles, ranked second behind Ohio State, were 11-1 last season.

 

Associated Press

Paul Hackett wins his first game at USC.

 

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8/31/98 AP Online 00:00:00

AP Online

August 31, 1998

 

Section: Sports,Sports Scores

 

USC 27, Purdue 17

 

KEN PETERS

 

LOS ANGELES One game into his new job, Southern Cal coach Paul Hackett already was facing a quarterback controversy.

 

So, coach, who's the starter?

 

USC's Mike Van Raaphorst opened the Pigskin Classic against Purdue, but freshman Carson Palmer came off the bench in the third quarter and rallied the Trojans to a tying touchdown and a field goal for the go-ahead score.

 

Van Raaphorst replaced Palmer before he returned with 3:54 remaining, and the Trojans scored again to seal their 27-17 victory Sunday over the Boilermakers.

 

It was three series, three scores for Palmer. With Van Raaphorst in the rest of the time, the Trojans managed only a second-quarter field goal.

 

Asked his impressions of Palmer's first college action, Hackett said, ''Remarkable.''

 

Then the coach gave Van Raaphorst an assist, saying, ''Obviously he (Palmer) has gotten good training and has worked hard. And the reason he worked hard is Mike Van Raaphorst, who is his roommate and whom he is around all the time.''

 

Hackett said that Van Raaphorst is still the starter, but that Palmer can expect to see playing time, essentially the same thing he said as the Trojans headed into the season-opening matchup against the Boilermakers.

 

Palmer said Hackett told him at halftime that he would replace Van Raaphorst for a couple of series in the second half.

 

''I was just praying all day that if I got in, I wouldn't screw up,'' Palmer said. ''That playbook is huge. Coach Hackett basically said we'd just run a few plays so it wasn't too complex for me.''

 

Palmer finished 3-of-6 through the air for 79 yards. Van Raaphorst, who started two games as a freshman late last season before being hurt, was 11-of-22 for 89 yards, with one interception.

 

Hackett explained why he took Palmer out after he led USC to two scores on just two possessions.

 

''We wanted Mike in there in the fourth quarter in case we had to go to the two-minute offense,'' the coach explained. ''It all worked out the way I wanted it to work out.''

 

The Trojans trailed 17-10 at halftime, but then, as the sweltering heat appeared to have more effect on the visitors from the Midwest, USC took control in the second half, outscoring the Boilermakers 17-0.

 

Temperatures on the Coliseum field reached 110-plus degrees, and several USC band members, a cheerleader and a number of fans fainted from the heat. The crowd of 56,623 thinned out considerably as the afternoon wore on, with about a third of the fans still in their seats by the middle of the final quarter.

 

Among those who had to leave early was USC ''super fan'' Giles Pellerin, 91, who hadn't missed a game, home or away, since 1926. He ran his string to 787 consecutive games before he had to be carried out of the stadium at halftime, looking alert but weary.

 

''Holy Toledo, it was hot!'' Hackett said. ''We had some guys at halftime on IVs, and we had been drinking a lot of water for four days.''

 

While Hackett hopes to restore a winning tradition to a football program that has fallen on hard times in recent years, he ended another sort of tradition by winning his first game as the Trojans' coach.

 

He became the first USC coach to win his initial game since Jess Hill in 1951. Hackett is the seventh coach, including John Robinson twice, in the years since then.

 

''There have been some pretty good football coaches here that haven't won their first game,'' Hackett said. ''I told the players about that before the game and some of them said coming down the tunnel (before the game) that they were going to find a way to get me a win in my first game.

 

''I'm exhausted. It's exciting to win, but when you win coming from behind, you just have to feel good.''

 

Chad Morton scored on a 98-yard kickoff return early in the game, then sealed the victory with a 13-yard touchdown run with 3:02 left in the season-opening matchup.

 

Morton said of his long kickoff return, ''It almost scared me. The hole was so big, I almost didn't know where to go.''

 

Although the Boilermakers were 7 -point underdogs, the loss was more difficult to take after they dominated the first half.

 

Drew Brees, a sophomore making his first start, completed 30 of 52 passes for 248 yards and two TDs, with two interceptions. He was 18 of 27 for 148 yards and two scores in the first half, then had a lot of passes dropped in the second.

 

''Drew did a good job,'' said second-year coach Joe Tiller, who led the Boilermakers to a 9-3 record last season and their first bowl since 1984. ''Even when things weren't going well offensively, it wasn't his fault. He was very accurate.

 

''We did not compete as well as we had to at the wide receiver position to get back into the game.''

 

Tiller added: ''When you have this many newcomers, it's tough. We have to remind ourselves that we had seven guys out there making their first start. I was pretty pleased with most of what they did.''

 

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9/4/98 Boston Globe F16

Boston Globe (MA)

September 4, 1998

 

Section: Sports

 

AUGUST GAMES ARE CLASSIC WASTE OF TIME WANT TO EXTEND THE SEASON? THEN ADD A TRUE POSTSEASON

 

Mark Blaudschun, Globe Staff

 

Encouraging? Naturally

 

Here's a good trend in college football. According to an NCAA survey, of the 112 Division 1-A schools, 73 are now playing on natural grass surfaces . . . Texas Christian has backed out of a three-game series with Nebraska. Why? The Frogs don't think they can compete with the Huskers. Normally, such a breach of contract would warrant a $100,000 penalty, but Nebraska athletic director Bill Byrne waived the fee. TCU officials say they hope to get Nebraska back on their schedule when they are more competitive . . . There are fans and then there are fans. But who's going to top Southern California follower Giles Pellerin, who is 91 years old and has seen 787 consecutive Trojan games, home and away, since 1926? Pellerin has seen every UCLA-USC and every Notre Dame-USC game ever played, as well as all 26 of the Trojans' Rose Bowl appearances . . . New USC coach Paul Hackett broke a precedent with the win over Purdue. The last six USC coaches had lost their debuts.

 

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9/5/98 Pitt. Post-Gazette B10

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (PA)

September 5, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Can you top this? There are fans and then there are fans. But who's going to surpass Southern California follower Giles Pellerin, who is 91 years old and has seen 787 consecutive Trojans games, home and away, since 1926? Pellerin has seen every UCLA-USC and every Notre Dame-USC game ever played, as well as all 26 of the Trojans' Rose Bowl appearances.

