Concerns Grow Over Place Where
the Remains of Imperial Family Found

The Russian Imperial Family

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Sverlovsk archeologists are afraid that some artifacts may disappear before additional archeological dig start at the site of founding relics of the last Russian Emperor’s family.

Research work on the Old Koptyakovskaya Road in the suburbs of Yekaterinburg may continue early in the fall, Sergey Pogorelov, the Head of the Archaeology Department of the Sverdlovsk region's department for the protection and use of monuments of history and culture, told Interfax on Monday.

“The question of financing has not been settled yet, but we’re afraid that people who come to know about this place can find something before archeologists do or on the contrary will put something there. Traces from bicycles and motorbikes are seen on the Old Koptyakovskaya Road, mushroomers are wandering around, the cattle is grazing here,” the interviewee of the agency noted.

Pogorelov said he knew two sites for further digs and artifacts could be found there.

“We know exactly where we need to dig, but experts’ opinion differs as to what can be found there. There can be lacking fragments of skeletons or things that were once lost, thrown away or hidden,” he explained.

According to his estimates, about two million rubles are required to finance certain works conducted in 2007 and compete research on the Koptyakovskaya Road.

Eleven family members of the last Russian emperor Nicholas II and his fellows were executed in the early hours of July 17, 1918 at the order of the Presidium of the Ural Regional Soviet.

A burial site in which there were remains of nine people was found on Staraya Koptyakovskaya road near Yekaterinburg in July 1991. Those were the remains of Nicholas II, his spouse Alexandra Fyodorovna, 46, daughters Olga, 22, Tatyana, 21, Anastasia, 17, as well as his fellows Yevgeny Botkin, 53, Anna Demidova, 40, Alois Trupp, 62, and Ivan Kharitonov, 48.

Years after, fragments of bones and teeth were recovered from the so-called 'second' burial site during archeological exploration on July 29, 2007. Russian and international experts confirmed that what was found there are the remains of Prince Alexey and Grand Duchess Maria.

Interfax
10 August, 2009