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Hawaii Statehood Day 2006 -- Celebration at Old Territorial Capitol Building (Iolani Palace) Disrupted by Hawaiian Ethnic Nationalist Wannabe-Terrorists


SHORT SUMMARY:

Celebration of an official state holiday in Hawai'i turned ugly. The 47th anniversary celebration of Hawai'i statehood, at the Capitol of the former Territory, was disrupted by Hawaiian sovereignty activists using a sound-system, bullhorns, and direct in-your-face yelling as the celebration was about to get underway. First to be targeted by the terrorists were the high school students who are members of the band invited to perform -- as they sat seated with their instruments, ready to play patriotic songs, numerous protesters walked right up to them, shouting and cursing, while the bullhorn warned there would be trouble and they should leave. Needless to say, their parent-chaperones escorted them to the bus. Then the goon-squad turned attention to the legitimate participants in the celebration, standing nose-to-nose while yelling loudly and continuously; cursing, spitting, coming between celebrants, and surrounding individuals while telling them to leave and to take their American flags with them because this is not America.

This webpage describes the event and includes the text of the most important related publications.

Important publications listed next; full text available later on this webpage.

Those wishing to see what happened on Statehood Day 2007, see:
"Hawaii Statehood Day August 17, 2007 -- Holiday hijacked by Hawaiian sovereignty activists for celebration of 125th anniversary of Iolani Palace; Zero celebration of Statehood" at
http://www.angelfire.com/planet/big60/StatehoodDay2007.html

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** The most important article about the August 18 event was published on August 29 in David Horowitz' nationally circulated Front Page Magazine. This article describes what happened and then explains the "big picture" about Hawaiian sovereignty activism and the need for repeal of the 1993 apology resolution.

No Freedom to Celebrate Statehood

By Andrew Walden
FrontPageMagazine.com, August 29, 2006

http://www.frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=24105

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THE REMAINING ITEMS ARE FIRST LISTED IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER, AND THEN COPIED IN FULL AFTER AN ANALYSIS BY KEN CONKLIN

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Original public announcement by Hawai'i state Senator Sam Slom, President of Small Business Hawaii: Hawaii Reporter, August 15, 2006

Kalani Band, Yamaguchi to Highlight Statehood Celebration This Friday, August 18

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?a69baf6c-5b88-4f47-813f-b470cf0ffd93

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Governor Linda Lingle, Proclamation for Statehood Day 2006, on official stationery in pdf format. It was published two days after Senator Slom's first announcement, and barely a day before the privately-organized celebration. Governor Lingle had been asked to organize a government-sponsored celebration, but refused on grounds of "political correctness" because she felt it might offend ethnic Hawaiians for the State of Hawai'i to celebrate the state holiday that honors the fact that we are a state! Lingle created the proclamation only after advisors warned her that, in view of the privately-organized celebration, she would be embarrassed if she failed to issue one. The proclamation as first printed had the wrong date for the 1959 Admission Day. An official announcement of the proclamation backdated its date of issuance to make it appear the proclamation had been issued earlier. Note that Lingle has repeatedly traveled to Washington D.C. to zealously lobby Congress to pass the Akaka bill, and spent most of her time with President Bush when he was in Hawai'i urging him to support the Akaka bill. Lingle has also personally attended numerous ceremonies for groundbreaking on Hawaiian Homelands projects. She personally appeared at a huge red-short rally at 'Iolani Palace, and wore the red shirt while speaking in support of Kamehameha School's racially segregated admissions policy. Yet she refused to have the state sponsor the Statehood Day celebration, refused to attend it, didn't issue a proclamation until it became apparent that the celebration would go forward under private sponsorship and she would be embarrassed if she made no statement at all. Thus it is clear where Governor Lingle's priorities lie -- support racial separatism, cultivate the approval of Hawaii's highly favored racial group, and do nothing that might offend the most radical leaders of that group. Here's the proclamation:

http://www.angelfire.com/planet/bigfiles40/StatehdDayLingleProc081806.pdf

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The first news reports were on KHNL TV (Channel 8, Honolulu) on the 5, 6, and 10 PM newscasts of Friday August 18. Their webpage for this event includes a broadcast transcript, two videos, and four photos.

http://www.khnl.com/Global/story.asp?S=5301211

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Hawaii Statehood Celebration Turns Ugly

By Richard Noah Hough (Republican primary-election candidate for Congress), Hawaii Reporter, August 18

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?506054a6-97d2-4d0b-8344-464f59bce661

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** NOTE: Hawai'i's largest-circulation newspaper, The Honolulu Advertiser, chose not to cover this important event, even though it had been notified at least two days beforehand. That newspaper is aggressively supporting the Akaka bill and a newer "Plan B" proposal by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to set up a state-recognized tribe for ethnic Hawaiians.

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Statehood celebration at palace gets heated
Protesters say the event was held at the "scene of a crime"

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, August 19, 2006, front-page story includes 4 photos

http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/19/news/story01.html

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Children Threatened by Anti-American Protestors at Hawaii's Statehood Celebration

Complete Lawlessness, That is How Observers Described the Conditions at Iolani Palace; Threats Were Made Against Innocent Civilians and Lawmakers There to Celebrate; Capitol Police Never Showed During the 1-Hour-Long Confrontation

Hawaii Reporter, August 21, 2006

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?97773d5e-4946-4230-8e6e-bd58a2c57cd7

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"The New Meaning of Aloha", Hawaii Reporter, August 21, 2006

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?4e825667-4e7e-4dee-b56b-23f8a8446d42

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"Actions of Hawaiian Militants Resemble That of Terrorists", Hawaii Reporter, August 22, 2006

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?48392cf5-7da5-4f2e-911e-fbd198f118a8

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Hawaii Under Siege by Radical Secessionists, Hawaii Reporter, August 25, 2006

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?b6a7cecf-40e9-47b5-a3d1-73b588ac8a6f

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Letters to editor: in Honolulu Star-Bulletin, August 25, 2006:

http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/25/editorial/letters.html

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Letters to Editor in Honolulu Advertiser (1 letter) and Honolulu Star-Bulletin (2 letters), on Sunday August 27, 2006:

http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060827/OPINION02/608270302/1108/LETTERS
and
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/27/editorial/letters.html

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Article in the Business section of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin for Sunday, August 27 describes the new executive director of 'Iolani Palace, and includes the fact that he will be meeting with the Governor and state officials regarding future rules for the use of the grounds surrounding 'Iolani palace.

http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/27/business/story03.html

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HAWAII STATEHOOD -- A Brief History of the 110-year Struggle to Achieve Statehood (1849-1959), and Current Challenges. Includes links to other webpages describing the Great Statehood Petition of 1954 with 120,000 signatures; the anti-statehood resolution that passed the Hawai'i Senate in 2001; the statehood celebration resolutions that died in the legislature in 2002 and 2003; the excellent Statehood Day message issued by Governor Cayetano in 2002 and the lukewarm message by Governor Lingle in 2003; the lack of any celebration in 2005 but the existence of a small anti-statehood rally at the Maui War memorial; and links to news reports and commentary about controversies over flying the U.S. flag at 'Iolani Palace and other places following the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center of September 11, 2001.

http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/statehoodhistandcurr.html

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On Monday August 28 Willaim F. Quinn died. He was the last (appointed) Governor of the Territory of Hawai'i and the first (elected) Governor of the State of Hawai'i. Honolulu newspapers published lengthy stories on Wednesday August 30 about his contributions to Hawai'i statehood, including photos of his inaugurations at 'Iolani Palace. One photo clearly showing the ceremony taking place at the Palace is:
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/30/news/art1cx.jpg

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Office of Hawaiian Affairs monthly newspaper for September, 2006 includes full-page news report and photos. The article extensively and approvingly quotes an ethnic nationalist independence activist asserting that 'Iolani Palace is not merely a museum but is the capitol of a still-living nation of Hawai'i. Publication in the OHA newspaper is clearly intended to endorse and praise the hooliganism of the protestors who disrupted the Statehood Day celebration.
http://www.angelfire.com/planet/bigfiles40/KaWaiOlaOOHASep2006p7Stathd.pdf

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MORE DETAILED SUMMARY AND ANALYSIS BY KEN CONKLIN

On August 21, 1959, Hawai'i officially became the 50th state. Ever since then the third Friday in August has been an official state government holiday. But in recent years the holiday has become merely a paid holiday for state and local government workers, with no real celebration. Attempts were made in the Legislature to ask the Governor to revive the active celebration of the holiday. But most Legislators, and the Governor, have declined to celebrate the holiday for fear of offending an increasingly noisy group of Hawaiian sovereignty radicals.

Another factor is the Akaka bill, which has been under active consideration in Congress for 6 years. The Governor, and all but one of the 76 state Senators and Representatives, strongly favor the Akaka bill; and they fear to do anything "politically incorrect" that might incite public protests which might raise doubts in Washington about Hawai'i's racial harmony or political stability.

The golden anniversary of Hawai'i statehood is only three years away, so planning should be underway for a major celebration (Alaska, the 49th state, is already planning a major 50th anniversary celebration for 2008). With that in mind, Hawai'i State Senator Sam Slom, head of Small Business Hawai'i, decided to take action.

Senator Slom organized a celebration of the 2006 holiday, privately funded with no taxpayer dollars, and no participation by government agencies. The program was publicly announced days beforehand through a widely-read on-line newspaper, several call-ins to popular radio shows, and e-mails. It included a high school band to play patriotic music, and a noted soloist to sing patriotic songs. The public was invited to attend and bring American flags.

The location of the celebration was the former Capitol building of the Territory and State of Hawai'i. This is the historic building where a ceremony of Annexation took place in August 1898 with an exchange of signed documents between Republic of Hawai'i President Sanford B. Dole and the special envoy of U.S. President William McKinley. This is where the Legislature and Governor of the Territory of Hawai'i conducted business from 1898 to 1968, when a new capitol building was completed. This is where the great Statehood Petition of 1954, containing 120,000 names, was given a sendoff before being flown to Washington -- a sendoff that included the Royal Hawaiian band, hula dancers, torch-bearers, and Hawaiian chants. This is the very place where the transition from Territory to State took place in 1959 with huge celebrations throughout the islands and dancing in the streets. The U.S. flag flew proudly over this building for 70 years from 1898 to 1968. There is no place more appropriate to hold a celebration of Statehood Day.

However, at the revived celebration held on August 19, 2006, a group of about 50 Hawaiian sovereignty radicals showed up ahead of time to protest. They believe that Hawai'i is not legitimately a part of the United States. They believe the revolution of 1893 that overthrew the monarchy was illegal, the annexation of 1898 was illegal, and the Statehood plebiscite of 1959 (with 94% "yes" votes) was illegal. The building where the celebration was being held had not only been the Capitol of the Republic, Territory and State of Hawai'i, it had also been the Palace of the Kingdom of Hawai'i. The radicals believe the Palace remains the capitol of a still-living independent nation of Hawai'i that is under illegal military occupation by the United States. They believe the spirit of deposed Queen Lili'uokalani still lives there. They claim it is a desecration to fly the U.S. flag anywhere on Palace grounds, or to celebrate the alleged 113-year ongoing foreign occupation of their ancestral homeland.

And so the protesters arrived early, strung their anti-American independence banners between the trees, played loud Jawaiian reggae music through their amplifiers, and used a bullhorn to warn the legitimate participants that there would be trouble if the celebration actually took place. Some of the protesters walked up within inches of the people assembling for the celebration -- including the children in the high school band who were already seated with their instruments -- yelling loudly in their faces, while the bullhorn warned of trouble. The parent-chaperones felt a need to remove the children from such a hostile environment under threat of violence, and so the band left. An adult soloist, not connected with the school, gathered closely in a group with the remaining legitimate participants, so all could hear each other sing the National Anthem along with the State anthem (Hawai'i Pono'i), as the protesters surrounded them, shouting and cursing. And for an hour afterward there were small verbal skirmishes between celebrants and protesters while waiting for the chair-rental company to pick up the chairs which the band had so briefly occupied.