 

FOURTH-AND-SHORT

 

Man of the half-century: Let's see one of these big-time, Division I coaches match John Gagliardi year for year. See how long they'd last. When St. John's of Collegeville, Minn., faces Concordia-St. Paul this afternoon, Gagliardi's 50th season as a college football coach will be under way. He trails only Eddie Robinson in all-time victories, having passed Paul "Bear" Bryant, Pop Warner, Amos Alonzo Stagg and every other college football coach who has ever lived.

 

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9/6/98 Chi. Trib. 8

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

September 6, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

PRESEASON 'CLASSICS' USUALLY ANYTHING BUT

Mark Blaudschun, Boston Globe.

 

Super fan: There are fans and then there are fans. But who's going to top Southern Cal follower Giles Pellerin, who is 91 years old and has seen 787 consecutive Trojans games, home and away, since 1926? Pellerin has seen everey UCLA-USC and every Notre Dame-USC game ever played, as well as all 26 USC Rose Bowl appearances.

 

Good trend: New USC coach Paul Hackett broke a precedent with the win over Purdue. The last six USC coaches had lost their debuts.

 

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9/26/98 Tampa Trib. (Fla.) 7

Tampa Tribune (FL)

 

September 26, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Super Fan: Expected to attend today's game is Giles Pellerin, USC's Super Fan. Pellerin, a 91-year-old Pasadena resident, has viewed in person 789 consecutive USC games - home and away - dating back to the 1926 season. He has traveled more than 650,000 miles and spent more than $85,000 doing so. He has witnessed every USC-Notre Dame and USC-UCLA game ever played as well as all 28 Rose Bowl trips by the Trojans.

 

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9/27/98 Tampa Trib. (Fla.) 1

 

Tampa Tribune (FL)

 

September 27, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

'NOLES SEEKING DELIVERANCE, WANT RESPECT

 

DAVID WHITLEY

 

TALLAHASSEE - There are a lot of people football players don't mind being compared to. Jimmy Swaggart usually is not one of them.

 

But these are different days at Florida State. The Seminoles have sinned. Now they are on the road to forgiveness. That's what prompted safety Dexter Jackson to start pounding an imaginary locker room pulpit before Saturday's game against USC.

 

"It was like Jimmy Swaggart," said teammate Mario Edwards.

 

Only the Seminoles don't want your donations. They want your respect, especially if you have any pull with the Bowl Championship Series. After losing to North Carolina State, this season has basically become a 10-step rehab.

 

Step One was last week against Duke, which didn't get the Seminoles very far. Step Two was a chance at major image enhancement. It wasn't a great leap, but the signs of true rehabilitation were there.

 

USC came to town and the hurricane didn't. The only Georges-like effects were a little rain, a double-rainbow at halftime and air so thick O.J. Simpson could slice it. The drained Trojan offense could have used him.

 

"It was the humidity more than the heat," FSU coach Bobby Bowden said.

 

If FSU doesn't beat you with one thing, it's the other. These days, it's to be the other.

 

That means defense. It hung all over the Trojans, who were making their first trip to Tallahassee with superfan Giles Pellerin. Old Giles hasn't missed a game since 1925. He could sit through another 790 games and not see a passing attack suffocated like USC's was Saturday.

 

Take away a 73-yard run, and the Trojans did nothing. It helped make for a game more fit for The Weather Channel than Keith Jackson. FSU's offense is sort of drifting around these days, not sure where to come ashore. The Seminoles had 30 points against USC, though you got the feeling it would have been 50 in the old days.

 

"We had a lot of positives," Peter Warrick said. "But we had a lot of negatives, too."

 

He was a definite positive. FSU has plenty of them on offense, but they're still scattered. Chris Weinke may be 26, but he still quarterbacks like a college sophomore. Until the offense matures, Bowden has decided defense and a running game isn't the worst way to win.

 

That will work against most teams. It probably would have worked against N.C. State. But as Swaggart would say, it's time to move on.

 

The Seminoles have to keep winning and hope the polls don't pass them by. Doak Campbell Stadium erupted Saturday when the announcer said Kentucky was beating Florida 14-7. Sometimes fans get so caught up hating the Gators, they don't see the big picture. The road to redemption, if not the Fiesta Bowl, will require quality wins against ranked teams. The Seminoles also need the heat, humidity or something to get to Nebraska, UCLA, Tennessee and Ohio State.

 

If that doesn't happen, the best FSU can hope for is another 11-1 season and top-four finish. Ho hum. It's tough when you have to exceed your own ridiculous standards to impress people.

 

"I thought they were better last year," USC guard Travis Claridge said. "Honestly, they were good. But they weren't super."

 

That's why Jackson's voice was hoarse after the game. His sermonettes have become a weekly habit. So has watching the scoreboard.

 

"Did Nebraska win today?" Jackson asked.

 

Afraid so, Reverend.

 

Nothing to do but keep preaching and hope there's forgiveness at the end of the rainbow.

 

DAVID WHITLEY

 

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9/27/98 St. Petersburg Times 13C

St Petersburg Times

 

September 27, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

NO. 18 USC AT NO. 10 FSU \ TITLE BOWL MAINTAINS INTEREST IN SEMINOLES

 

BRIAN LANDMAN

 

TROJAN IRONMAN: USC's most ardent fan, Giles Pellerin, 91, extended his streak of attending games to 790, dating to the start of the 1926 season. His enthusiasm remains unchanged, although he observed that ""the rules changes have made it so much different. Back in the '20s, guys got taken out in the first half couldn't go back in.''

 

- BRIAN LANDMAN

 

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9/27/98 Sarasota Herald-Trib. 8C

Sarasota Herald Tribune (FL)

 

September 27, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

FLORIDA STATE NOTES

 

ON THE WAR-RICK PATH

 

790 STRAIGHT GAMES

 

* Giles Pellerin, a 91-year-old retired telephone executive from Pasadena, Calif., attended his 790th consecutive USC football game. He has seen every game since the beginning of the 1926 season, his sophomore year at USC, spending $85,000 and traveling more than 650,000 miles by plane, train and automobiles. He has watched USC play in 75 stadiums in 50 cities. "I've always said that going to USC games is the thing that has kept me alive, young and happy," Pellerin said, in a story devoted to him in the USC media guide. Pellerin's brother, Oliver, 87, was attending his 591st straight USC game, dating back to 1945.

