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Original Photos Page 33



Gallery of the 23rd PA
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This is a Photo of Private Charles Henry Masland Company F , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, Three Months Volunteers,company F. He was born in Germantown on December 15th 1841, the second born son of John and Mary Ann Masland. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on April 21st 1861. He served with the unit during it's Three Months Campaign and Action. He was mustered out of Service with the 23rd PA on July 31st 1861. He re-enlisted as a member of The the 6th PA Cavalry,"Rush's Lancers". He was the last surviving member of his outfit. After the war he founded the company, C.H. Masland & Sons Carpets which eventually grew into the largest supplier of automotive carpet in the United States. There, in 1866, one year after Union and Confederate soldiers ended their four-year, epic struggle against one another, a young Charles H. Masland, fresh out of military uniform, founded a business that would outlive his great-great-grandchildren and capture headlines during the 1990s. In Philadelphia, Masland opened a yarn dye house, hoping to share in the explosive growth of the city's textile industry. It was a prudent and financially rewarding decision, one that enabled his fledgling enterprise to take root in Philadelphia and enjoy sufficient prosperity to finance the acquisition of a carpet mill near Philadelphia 20 years later, in 1886.

The move into carpet manufacturing would prove to be one of the most significant developments in the company's history, guiding the Masland venture into the business area that would fuel its growth during the 20th century. Nearly all of the financial and physical growth that resulted from the acquisition of the carpet mill, however, occurred after the company's headquarters were moved from Philadelphia to Carlisle in 1919, three short years before the most pivotal moment in the company's history would occur. Although C.H. Masland & Sons Carpets , as the company was known at the time, had already moved past its 50th year of business when it relocated to Carlisle, in many respects the history of the Masland business was just beginning.

By the time of the move to Carlisle, Masland had been involved in carpet manufacture for more than four decades, relying on the production of flooring material to grow into a modestly sized firm with more than half a century of business experience. By all accounts the company was a success, but in 1922 Masland made a move that would forever change the magnitude and scope of its business. That year, Frank Masland, a descendant of Charles H. Masland and one of the reasons the company operated under the name "C.H. Masland & Sons," sold his first shipment of woven carpet to Ford Motor Company. The C.H. Masland & Sons carpet was first used in Ford's Model T, but Masland-manufactured carpeting would find its way into countless Ford automobiles, as well as the sundry models manufactured by other car manufacturers, becoming one of the most widely used types of automobile floor material during the ensuing decades.

Frank Masland's first step into the automobile industry in 1922 steered C.H. Masland & Sons toward a business area that would serve as the foundation for the company in the future and it introduced the company to its most important customer. Seventy years later, Ford ranked as Masland's largest customer by far, accounting for more than 60 percent of the sales collected by the Carlisle-based manufacturer. Once Ford began purchasing Masland-made woven carpet, other car manufacturers quickly followed suit. General Motors was the next manufacturer to look to C.H. Masland & Sons for floor material and then, as Masland's presence in the automobile industry matured, a full range of domestic and foreign car manufacturers turned to Masland for automobile floor carpeting.

During the decades following the first foray into the automobile industry, Masland refined its products and deepened its involvement in the automotive sector, building a reputation that was strengthened with each innovation the company brought to market. Among the highlights of the company's rise during the 20th century was its development of molded auto-carpet pieces in 1955. The molded, multipiece floor systems did away with the old "cut-and-sew" technique and C.H. Masland & Sons' limited role as a manufacturer and marketer of rolls of carpet. From the 1950s forward, the company's design contributions to car floor systems picked up pace, placing a greater emphasis on the expertise C.H. Masland & Sons' employees were rapidly developing. During the 1960s, the first one-piece molded floor systems went into production, engendering the introduction in 1968 of a carpet system that covered both the frontseat and the backseat areas inside automobiles. The 1970s, in turn, brought their own innovations, including the creation of floor systems that possessed noise- and vibration-abatement features. By the 1980s, the company's legacy of offering a consistent supply of new and improved floor systems had earned the respect of the world's largest car manufacturers, who demonstrated their faith in C.H. Masland & Sons by awarding product design and engineering responsibilities to the Carlisle-based company during the middle years of the decade.

His death occurred on March 26th,1934 in Philadelphia. He is buried at Ivy Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in Section L, Lot 453-454, Grave 1.

You can view a Wartime Photo and Post-War Photo of Charles Henry Masland on Page 33 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.

Photo Courtesy of Gene Stackhouse. I recommend his Book, "Germantown and the Civil War" to any History Buff.

This is a Post-War Photo of Private Charles Henry Masland Company F , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, Three Months Volunteers,company F. He was born in Germantown on December 15th 1841, the second born son of John and Mary Ann Masland. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on April 21st 1861. He served with the unit during it's Three Months Campaign and Action. He was mustered out of Service with the 23rd PA on July 31st 1861. He re-enlisted as a member of The the 6th PA Cavalry,"Rush's Lancers". He was the last surviving member of his outfit. After the war he founded the company, C.H. Masland & Sons Carpets which eventually grew into the largest supplier of automotive carpet in the United States. There, in 1866, one year after Union and Confederate soldiers ended their four-year, epic struggle against one another, a young Charles H. Masland, fresh out of military uniform, founded a business that would outlive his great-great-grandchildren and capture headlines during the 1990s. In Philadelphia, Masland opened a yarn dye house, hoping to share in the explosive growth of the city's textile industry. It was a prudent and financially rewarding decision, one that enabled his fledgling enterprise to take root in Philadelphia and enjoy sufficient prosperity to finance the acquisition of a carpet mill near Philadelphia 20 years later, in 1886.