There were no arrests; indeed, this celebrant did not see any police or sheriffs at all, even when closely accosted by protesters shouting insults and wagging fingers in his face. The legitimate celebrants had an official permit to use the Palace grounds; but the management of the museum ("Friends of 'Iolani palace") is controlled by sovereignty activists who probably would have refused to make any police complaint against the protesters even if the management had been present or been asked to do so. (By contrast, there have been hundreds of Hawaiian sovereignty rallies at the same location, nearly all conducted without the issuance of any permit, and none suffering interference from anyone who might object to the anti-Americanism and racism publicly displayed at those events)

Some folks might blame Senator Slom for placing the students from Kalani High School in harm's way. Shouldn't he have known there'd be trouble? People who think this way are similar to Ward Churchill and Haunani-Kay Trask, who blame the U.S. for the fact that terrorists attacked the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 and killed 3,000 people. They say the U.S. "had it coming" because of our lifestyle and actions that offended the Islamofascists, causing them to hate us and attack us. They say the secretaries and janitors who worked in the Trade Center deserved to die, calling them "Little Eichmans" because their work was performed in service to multinational corporations that (the terrorists say) were oppressing Arabs. And so that kind of illogical thinking says the children of Kalani High School are legitimate targets because their presence at 'Iolani Palace, to play music for a flag-waving celebration of American sovereignty, is offensive to the Hawaiian sovereignty crazies. Let's hope not too many people think that way. Where should we put the blame for walking up to children, shaking fists, shouting, and using a bullhorn to warn "better leave now before there's trouble"? Put the blame right where it belongs -- on the shoulders of the evil-hearted wannabe terrorists who did it -- some of whom brought their own pre-pubescent children along as apprentice shouters and cursers so they too can learn how to terrorize others.

Happy Statehood Day 2006! Wait 'til next year! The celebration must be held at 'Iolani Palace, which is the historic Territorial Capitol where Statehood happened and where the U.S. flag flew proudly for 70 years. Moving the celebration somewhere else to appease the terrorists would be comparable to what Neville Chamberlain did in offering a compromise "Peace in Our Time" in 1939. Giving a piece of Czechoslovakia to Hitler to appease him did not bring peace in 1939; and giving a piece of Hawai'i (such as 'Iolani Palace) to the control of ethnic nationalist wannabe terrorists will not bring peace or unity or equality or aloha to Hawai'i in the 21st Century.

It must be stressed that there is no excuse for the hooliganism and terroristic threatening that took place on August 18. Sovereignty activists and their apologists say it was "insensitive" to hold Statehood Day celebrations on the grounds of the Palace where the monarchy was overthrown in 1893. But then, was it insensitive to fly the U.S. flag atop that building for 70 years? This is not about ruffling the feathers of some overly sensitive mourners of a bygone era. This is about the assertion that 'Iolani palace is the capitol of a still-living independent nation of Hawai'i, and therefore no U.S. flag should fly there and no celebration of the U.S. "occupation" should take place. The signs displayed in this photo at the Palace show the attitude that must be opposed and thoroughly defeated. Any respect at all for these sentiments empowers the Hawaiian secessionists.


Here is a photo of the Kalani High School Band, seated near the steps to 'Iolani Palace, holding their instruments, waiting to play three patriotic songs they had practiced. This photo was taken moments before these children were terroristically threatened by thugs who marched right up to them, yelled in their faces, and used a megaphone to shout that "unless you leave right now, we cannot guarantee your safety." Photo originally posted on the Small Business Hawaii website at:
http://www.smallbusinesshawaii.com/2006/statehood-pics/statehood02.jpg



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HAWAII STATEHOOD -- A Brief History of the 110-year Struggle to Achieve Statehood (1849-1959), and Current Challenges. Includes links to other webpages describing the Great Statehood Petition of 1954 with 120,000 signatures; the anti-statehood resolution that passed the Hawai'i Senate in 2001; the statehood celebration resolutions that died in the legislature in 2002 and 2003; the excellent Statehood Day message issued by Governor Cayetano in 2002 and the lukewarm message by Governor Lingle in 2003; the lack of any celebration in 2005 but the existence of a small anti-statehood rally at the Maui War memorial; and links to news reports and commentary about controversies over flying the U.S. flag at 'Iolani Palace and other places following the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center of September 11, 2001.

http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/statehoodhistandcurr.html

===============

http://www.frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=24105
FrontPageMagazine.com, August 29, 2006

No Freedom to Celebrate Statehood

By Andrew Walden

Honolulu's Iolani Palace August 18 witnessed the shameful spectacle of Americans being denied the right to peacefully celebrate the 1959 decision of 94% of Hawaii voters to become the 50th state. Citizens' first amendment rights were blocked by a gang including self-described drug-addicts led by pseudo-secessionist anti-American-military protesters Ikaika Hussey and Dr. Richard Kekuni Blaisdell. The goons' were abetted by the refusal of police to provide crowd control to assure that in 2006 the freedom to celebrate Hawaii Statehood is protected on the very site from which statehood was proclaimed in 1959.

Fifty goons could not obstruct the First Amendment of the United States Constitution without some backing. A key element of this goons' power comes from the so-called "Apology Resolution."

The Apology Resolution, Public Law 103-150, passed by the Democrat-controlled 103rd Congress and signed into law in 1993 by Democrat President Bill Clinton, in effect decrees that the 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom is the key fact in Hawaiian history. It then writes into law the "correct"version of the history of how the Hawaiian Kingdom was overthrown and apologizes for it.

After passage of six years in Hawaii without a government-organized statehood celebration, the marching band of Honolulu's Kalani High School planned to join State Senator Sam Slom (R-Hawaii Kai), State Representative Barbara Marumoto (R-Waialae-Kahala) and Bill Brennan, spokesperson for Honolulu's Democratic mayor, Mufi Hanneman at Iolani Palace the morning of Statehood Day, August 18. In preparation for the event, Hawaii's Republican Governor Linda Lingle issued an official Statehood Day proclamation -- her first after skipping the three previous Statehood Days. Democratic Congressman Ed Case, currently campaigning for the Democratic Senatorial nomination, announced his intention to attend.

The celebration was not allowed to proceed. Bikers rode their Harleys onto the palace grounds. Bill Brennan was shoved. Barbara Marumoto, dressed as Lady Liberty, and Sam Slom were menaced by thugs. Others shouting into a microphone told band members, "We cannot guarantee your safety unless you put down your instruments and leave the premises immediately." In spite of all the politicos and the High School band, no police were in sight and none arrived during the hour-long fracas that followed.

When asked about his dilated pupils by a reporter, one counter-protester explained, "I can smoke ice if I want to. I belong to the Kingdom of Hawaii." He then dropped his pants and exposed himself to the female reporter and two children.

Methamphetamine addiction continues to ravage Native Hawaiians and others on all the islands. In contrast to the addict, one of the leaders, Kekuni Blaisdell, is a MD. Is this MD interested in using addicts for his own political and economic gain rather than providing them the medical treatment they need to get off drugs? Does this anecdote tell the story of a living culture moving forward or of a culture being strangled by federally-decreed history lessons and the goons that enforce them?

One might ask if Clinton was apologizing to Hawaiians for making them Americans or apologizing to America for letting Hawaiians into the Union. Can these two views be separated? It would not be the first time Democrats have played this double game. In 1959 Segregationist Democrat Senators including Albert Gore Sr. (D-TN) worked to block Hawaii statehood on the grounds that Hawaii's multi-ethnic peoples were not white enough. Thirty-four years later on November 21, 1993, Albert Gore Jr. stood proudly behind Clinton as he signed 103-150 into law.

Is there an analogy between the Apology Resolution and the Democrat Party's 1964-65 reversal on civil rights for African-Americans?

For one-hundred years after the defeat of their Confederacy, Democrats stood for Jim Crow segregation. With the rise of the civil rights movement in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Democrats could see the writing on the wall. As segregation collapsed, they switched from the stick to the carrot and kept blacks in subjugation. As segregation ended, the welfare programs of Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society"began destroying black families and communities and undermining the morale of black men, women, and children.

The Apology Resolution has become the excuse for millions of dollars in pork-barrel spending on Hawaiian programs which keep low income Hawaiians in dependency and provide a ready cash flow for high-income Hawaiians attached to the political machines and the bureaucracy: Hence the doctor and the addict.

The 1893 overthrow of the monarchy is not the only fact in Hawaiian history nor are the facts surrounding the overthrow absolutely clear and subject to only one legitimate interpretation.

By decreeing the "correct"version of Hawaiian History, the 103rd Congress robs Native Hawaiians and all of Hawaii's people of opportunities to debate and challenge interpretations of the past. By extension we are robbed of the freedom to advocate differing interpretations of the Hawaiian future. As Senator Slade Gorton (R-WA) said in opposing the Apology Resolution, "...the logical consequences of this resolution would be independence."

Culture emerges from the past. Culture continually evolves and develops in response to the changing world around it. At one point a particular interpretation of history seems to better inform the present. At another point, other interpretations gain more credence. The strength of a culture comes not from one interpretation or the other but from the interplay of all interpretations.

By decreeing one "correct"version of Hawaiian history, the United States government, with the acquiescence of guilt-ridden liberals, has fossilized an important section of the Hawaiian past. Denial of the right to challenge federal history spreads the fossilization process from 1893 to interpretations of the present day.

If the federally-decreed fossilization spreads, Hawaiian culture will die. In its place will only be welfare programs for Hawaiian 'victims'. In the name of national independence, personal dependence is created. Even those who believe the version of history contained in the Apology Resolution should recognize that any government decreed history is inherently an act of cultural genocide.

The one-sided version of history decreed by Clinton is at the root of comments by others such as Kapu Paishon from Pahoa writing in a letter published in the Star Bulletin: "(H)osting a celebration of Statehood Day at the palace is a textbook example in disrespect and insensitivity toward the Hawaiian people. One would think that the appropriate venue for such a program would be at the state Capitol building. Are the organizers of the event so ignorant of the history that surrounds the palace … The Statehood Day celebrants owe all of us an apology for their gross stupidity."

No, the Statehood celebrants are not ignorant. Here are some historical facts secessionists wish to keep all of Hawaii ignorant of:

* Iolani Palace was the seat of the Hawaii legislature from 1900 through 1969.

* The 1959 statehood referendum was supported by 94% of Hawaii voters.

* Molokai -- the most Hawaiian of the major Islands -- voted 97% for Statehood.

* When the Hawaii Statehood Act was signed by Eisenhower, Iolani was where the proclamation was announced. Iolani was the site of huge spontaneous celebrations on August 21, 1959.

* In 1902, Hawaiian royal heir Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole led Native Hawaiians in joining the Republican Party and supporting US rule. Native Hawaiians were elected to the majority of legislative seats and joined the civil service.

* In 1919 Prince Kuhio, serving as Hawaii's Territorial Delegate to the US Congress, presented the first Hawaii Statehood Bill.

* Between 1941 and 1945 American soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines fought and died from Pearl Harbor to Okinawa to keep Hawaii free.

* A 2006 Grassroot Institute poll of over 39,000 Hawaii residents found that even after three-and-a-half decades of relentless anti-American propaganda, 77.8% would vote for statehood today.

* The same poll shows that 61.4% of Native Hawaiians would vote for statehood today.

The slogan of Kamehameha Schools is "I mua"(forward) not "Ho'opau"(cease). No culture, including Native Hawaiian culture, can survive government-ordered historical interpretation. For a culture to live and grow there must be free debate, interpretation and re-interpretation of history.

The Apology Resolution is a dagger aimed at killing free inquiry into the past. It is an ideological tool for politically-connected elites to acquire federal pork and to shield highly lucrative corrupt activities from legal scrutiny. The goons are their enforcers.

Freedoms not used are lost. Next year, statehood celebrants should be back again at Iolani Palace.