 

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9/27/98 Orlando Sentinel C13

Orlando Sentinel

 

September 27, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

LEADERS WANTED

 

Alan Schmadtke of The Sentinel Staff

 

FAN'S STREAK 790

 

SATURDAY MARKED the 790th consecutive USC game that Trojans fan Giles Pellerin has witnessed. Pellerin, 91, dubbed USC's ''Super Fan,'' has not missed a game since 1925 - when Calvin Coolidge was president. Pellerin arrived in Tallahassee on Thursday with his brother, Oliver, 87, who hasn't missed a USC game since 1945. Oliver's streak is 592 games.

 

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10/16/98 L.A. Times 6

Los Angeles Times

 

October 16, 1998

 

Section: Sports

 

SPORTS WEEKEND

COLLEGE FOOTBALL DAILY REPORT / USC

 

ROBYN NORWOOD

 

The 792-game attendance streak of Giles Pellerin, 91, was in danger this week. Pellerin, 91, was planning to skip the arduous trip to Pullman, Wash., but changed his mind when USC officials invited him to travel on the team plane, as he occasionally does. . . . Receiver Quincy Woods will miss the trip because of a sore knee. . . . Assistant coach Larry Petroff, who has been out because of kidney stones, is expected to go. "I told him, 'I don't want to see you until we get on the airplane,' " Hackett said. . . . Tests confirmed offensive tackle Matt Welch has mononucleosis, and he won't make the trip. Hackett said doctors told him there was no need to be concerned about it being contagious.

 

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10/16/98 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) S12

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

 

October 16, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

SC NOTEBOOK: FEW CATCHES FOR BASTIANELLI IN NEW OFFENSE

 

Scott Wolf Daily News Staff Writer

 

The streak continues: USC superfan Giles Pellerin nearly had his streak of 792 consecutive games come to an end this week. Pellerin, 91, is in frail health and attends games in a wheelchair.

 

He was not going to make the trip to Pullman, Wash., until USC officials offered to take him on the team charter. He has attended every USC game since 1926.

 

Welch has mono: Right tackle Matt Welch has been diagnosed with mononucleosis and will not make the trip. Hackett said he is hopeful Welch will return in a backup role next week.

 

Also missing the trip is wide receiver Quincy Woods, who is bothered by a sore knee.

 

''It's an iffy situation because of his knee,'' Hackett said. ''It's a wear-and-tear thing.''

 

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AP Online

November 21, 1998

 

Section: Sports,Sports Scores

 

USC's ''Super Fan'' dies at Trojans-Bruins game

 

PASADENA, Calif. Giles Pellerin, Southern California's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl, a school spokesman said Saturday. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, when he complained of feeling ill, sports information director Tim Tessalone said.

A retired telephone company executive and longtime resident of Pasadena who had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since the start of the 1926 season, Pellerin died of cardiac arrest at 2:45 p.m. during UCLA's eighth straight victory over the Trojans.

 

According to Tessalone, Pellerin had been in failing health, and asked his brother, who was attending his 600th straight USC game, to take him home because he didn't feel well.

 

Pellerin went into cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot. Paramedics attempted to resuscitate him but failed, and he was pronounced dead upon arrival at a nearby hospital, Tessalone said.

 

The USC-UCLA series began in 1929, so Pellerin attended each of the 68 games played so far, as well as all 69 USC-Notre Dame games. That streak will end next Saturday night when the Fighting Irish and Trojans meet at the Los Angeles Coliseum.

 

Also, Pellerin attended each of the 28 Rose Bowl games in which the Trojans have played.

 

The first football game Pellerin ever watched in person was the 1923 Rose Bowl when he was a student at Huntington Park, Calif., High. USC beat Penn State 14-3 that day.

 

Pellerin traveled more than 650,000 miles and spent over $85,000 over the years as USC's ''Super Fan,'' Tessalone said. Pellerin's biography has been printed in the Trojans' press guide for years.

 

Pellerin will be cremated as he requested, and entombed next to his late wife, Jessie, Tessalone said, adding that there was no immediate announcement as to a memorial service.

 

In lieu of flowers Tessalone said the family requested donations be made to the USC athletic department in Pellerin's name.

 

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11/22/98 St. Petersburg Times 16C

St Petersburg Times

 

November 22, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC'S NO. 1 FAN DIES AT GAME

 

Compiled from Wire Reports

 

PASADENA, Calif. Giles Pellerin, Southern Cal's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl, a school spokesman said Saturday. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th straight Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother Oliver when he complained of feeling ill, sports information director Tim Tessalone said.

 

A retired telephone company executive and longtime Pasadena resident who had watched every USC game in person since the start of the 1926 season, Pellerin died of cardiac arrest at 2:45 p.m. during UCLA's eighth straight victory over the Trojans.

 

Tessalone said Pellerin had been in failing health and had asked his brother, who was attending his 600th straight USC game, to take him home because he didn't feel well. Pellerin went into cardiac arrest in the parking lot.

 

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11/22/98 St. Paul Pioneer Press (Minn.) 10C

St. Paul Pioneer Press (MN)

November 22, 1998

 

Section: Sports

 

TICKETS FOR ROSE BOWL MORE AVAILABLE, COSTLY

 

Associated Press

 

USC 'Super Fan' dies at game:

 

Giles Pellerin, Southern California's most loyal fan, died of cardiac arrest during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl, a school spokesman said. He was 91.

 

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11/22/98 Star-Ledger (Newark N.J.) 28

Star-Ledger, The (Newark, NJ)

 

November 22, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

SPORTS SHORTS

 

Giles Pellerin , Southern California's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl, a school spokesman said. He was 91. Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother, Oliver.

 

The longtime resident of Pasadena, Calif., had watched every USC game in person, home and away, since the start of the 1926 season.

 

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11/22/98 South Florida Sun-Sentinel 3D

 

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

 

November 22, 1998

 

Section: COLLEGE FOOTBALL

 

* UCLA beat USC for the eighth straight time.

 

* Giles Pellerin, USC's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans loss. He was 91. Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive game, a streak that started in 1926.

 

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Sinocast

Comtex News Network.

November 22, 1998

 

USC fan dies at Rose Bowl game

 

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 22 (UPI S) -- A 91-year-old man who had attended almost 800 consecutive University of Southern California football games died of a heart attack at the Rose Bowl during the team's loss to the University of California at Los Angeles. The Los Angeles Times reports (Sunday) that Giles Pellerin was legendary for his dedication to the team, traveling more than 650,000 miles and spending an estimated $85, 000 in travel expenses to root at 797 home and away games since 1926.

 

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Sinocast

Comtex News Network.

