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Virtual Cemetery Page 66

The Final Resting Places of 23rd PA Soldiers
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This is the Grave of Private Franklin Smeck Company I , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Lancaster County in 1836. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on September 1st 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . He was mustered out of Service on September 8th 1864. After the War, He returned to Lancaster before moving to reading,PA. His death occurred in 1882. He is buried at Aulenbach's Cemetery in Mt. Penn,PA.
This is the Grave of Private Charles Henry Masland Company F , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, Three Months Volunteers,company F. He was born in Germantown on December 15th 1841, the second born son of John and Mary Ann Masland. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on April 21st 1861. He served with the unit during it's Three Months Campaign and Action. He was mustered out of Service with the 23rd PA on July 31st 1861. He re-enlisted as a member of The the 6th PA Cavalry,"Rush's Lancers". He was the last surviving member of his outfit. After the war he founded the company, C.H. Masland & Sons Carpets which eventually grew into the largest supplier of automotive carpet in the United States. There, in 1866, one year after Union and Confederate soldiers ended their four-year, epic struggle against one another, a young Charles H. Masland, fresh out of military uniform, founded a business that would outlive his great-great-grandchildren and capture headlines during the 1990s. In Philadelphia, Masland opened a yarn dye house, hoping to share in the explosive growth of the city's textile industry. It was a prudent and financially rewarding decision, one that enabled his fledgling enterprise to take root in Philadelphia and enjoy sufficient prosperity to finance the acquisition of a carpet mill near Philadelphia 20 years later, in 1886.

The move into carpet manufacturing would prove to be one of the most significant developments in the company's history, guiding the Masland venture into the business area that would fuel its growth during the 20th century. Nearly all of the financial and physical growth that resulted from the acquisition of the carpet mill, however, occurred after the company's headquarters were moved from Philadelphia to Carlisle in 1919, three short years before the most pivotal moment in the company's history would occur. Although C.H. Masland & Sons Carpets , as the company was known at the time, had already moved past its 50th year of business when it relocated to Carlisle, in many respects the history of the Masland business was just beginning.

By the time of the move to Carlisle, Masland had been involved in carpet manufacture for more than four decades, relying on the production of flooring material to grow into a modestly sized firm with more than half a century of business experience. By all accounts the company was a success, but in 1922 Masland made a move that would forever change the magnitude and scope of its business. That year, Frank Masland, a descendant of Charles H. Masland and one of the reasons the company operated under the name "C.H. Masland & Sons," sold his first shipment of woven carpet to Ford Motor Company. The C.H. Masland & Sons carpet was first used in Ford's Model T, but Masland-manufactured carpeting would find its way into countless Ford automobiles, as well as the sundry models manufactured by other car manufacturers, becoming one of the most widely used types of automobile floor material during the ensuing decades.

Frank Masland's first step into the automobile industry in 1922 steered C.H. Masland & Sons toward a business area that would serve as the foundation for the company in the future and it introduced the company to its most important customer. Seventy years later, Ford ranked as Masland's largest customer by far, accounting for more than 60 percent of the sales collected by the Carlisle-based manufacturer. Once Ford began purchasing Masland-made woven carpet, other car manufacturers quickly followed suit. General Motors was the next manufacturer to look to C.H. Masland & Sons for floor material and then, as Masland's presence in the automobile industry matured, a full range of domestic and foreign car manufacturers turned to Masland for automobile floor carpeting.

During the decades following the first foray into the automobile industry, Masland refined its products and deepened its involvement in the automotive sector, building a reputation that was strengthened with each innovation the company brought to market. Among the highlights of the company's rise during the 20th century was its development of molded auto-carpet pieces in 1955. The molded, multipiece floor systems did away with the old "cut-and-sew" technique and C.H. Masland & Sons' limited role as a manufacturer and marketer of rolls of carpet. From the 1950s forward, the company's design contributions to car floor systems picked up pace, placing a greater emphasis on the expertise C.H. Masland & Sons' employees were rapidly developing. During the 1960s, the first one-piece molded floor systems went into production, engendering the introduction in 1968 of a carpet system that covered both the frontseat and the backseat areas inside automobiles. The 1970s, in turn, brought their own innovations, including the creation of floor systems that possessed noise- and vibration-abatement features. By the 1980s, the company's legacy of offering a consistent supply of new and improved floor systems had earned the respect of the world's largest car manufacturers, who demonstrated their faith in C.H. Masland & Sons by awarding product design and engineering responsibilities to the Carlisle-based company during the middle years of the decade.

His death occurred on March 26th,1934 in Philadelphia. He is buried at Ivy Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in Section L, Lot 453-454, Grave 1.

You can view a Wartime Photo and Post-War Photo of Charles Henry Masland on Page 33 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.

Photo Courtesy of Gene Stackhouse. I recommend his Book, "Germantown and the Civil War" to any History Buff.

This is the Grave of Private Samuel L. Ely Company B , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Philadelphia,Pennsylvania in 1847. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on August 2nd 1861.On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark .Shortly After he was transfered to Company R and then was transfered to the 215th Pennsylvania volunteers on April 21, 1865, for one year. He was sent to Delaware and employed in guard duty in that state and on the east shore of Maryland. From June to the end of July, he was stationed at Fort Delaware where he was mustered out on July 31, 1865. His death occurred on March 25th 1885. He is buried at William Penn Cemetery in Philadelphia,PA.
This is the Grave of Pvt. Samuel C Hart Company G , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in New Jersey in July 22nd 1832. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on April 21st 1861 and served with the unit during it's Three Months Campaign and Action. He was mustered out on July 31st 1861 and returned to New Jersey where he died on February 12th 1889. He is buried at Trinity Episcopal Church in Moorestown,NJ.
This is the Grave of Private James Nacey Company G , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Philadelphia in 1844. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on September 1st 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . James Nacey was Wounded at The Battle of 2nd Fredericksburg (Marye's Heights) Virginia on May 3rd 1863. James Nacey was again Wounded at The Battle of Cold Harbor Virginia on June 1st 1864, near Richmond. He was mustered out of Service on September 8th 1864. After the War, He returned to Philadelphia. His death occurred on September 26th 1886. He is buried at Fernwood Cemetery in Lansdowne,PA.


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Birney's Zouaves

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