Free debate of Hawaiian history is a necessary precondition of the continuation of Hawaiian culture. For free debate to occur, police must maintain the peace. Next year, law enforcement and political leaders can do a great service to Hawaiian culture and to the cause of freedom by ensuring that statehood celebrations are allowed to occur without harassment or intimidation.

Debate and inquiry into Hawaiian history must be liberated from the shackles of federally-decreed political correctness. Hawaii must recognize all of its history, not just the parts convenient to the anti-Americans. Joining America is nothing to apologize for. Congress should repeal Public Law 103-150.

Senate Debate on Passage of the Apology Resolution 1993:
http://www.hawaii-nation.org/congrec-senate.html

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** First comment at FrontPage:
Date: 8/29/2006 9:21:36 AMName: SFLBIB

Subject: Sorry, so sorry Comment:

- Clinton apologized for slavery.

- Clinton apologized for the support Washington gave dictators and kleptocrats in the name of cold war anti-communism.

- Clinton apologized for the failure of the "international community" to act quickly enough in the Rwandan genocide.
http://www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/1998/03/31/time/clinton.africa.html

- Clinton apologized to the Okinawans for the sexual abuse their women and girls had suffered at the hands of American soldiers.
http://www.harpers.org/BillClinton.html

- Clinton apologized for the Tuskeegee research.
http://www.actupny.org/reports/clinton97zap.html

- Clinton apologized to the Greeks for not supporting democracy strongly enough.
http://www.bbhq.com/this0320.htm

- Clinton apologized to former President Nelson Mandela . . . for his 27 years in prison.
http://www.theperspective.org/2005/mar/historicalcontext.html

- Clinton apologized for the supposedly bad behavior of the entire Western world toward Iran for the last 150 years.
http://www.house.gov/hasc/schedules/92905GerechtTestimony.pdf

- Clinton apologized to the people of Guatemala.
http://www.ariannaonline.com/columns/column.php?id=281

- Clinton apologized for his sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky.
http://www.ratherbiased.com/impeachment.htm

- Clinton apologized for the secret radiation tests performed on Americans.
http://www.pecos.net/news/arch97a/082997o.htm

- Clinton apologized to Hawaii.
http://starbulletin.com/2003/11/23/business/bizcol.html

- Clinton apologized even FOR THE CRUSADES!
http://www.enterstageright.com/archive/articles/0404/quotes.htm

And now, ta-ta...

- "Clinton today apologized to Antarctica." - George Will.
http://texnews.com/1998/opinion/will0331.html

What a sorry excuse for a president.


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HERE IS A LIST OF CONTENTS BELOW

TWO ANNOUNCEMENTS OF THE EVENT, AND THE GOVERNOR'S PROCLAMATION REMINDING CITIZENS ABOUT THE HOLIDAY

NEWS REPORTS AFTER THE RUMBLE AT THE PALACE, IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER OF PUBLICATION (Note -- the Honolulu Advertiser did not cover the event, but the Star-Bulletin did so and provided a fair and balanced report the following morning).

The first reports were on KHNL TV (Channel 8, Honolulu) on the 5,6, and 10 PM newscasts of August 18. The KHNL broadcast transcript is provided, along with two videos, and four photos. The links to the videos work for those who have the software; but might expire after a few days. Copy and paste them into your browser with crossed fingers.

That same evening Hawaii Reporter published a hastilly-written article "Hawaii Statehood Celebration Turns Ugly" by a Republican candidate running in the primary election for Congress, Richard Noah Hough, who was an eye-witness.

The morning of August 19 the Honolulu Star-Bulletin published a fair and balanced lengthy front-page story with four excellent photos, all provided below.

The morning of August 21, Hawaii Reporter editor and president Malia Zimmerman, who was an eye-witness, published a lengthy article describing exactly what happened. Some photos were inserted later.

The afternoon of August 21, Don Newman, senior policy analyst for Grassroot Hawaii, published an article in Hawaii Reporter.

August 22: Garry Smith published an article in Hawaii Reporter

August 25: Elaine Willman published an article in Hawaii Reporter

August 25: 2 leters to editor published in Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Sunday August 27: (1) Letter in Honolulu Advertiser; (2) 2 letters in Honolulu Star-Bulletin; (3) News report in the "Business" section of the Star-Bulletin describing newly appointed Executive Director of Iolani palace, and his plans to meet with the Governor and the state parks department to assert that Palace officials should have control over the way the grounds of the palace are used (presumably they will try to deny any permit for Statehood Day celebrations on Palace grounds in the future).

August 28: (1) Honolulu Advertiser letter says Statehood Day celebrations do not belong at the Palace because "'Iolani Palace, the heart of the Hawaiian kingdom, stands as a constant reminder of atrocities committed against that peaceful nation. Blatantly and disrespectfully casting salt upon an open wound ... is by no means a joyous occasion." (2) Another Advertiser letter says Hawai'i is not truly part of the U.S. because annexation was not done lawfully. (3) Hawaii Reporter letter says "Americans Should Pack Up Their Bags and Go Back Home" (4) Hawaii Reporter letter says "Racism is Evil"

August 31, Honolulu Star-Bulletin letter by Richard Kinney says the protest on Statehood Day was righteous and is a small example of what should have happened in 1893, 1900, and 1959.

** Article published on Statehood Day, August 18, 2006, in West Hawaii Today (Kona). This article has no relation to the events at 'Iolani palace, but is simply a "balanced" news report about the history of Statehood Day published in an daily newspaper on a different island.

Articles published August 30, commemorating the death of William F. Quinn on August 28. Quinn was the last (appointed) Governor of the Territory of Hawai'i, and the first (elected) Governor of the State of Hawai'i. A photo of his inauguration clearly shows that it took place at 'Iolani palace.


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http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?038583b4-77e1-4884-8690-6b038dfa2d62
Hawaii Reporter, August 8, 2006

Hawaii Statehood to Again Be Celebrated
Senator, Small Business Hawaii Organizing Event for Friday, Aug. 18

By Sen. Sam Slom

HONOLULU, HI: Each third Friday in August is a state and county holiday in Hawaii, marking admission to the union. But for the past half dozen years, there have been no official celebrations noting Hawaii's entrance as a full partner with all the rights of a state of the United States.

Why no observance?

Hawaii became the 50th State of the United States on Aug. 21, 1959, after a long and passionate battle stretching from the 1930s and since 1947 when a Statehood Commission was established.

The residents of the Territory of Hawaii struggled to convince the United States Congress that citizens of Hawaii were "worthy" enough to be part of the U.S.

For decades there had been strong Congressional opposition to statehood in Hawaii-and Alaska. Distance, geography, race, ethnicity, politics and in the case of Hawaii, "loyalty" to the United States were all issues. (Loyalty because of Pearl Harbor and the fear of Japanese intervention, and several Congressional hearings uncovering communist infiltration of labor unions and membership within Hawaii).

Residents of Hawaii anticipated becoming the 49th U.S. state after World War II. But statehood didn't come then and it didn't come easily. A Constitutional Convention in 1950 drafted Hawaii's basic legal document which closely matched the U.S. Constitution. It too waited.

Political horse-trading added value to all the business names, commemorative coins and materials declaring Hawaii the "49th." In the end, a deal was struck to bring Alaska and Hawaii into the Union together, with Alaska getting the nod first in1958.

There was also some opposition at home to statehood. Among some Native Hawaiians and also business interests. But a vote to affirm statehood was passed with more than 94% of Hawaii residents enthusiastically approving.

On March 12, 1959, at about 10:04 am (Hawaii Standard Time), the U.S. House of Representatives voted 323 to 89 in favor of granting statehood to Hawaii. The previous day the Senate passed an identical bill, 76 to 15. Months later, on August 21, President Dwight David Eisenhower made it official by signing the proclamation welcoming Hawaii as the 50th state. Statehood celebrations were unprescedented in Hawai'i. There was happiness, relief and pride everywhere. Nearly every church bell rang. Almost every ship in Honolulu Harbor blew her whistle. Fireworks and bonfires were ablaze. Bands played in Waikiki, shops closed, and teenagers jitterbugged and waved banners outside Iolani Palace. Hula in the streets was prominent.

During the next several decades, Hawaii experienced tremendous economic growth. Statehood and political stability were recognized as primary factors for that growth.

But there were also growing pains and internal issues. By the 1990s, political protests were more common and frequent and an increase in anti-American sentiment, stoked by Vietnam, was accelerated by a rising, more militant, activist community and university.

Major Native Hawaiian protests emerged, centered around the 100th anniversary of the annexation of Hawaii (1893) by the United States, in 1993, and the initial advocacy of the divisive Akaka Bill in 1999.

Parallel to this, was a marked loss of fervor for celebration of American holidays in Hawaii, including the Admission Day state holiday, which then became Statehood Day.

Finally, the holiday was not observed at all.

The last "major" observance of this holiday took place in Candlestick Park, San Francisco, with Democrat Governor Benjamin Cayetano and area Hawaii residents and visitors. The Governor explained that the celebration in Hawaii had become too controversial, and that it might now be perceived as culturally insensitive by Native Hawaiian leaders.

When Republican Gov. Linda Lingle was elected in 2002-the first Republican elected in Hawaii in 40 years -- it was assumed Hawaii would make a return to American values while honoring Native Hawaiian rights as well.

Despite federal and state monies set aside for celebration of Statehood, meaningful celebrations have not taken place.

Some political leaders assume that Native Hawaiians would be upset with a public reminder of American Statehood. Their support of the recently defeated Akaka Bill stiffened resolve not to support Statehood Day.

While the upset with the event may be true of certain activist political leaders, the support of statehood among all sectors of the State of Hawaii, including Native Hawaiians, still remains high.

During the 2006 Legislative Session, I introduced a Resolution to eliminate Statehood Day as a paid government holiday since the government doesn't want to recognize it. The Resolution never got a public hearing.

Now the organization I head, Small Business Hawaii, plans to take the lead and sponsor a public celebration of the 47th year of statehood in Hawaii for those who want to recognize and celebrate the day.

The government has remained silent but I believe it is appropriate for private citizens to lead the event which I hope will invigorate the day and holiday.

It is not a political statement but one of historical reality that used to be fun.

The public is invited to the brief celebration, Friday, Aug. 18, from 10 to 11 a.m., in front of historic Iolani Palace.

The event is being planned as a joyful recognition of being part of America, and our American troops will be recognized and honored.

Entertainers are welcome. The public is encouraged to wear red, white and blue, bring an American Flag, bring family and friends, and enjoy the benefits of freedom.

For more details, contact Small Business Hawaii at 808-396-1724; or reach Sam Slom at (808) 349-5438 or by email at mailto:sbh@lava.net

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http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?a69baf6c-5b88-4f47-813f-b470cf0ffd93
Hawaii Reporter, August 15, 2006

Kalani Band, Yamaguchi to Highlight Statehood Celebration This Friday, August 18

By Sam Slom

Organizers of Hawaii's 47th Statehood Day Celebration have announced that the celebrated Kalani High School Marching Band, and patriotic soloist, Tom Yamaguchi, will highlight the musical entertainment at this Friday's event, August 18, 10-11 am, at Iolani Palace.

The event recognizes Hawaii's entrance into the United States as a state, August 21, 1959.

Small Business Hawaii (SBH) and its president, State Senator Sam Slom have stepped forward to organize a celebration of Hawaii's statehood after years of non-celebration.

The event is free and open to the public; it will also honor America's men and women in the armed forces. The event is being planned as a joyful recognition of being part of America, and honoring our American troops.

Other entertainers are welcome. Those wishing to attend are encouraged to wear red, white and blue, bring an American Flag, their family and friends, and enjoy the benefits of freedom.

For details, contact SBH at 808 - 396-1724, or Sam Slom, the president of Small Business Hawaii, at 808 - 349-5438.