November 22, 1998

 

USC fan dies at Rose Bowl game

 

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 22 (UPI S) -- A 91-year-old man who had attended almost 800 consecutive University of Southern California football games died of a heart attack at the Rose Bowl during the team's loss to the University of California at Los Angeles. The Los Angeles Times reports (Sunday) that Giles Pellerin was legendary for his dedication to the team, traveling more than 650,000 miles and spending an estimated $85, 000 in travel expenses to root at 797 home and away games since 1926. ---

 

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Sinocast

Comtex News Network.

 

November 22, 1998

 

California News Report

 

Legendary USC fan dies at Rose Bowl LOS ANGELES, Nov. 22 (UPI) -- A 91-year-old football fan who had attended nearly 800 consecutive University of Southern California games, died at the Rose Bowl while at the USC-UCLA matchup. Giles Pellerin left Saturday's game shortly after halftime, telling companions he didn't feel well. He suffered a heart attack in the parking lot, and was pronounced dead on arrival at a hospital. The Los Angeles Times reports that Pellerin's dedication to USC football was legendary, and had seen every game the team had ever played against UCLA and Notre Dame. His 797-game streak started in 1926.

 

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11/22/98 Seattle Times D9

Seattle Times (WA)

November 22, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

UCLA TROUNCES USC, TURNS GAZE TOWARD BOWLS -- UCLA FOSTERS NATIONAL TITLE ASPIRATIONS

 

THE AP

 

Note

 

-- Giles Pellerin, USC's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl, a school spokesman said. Pellerin was 91. He was attending his 797th consecutive USC game (since 1926) with his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, when he complained of feeling ill. He had a heart attack in the parking lot as he and his brother left the stadium.

 

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11/22/98 San Jose Mercury News 3C

San Jose Mercury News (CA)

November 22, 1998

 

Section: Sports

 

POINTS AFTER

 

Mercury News Wire Services

 

''It's hatred, nothing more. That was like them coming into our home, jumping on our couch and tearing out our hearts.'' -- Florida State safety Dexter Jackson after a pregame scuffle with Florida players NOTEWORTHY USC 'SUPER FAN' DIES DURING GAME

 

Giles Pellerin, USC's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl on Saturday. He was 91.

 

Known as the USC's ''Super Fan,'' Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, USC sports information director Tim Tessalone said.

 

Pellerin died of cardiac arrest at 2:45 p.m.

 

He was a retired telephone company executive and longtime resident of Pasadena who had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since the start of the 1926 season.

 

According to Tessalone, Pellerin had been in failing health and asked his brother, who was attending his 600th consecutive USC game, to take him home because he didn't feel well.

 

Pellerin went into cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot. Paramedics attempted to resuscitate him but failed, and he was pronounced dead upon arrival at a nearby hospital, Tessalone said.

 

Pellerin attended each of the 68 USC-UCLA games ever played, as well as all 69 USC-Notre Dame games. Pellerin also attended each of the 28 Rose Bowl games in which the Trojans played.

 

Photo

PHOTO Pellerin\(981122 SP 3D)

 

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11/22/98 Orlando Sentinel C2

Orlando Sentinel

 

November 22, 1998

 

Section: SPECIAL SECTION

 

SUPERFAN DIES

 

GILES PELLERIN, Southern California's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, when he began feeling ill. Pellerin went into cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot. He was pronounced dead upon arrival at a nearby hospital.

 

Pellerin was a retired telephone company executive who had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since the start of the 1926 season. He attended each of the 68 games USC-UCLA games played so far, as well as all 69 USC-Notre Dame games.

 

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11/22/98 Portland Oregonian E13

Oregonian, The (Portland, OR)

November 22, 1998

Section: SPORTS

 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL PAC-10 NOTES RUNNING WILD:

KEN GOE - of The Oregonian staff

 

OBITUARY:

GilesI PellerinI, who had seen every USC game since the 1926 season opener, suffered cardiac arrest and died Saturday in the Rose Bowl parking lot.

 

Pellerin, 91, complained of feeling ill during the game and asked to leave. He collapsed in the parking lot. Efforts to revive him were unsuccessful.

 

Saturday's game was the 797th consecutive USC game Pellerin had attended, a streak that took more than 650,000 miles at a cost of $85,000.

-- Ken Goe

 

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11/22/98 Mobile Reg. (AL) C2

Mobile Register (AL)

November 22, 1998

 

Section: C

 

USC's super fan dies during game Southern Cal supporter at every Trojans football game since 1926

7MR0202C1122

 

PASADENA, Calif. Giles Pellerin , Southern California's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl, a school spokesman said Saturday. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, when he complained of feeling ill, sports information director Tim Tessalone said.

 

A retired telephone company executive and longtime resident of Pasadena who had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since the start of the 1926 season, Pellerin died of cardiac arrest at 2:45 p.m. during UCLA's eighth straight victory over the Trojans.

 

According to Tessalone, Pellerin had been in failing health, and asked his brother, who was attending his 600th straight USC game, to take him home because he didn't feel well.

 

Pellerin went into cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot. Paramedics attempted to resuscitate him but failed, and he was pronounced dead upon arrival at a nearby hospital, Tessalone said.

 

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11/22/98 Milwaukee J. & Sentinel 2

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (WI)

 

November 22, 1998

 

Section: C SPORTS

 

USC'S 'SUPER FAN' DIES AT 91

 

JOURNAL SENTINEL WIRE REPORTS

 

Giles Pellerin, Southern California's most loyal football fan, died Saturday during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, when he asked to be taken home because he felt ill. He went into cardiac arrest in the parking lot and was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital.

 

A retired telephone company executive, Pellerin had watched every USC game in person, home and away, since the start of the 1926 season. He also saw each of the 28 Rose Bowl games in which the USC has played.

 

Pellerin's biography has been printed in the Trojans' media guide for years.

 

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11/22/98 L.A. Times 13

Los Angeles Times

November 22, 1998

 

Section: Sports

 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL / WEEK 12

NOTES

ROBYN NORWOOD

TIMES STAFF WRITERS

 

Giles Pellerin , the 91-year-old USC fan who had an incredible streak of attending 797 consecutive games--home and away--died at the Rose Bowl Saturday.

 

Pellerin left Saturday's game early in the second half, telling his brother, Oliver, that he didn't feel well. He suffered cardiac arrest in the parking lot and was dead on arrival at a hospital. Official time of death was 2:45 p.m.

 

Pellerin's fan dedication to USC football was legendary. He saw every USC-UCLA game ever played, as well as every USC-Notre Dame game. His USC streak started in 1926.