The move into carpet manufacturing would prove to be one of the most significant developments in the company's history, guiding the Masland venture into the business area that would fuel its growth during the 20th century. Nearly all of the financial and physical growth that resulted from the acquisition of the carpet mill, however, occurred after the company's headquarters were moved from Philadelphia to Carlisle in 1919, three short years before the most pivotal moment in the company's history would occur. Although C.H. Masland & Sons Carpets , as the company was known at the time, had already moved past its 50th year of business when it relocated to Carlisle, in many respects the history of the Masland business was just beginning.

By the time of the move to Carlisle, Masland had been involved in carpet manufacture for more than four decades, relying on the production of flooring material to grow into a modestly sized firm with more than half a century of business experience. By all accounts the company was a success, but in 1922 Masland made a move that would forever change the magnitude and scope of its business. That year, Frank Masland, a descendant of Charles H. Masland and one of the reasons the company operated under the name "C.H. Masland & Sons," sold his first shipment of woven carpet to Ford Motor Company. The C.H. Masland & Sons carpet was first used in Ford's Model T, but Masland-manufactured carpeting would find its way into countless Ford automobiles, as well as the sundry models manufactured by other car manufacturers, becoming one of the most widely used types of automobile floor material during the ensuing decades.

Frank Masland's first step into the automobile industry in 1922 steered C.H. Masland & Sons toward a business area that would serve as the foundation for the company in the future and it introduced the company to its most important customer. Seventy years later, Ford ranked as Masland's largest customer by far, accounting for more than 60 percent of the sales collected by the Carlisle-based manufacturer. Once Ford began purchasing Masland-made woven carpet, other car manufacturers quickly followed suit. General Motors was the next manufacturer to look to C.H. Masland & Sons for floor material and then, as Masland's presence in the automobile industry matured, a full range of domestic and foreign car manufacturers turned to Masland for automobile floor carpeting.

During the decades following the first foray into the automobile industry, Masland refined its products and deepened its involvement in the automotive sector, building a reputation that was strengthened with each innovation the company brought to market. Among the highlights of the company's rise during the 20th century was its development of molded auto-carpet pieces in 1955. The molded, multipiece floor systems did away with the old "cut-and-sew" technique and C.H. Masland & Sons' limited role as a manufacturer and marketer of rolls of carpet. From the 1950s forward, the company's design contributions to car floor systems picked up pace, placing a greater emphasis on the expertise C.H. Masland & Sons' employees were rapidly developing. During the 1960s, the first one-piece molded floor systems went into production, engendering the introduction in 1968 of a carpet system that covered both the frontseat and the backseat areas inside automobiles. The 1970s, in turn, brought their own innovations, including the creation of floor systems that possessed noise- and vibration-abatement features. By the 1980s, the company's legacy of offering a consistent supply of new and improved floor systems had earned the respect of the world's largest car manufacturers, who demonstrated their faith in C.H. Masland & Sons by awarding product design and engineering responsibilities to the Carlisle-based company during the middle years of the decade.

His death occurred on March 26th,1934 in Philadelphia. He is buried at Ivy Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in Section L, Lot 453-454, Grave 1.

You can view a Wartime Photo and Post-War Photo of Charles Henry Masland on Page 33 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.

Photo Courtesy of Gene Stackhouse. I recommend his Book, "Germantown and the Civil War" to any History Buff.

This is a Post Civil War Photo of Private Milton Hansell Company R , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was born in Philadelphia in 1838. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on September 4th 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . In March of 1862, an order was given that Four Companies of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, L,O,P, and R, were to be transferred to the 61st Pennsylvania Volunteers. This order was met with much protest since the men enlisted as the 23rd PA Regiment and did not enlist to fight with the 61st PA. After a time the men obeyed the order. Milton Hansell of Company R , now was transferred to Company I of the 61st PA Volunteers. He was mustered out of Service on September 4th 1864. After the War, He moved to New Jersey and was close with Richard Lippencott of the same Company. They stayed in the Military for about ten years as U.S. Regulars and Milton reached the Rank ot Lt. He then worked at a General Store owned by Richard R. Lippincott. His death occurred on May 21st 1898. He is buried at Monument Cemetery in Beverly,NJ in Section 1,Div. 1, Lot 103, Grave 5.

You can view a Photo of the Grave of Private Milton Hansell on Page 57 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Virtual Cemetery pages.

Milton Hansell wrote a letter home from his Camp with the 61st PA Regiment on March 30th 1864 where he spoke of how he missed home, his expectations for the end of the war and how the officers of the 61st Pennsylvania were drunks.