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Governor Linda Lingle, Proclamation for Statehood Day 2006, on official stationery in pdf format. It was published two days after Senator Slom's first announcement, and barely a day before the privately-organized celebration. Governor Lingle had been asked to organize a government-sponsored celebration, but refused on grounds of "political correctness" because she felt it might offend ethnic Hawaiians for the State of Hawai'i to celebrate the state holiday that honors the fact that we are a state! Lingle created the proclamation only after advisors warned her that, in view of the privately-organized celebration, she would be embarrassed if she failed to issue one. The proclamation as first printed had the wrong date for the 1959 Admission Day. An official announcement of the proclamation backdated its date of issuance to make it appear the proclamation had been issued earlier. Note that Lingle has repeatedly traveled to Washington D.C. to zealously lobby Congress to pass the Akaka bill, and spent most of her time with President Bush when he was in Hawai'i urging him to support the Akaka bill. Lingle has also personally attended numerous ceremonies for groundbreaking on Hawaiian Homelands projects. She personally appeared at a huge red-short rally at 'Iolani Palace, and wore the red shirt while speaking in support of Kamehameha School's racially segregated admissions policy. Yet she refused to have the state sponsor the Statehood Day celebration, refused to attend it, didn't issue a proclamation until it became apparent that the celebration would go forward under private sponsorship and she would be embarrassed if she made no statement at all. Thus it is clear where Governor Lingle's priorities lie -- support racial separatism, cultivate the approval of Hawaii's highly favored racial group, and do nothing that might offend the most radical leaders of that group. Here's the proclamation:

http://www.angelfire.com/planet/bigfiles40/StatehdDayLingleProc081806.pdf


====================

The first news reports were on KHNL TV (Channel 8, Honolulu) on the 5,6, and 10 PM newscasts. Here are the contents of their webpage for this event, including a broadcast transcript, two videos, and four photos. The links work for those who have the software; but might expire after a few days. Copy and paste them into your browser with crossed fingers.

http://www.khnl.com/Global/story.asp?S=5301211

KHNL TV

Aug 18, 2006 07:01 PM

Statehood Showdown At Iolani Palace

By: Stephen Florino

(KHNL)- A day of celebration turned into one of confrontation.

As dozens tried to honor Hawaii's statehood, many more showed up to put an end to the party. The protestors were Native Hawaiian groups, fighting against what they say was the illegal overthrow of the monarchy.

The statehood celebration was on the grounds of Iolani Palace.

"We found that it was extremely disrespectful, and ignorant and arrogant all at the same time," said Kealii Collier, one of the protestors.

State Senator Sam Slom organized the event. He said recently, that historic day 47-years ago hasn't been celebrated the way it should've been.

"People have been afraid to come out and express their pride in America," said Slom. "Even today, there were threats against the high school band here, people that were here."

Slom says he wanted the celebration on the grounds of Iolani Palace because that's where Hawaii was proclaimed a state.

Native Hawaiians felt it was disrespectful because the palace served as home to the Hawaiian monarchy, and prison to Queen Liliuokalani.

"The people who imprisoned her were the Americans of that time," said Collier. "And Americans of this time are continuing the same imprisonment."

There were numerous confrontations between both groups. But no one was hurt or arrested.

"That's what it's all about -- America and free speech, " said Slom. "That's why we're proud to be American. Proud to be in Hawaii, and why people fought for more than three decades for statehood."

Slom says he was not surprised or disappointed, but felt some of the protestors were not courteous. He says the celebration was not meant to be disrespectful, but to mark an historic event.

Statehood day is celebrated on the third Friday in August.

The official day Hawaii became a part of the union was August 21, 1959.

Featured Videos

More From The Clash At Iolani Palace

javascript:playVideo('921576', 'More%20From%20The%20Clash%20At%20Iolani%20Palace', 'v', 'News', '258733', 'News', '', '');

Statehood Showdown At Iolani Palace

javascript:playVideo('921573', 'Statehood%20Showdown%20At%20Iolani%20Palace', 'v', 'News', '147833', 'News', '', '');

Photos

http://KHNL.images.worldnow.com/images/5301211_BG1.jpg

http://KHNL.images.worldnow.com/images/5301211_BG2.jpg

http://KHNL.images.worldnow.com/images/5301211_BG3.jpg

http://KHNL.images.worldnow.com/images/5301211_BG4.jpg

** In the humble opinion of website editor Ken Conklin, the best of these four photos is the second one, showing Ken Conklin and Terri Raymond just getting started. Soon she would press in very close, shout loudly and at length so the crowd many yards away could hear, and shake her finger close enough to Conklin's face, repeatedly, that he could have bitten it without taking a step if he wanted to (he did, in fact, playfully pantomine biting the finger). As events unfolded, it became clear that various wannabe-terrorists singled out particular celebrants for the purpose of approaching closely, harrassing, assaulting, and provoking them. Raymond chose Conklin.


Ms. Raymond has a 35-year history as an anti-military, anti-American, Hawaiian sovereignty activist. She was "honored" guest of the University of Hawaii Political Science Department, April 29, 2005, as follows:

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http://socialsciences.people.hawaii.edu/events/Detail.CFM?Events_EventId=139&Event_Detail=ok&View=Full

Event Title: Terri Napua Keko'olani-Raymond, Politics Community Scholar in Residence, will speak. Topic: "A Personal Account of My Years in the Hawaiian Movement"

Description: "My talk will be a personal account of my years in the Hawaiian movement, from my anti-war resistence days as a High School student, the struggle on UH-M campus to establish Ethnic Studies, experience in various anti-development struggles like Waiahole, Waikane, TH-3, involvement in Kanaka Maoli nation building, the early campaign to stop Navy bombing on Kaho'olawe, various anti-eviction struggles like Makua & Pai Ohana, work regarding iwi kupuna on Mo'okapu, and more recently demilitarization work with Ohana Koa, Nuclear Free & Independent Pacific & DMZ Hawai'i Aloha Aina."

Speaker(s): Terri Napua Keko'olani-Raymond

Time: 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Location: Harry Friedman Room Saunders 624
Sponsored by: Political Science

Other Information: "Terri Napua Keko'olani-Raymond is a Hawaiian activist, member of 'Ohana Koa, the Hawai'i chapter of Nuclear Free and Independent Pacific (NFIP), and DMZ Hawai'i / Aloha 'Äina, an island-wide alliance to demilitarize Hawai'i. Throughout the last 30 years, Napua organized Hawaiian resistance against state sanctioned evictions of natives from their land, fought the H-3 freeway that destroyed many sites sacred to the Hawaiian people for the sake of connecting Pearl Harbor to the Kaneohe Marine Corp Base, and occupied Kaho'olawe Island to save it from the US Navy's bombs. She was also integral to organizing protests in Hawai'i against nuclear testing in Tahiti. She is also supportive of the movements of Indigenous Peoples worldwide to oppose militarization of their homelands." She is our Political Science Department's Politics Community Scholar in Residence.

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Terri Raymond was featured in a Honolulu Star-Bulletin special feature story about a photo exhibition of protesters in the Hawaiian resistance movement going back to the 1970s. The first photo shows a bunch of radical men all dressed alike in brown shirts and berets. Raymond's photo from 1973 is included. See:
http://starbulletin.com/2003/07/10/features/story1.html


30 years later, Raymond was arrested October 29, 2003 while protesting and trying to disrupt a public hearing regarding U.S. military plans to deploy a stryker brigade. See:
http://starbulletin.com/2003/11/21/news/story12.html

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http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?506054a6-97d2-4d0b-8344-464f59bce661
Hawaii Reporter, August 18, 2006

Hawaii Statehood Celebration Turns Ugly

By Richard Noah Hough

Today is the state of Hawaii's 47th Birthday. And with an open invitation announced on the radio by state Sen. Sam Slom to celebrate this occasion at Iolani Palace, where statehood was originally declared, I took my family to the event to meet with people and show my support for the union. A local high school band was on site, outside the steps of the palace, and to my surprise, so were unregistered protesters. Armed with microphone, bullhorns, and ample rage, needless to say the occasion did not go as I hoped but a part of me expected.

So for one hour I observed Sam Slom and others hold their ground while insolent, arrogant and ultimately, uninformed, brainwashed hooligans insulted them. It was a sad event and worthy of the public's attention.

What is sad, to me, is that the children of those protesting were casting their own insults with plenty of cursing and abusiveness. The facts they used, on the steps of this utterly western palace, were ridiculous; but, to their credit some on the other side of the argument had their own facts and commentary grounded in misconception -- not everyone is an equal debater or a good advocate for what they desire to say and hold dear in their heart.

I believe that there will be a day when such confrontations will go beyond verbal, but who will cast the first stone? To those who are loyal to the United States, I observed and I spent most my time silently watching and taking it all in, no insulting or threatening behavior was put forth. Yet, those protesting, even on the microphones with police present, made threats and even stated, "we are coming for you Gov. Linda Lingle, Sam Slom ... and all you in the Hawaii Legislature, we are coming for you!"

I am an advocate of free speech and not a fan of the laws supporting my next statement, but also I believe such statements would be taken as "terroristic threatening" in any other state.

It was a sad day for Hawaii. Three years from now, on the 50th anniversary of statehood, I pray that the elected officials of Hawaii make a big fuss. Should they not, it will be par for the course and demonstrative of the failed leadership over this state in our union.

Richard Noah Hough is a Republican Candidate for U.S. House (Honolulu). See more about him at http://www.houghforcongress.org or reach him via email at mailto:houghr002@hawaii.rr.com

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** NOTE: The Honolulu Advertiser chose not to cover this important event, even though it had been notified at least two days beforehand.

===============

http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/19/news/story01.html
Honolulu Star-Bulletin, August 19, 2006

Statehood celebration at palace gets heated
Protesters say the event was held at the "scene of a crime"

By Diana Leone

A small group marking Hawaii's statehood anniversary yesterday was confronted by protesters who said the grounds of Iolani Palace were the wrong place for the celebration.

Clashing views of Hawaii history were evident as about 50 native Hawaiians and supporters with a public address system shouted at a similar number of American flag-waving Statehood Day celebrants trying to sing "The Star-Spangled Banner" without accompaniment.

The statehood group carried American flags, including the "Don't Tread on Me" flag of the American Revolutionary War.

Protesters carried Queen Liliuokalani's Hae Kalaunu crown flag and had posted banners such as "De-occupy Pae Aina O Hawaii" or "Kuokoa Kanaka Maoli Independence."

The event was organized by state Sen. Sam Slom (R, Hawaii Kai), who said the palace grounds were "exactly the right place because this is where statehood was declared" on Aug. 21, 1959.

Slom, president of Small Business Hawaii, said he promoted the event through e-mails and media announcements, and that "anyone was welcome to come."

Several protesters said they were there because they found Slom's choice of the Iolani Palace grounds, viewed as the heart of the Hawaiian monarchy, as provocative and insulting.

"This is a sacred spot, which is the seat of our government," said Kekuni Blaisdell, a longtime Hawaiian sovereignty activist, of the importance of Iolani Palace.

Before the 10 a.m. start time of Slom's event, a male protester with a microphone urged the statehood celebration be held at the state Capitol instead.

"This is the scene of a crime," said another protester, Karen Murray. "The queen was held captive up there," she said, pointing to the upper story of the palace.

Among those gathered with Slom were H. William Burgess, who challenged the constitutionality of the state Office of Hawaiian Affairs and Hawaiian Homes Commission Act in federal court, and Kenneth Conklin, whose lawsuit successfully opened OHA trustee positions to non-Hawaiians.

Burgess, who said he remembers Statehood Day as a day of rejoicing in Hawaii, called the protest part of "the politics of racial grievance."

The total number celebrating statehood with Slom appeared to be fewer than 50, not including the Kalani High School Band, which he had invited to play.

The band left the event before it started and without playing their instruments after being heckled by protesters.

"We should not be here. We don't have to subject our students to that kind of situation," one adult with the band said as the students were escorted away.

Slom tried to make a short speech about the significance of Statehood Day but could hardly be heard over protesters shouting comments such as, "We have less freedom now. We had more freedom in our own kingdom."