 

He attended 28 Rose Bowls and, ironically, saw his first college football game in 1923, at the site he died Saturday, the Rose Bowl.

 

Pellerin, of Pasadena, traveled more than 650,000 miles in his attendance streak, and spent an estimated $85,000 on travel.

 

*

 

R. Jay Soward, bothered by a lingering ankle sprain, wasn't much of a factor for USC.

 

Soward played only a dozen plays or so and didn't return any kicks. He caught three passes for 22 yards, fumbling one of the receptions.

 

"I did what I could do," Soward said. "I honestly think I could have had a little more opportunity.

 

"I was about 90%. Not full speed, but me 90% is a lot faster than a lot of people."

 

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11/22/98 L.A. Times 2

Los Angeles Times

 

November 22, 1998

 

Section: Sports

 

THE INSIDE TRACK

If You Can't Guess Key Play of This Game, Then Punt

 

RANDY HARVEY

 

While waiting for the BCS computers to tell us whether UCLA really won or lost, I was thinking: The game would have been more fun if R. Jay Soward had been sound, it's hard to feel too sorry for the Trojans if this loss knocked them into the Aloha Bowl, Giles Pellerin RIP.

 

*

 

Randy Harvey can be reached at his e-mail address: randy.harvey@latimes.com

 

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11/22/98 Kan. City Star C6

Kansas City Star (MO)

November 22, 1998

Section: SPORTS

 

National report

 

'SUPER FAN' DIES Giles Pellerin, Southern California's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game. He was accompanied by his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, and complained of feeling ill, sports information director Tim Tessalone said.

 

Pellerin had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since the start of the 1926 season. He died of cardiac arrest at 2:45 p.m. Pacific time - during UCLA's eighth straight victory over the Trojans.

 

According to Tessalone, Pellerin had been in failing health and asked his brother, who was attending his 600th straight USC game, to take him home because he didn't feel well.

 

Pellerin went into cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot.

 

Paramedics attempted to resuscitate him but failed, and he was pronounced dead on arrival at a nearby hospital, Tessalone said.

 

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11/22/98 Kan. City Star C6

Kansas City Star (MO)

November 22, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

NATIONAL REPORT

 

'SUPER FAN' DIES

Giles Pellerin, Southern California's most loyal fan, died during

the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game. He was

accompanied by his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, and complained of

feeling ill, sports information director Tim Tessalone said.

 

Pellerin had watched every USC game in person, both home and

away, since the start of the 1926 season. He died of cardiac arrest

at 2:45 p.m. Pacific time - during UCLA's eighth straight victory

over the Trojans.

 

According to Tessalone, Pellerin had been in failing health and

asked his brother, who was attending his 600th straight USC game, to

take him home because he didn't feel well.

 

Pellerin went into cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot.

 

Paramedics attempted to resuscitate him but failed, and he was

pronounced dead on arrival at a nearby hospital, Tessalone said.

 

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11/22/98 Hous. Chron. 6

Houston Chronicle

November 22, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Giles Pellerin, Southern California's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, when he complained of feeling ill, sports information director Tim Tessalone said.

 

Pellerin had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since the start of the 1926 season.

 

According to Tessalone, Pellerin had been in failing health and asked his brother, who was attending his 600th straight USC game, to take him home because he didn't feel well. Pellerin went into cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot. Paramedics attempted to resuscitate him but failed..

 

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11/22/98 Fresno Bee D4

Fresno Bee

November 22, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

UCLA FUTURE STAR FOSTER NO LONGER A MERE FRESHMAN

 

BEE NEWS SERVICES

 

"Super Fan' dies at game

 

Giles Pellerin, USC's most loyal fan, died od cardiac arrest during the game, a school spokesman said. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother when he complained of feeling ill, sports information director Tim Tessalone said.

 

1 Photo

 

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11/22/98 Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) N22

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)

 

November 22, 1998

 

Section: NEWS

 

USC'S NO. 1 FAN DIES AT GAME AT 91

 

Scott Wolf Daily News Staff Writer

 

USC's most loyal fan, Giles Pellerin, died of cardiac arrest during Saturday's USC-UCLA game at the Rose Bowl. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive University of Southern California game, dating to 1926. His beloved Trojans lost their eighth straight to the rival Bruins.

 

Pellerin, who had been in failing health, was watching Saturday's game from the stands. He told his brother, Oliver, 87, that he didn't feel well and was taken to the Rose Bowl parking lot, said a USC spokesman.

 

Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies called paramedics, but Pellerin died at 2:45 p.m. as first aid was administered.

 

A retired telephone company executive and longtime Pasadena resident, Pellerin left his estate to the USC athletic department. His family asked that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the department as well.

 

The first football game Pellerin watched in person was the 1923 Rose Bowl when he was a student at Huntington Park High. USC beat Penn State 14-3 that day.

 

Pellerin attended each of the 68 USC-UCLA games in the series, which began in 1929. He also saw all 69 USC games against Notre Dame and each of the 28 Rose Bowl games in which the Trojans played.

 

Pellerin will be cremated and entombed next to his late wife, Jessie, the USC spokesman said. Memorial details are pending.

 

Oliver Pellerin now takes over for his brother as USC's No. 1 fan. He attended his 600th straight USC game Saturday.

 

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

 

Photo

PHOTO (Ran on Page 1) USC FAN DIES

Giles Pellerin, USC's most loyal fan, died during the Trojan's 34-17 loss to UCLA. The contest was Pellerin's 797th consecutive game.

 

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11/22/98 Contra Costa Times (Walnut Creek, CA) B09

Contra Costa Times (Walnut Creek,CA)

 

November 22, 1998

 

Section: Sports

 

WIN PUTS BRUINS ON TOP OF L.A. PITTSBURG'S SIMONTON RUNS FOR FIVE TOUCHDOWNS, INCLUDING THE GAME-WINNER, AS OREGON ST. STUNS OREGON

 

PASADENA It had everything a UCLA-USC football game is supposed to have: high stakes, great atmosphere and standout performances. And now that UCLA has won yet another Los Angeles city championship, the Bruins can focus their full attention on the national picture.

 

Freshman DeShaun Foster, hospitalized a day earlier with strep throat, gained 109 yards on 15 carries and scored four touchdowns to tie a school record Saturday as the third-ranked Bruins beat the error-prone Trojans 34-17 in front of a sellout crowd of 88,080 at the Rose Bowl.