This is a Photo of Lt. Richard Roberts Lippincott Company R , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was born in Rancocas New Jersey in 1840. He was the son of William and Elizabeth Lippincott. “Come 1860 and the Civil War. R.R. Lippincott and Ella Hansell were sweethearts, too young for marriage but much in love.” He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on September 4th 1861. On September 8th 1861,with the rank of Corporal, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . On March 14th 1862, an order was given that Four Companies of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, L,O,P, and R, were to be transferred to the 61st Pennsylvania Volunteers. This order was met with much protest since the men enlisted as the 23rd PA Regiment and did not enlist to fight with the 61st PA. After a time the men obeyed the order. Richard Roberts Lippincott of Company R , now was transferred to Company I of the 61st PA Volunteers. He was Promoted to Sgt Major shorly afterward and then again to 1st Lt on September 12th 1863. He was seriously wounded at The battle of Spotsylvania on May 10th 1864 being shot in the leg and left abdomen. The two Hansell boys searched the battlefield and found him almost dead. They brought him to the ‘field hospital,’ a surgeon refused to attend him— said he would be wasting his time. George said, ‘This man is an officer, he gets preference and you know it. You do everything you can and do it now. This gun’s loaded and one false move from you and you’ll have a minnie ball through your head.’He was sent to General Hospital in Annapolis ,MD to recover.At Annapolis, he was treated for a shell wound of his back and left side until he could be sent home to Rancocas and placed under the care of Dr. Granville S. Woolman. He was mustered out of Service on September 3rd 1864. After the War, He returned to Rancocas, bought the Rancocas Country Store, made it prosper, married his sweetheart, Ella Hansell.1870 Census Richard (age 30) and Ella (age 26) are living in Willingboro Township. His occupation is dry goods and groceries. In 1870, Richard served as the Willingborough Township Clerk. Aunt Ella writes in her remembrances that Richard and Ella were active members of the Lyceum Literary Society. Ella acted as Mrs. Jarley in the Waxworks (a combination of monologue and tableaux production piece for benefit purposes.) 1872 - Richard – Postmaster of Rancocas for $160/Year.“In the 1880’s Richard and Ella built the stone house where I was born. The stone came from a quarry in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Albert Hansell bought carloads of apples from the Pennsylvania Dutchmen and he got the stone cheap. The only stone house in the village. The stone was hauled three miles from the railroad at Masonville across the river to Rancocas.1880 - Richard Granted Civil War Pension Richard was awarded a pension of $8.50 per month. 1880 Census – June 15, 1880 RR and Ella and their three children, Hansell (9), Jessie H. (6) and Ella H. (5) are living in Willingboro with Ella’s parents, James S. Hansell (69), his wife Hannah (69) and son Richard (27).1888 - Richard Attends a Civil War Reunion History of the Twenty-Third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Birney’s Zouaves, 1903- 1904, has a long article on the June 1888 Reunion of Shaler’s Brigade. A three day reunion was held in Gettysburg, hosted by the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers Association; thousands attended. The Fayetteville Recorder newspaper of New York reported: “Captain Dick Lippincott marshalled the Rancocas contingent of fourteen. They roomed together, a most social crowd. We found the squad wherever we went, enjoying the occasion. Dick says he will have to kill some of them off, or they will soon outnumber the survivors.” The contingent included the following: Wilmot Hansell and George Hansell came from Philadelphia. Men from Rancocas are: Richard R. Lippincott, Jos. Lundy, M.B. Friant, Charles Funk, Joseph Wills, J.B. Wilson, John Wells and Emlin Martin.1900 Census – June 15, 1900 RR (61) and Ella (58) are living Westhampton Township. His occupation is listed as salesman. Included in the household are J. Hansell (29, farmer) and his wife of one year, Lida (26). Because of his poor health, Richard gave up the store and was a traveling salesman. His death occurred on May 31st 1901. He is buried at The Friends Quaker Cemetery in Rancocas, NJ. His stone, U.S. Government issue to Civil War veterans, is one of two which proudly rise above the modest Quaker stones. Almost every family in the village and in surrounding farms was represented at his funeral and the line of wagons extended from the cemetery back through the village, almost a mile. Papa told me this as a little boy. No other person in the area, before or since, has been so honored.”

You can view a Photo of the Grave of Richard Roberts Lippincott on Page 13 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Virtual Cemetery pages.

  • Richard Roberts Lippencott Bio (Part 1) .

  • Richard Roberts Lippencott Bio (Part 2) . bio Provided by Nancy and Bob Ettensperger.
  • This is a Photo of Private John Henderson Company E , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Philadelphia on January 27th 1841. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on October 13th 1862. He was transfered to the 82nd Pennsylvania, company E on September 8th 1864. He was mustered out of Service on July 13th 1865. After the War, He returned to Philadelphia.He was on the Council of Administration for the 23rd Pennsylvania Survivors for the Years 1903-1904. His death occurred on March 31st 1913. He is buried at Fernwood Cemetery in Lansdowne,PA.
    This is a Photo of Private William J. Farran Company I , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . He was mustered out of Service on September 8th 1864.




    Birney's Zouaves

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