Though there were moments of heated argument and boisterous shouting, the hour-long encounter between the two sides had moments of civility as well.

"I'm not attacking you as a person," protester Kamana Beamer told Slom. "I'm attacking America's occupation of Hawaii."

Beamer said he considers himself to have dual citizenship of both the United States and the kingdom of Hawaii.

At one point a protester put his hand on city spokesman Bill Brennan's shoulder as if to push him, while asking the statehood celebrators to leave. Brennan stood his ground and asked the man to take his hand away.

Protester Baron Ching has no Hawaiian blood, but said his Chinese grandfather protested the annexation of Hawaii as an American territory because of American treatment of Chinese and Japanese.

Ching said the Hawaiian protesters might "yell a little bit and wag fingers," but he noted that in 113 years of objections to annexation, "there has been not one single act of violence."

State Rep. Barbara Marumoto (R, Waialae-Kahala) wore a Statue of Liberty costume to the event, which she said she expected would be "lighthearted."

Instead, she said, afterward, "I was very upset" at the behavior of the protesters. "They were directing a lot of their remarks at the students, and it was unseemly behavior to address it at the students.

"If they wanted to direct it at Sen. Slom, that's fair game," Marumoto said, "but the students were really victims in this situation. It was very sad."

As the two groups began to disperse, there were signs of aloha, too.

The white-mustachioed Burgess, his blue dress shirt wet with sweat, was sharing an animated but friendly conversation with a long-haired protester wearing a red Hawaiian sovereignty T-shirt as the two sat in the shade of Iolani Palace.

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** Photos


** original URL, caption, and credit
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/19/news/art1b.jpg
Pam Smith and Keli'i Collier clashed as friends held on to Collier.
DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARBULLETIN.COM

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** original URL, caption, and credit
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/19/news/art1d.jpg
A group marking Hawaii's statehood clashed yesterday with a group objecting to the observance of the anniversary on the grounds of Iolani Palace. Above, H. William Burgess and his wife, Sandra Puanani Burgess (at left with back to camera), had words with Hanaloa (no last name given) as Dexter Kaiama tried to separate the two arguing sides.
DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARBULLETIN.COM

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** original URL, caption, and credit
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/19/news/art1c.jpg
After the statehood group started to pack up, the protesters formed a circle to chant.
DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARBULLETIN.COM

** Note: In the center of the circle is Ken Conklin, wearing a light-colored shirt, holding his U.S. flag. This happened because as the circle began to form, Conklin was in the middle. A protester peremptorily and dismissively waved Conkin away, but Conklin refused to move. Thereupon the protester shrugged his shoulders and motioned for everyone to continue forming the prayer circle. The use of public prayer as a political weapon is commonplace in the Hawaiian sovereignty movement. But the protesters were shocked when Conklin chanted the prayer in Hawaiian right along with them! The prayer, "E Ho Mai" calls upon the spirits above to come in support -- an appropriate prayer for anyone seeking the help of the gods!

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** original URL, caption, and credit
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/19/news/art1a.jpg
State Sen. Sam Slom, holding a U.S. flag, and state Rep. Barbara Marumoto, dressed as the Statue of Liberty, faced protesters who said Iolani Palace was the wrong place for yesterday's statehood celebration.
DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARBULLETIN.COM

=================

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?97773d5e-4946-4230-8e6e-bd58a2c57cd7
Hawaii Reporter, August 21, 2006

Children Threatened by Anti-American Protestors at Hawaii's Statehood Celebration

Complete Lawlessness, That is How Observers Described the Conditions at Iolani Palace; Threats Were Made Against Innocent Civilians and Lawmakers There to Celebrate; Capitol Police Never Showed During the 1-Hour-Long Confrontation

By Malia Zimmerman, 8/21/2006

Hawaii became a state on August 21st, 1959, after a primarily native Hawaiian Legislature and 95 percent of the island residents voted to support the conversion from a Territory. The announcement was made from Iolani Palace, where the Legislature regularly convened, and the news was met with celebrations throughout the new 50th state, hula dancing in the streets, and an economy going gangbusters.

However, 47 years later on the day the state observes "Admissions Day" with a state and county holiday, there was a very different scene at Iolani Palace -- complete lawlessness wielded by a pack of snarling gangsters who called themselves native Hawaiian protestors who were ranting irrationally about their hatred toward America and its citizens.

State Sen. Sam Slom, a Republican who also heads the small business advocacy group, Small Business Hawaii, organized a 47th annual statehood celebration at the Iolani Palace grounds and invited everyone in the state to participate. He remembers when there was no state Capitol and the Legislature and government affairs were conducted at Iolani Palace, which is why, for historical accuracy, he planned to hold the statehood celebration there.

Slom and others attending, including a military officer who as a child was present at the statehood announcement, said they were excited because this was the first celebration in 6 years. The last statehood event was held in California because then Gov. Benjamin Cayetano said it was too controversial to celebrate statehood at home in part because groups like this sabotaged it.

On Friday, the day statehood was observed, Slom welcomed a group of about 50 people who arrived with big smiles, American flags and plans to enjoy the 90-member Kalani High School Band. One of the best high school bands in the state, Kalani High School Band was recruited to play its favorite songs along with the one patriotic song that the band members knew.

But instead of a warm welcome, the patriots were greeted by a gang of about 50 hostile protestors with bullhorns, a state-of-the-art sound system, and preprinted signs protesting the statehood celebration, and who claimed to represent the feelings of native Hawaiians throughout Hawaii and the world, of which there are an estimated 400,000.

Shouting profanities in front of children as young as 6 years old, and spitting and yelling at those who were there to observe statehood, the protestors said they wanted to "wipe their ass" with the American Flag or burn it. One protestor screamed in front of a military family that it was a really good thing that Americans died in the 9-11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Centers -- that Americans deserved to be "slammed down." All who spoke on the mega phones or microphone said Americans including the native Hawaiian people who showed up to celebrate statehood -- should get off "their land" and out of Hawaii.

One of the leaders of the pack, with rabid eyes and foam around his mouth, carried a bullhorn and shouted profanities directly in people's ears. He pushed around women and children and senior citizens. He spit on people. He bit the American flags people carried and tried to tear them. He took down his pants and told people to suck him. In front of their children, he called women "bitches" and told them to "show him their tits." He even bragged about being high on crystal meth, saying he could do whatever he wants because he belongs to the "kingdom of Hawaii," not America.

Threats of Physical Violence, Verbal Attacks, Targets Kids First

The protestors used a strategy that the Islamic terrorists co-opted when they hijacked the planes on 9-11. They attacked those people they perceived as the weakest people first -- in this case the children -- so they could break part of the group and scare them into leaving.

The belligerent group opened the protest shouting threats of violence at the young band members who were sitting quietly as they observed the scene and waited for the go-ahead from their bandleader to play some of their favorite songs and the one patriotic song they knew.

They told the 13-year-old to 17-year-old kids and their parents that if they played even one note, they would be in danger. "We cannot guarantee your safety unless you put down your instruments and leave the premises immediately," one protestor shouted from a microphone, just feet away from the kids who were sitting in a semi-circle, instruments in hand.

The berating by various protestors of the high school band continued for 15 minutes until frightened parents and the band leader quietly led the kids away and had them board the bus that their area Senator had especially rented for the occasion.

Applauding wildly and cheering as the band kids abandoned their seats without playing a note and headed toward the bus, the protestors congratulated themselves, saying they were victorious there and would be in taking back Hawaii from America.

Police Never Showed, Despite Lawlessness

As the remaining 50 people there to celebrate statehood stood in a circle and sang the National Anthem and Hawaii Pono I, the protestors interrupted them by yelling and cursing and threatening to burn the American flags.

Threats were also made against other citizens including Slom as well as state Rep. Barbara Marumoto, who enthusiastically arrived on scene with her freedom torch in hand, dressed as "Lady Liberty."

But the state police based just yards away at the Capitol did not show up during the hour-long event, during which numerous laws were openly and intentionally broken. That included threatening children and their parents as well as elected officials and other innocent civilians, "flashing" in front of women and children, demonstrating without a permit, using a sound system and bullhorns without a permit, driving a Harley Davidson to the foot of the palace steps where it is off-limits to automobiles and motorcycles, and standing on the palace steps during the demonstration.

The protestors said their main contention, besides the fact that Hawaii is a state, is that the event was held in front of the palace.

Running around with video cameras so they could film their confrontations, they shouted over and over that "their Queen," Liliuokalani, had been imprisoned in the palace in 1893 and that it was "the scene of a crime." They said there should not be any celebrations at the palace, especially by the "haoles" or outsiders "whose ancestors had brought diseases to Hawaii and killed their ancestors."

They called those there to celebrate, "ignorant," "arrogant" and "disrespectful." But those there to attend the statehood celebration, including native Hawaiians and lifetime residents, said the protestors were the ones who were arrogant, ignorant, disrespectful and oblivious to their own native Hawaiian history.

Rewriting History to Further Anti-Americanism

The protestors attempted to rewrite history to justify their protest rather than admit some basic facts:

* Ties to the United States were advocated in the early 1800s by their own native Hawaiian royalty, including King Kamehameha III and Hawaiian rulers who followed, because they foresaw the need for protection of the United States military against other foreign governments including France and Britain and were beginning to appreciate a free-market system.

* When Queen Liliuokalani was overthrown in favor of a Republic government because she sought absolute power, it was not by the hands of the United States government or military, but rather by Hawaii's citizens.

* Then President Grover Cleveland unsuccessfully attempted to reinstate the monarchy.

* While these modern day protestors claimed the American military pointed guns at their Queen, the American military never did such a thing. 162 marines and sailors were sent ashore to protect American lives and property, not to participate in the arrest of a Queen, and not once did they fire a single shot.

* Hawaii became a Republic in 1894, was annexed to the United States in 1898, allowed all Native Hawaiians full U.S. citizenship in 1900, and sent as its first delegate to Congress, Robert Wilcox, a native Hawaiian who was elected on the promise that the first bill he would introduce was for statehood.

* In 1903, the Territory's first Legislature with more than 70 percent being Native Hawaiian, asked Congress to convene a constitutional convention to establish a constitution in hopes Hawaii would become a state.

* In 1919, Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalakaua Kalaniana'ole, who was Hawaii's elected Territorial Delegate and heir to the throne if the Kingdom had it continued, introduced the first bill for Hawaii statehood in Congress.

* Between 1919 and 1954, 33 more bills for statehood were introduced in Congress by Hawaii's Territorial delegates.

* In 1940, results of a Hawaii Statehood plebiscite showed that two out of three Hawaii voters said "Yes" for Statehood.

* In 1959, the people of Hawaii finally achieved their long sought goal with 95 percent of the vote. On Molokai, where the majority of people are native Hawaiian, the percentage supporting statehood was its highest at 97 percent.

Organizer Says He Won't Be Intimidated

Slom said he won't be intimidated and is already making plans for next year's celebration, agreeing some things will be done differently.

He notes despite the nastiness at the event, that there was some progress this year: First, Gov. Linda Lingle issued a proclamation recognizing statehood, which is the first time she has done so during her 4-year term in office; and an event was held in Hawaii for the first time in 6 years.

All who attended the "celebration" in support of the 47th anniversary said that it was one of the lowest points in Hawaii's young state history.

They agreed a handful of protestors claiming to represent all 400,000 native Hawaiians, probably don't.

They noted with some irony that the protestors were being hypocritical. Some admitted they collect government aid, others wore western clothes, drove American cars and one even drove a Harley Davidson Motorcycle. A leader of the protestors, Ikaika Hussey, ran for political office in recent years in hopes of becoming a member of the Hawaii State Legislature, yet at the event, he protested the American government.

They said more political leaders and people in Hawaii proud to be part of America and to take back the islands from lawless hooligans who try to take away their pride.

They agreed that educating people about what truly did -- and did not -- happen to bring Hawaii into statehood is vital for the survival of the state and unity of all of its people, no matter their race.