 

The victory was UCLA's eighth in a row over the Trojans, by far the longest streak in the 68-game crosstown series that began in 1929. It extended the Bruins' school-record winning streak to 20 games, longest in the country.

 

UCLA (10-0, 8-0 Pac-10) completes its season at No. 22 Miami on Dec. 5. A victory would give the Bruins an excellent shot at a berth in the Fiesta Bowl for the national championship on Jan. 4.

 

"Our team's good enough to win 20 games in a row, our team's good enough to win the Pac-10 championship, our team's good enough to compete with anyone in the country," UCLA coach Bob Toledo said. "If we beat Miami, we should go to the Fiesta Bowl. That's my opinion."

 

The Trojans (7-4, 5-3) hurt themselves by losing four fumbles in the first 22 1/2 minutes, severely damaging their momentum as well as directly leading to 13 UCLA points. USC had seven turnovers to three for the Bruins.

 

Cade McNown, a Heisman Trophy contender who has quarterbacked UCLA to four wins over USC, wasn't up to form statistically, completing 12 of 20 passes for 146 yards with two interceptions.

 

During the game, Giles Pellerin, USC's most loyal fan, died. He was 91. Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game. He had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since the start of the 1926 season. Pellerin died of cardiac arrest at 2:45 p.m.

 

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11/22/98 Chi. Trib. 2

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

November 22, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

NORTH CENTRAL WINS NCAA CROSS COUNTRY

Compiled by Jack Thompson.

 

E

 

College football: Giles Pellerin, who was attending his 797th consecutive USC game, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl, a school spokesman said Saturday. He was 91. Pellerin, whose streak began in 1926, went into cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot, Southern Cal SID Tim Tessalone said. He was pronounced dead at a hospital.

 

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11/22/98 Buff. News D6

Buffalo News (NY)

November 22, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

EMOTIONALLY DRAINED WILDCATS ARE CLAWED BY TOP-RANKED VOLUNTEERS

 

From News Wire Services

 

UCLA 34, USC 17

 

PASADENA, Calif. -- Freshman DeShaun Foster rushed for 109 yards on 15 carries and scored four touchdowns to tie a school-record as third-ranked UCLA beat error-prone Southern California in the Pacific-10 Conference.

 

"I just wanted to come out here and contribute a little bit," Foster said. "I think I did that today."

 

The victory was UCLA's eighth straight over the Trojans. It extended the Bruins' school-record winning streak to 20 games, longest in the country.

 

UCLA (10-0, 8-0) completes its season at No. 22 Miami on Dec. 5. A victory would give the Bruins an excellent shot at a berth in the Fiesta Bowl for their first national championship on Jan. 4.

 

The Trojans (7-4, 5-3) hurt themselves by losing four fumbles in 221/2 minutes, severely damaging their momentum as well as directly leading to 13 UCLA points.

 

Giles Pellerin, USC's 91-year-old loyal fan, died during the game. Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game. A retired telephone company executive and long-time resident of Pasadena who had watched every USC game in person -- both home and away -- since the start of the 1926 season, Pellerin died of cardiac arrest.

 

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11/22/98 AP Online 00:00:00

AP Online

November 22, 1998

 

Section: Sports,Sports Scores

 

College Football Today

 

SUPER FAN DIES

 

Giles Pellerin, a 91-year-old fan who attended 797 consecutive

USC games, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA. Pellerin,

who had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since

the start of the 1926 season, went into cardiac arrest in the Rose

Bowl parking lot, and was pronounced dead on arrival at a nearby

hospital.

 

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AP Online

November 22, 1998

 

Section: Sports,Sports Scores

 

College Football Today

 

SUPER FAN DIES

 

Giles Pellerin, a 91-year-old fan who attended 797 consecutive

USC games, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA. Pellerin,

who had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since

the start of the 1926 season, went into cardiac arrest in the Rose

Bowl parking lot, and was pronounced dead on arrival at a nearby

hospital.

 

SPEAKING

 

''I asked him in the first quarter, 'How are you feeling,

because we just put a saddle on your back and we're riding you

home.' Then he said, 'Just call the plays, coach. I'll get us in

the end zone.''' Richmond coach Jim Reid on quarterback Jimmie

Miles, who rushed for 179 yards and five touchdowns, tying a

70-year-old school record, in a 42-17 victory over William & Mary.

 

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11/23/98 USA TODAY 03C

USA Today (USA)

November 23, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

Longtime USC fan dies at 91

 

TEXT NOT AVAILABLE FOR DATABASE -- PLEASE SEE MICROFICHE.

 

PHOTO, B/W, USA TODAY file photo

 

NOTES: SPORTS PEOPLE

 

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Sinocast

Comtex News Network.

 

November 23, 1998

 

California News Report

 

USC fan dies at Rose Bowl game PASADENA, Nov. 23 (UPI) -- A 91-year-old man who had attended almost 800 consecutive University of Southern California football games died of a heart attack at the Rose Bowl during the team's loss to UCLA Bruins. Giles Pellerin was legendary for his dedication to the USC Trojans, traveling more than 650,000 miles and spending an estimated $85,000 in travel expenses to root at 797 home and away games since 1926. Family members say Pellerin made a bequest to the USC athletic department in his will.

 

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11/23/98 Seattle Times D2

 

Seattle Times (WA)

November 23, 1998

 

Section: SPORTS

 

USC'S BIGGEST FAN DIES A HAPPY MAN

 

To those who had seen him in recent weeks, the news that Giles Pellerin had died Saturday was not shocking. To those who knew him at all, it came as absolutely no surprise that the end came at a USC football game.

 

When Pellerin died after suffering cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot during the USC-UCLA game Saturday afternoon, he was a little more than a month shy of his 92nd birthday.

 

He was also a week away from attending his 798th consecutive USC football game.

 

Pellerin wasn't in the best of health lately, but the streak went on. He hadn't let hospitalizations or even the threat of a hurricane stop him before. Saturday confirmed what many always thought: only death could keep Giles Pellerin from attending a USC football game.

 

"It was an obsession with him," said his brother Oliver, who has a streak of 598 consecutive USC games himself. "It was the way he lived, and that's the way he died."

 

It's remarkable to turn through the pages of the USC media guide and realize Giles Pellerin was at most of the games listed. The last time he missed one was the season-ender against St. Mary's on Dec. 12, 1925.

 

It's only fitting that his odyssey began and ended in what might be the most cherished football place of all, the Rose Bowl.

