Battle Over Will of Man Who Claimed
to be Son of Last Russian Tsarevich

Tsarevich Alexis, was murdered along with his entire family in 1918

||| THE ROMANOVS ||| REIGN OF NICHOLAS II ||| ROYAL RUSSIA NEWS ||| ROYAL RUSSIA VIDEOS |||
|||
VISIT OUR ROMANOV BOOKSHOP ||| ROMANOV & RUSSIAN LINKS ||| WHAT'S NEW @ ROYAL RUSSIA & GILBERT'S ROYAL BOOKS |||
||| RETURN TO ROYAL RUSSIA - DIRECTORY ||| RETURN TO WELCOME TO ROYAL RUSSIA |||
A lengthy legal battle over the fortune of a “delusional” multi-millionaire who believed he was the son of the last Tsarevich of Imperial Russia was finally settled by the High Court yesterday.

Eric Anker-Petersen was adopted as a child and maintained a lifelong belief that he was the son of the last Tsarevich, Alexei Nikolaevich, who is thought to have been killed by revolutionaries along with the rest of his family in 1918.

His £15 million estate has been at the centre of a tug of war between six members of his adopted Danish family and a Chinese man who claims to be his long-lost nephew since he died at the age of 72 in 2007.

The multi-millionaire from Purley, south London also believed he was the twin brother of the Dynasty actress Joan Collins, the High Cout heard. He was in fact the son of Leslie Hall, a 1920s music hall comedian, and Hazel Green, a dancer.

He was adopted by Karl Anker-Petersen, a Danish tycoon who in 1928 co-founded the multi-national pest control firm Rentokil in Britain, but remained convinced all his life that he was descended from the Russian aristocracy.

Mr Anker-Petersen penned a “home made” will in 1991 which granted 80 per cent of his fortune to his six adopted relatives and 20 per cent to any relatives of his Chinese wife who could be traced.

Since his death, the claims his six Danish family members have been challenged by Chan Kam Hung, a Hong Kong resident who said he was the son of the dead man's estranged brother-in-law.

But Mr Justice Warren ruled yesterday that Mr Chan has no claim to the fortune and allotted the Anker-Petersen family members, including a former Church of England Deacon, £14 million to share between them.

The fortune will be split between Robert Anker-Petersen, a former Deacon of St Ninian's Cathedral in the Scottish town of Perth, who now runs a Christian centre innearby Tibbermore, and five other family members who live in Denmark.

The remaining £1 million, consisting of three properties, will go to the children of Mr Anker-Petersen’s natural parents.

Mr Chan came forward to stake a claim to the estate following enquiries by Mr Anker-Petersen's solicitor, but the judge rejected his bid for a £2.8 million share.

He said: "Eric was on any view an unusual and indeed delusional individual, as is accepted on all sides. He considered himself to be the son of the last Tsarevich who is generally accepted to have been murdered at Yekaterinburg in 1918."

Mr Justice Warren said the disputed will was "home made" and "not well drafted", and ruled out Mr Chan's claim to be a long lost relative, saying that documentary evidence showed Mr Anker-Petersen’s brother-in-law, Soong, had died years before Mr Chan's father.

Source: The Telegraph
28 November, 2010