Reach Malia Zimmerman, editor and president of Hawaii Reporter, via email at mailto:Malia@hawaiireporter.com

** Note from website editor Ken Conklin: Professional photographer Mel Ah Ching, who sometimes does work for Small Business Hawaii, was present throughout the Statehood Day events and took many pictures. It is possible that eventually some of them might be posted at Hawaii Reporter. Meantime, as Mr. Ah Ching works on his photos, the ones he has uploaded so far can be found on his archive for August 2006 at
http://macpro-events.buzznet.com/user/archive/

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http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?4e825667-4e7e-4dee-b56b-23f8a8446d42
Hawaii Reporter, August 21, 2006

The New Meaning of Aloha

By Don Newman

Hawaii celebrates its 47 anniversary of statehood today. Attending an earlier Hawaii Statehood Day Celebration on Friday, Aug. 18, 2006, was an eye opening experience. It gives a whole new meaning to the word "Aloha."

After setting up an illegal sound system and haranguing the audience for some time before the beginning of the festivities, the native Hawaiian protestors of the celebration moved into full gear when State Senator Sam Slom began speaking. Sidling up to him on both sides when he began to mark the meaning of the day and why we were there, they literally shouted him down.

They in turn threatened the Kalani High School Marching Band students should they begin to play, implying potential physical violence. After a few minutes of this abuse the conductors of the band wisely instructed the band to leave. It was a scene the children should never have had to endure in the first place.

Screaming with bullhorns in the faces of those they disagreed with the protestors made quite a spectacle of themselves without even realizing they were doing so. What they were really doing is demonstrating that they have no idea of what the word "Aloha"really means. Or that it only applies to those they agree with.

Intimidating children, spitting on the American flag, rudely shouting in the faces of others is not what one would normally associate with the concept of "Aloha."It is, in fact, the opposite of Aloha.

One fellow who kept getting in my face and screaming at me was stymied when I asked him, "Do you think your arguments are more valid the louder you shout them?"He dropped to a conversational tone for about 30 seconds and once again returned to his high decibel exhortations, his lips trembling in anger. When I asked him the same question again he leaned into my ear and in an exaggerated whisper that was nearly a shout restated his point again, a slogan really. He then made suggestions that I literally cannot even allude to here in good taste.

When the Kalani High Band left the protesters took this as a victory. They didn't realize that intimidating children into leaving didn't mean they could intimidate adults and they had expected the adults would vanish as soon as the children did. They were mistaken. The celebration was scheduled for an hour and it continued for that hour.

So the event degenerated into pockets of protesters yelling in the faces of Statehood Day celebrators. What was striking was the dignity and aplomb held by the celebrators. None raised a voice to match the shouting of the protestors. Many refused to answer the protesters at all and merely silently stood there or turned their backs.

In other words the Aloha was all on the part of the celebrants and there was none to be found on the side of the protestors. At one point a celebrant said something in Hawaiian and the protestors almost went berserk. "Don't you speak our language! How dare you speak our language! You have no right to speak our language!"

All in all it was a sad display. Yet it was worthwhile. It demonstrated that the protesters were nothing more than bullies. Other points of view are not permitted to be uttered or celebrated. One has to wonder if this would be the nature of the native Hawaiian government they would impose, the banning of all points of view that do not conform to their orthodoxy. All the more reason for Hawaii to celebrate statehood and remain a part of the United States.

So what became of "Aloha?"Is Aloha to be reserved for only with whom you agree? The Kalani High School Marching Band felt no Aloha that day. Neither did many of the brave people who remained to celebrate the meaning of the day. Is screaming in someone's face with a bullhorn the meaning of Aloha?

As the celebration came to an end and we all pitched in to stack the chairs that had been provided for the Kalani High Band the protesters once again demanded that we leave the "sacred grounds"of Iolani Palace, oblivious to the fact that we could not do so until the rental company came and picked up the chairs.

Screaming in their bullhorns, causing them to feedback so they would shriek at us as we sat along the wall of the palace awaiting the truck, they seemed unable to understand the reality of the situation. Finally they gave up and began packing up their equipment to leave.

Then came what is probably the most incongruous moment of the whole event. One of the protesters, who had quietly sat talking with Bill Burgess at one point after things had died down, walked by our group sitting in the shade of the Palace while waiting for the rental truck and as he walked away he turned and said "Aloha."And the approximately ten of us that remained, to a man and woman, instantly turned and said virtually in one voice "Aloha"in return.

There were smiles all around and there was no cynicism in that moment. It left me wondering what really happened here. What was the real sentiment? All that yelling and anger, or the softly spoken "Aloha"after it all. Where was that Aloha for the children of the Kalani High Band?

If Aloha is only to be expressed when it is convenient then perhaps the word has no meaning at all anymore. Or if it does retain meaning it must mean something other than is traditionally thought, a universal benevolence. That principle no longer applies.

I guess you could call it the new meaning of Aloha.

Don Newman, senior policy analyst for the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, Hawaii's first and only free market public policy institute focused on individual freedom and liberty, can be reached at: mailto:don@grassrootinstitute.org This editorial is intended to provoke thought, discussion and an examination of issues. It does not reflect official policy of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii. See the GRIH Web site at: http://www.grassrootinstitute.org/

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http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?48392cf5-7da5-4f2e-911e-fbd198f118a8
Hawaii Reporter, August 22, 2006

Actions of Hawaiian Militants Resemble That of Terrorists

By Garry Smith

Pete Doktor "Statehood celebration belonged at Capitol" published in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin on August 22, 2006, seems to believe that people in the United States have freedom of assembly and speech at a place and venue only when it is agreeable to him and his ilk.

Doktor's attempt to legitimize the Hawaiian militants who attended the celebration at Iolani Palace and immediately tried to intimidate those who chose to speak and act in favor of the United States and Hawaii Statehood is simply the act of zealots.

Their actions at the rally more resembled those of terrorists such as hezbollah or hamas rather than native Hawaiian culture warriors. These self proclaimed "protestors" had no mandate from any group other than their own yet claimed to speak for what "Hawaiians" want.

There is an old saying "the Irish don't know what they want but they're willing to fight for it".

The Hawaiian militants who showed up at an otherwise peaceful rally seemed not to know what they want but were willing to engage in an act of terror against anyone who did not appear to them to be of their favored race or who did not agree with their political agenda of hatred for the United States.

It was truely unfortunate that a rag tag group of misguided Hawaiian nationalists would confront a peaceful group of U.S. and State patriots who had a valid permit for their activity.

It is also unfortunate that in the future when blood is finally shed at the hands of these militants which it almost came to at the Iolani Palace rally and eventually will happen, that it will fall on the hands of our local politicians who have continually supported Hawaiian nationalism in their quest for native Hawaiian votes.

'Garry Smith, a resident of Ewa Beach, Hawaii, who attended the Statehood celebration and rally, can be reached via email at mailto:garrypsmith@juno.com

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http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?b6a7cecf-40e9-47b5-a3d1-73b588ac8a6f
Hawaii Reporter, August 25, 2006

Hawaii Under Siege by Radical Secessionists

By Elaine D. Willman

Our youngest state, Hawaii, continues under literal siege by radical secessionists insistent upon a separate, race-based "sovereignty." The defeat of the Akaka Bill was profound, but insufficient to encourage U. S. citizens of Hawaiian ethnicity to value or respect all that their country offers them. Enough is simply never enough ... .

The recent celebration of Hawaii's Statehood Day (an event that has been severely downplayed by the present governor and state Legislature for many years) was an occasion of profane, and abusive confrontation.

I so deeply respect the few brave citizens who have stood toe-to-toe, have weathered ongoing, and well-funded character assassinations for simply supporting the U.S. Constitution and the respectful status of Hawaii as our country's 50th state. These brave citizens dared to hold a small celebration of Hawaii's statehood, against the unrelenting noise of those promoting monarchy and racial sovereignty as the preferred governance in our 50th State.

The cliche of a chain being only so strong as its weakest link fits for the state of Hawaii, more imperiled by anti-U.S. sentiment, and more isolated than all other states of the United States.

If, for a single moment, we do not think such efforts would succeed on the mainland, consider the escalation of the Aztlan and La Raza Movements, seeking to overturn the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, for separate Mexican Indigenous territories in at least seven of our Southwestern states. Consider that some 274 more Indian tribes are seeking to join the current 562 federally recognized Indian tribes that maintain separate, race-based governments and lands off-limits to traditional law enforcement, and a tax-free casino industry eroding the economies of one state after another.

Supporting race-based governments is an enormous political, fiscal, and homeland security vulnerability blanketing the United States, at a time when our borders are sieves and many states cannot guarantee a seamless continuum of domestic public safety.

Hawaii's battle is unique only to its location. The anti-U.S. sentiment and entitlement demands for separate racial governments to be funded upon the backs of all other U.S. citizens is a movement, second only to terrorism for the implosion of our country.

U.S. taxpayers are the equivalent of indentured servants funding separate race-based governments. Equal treatment of all citizens remains a mythical goal.

Read the editorial below: [referring to the article by Richard Noah Hough in Hawaii Reporter published the same day as the Statehood Day event:]

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?506054a6-97d2-4d0b-8344-464f59bce661

Coming to your state soon?

Elaine D. Willman, who is the Chair of the Citizens Equal Rights Alliance (CERA) in Toppenish, WA. CERA is an organization seeking Constitutional and civil rights for individuals on or near Indian reservations. See more on its Web site at:
http://www.citizensalliance.org
Willman may be reached via email at: mailto:toppin@aol.com

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http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/25/editorial/letters.html
Honolulu Star-Bulletin, August 25, 2006, Two Letters to editor

Statehood protest ended on calmer note

After blasting their loudspeaker, surrounding Sen. Sam Slom, sticking cameras in his face and shouting, trying to drown him out, the Statehood Day protesters advanced on the members of the high school band seated in their chairs with their instruments ready to play. The protesters pointed bullhorns right at the students, yelled at them that they had been lied to, defrauded, that the United States illegally occupied Hawaii and imprisoned their queen at the palace, that the students playing there were insensitive and that the protesters could not guarantee their safety. The protesters were angry, loud and menacing. The kids were wide-eyed and looked scared to death. The band leader or parents then told the students to leave, and they did.

The rest of us stood our ground and sang the "Star-Spangled Banner" and "Hawaii Ponoi," despite the bullhorns and interruptions, "discussed" the issues with the protesters and after another hour or two shook hands with some and agreed to have further discussions in a calmer atmosphere in the future.

H. William Burgess
Honolulu

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Hawaiian protesters should look to future

In reading through all of the coverage about the celebration of statehood held at Iolani Palace, I am dismayed and ashamed by the actions of a handful of local dissidents protesting the use of the palace. Are Hawaiians so thin-skinned and lacking in aloha that they turn to bullying the people of Honolulu in order to force their opinions into the public eye? Why, the state Capitol was not the seat of power at the time of statehood, nor even in the Territory of Hawaii. Iolani Palace was the site of authority that represented our island nation.

The times are a-changing and we as the descendants of the indigenous people of Hawaii must change and prosper with them or become just a memory of what once were a proud people who conquered the Pacific. I, too am a descendant of Hawaiians, and to reclaim our past, we must look to the future.

Erin K. Smith
Honolulu

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** On Sunday August 27, 2006 the same letter to editor was published in both the Honolulu Advertiser and the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. The Issue -- Disruption of Statehood Day compared to silent protest of Kamehameha School racist admissions policy at renovation of Kamehameha-owned Windward Mall

Advertiser title: "PROTEST -- THOSE WHO DISAGREE SHOULD RESPECT OTHERS"
http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060827/OPINION02/608270302/1108/LETTERS

Star-Bulletin title: "Rudeness replaces aloha for patriotism"
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/27/editorial/letters.html

Hooligan sovereignty protesters used a sound system, bullhorns and in-your-face shouting to disrupt Statehood Day celebrations. They terrorized a high school band into leaving before the music could be played.