 

Pellerin traveled more than 660,000 miles and spent more than $85,000 on travel and tickets over the course of the streak.

 

He has seen his Trojans win eight national championships, play in 28 Rose Bowls and watched the team field 120 All-Americans and four Heisman Trophy winners.

 

He was hospitalized after an emergency appendectomy in 1949 and had to fool the nurses to get to the USC-Oregon game. "He called me on Friday (before the game) and said, 'Be here Saturday at noon,' " Oliver Pellerin said. Giles told the nurses he was going for a walk, watched the Trojans win 40-13, then returned, not bothering to explain why his face was sunburned.

 

Bad blood continues

 

Apparently some bitter feelings still remain from last year's playoffs between the Boston Bruins and Washington Capitals.

 

They spilled over into a widespread confrontation in Saturday night's game at the FleetCenter.

 

A total of 270 minutes in penalties were handed out - including a fight at 11:42 of the first period that involved every player on the ice and saw all 12 of them ejected, including goaltenders Byron Dafoe of the Bruins and Washington's Olaf Kolzig. Kolzig and Dafoe are good friends and Kolzig said, "It's tough fighting your best friend. You can joke about it all you want, but when you're out there it's tough to throw a punch at (Dafoe)."

 

Dreary tune

 

Howard Schnellenberger, former college coach and now athletic director at Florida Atlantic University, doesn't like the way Miami Dolphin Coach Jimmy Johnson is using Dan Marino - emphasizing running instead of passing: "They've got a concert pianist sitting at the keyboard wearing handcuffs, and the only thing he can play is 'Chopsticks.' "

 

Spelling bee

 

Bill Fitch, former NBA coach, who was recently inducted into the Coe College (Iowa) Hall of Fame: "A lot of people said I came to Coe because it was the only school I could spell."

 

Fashion statement

 

At a recent game, Georgia State Coach Lefty Driesell wore an olive suit with a sleeveless Nehru-style jacket and matching two-tone shoes. "That looks like something the rappers would wear," said television analyst George Raveling, a former Driesell assistant at Maryland. "Next he'll come out with a CD."

 

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11/23/98 N.Y. Times D3

New York Times (NY)

 

November 23, 1998

 

Section: D

 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL; U.S.C.'s Super Fan Dies at 797th Consecutive Football Game

 

RICHARD GOLDSTEIN

 

Giles Pellerin, who attended 797 consecutive University of Southern California football games, dies at halftime of game against UCLA; he was 91; photo (M)

 

Giles Pellerin never scored a touchdown before a huge crowd, never struck out a batter, never dunked a basketball, but he compiled one of the most remarkable streaks in sports history.

 

On Saturday afternoon, Pellerin was at the Rose Bowl, attending his 797th consecutive University of Southern California football game, a streak dating to 1926. During the second half of the U.S.C.-U.C.L.A. game, he felt ill and asked his brother Oliver, 87, (who was merely attending his 600th consecutive U.S.C. game) to take him home. But Giles Pellerin collapsed and died in the Rose Bowl's parking lot.

 

The man known as U.S.C.'s Super Fan, and presumably America's No. 1 college football fan, was 91.

 

Pellerin traveled more than 650,000 miles by plane, train and automobile -- visiting more than 50 cities, including Tokyo -- and spent upward of $85,000 in following the Trojans, according to the U.S.C. athletic department.

 

In the 1930's, Pellerin's streak almost ended well before reaching epic proportions. On his way to a game at Notre Dame, his car's water pump broke outside Oklahoma City, 36 hours before kickoff. It was fixed, and he made the game.

 

Then there was his honeymoon with his bride Jessie. He postponed it eight months so he could celebrate at a U.S.C. game in Hawaii in 1935.

 

In 1949, Pellerin was hospitalized for an appendectomy five days before a home game. The day of the game, he told nurses he was going to take a walk on hospital grounds. Instead, he went to the Los Angeles Coliseum, saw his beloved U.S.C. rout Oregon, 40-13, then returned to the hospital before anyone realized he had been missing.

 

The day after a 1993 game at Penn State, he suffered a ruptured abdominal aneurysm when he was about to leave his hotel. He was hospitalized in Harrisburg for 12 days, but U.S.C. had the following weekend off. After signing a waiver absolving hospital officials of responsibility for his leaving prematurely, he returned to Los Angeles for the U.S.C. game against Washington State.

 

A U.S.C. graduate, class of 1929, and a retired telephone executive who lived in Pasadena, he donated $1.3 million to endow three football scholarships and a swimming scholarship at U.S.C. He was inducted into the university's Athletic Hall of Fame in 1994.

 

"My whole life has been U.S.C. football, and I've loved every minute of it," he once said.

 

"I don't think I'm a nut," he said. "I do more than just watch a game when I visit these cities. I've met a lot of nice and interesting people."

 

Pellerin and his late wife had no children. So he essentially adopted the U.S.C. players, whom he called his "family."

 

"God must be a Trojan," Pellerin once said. "I've been lucky."

 

Photo: Giles Pellerin (Associated Press)

 

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11/23/98 N.Y. Times (Abstracts) D3

New York Times Abstracts

November 23, 1998

 

Section: D

 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL: U.S.C.'S SUPER FAN DIES AT 797TH CONSECUTIVE FOOTBALL GAME

Goldstein, Richard

 

Giles Pellerin, who attended 797 consecutive University of Southern California football games, dies at halftime of game against UCLA; he was 91; photo (M)

 

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11/23/98 CNN: Moneyline

 

MONEYLINE

November 23, 1998

 

Section: Business

 

MONEYLINE, CNN

 

Tony Guida

Fred Katayama

Myron Kandel

Wolf Blitzer

Pierre Thomas

Jane Arraf

Kelli Arena

Jeff Flock

Jan Hopkins

Rhonda Schaffler

Bill Tucker

Bruce Francis

Steve Young

Katharine Barrett

Allan Dodds Frank

 

ANNOUNCER: From CNN's New York headquarters, the MONEYLINE NEWS HOUR with Lou Dobbs.

 

TONY GUIDA, HOST: Good evening. I'm Tony Guida sitting in for Lou Dobbs.

 

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

 

GUIDA: This may be the greatest college football streak ever, and it did not take place on the field. When Giles Pellerin was a freshman at the University of Southern California, he went to a football game. That was in 1926. Calvin Coolidge was president. He went to the next game and the next and didn't miss one USC game after that, traveling more than a million miles to all the away games, all the Bowl games, every home game, through the decades and the wars, for most of the history of this century. Back in 1990, Giles Pellerin talked about a goal he set for himself.

 

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

 

GILES PELLERIN, USC FAN (November 11, 1990): I figured in about eight years, about -- let's see, about 1998, I expect to see my 800th game.

 

(END VIDEO CLIP)

 

GUIDA: He almost made it. This past weekend, Giles Pellerin died during the second half of the USC-UCLA game. It was his 797th consecutive game, just three short of that goal. He was 91.

 

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11/23/98 L.A. Times 1

Los Angeles Times

November 23, 1998

 

Section: Sports

 

A Super Fan and a Super Streak

It is no surprise Giles Pellerin, 91, died while attending a USC game, his 797th in a row.

 

J.A. ADANDE

 

To those who had seen him in recent weeks, the news that Giles Pellerin had passed away Saturday was not shocking. To those who knew him at all it came as absolutely no surprise that the end came at a USC football game.

 

When Pellerin died after suffering cardiac arrest in the Rose Bowl parking lot during the USC-UCLA game Saturday afternoon, he was a little more than a month shy of his 92nd birthday.

 

He was also a week away from attending his 798th consecutive USC football game.

 

Pellerin wasn't in the best of health lately, but the streak went on. He hadn't let hospitalizations or even the threat of a hurricane stop him before. Saturday confirmed what many always thought: only death could keep Giles Pellerin from attending a USC football game.

 

"It was an obsession with him," said his brother Oliver, who has a streak of 598 consecutive USC games. "It was the way he lived, and that's the way he died."

 

It's remarkable to turn through the pages of the USC media guide and realize Giles Pellerin was at most of the games listed. The last time he missed one was the season-ender against St. Mary's on Dec. 12, 1925.

 

No two opponents matter more to USC than UCLA and Notre Dame, and Pellerin was there every time the Trojans played those schools.

 

He also saw USC play schools with different names and schools that don't even have football programs anymore, like Carnegie Tech and Santa Clara.

 

Pellerin's devotion to USC took him to nearly all of the fabled houses of college football, including Notre Dame Stadium, Michigan Stadium, Penn State's Beaver Stadium, Ohio Stadium, Nebraska's Memorial Stadium, Florida Field and Tennessee's Neyland Stadium.

 

He saw USC play in Yankee Stadium and Soldier Field.

 

In 1985 alone, he saw his team play in Honolulu and Tokyo.

 

As for the Coliseum, a historic stadium in its own right, the Trojans are celebrating their 75th year there, and Pellerin made every home game for 72 of them.

 

He was one of the 104,953 people on hand for the Notre Dame game on Dec. 6, 1947, the largest football crowd in Coliseum history.

 

Of course, the Coliseum's grandest distinction is it hosted two Olympic Games. Now think about this: Pellerin's streak began six years before the 1932 Olympics and ended 14 years after the 1984 Games.

 

It's only fitting that his odyssey began and ended in what might be the most cherished football place of all, the Rose Bowl.

 

It all began with a 14-3 victory by USC in the 1923 Rose Bowl.

 

"He went to see the first time they played Penn State at the Rose Bowl, and he got hooked on it," Oliver Pellerin said.

 

Giles Pellerin didn't really consider college while growing up, but watching the Trojans play made him want to go to USC. His streak began his sophomore year. While there, he kept his job as a technician for AT&T.

 

He remained in the telephone industry after graduating, put his engineering degree to use and moved up the ranks. The key, he told his brother, was to have a job that would allow him to go to games on weekends.

 

Pellerin traveled more than 660,000 miles and spent more than $85,000 on travel and tickets over the course of the streak.

 

He has seen his Trojans win eight national championships, play in 28 Rose Bowls and watched the team field 120 All-Americans and four Heisman Trophy winners.

 

He was hospitalized after an emergency appendectomy in 1949 and had to fool the nurses to get to the USC-Oregon game. "He called me on Friday [before the game] and said, 'Be here Saturday at noon,' " Oliver Pellerin said. Giles told the nurses he was going for a walk, watched the Trojans win, 40-13, then returned, not bothering to explain why his face was sunburned.

 

He ruptured an aorta in his stomach after the 1993 game at Penn State and was hospitalized for 12 days. Fortunately for him it coincided with a Trojan open-date week, and he returned to Los Angeles in time for the next game against Washington State.

 

This September he flew into Tallahassee, Fla., in the projected path of Hurricane Georges, for USC's first visit to Florida State. He was rewarded when the hurricane veered away and left blue skies on game day.

 

The school let Pellerin on the team charter to Washington State last month, or he would have missed the game. And Oliver took two days each way to drive his brother to Oregon.

 

Pellerin was hoping that he could attend this season's games plus a bowl game, which would make the season-opener at Hawaii next year his 800th consecutive game.

 

Hawaii is where he went on his honeymoon--which, of course, was delayed seven months to coincide with a USC game in Honolulu.

 

Even though Pellerin's health was sliding as this season went on, he still enjoyed the games.

 

"He didn't show a lot of emotion, but he knew what was going on," Oliver said.

 

And he still cursed the referees.

 

With about eight minutes left in the second quarter Saturday, Giles told his brother he wasn't feeling well. They went out to the parking lot. A police officer called paramedics, but by the time they arrived it was too late to save Giles.

 

This Saturday, for the first time, Notre Dame will play USC . . . and Giles Pellerin won't be in attendance.

 

"He was a loyal Trojan fan," Oliver said.

 

Right up to the very end.

 

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11/23/98 Lexington Herald Leader C5

Lexington Herald-Leader (KY)

November 23, 1998

 

Section: Sports

 

HUSKIES QB HUARD SAYS HE'LL GO PRO; SOONERS FIRE COACH

 

Herald-Leader Wire Services

 

Trojan super fan dies

 

Giles Pellerin, Southern California's most loyal fan, died during the Trojans' 34-17 loss to UCLA at the Rose Bowl, a school spokesman said. He was 91.

 

Pellerin was attending his 797th consecutive Trojans game with his 87-year-old brother, Oliver, when he complained of feeling ill, sports information director Tim Tessalone said. During the second half, he asked Oliver, who was merely attending his 600th consecutive USC game - to take him home. But Giles Pellerin collapsed and died in the Rose Bowl's parking lot.

 

A retired telephone company executive, Pellerin had watched every USC game in person, both home and away, since the start of the 1926 season .

 

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11/23/98 Lexington Herald Leader C5