Five days later, still recuperating, I attended a blessing ceremony to open a $23 million renovation project at Windward Mall. Kamehameha Schools owns the mall. Trustee Robert Kihune and Mayor Mufi Hannemann spoke.

I am an active opponent of Kamehameha's racist admissions policy. But I left my bullhorn at home. I did not go to the podium, interrupt any speakers, yell, or stick my finger in their faces. I did not harass the school kids performing right next to my seat. A large American flag hangs permanently above center stage; yet there was no Pledge of Allegiance. When everyone stood for the singing of "Hawai'i Pono'i" I sat down because the U.S. national anthem was not also sung. That was my protest. I believe the anthem and pledge were deliberately excluded for fear that some in attendance would be disrespectful. That's how bad things have gotten.

At the end, we all joined hands and I sang along for "Hawai'i Aloha." Indeed! Let's hope so. Aloha ke Akua. Aloha kakou.

Ken Conklin
Kane'ohe

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http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/27/editorial/letters.html
Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Sunday, August 27, 2006; Letters to the Editor

Misguided militants flirted with terror

Pete Doktor, whose Aug. 22 letter asserted that the statehood celebration should have been at the state Capitol, not Iolani Palace, seems to believe that people in the United States have freedom of assembly and speech at a venue only when it is agreeable to him. He attempts to legitimize the Hawaiian militants who attended the celebration at Iolani Palace and tried to intimidate those who chose to speak and act in favor of the United States and Hawaii statehood.

Their actions more resembled those of terrorists than native Hawaiian culture warriors. These "protesters" had no mandate from any group, yet claimed to speak for what Hawaiians want. There is an old saying: "The Irish don't know what they want, but they're willing to fight for it." The Hawaiian militants who showed up at a peaceful rally seemed not to know what they want, but were willing to engage in an act of terror against anyone who did not agree with their political agenda of hatred for the United States.

It was truly unfortunate that a ragtag group of misguided Hawaiian nationalists would confront a peaceful group of U.S. and state patriots who had a valid permit for their activity. It is also unfortunate that in the future when blood is finally shed at the hands of these militants -- which it almost came to at the Iolani Palace rally and eventually will happen -- that it will fall on the hands of our local politicians who have continually supported Hawaiian nationalism in their quest for votes.

Garry Smith
Ewa Beach

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http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/27/business/story03.html
Honolulu Star-Bulletin, August 27, 2006
[ INSIDE HAWAII INC. ]

Taking the reins at Iolani Palace
The new executive director's priorities include finding a dedicated source of funding

Question: There was an hour-long confrontation at the palace a week ago between statehood celebrators and native Hawaiians protesting how the celebration was being held on the palace grounds. How is it determined who can hold events there?

Answer: That is determined by the state Department of Land and Natural Resources. They issue the permit. We have no say in that.

I believe that we should be consulted very closely, especially on sensitive issues like this one.

Q: Will you meet with the state?

A: We're actually going to meet with them. We're going to set up a meeting with the chairman of DLNR and the governor and top officials to come up with a better policy for future events.

Q: What brought you from studying international business administration to working at the state Legislature?

A: After I got my degree I actually wanted to come home to Hawaii. I missed the surf and I had been away for five years. I worked for my auntie, Bertha Kawakami. I got interested in listening to her talk about the legislative session.

Q: How did your experience at the Legislature compare with your expectations?

A: It was a lot harder than I thought it would be. There was a lot of work involved, a lot of research, a lot of overtime. Very different from the stereotype people have.

Q: It wasn't a 9-to-5 job?

A: That's what I liked about it, the different hours, and also to see things from a different perspective.

Q: A press release said the palace is facing challenging new times. How so?

A: We do not have a dedicated source of state funding and that's one of our top priorities. Our funding has been private, and we also recently got a grant-in-aid from the state for $600,000 -- but that's a one-time for operations.

Q: How much private funding do you get?

A: The most recent year, privately we brought in $400,000.

Q: What does it cost to maintain the palace?

A: We have about $1.5 million in operating expenses annually.

Q: Are you seeking more private funding?

A: We're going to push for more private grants from local foundations and from foundations on the mainland as well. We don't even have a development director at this point. Any grant would be great at this point.

Q: What's the palace's financial state?

A: The state's grant-in-aid is going to pay for our electricity bill and security.

Another top priority is replacing the air-conditioning system in the palace. It keeps breaking and it's very energy inefficient.

KIPPEN DE ALBA CHU

* New job: Executive director of the Iolani Palace. He succeeds Deborah Dunne, who left at the beginning of February.

* Background: He most recently worked as assistant executive director of the Hawaii Insurers Council, starting in 2004. Before that, he worked for 13 years as office manager and chief of staff for state Rep. Bertha Kawakami (D, Niihau-Poipu-Kokee), his auntie. He was born and raised in Hawaii and studied international business administration.

Kippen de Alba Chu has been named executive director of Iolani Palace. He is both a former chief of staff for state Rep. Bertha Kawakami and assistant executive director of Hawaii Insurers Council.

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http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060828/OPINION02/608280316/1108/LETTERS
Honolulu Advertiser, August 28, 2006, LETTERS TO EDITOR (2 on this topic)

PROTEST
STATEHOOD CEREMONY SHOULD NOT BE AT PALACE

It is apparent that Bud Ebel (Letter, Aug. 23) stands among those who are not sensitive enough to understand the intricacies and unique circumstances regarding issues in Hawai'i.

The inappropriate behavior began with the unprovoked invasion by U.S. military forces, contrary to treaties of perpetual peace and friendship established between two recognized nations.

Mr. Ebel's quote from the U.S. Constitution assumes that Hawai'i was obtained lawfully. How convenient to quote a point of law if it only works in America's favor.

Hawai'i was not annexed lawfully through treaties as was required, but by a joint resolution of Congress.

'Iolani Palace, the heart of the Hawaiian kingdom, stands as a constant reminder of atrocities committed against that peaceful nation.

Blatantly and disrespectfully casting salt upon an open wound, Mr. Ebel, is by no means a joyous occasion.

Leland Yadao
Lihu'e

HAWAI'I NEVER LEGALLY A TERRITORY OR STATE

I've read with interest several letters regarding behavior of Native Hawaiians at the recent statehood celebration at 'Iolani Palace.

On 'Olelo TV, UH English Professor Ruth Hsu moderated a couple of forums with Keanu Sai, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Hawai'i, and William E. Lawson, a legal researcher.

In these forums, it was made clear that when the Treaty of Annexation was passed in 1898 in the U.S. House and Senate, they could not get the constitutionally mandated two-thirds vote for passage and resorted to a joint resolution for passage, which was not a legal way to annex an area to the U.S. Therefore, Hawai'i was never legally a territory of the U.S.

Since Hawai'i was never a territory of the U.S., it could not be made a state as was done in 1959. Therefore, Hawai'i is not, and never was, a legal state of the U.S. Also, Hawai'i never gave up its sovereignty, so I guess this is still the Kingdom of Hawai'i.

Now, what was wrong with Native Hawaiians protesting statehood?

Lawrence Basich
Honolulu

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http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?6e2ec2b8-1a46-4066-ab80-288001211f81
Hawaii Reporter, August 28, 2006

Americans Should Pack Up Their Bags and Go Back Home

By Eric Po'ohina

Editor's note: This letter is reprinted exactly as it was received.

In response to K. Conklin letter dated 8/27, rudeness replaced aloha for patriotism. starbulletin & honolulu advertiser

If the organizers of the statehood celebration at the Iolani Palace were so into the celebration of the state of Hawaii how come non of them flew the state flag?

All I could see was the american flag. They didnt fly the state flag because they are into american expansionism and western imperialism.

They are no better than the paramount terrorists of the world today. The Bush administration.

The organizers of the statehood celebration were not there to celebrate statehood but to acknowledge western imperialism in Hawaii the pacific region and the world.

The american, western system renders indeginous claims by racializing native peoples, while simultaneously normalizing white supremecy and white subjectivity.

Hawaiians have been protesting American expansionism since 1887. In 1898 forty thousand Hawaiians protested against the annexation of Hawaii to the USA.

Throughout history Hawaiians have been protesting against american imperialism and we will continue to protest until Americans pack up their bags and go home.

Brandish the banner of Hawaiian independence!

Eric Po'ohina, a resident of Kailua, can be reached via email at
aumakua@aloha.net

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http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?2daaac1f-aed1-4aac-93f7-e29cb64cbec6
Hawaii Reporter, August 28, 2006

Racism is Evil

By Hana Johnson

All rational people will agree that racism is evil. There are laws to protect citizens against discriminate acts of racism. As a doctrine, it is not punishable by law, but when ones safety is threatened by racist brutes, law enforcement is responsible for providing protection to the public.

On August 18, 2006, the law enforcers of Honolulu miserably failed in their duty to protect those who celebrated Statehood at the Iolani Palace, which is on public property. The Hawaii Admission Act granted the ceded land to the State of Hawaii "as a public trust for the…provision of lands for public use."

Those who participated in the Statehood celebration had obtained a permit to hold the celebration on the Palace grounds to which the public was invited. From the report on KHNL, news coverage by the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, August 19, 2006, and personal testimonies on HawaiiReporter.com, it is clear that they were challenged by hostile demonstrators.

This was not a peaceful demonstration but one where people were victims of racist and vicious verbal attacks, were spit on, and even "flashed"(a lewd act) by a demonstrator who said he was on crystal meth. Apparently law and order counts for nothing when faced with zealots for "Hawaiians Only."This is what the future of Hawaii will be like if ruled by brutes.

Racism has been manifested in Hawaii by advocates of collectivist rights and they are guilty of causing civil disorder. To quote from Ayn Rand, "[r]acism is the lowest, most crudely primitive form of collectivism. It is the notion of ascribing moral, social or political significance to a man's genetic lineage ... [It] negates two aspects of man's life: reason and choice, or mind and morality, replacing them with chemical predestination."

Hana Johnson, Director of Youth Programs for the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, Hawaii's first and only free market public policy institute focused on individual freedom and liberty, can be reached at:
hana@grassrootinstitute.org

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http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/31/editorial/letters.html
Honolulu Star-Bulletin, August 31, 2006, Letter to editor

Statehood protesters speaking for many

To celebrate statehood is saying that the wrong that was committed to the Hawaiian people in the overthrow of their lawful government of the Hawaiian Kingdom was the right thing to do ("Statehood celebration at palace gets heated," Star-Bulletin, Aug.19). Statehood for Hawaii is the perpetuation of the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom government that was no threat to the United States.

Native Hawaiian nationals who protested at the recent statehood celebration at Iolani Palace did what should have been done in 1959 and 1900 and 1893.

Richard Pomaikaiokalani Kinney


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** Article published on Statehood Day, August 18, 2006, in West Hawaii Today (Kona). This article has no relation to the events at 'Iolani palace, but is simply a "balanced" news report about the history of Statehood Day published in a daily newspaper on a different island.

http://www.westhawaiitoday.com/articles/2006/08/18/local/local09.txt
West Hawaii Today (Kona), Friday, August 18, 2006

Statehood announcement a festive occasion for some, but not all

by Kim Eaton

Bill Cormack was 22 years old when Hawaii was granted statehood -- and he remembers every minute of that fateful day.

On Aug. 21, 1959, after nearly 60 years as a U.S. territory, Hawaii became the 50th state when President Dwight Eisenhower signed the proclamation. The state holiday is now celebrated on the third Friday in August.

"It's like Pearl Harbor," Cormack said, now a 69-year-old California resident who was born and raised on Oahu. "It's one of those things that have been ingrained in your mind, a day you will never forget."

It was early afternoon, and while Cormack was at work, family and friends kept calling to tell him the news.

"There were immediate celebrations in the streets. Almost all of the companies closed down for the day. Church bells were ringing," he said. "Waikiki was a mad house of people."

But not everyone clapped and cheered. There was also disappointment. Some did not want Hawaii to become a state.

Eighty-three-year-old William Paris felt Hawaii would be better off as a commonwealth or free association. While there were certain benefits to statehood, particularly direct representation in Congress, many people wanted independence, and that is not something that was offered to them, Paris said.

"The people were only offered two choices: remain a territory or become a state," said Dr. Howard Van Trease, University of Hawaii at Hilo Pacific History professor. "When the referendum was put to the people, there should have been another option -- Do you want to be independent?"

Paris said the mood where he lived was somber.

"There wasn't much celebration on the outer islands. We just accepted it and took it for what it was worth," Paris said. "Statehood did give us the right to vote for our president, which we were never able to do, and wouldn't have been able to do as a commonwealth. We're also known a lot better now than we were then. A lot of people thought we were hicks still living in grass shacks. But we could hold our own. We were well educated and we were well rounded."

Statehood was a long process. Hawaii was made a U.S. territory in 1900 and -- except for New Mexico -- it had the longest period of territorial status in U.S. history, said Van Trease.

"It wasn't that the U.S. didn't want Hawaii. The state's strategic advantage was just too good to be true, but here was the problem: America has an ugly history of racism and Hawaii didn't fit the picture the mainland wanted," Van Trease said. "There was no major support for bringing Hawaii in at that time."

However, Congress did not forget Hawaii, bringing the statehood issue up many times. But Hawaii's population was not overwhelmingly Caucasian, and it was difficult to find votes, particularly among the southern states, said John Cole, Hawaii Community College history teacher.

"But World War II changed the equation, and it was harder for racist elements to block Hawaii's application for statehood," Van Trease said.

The year 1959 began with Alaska's statehood. The Senate and House then passed a Hawaii statehood bill in March, with the president signing the bill into law. In June, the people had to vote for or against admission, and in July they elected their delegation to Congress, a state legislature and a governor. When the news reached Hawaii that Eisenhower signed the proclamation, there was excitement, there was cheering and there was life.

"Wherever you went around town people were expressing their happiness. American flags were raised here and there, some Hawaiian flags were raised as well," Cormack said. "It was a day that brought all the racial groups together, and at least for that day, we were all unified in statehood."

Leon Thevenin, 91, said it was the best thing that could have happened to his family. His Hawaiian grandmother lived 50 years under the Hawaiian monarchy and 50 years under U.S. authority, and she was proud to be part of the United States, he said.

"Our ancestors were commoners, so we didn't really lose anything (becoming a state) because we didn't have anything," he said. "We're proud of being a part of this great nation. The great majority were in favor of it, and proud. But now there are some masquerading Hawaiian groups trying to break them up and it's not good for the state."

Paris said Hawaii's history changed dramatically in the 1840s when it became possible for foreigners to buy Hawaii lands, opening the state to outside ownership.

"We were a vital part of the Pacific Ocean. As time changed, we became a very important place, both militarily, economically and as a foreign trade base," Paris said. "If the U.S. didn't take us over, someone else would have. Hawaii could never have stood as an independent state."

Cole disagrees. In the 1960s, the United Nations created a theory on how to ask people what they wanted when they were decolonized, and that poll should include incorporation, complete independence, status quo and a free association.

"If those four options had been on the table when Hawaii's people were given a choice, I haven't a clue what would have happened," Cole said. "Most people in the Pacific have voted for free association or independence. It's possible that another country could have come in and taken over, but I don't think it's just an open-and-shut case. It's just kind of wishful thinking."


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On Monday August 21, 2006 William F. Quinn died at the age of 87. He was the Governor of Hawai'i who organized the transition from Territory to State. He was appointed by President Eisenhower to be Governor, and was inaugurated in 1957. Then, after Statehood was passed by Congress, ratified by Hawai'i's people, and proclaimed by President Eisenhower, an election was held in 1959 in which Quinn was elected to be the Governor. Thus he was the last appointed Governor of the Territory of Hawai'i and the first elected Governor of the State of Hawai'i. Of course 'Iolani Palace was the government building for both the Territory and the State. So both of Governor Quinn's inauguration ceremonies were held at 'Iolani Palace, with large celebrations. The Honolulu Advertiser and Honolulu Star-Bulletin both published lengthy news reports and commentaries about Governor Quinn on August 23, including photographs.

William F. Quinn, 1919-2006, political pioneer
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/30/news/story01.html

Statehood was Quinn's key achievement
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/30/news/story02.html

'He lived a very full life'
http://honoluluadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060830/OBITS01/608300342

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http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?0256cb98-3a12-4ba7-b2a0-7ca9fa13cc1c
Hawaii Reporter, August 31, 2006

Hawaii's First Governor Was Proud of Hawaii's Transition to Statehood
William Quinn Dies at 87

By Malia Zimmerman William F. Quinn, the state of Hawaii's first governor, died Monday at the age of 87 in Honolulu.

One of his proudest moments was when under his leadership, Hawaii became a state in 1959. He was elected as Hawaii's first governor that year and served until 1962.

Prior to that, the Republican was appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to serve as governor of the Territory of Hawaii from 1957 to 1959.

In a statement issued by Gov. Linda Lingle, Hawaii's first Republican to serve since Quinn left office, she says she and Lt. Governor Aiona are mourning the death of former Governor William Francis Quinn and are extending their deepest sympathies to his family and friends.

Lingle noted that Quinn "played a pivotal role in Hawaii’s historic transition from a U.S. territory to America’s 50th state."

"There is much to admire about this Harvard Law School graduate, who distinguished himself as a Navy officer in the South Pacific during World War II, and later served as an attorney and as president of Dole Pineapple Company," Lingle says. "Governor Quinn, who like me, spent part of his childhood in St. Louis, Missouri, grew to love Hawai'i and made these islands his home together with his wife Nancy and their seven children. Throughout the years, Governor Quinn remained active in our community and he continued to serve as an elder statesman who many looked to for guidance and mentorship."

Honolulu Mayor Mufi Hannemann also offered his condolences to the Quinn family. Hannemann, who like Quinn enjoys singing and music, noted that Quinn had "personal integrity and charm, and, ... an ability to win over an audience by singing a song."

"He was always a willing, thoughtful participant who never let partisanship get in the way of civic responsibility and his concern for Hawaii's future. We are all the poorer for his passing. He will be missed," Hannemann says.

In honor of Quinn, Lingle ordered the state's flag flying at all state and county buildings to be flown at half-staff from August 29, 2006, until day of internment.

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Here's a file-photo from the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, taken at Quinn's inauguration in 1957, clearly showing that he is on the grounds of 'Iolani Palace with a huge crowd (and perhaps several kahili?) The original URL of the photo as published on August 30, 2006 is
http://starbulletin.com/2006/08/30/news/art1cx.jpg


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The monthly newspaper of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs has a circulation of about 60,000 by mail, free to subscribers, and by distribution in all branches of the public library, all paid for by state government funds. The issue published for September 2006 includes a full-page article accompanied by photographs. Ka Wai Ola o OHA, 2006 v.23 n.9 - September, page 7. Text of the article has been copied below. The full page, including photos, can be downloaded from this website as a pdf file from:
http://www.angelfire.com/planet/bigfiles40/KaWaiOlaOOHASep2006p7Stathd.pdf
The original source on the OHA website was
http://www.oha.org/pdf/kwo06/0609/7.pdf
(The OHA website is unreliable as a permanent archive, since OHA occasionally makes radical revamping of its website and might delete items or change their URLs without notice and without forwarding.)
This article is especially interesting because of quotes from sovereignty activist Ikaika Hussey clearly showing the protestors view the Palace as the capitol of their still-living independent nation of Hawai'i, where it is rude for American oppressors to celebrate the annexation and continued occupation of their nation. OHA's publication of the story and photos is clearly an endorsement of that viewpoint and a celebration of the hooliganism of the protestors who succeeded in intimidating a high school marching band and disrupting a celebration of Hawai'i's 47th anniversary of Statehood under American sovereignty.

Showdown at the palace
Tempers flare as protestors challenge statehood celebrators at the seat of the Hawaiian monarchy

By Sterling Kini Wong
Publications Editor

Emotions ran high at 'Iolani Palace on Aug. 18, when a group of about 50 Native Hawaiians confronted participants in an Admission Day celebration led by state Sen. Sam Slom, who also introduced an unsuccessful bill during this year's legislative session to remove the anniversary of statehood as a state holiday, claiming that it no is longer being properly celebrated because of political controversy.

The protestors at the palace said it was inappropriate and disrespectful to hold the statehood celebration on the very spot where the Hawaiian kingdom was overthrown with the help of U.S. marines in 1893. But Slom, a Republican who represents East Honolulu and is also the president of the advocacy group Small Business Hawai'i, said the palace was appropriate for the event because it was the site of the signing of the proclamation that admitted Hawai'i into the Union on Aug. 21,1959.

Some of the approximately 30 participants in the celebration brought American flags and wore patriotic clothes. State Rep. Barbara Marumoto dressed up as the Statue of Liberty.

Slom dismissed the protestors' claims that the event was located at the palace to provoke Native Hawaiians. "We didn't want any disrespect for anybody," he said. "This event was not put together as a political event; it was put together as a historical event."

Protestor Ikaika Hussey, however, said that having the event at the palace "was not an innocuous decision," noting that among the participants were H. William Burgess, his wife, Sandra, and Ken Conklin, all of whom are vocal opponents of government programs that benefit only Native Hawaiians, and support or are directly involved with a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of OHA and the Department of Hawaiian Homelands. "I do think that they were try- ing to upset Hawaiians," Hussey said."

"I think they were also trying to turn the palace into simply a museum, as opposed to a living symbol of Hawaiian nationalism. And our intent here was to defend that Hawaiian symbol."

He added, "It's true the statehood event did happen here in 1959, but hopefully we've grown since then and realize that Hawai'i's relationship with the United States is fraught with error, and we need to re-evaluate that."

About an hour prior to the start of the event, protestors began to set up a sound system, Hawaiian flags and banners on a grassy area fronting the palace. As people began to arrive, the protestors took turns on the microphone to explain the history of the overthrow and demand that the celebration be moved to the grounds of the state Capitol.

The confrontation caused members of the Kalani High School marching band, which had been invited to play for the celebration, to leave before playing a single note, with some of the students and their accompanying adults looking visibly disturbed by the encounter.

After the band left, the situation escalated, with protestors and event participants engaging in heated, face-to-face exchanges. The two groups eventually separated themselves after about an hour and a half, and the day ended without any injuries or arrests.

Celebration participant Laura Brown said she was disappointed with the behavior of the protestors. "[America] gives them the right to be able to assemble and the right to free speech, but they misuse it to be hateful to other people," she said. "It's almost exclusionary, like they're the only ones allowed to be here. And they've been miseducated about Hawai'i's history."

Peter Judkins, who came to Hawai'i three years ago from Virginia, was walking from the state library when he saw the "hoopla" and wanted to see what was going on. "What I saw was some people misrepresenting the Ameri can people by disrespecting the Hawaiians here on this land, Hawaiian land, and I wanted to get involved," he said.

** Photo captions

State Sen. Sam Slom and Native Hawaiian attorney Dexter Kaiama were among the Admission Day celebrators and protestors who faced off.

Ken Conklin and Terri Keko'olani

Trisha Kehaulani Watson and H. William Burgess

Malia Zimmerman and Mehana Kaiama


==================

Send comments or questions to:
Ken_Conklin@yahoo.com

You may now

See what happened on Statehood Day 2007:
"Hawaii Statehood Day August 17, 2007 -- Holiday hijacked by Hawaiian sovereignty activists for celebration of 125th anniversary of Iolani Palace; Zero celebration of Statehood" at
http://www.angelfire.com/planet/big60/StatehoodDay2007.html

OR

GO BACK TO OTHER TOPICS ON THIS WEBSITE


(c) Copyright 2006 Kenneth R. Conklin, Ph.D. All rights reserved