ROYAL RUSSIA NEWS. THE ROMANOV DYNASTY & THEIR LEGACY, MONARCHY, HISTORY OF IMPERIAL & HOLY RUSSIA
« October 2017 »
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
Entries by Topic
All topics
400th Anniversary
A Russian Moment
Alapaevsk
Alexander I
Alexander II
Alexander III
Alexander Mikhailovich, GD
Alexander Palace  «
Alexandra Feodorovna
Alexandra Nicholayevna, GD
Alexandra Pavlovna GD
Amber Room
Andrei Vladimirovich, GD
Anna Feodorovna, GD
Anna Ioannovna, Empress
Anna Leopoldovna
Anna Pavlovna, GD
Antiques
Architecture
Auctions
Bagrations
Beautiful Orthodox Churches
Benckendorff, Count Paul
Bolsheviks
Bolshoi
Books
Catherine II
Chavchavadze
Chekhov
Collectibles
Conspiracy Theories
Constantine Constantinovich, GD
Cossacks
Country Estates
Crimea
Dmitri Pavlovich, GD
Dmitri Romanovich
Documentaries
Dowager Empress Maria
Eagar, Margaretta
Easter
Ekaterinburg
Ekaterinburg Remains
Elena Vladimirovna, GD
Elizabeth Feodorovna GD
Elizabeth Petrovna, Empress
Events
Exhibitions
Faberge
Frederiks, Count Vladimir
Ganima Yama
GARF
Gatchina
George Alexandrovich, GD
Gibbes, Charles Sidney
Grand Duchess Xenia Alexa
Grand Duke Mikhail Alexan
Grand Dukes
Holy Royal Martyrs
Imperial Russia
Ivan IV, Tsar
Jewels
Kazan Cathedral
Kerensky, Alexander
Kolchak, Admiral
Kolomenskoye
Konstantin Nikolayevich, GD
Kostroma
Kremlin
Kronstadt
Kulikovsky
Livadia
Maria Alexandrovna
Maria Feodorovna, Empress
Maria Pavlovna, Senior
Maria Vladimirovna GD
Marie Georgievna, GD
Massandra
Mikhail Nikolayevich, GD
Moscow
Museums
Nevsky, Alexander
News
Nicholas Alexandrovich GD
Nicholas I
Nicholas II
Nicholas Mikhailovich, GD
Nicholas Nicholayevich, GD
Nicholas Romanovich
Nobility
Numismatics
Oldenburg
Oleg Konstantinovich, Prince
Olga Alexandrovna GD
Olga Konstantinovna GD
Olga Nicholayevna GD
Oranienbaum
Ostankino
OTMA
Palaces
Paley, Princess Natalia
Paul Alexandrovich, GD
Paul Gilbert
Paul I, Emperor
Pavlovsk
Peter and Paul Fortress
Peter II
Peter III
Peter Nicholayevich, GD
Peter the Great
Peterhof
Prince Michael of Kent
Pushkin
Rasputin
Romanov
Romanov Descendants
Romanov Family Album
Ropsha
Royal Russia
Ruriks
Russian Art
Russian Church
Russian Cuisine
Russian Film
Russian History
Russian Imperial House
Russian Monarchy
Russian Orders
Russo-Japanese War
Sergei Alexandrovich GD
St. Petersburg
St. Theodore's Church
State Hermitage Museum
Stieglitz, Alexander
Stolypin, Pyotr
Strelna
Succession
Tauride Palace
Tobolsk
Tsaritsino
Tsarskoye Selo
Tsesarevich Alexei
Vera Konstantinovna, Princess
Vladimir Alexandrovich, GD
Vyrubova, Anna
Winter Palace
Witte, Sergei
World War I
Wrangel, Pyotr
Yachts
Yalta
Yelagin Palace
Yusupov
Blog Tools
Edit your Blog
Build a Blog
RSS Feed
View Profile
You are not logged in. Log in
Wednesday, 11 October 2017
Tender Issued for Restoration of Historic Interiors of the Alexander Palace
Topic: Alexander Palace

 
Colour auto-chromes of the interiors of the Alexander Palace, taken in 1917
Photos © Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Reserve 
 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

As reported in an article in Royal Russia News back in February 2017, the Alexander Palace is scheduled to open as a multi-museum complex in July 2018, however, the entire restoration is not expected to be completed now until 2019, or later due to the lack of funding to complete the project.

The Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Reserve issued a tender this week for the recreation of the historic interiors of the east wing of the Alexander Palace.

According to the tender documentation, the initial price of the contract is 47 million rubles. The work is expected to be completed by April 2019.

The Terms of Reference provide for the reconstruction of the former rooms of Emperor Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, located in the eastern wing of the palace: the Tsar’s Old Study and Moorish Bathroom, Imperial Bedroom, Mauve Study and Palisander, Maple and Crimson Drawing Rooms.

Skilled craftsmen will use documents, drawings, and a collection of colour auto-chromes (photos above) taken in 1917 to restore the interiors to their historic original. The reconstruction will also include the recreation and installation of interior finishing elements, such as wall coverings, carpets, and furniture, as well as the recreation of portraits and marquises for windows. 

The Alexander Palace officially closed its doors to visitors in August 2015. The permanent exhibition Reminiscences in the Alexander Palace, which included the former private apartments of Emperor Nicholas II and his family located in the East Wing of the palace closed on August 2, while the Suite of State Rooms closed on August 31.

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 11 October, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 1:14 PM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 11 October 2017 1:23 PM EDT
Permalink | Share This Post
Friday, 28 April 2017
Exhibition: Silvio Dagnini. the Architect, the Artist, the Builder
Topic: Alexander Palace

 
Silvio Dagnini (1867–1942) was the last court architect of the Alexander Palace
Photo © Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve
 
From 25 April to 30 December 2017 a display room near the Third Antechamber of the Catherine Palace hosts the architect Silvio Dagnini’s 150th anniversary exhibition titled Silvio Dagnini: the Architect, the Artist, the Builder.

Silvio Dagnini (1867–1942) was the last court architect of the Romanovs. His work at Tsarskoye Selo included renovations of Nicholas’ and Alexandra’s rooms in the Alexander Palace, a tunnel connecting the palace and the Kitchen Building, and the surviving wrought-iron gate to the palace from Dvortsovaya Street.
 


The exhibition presents over fifty objects from the Dagnini family holdings
Photo © Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve
 
The exhibition presents over fifty objects from the Dagnini family holdings such as a card table by the architect’s design and his personal arm chair, writing accessories, photographs and mandolin. A rare exhibit is the Red Cross badge, instituted in 1899 by the Red Cross Community for those who showed exceptional service to the Community, and awarded to Dagnini on 14 November 1914.    

Supplemented from the collection of Tsarskoye Selo are Dagnini’s designs marking the main periods of his professional life. His technical drawings of the building for the Red Cross Sister Community of Tsarskoye Selo are especially noteworthy, as well as a chair from the furniture set of the Alexander Palace’s Semi-Circular Hall. Its design was personally approved by Empress Alexandra Feodorovna. The chair was produced by Fyodor Meltzer’s factory, whose craftsmen created most of the furniture for the palace.
 

Dagnini’s drawing for the surviving wrought-iron gate to the palace from Dvortsovaya Street
Photo © Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve
 
© Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve. 28 April, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 7:21 PM EDT
Updated: Friday, 28 April 2017 7:39 PM EDT
Permalink | Share This Post
Wednesday, 1 February 2017
Update on the Restoration of the Alexander Palace
Topic: Alexander Palace

 
Restoration and reconstruction of the Alexander Palace is in full swing. Photo © Artur Mackiewicz 
 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

The restoration of the Alexander Palace, and the reconstruction of the historical interiors is in full swing. Work carried out in more than 70 rooms so far have revealed a number of interesting discoveries. For example, while disassembling the flooring in the Moorish Room, the remains of the bath (pool) were discovered, along with pieces of original tiles. Also, when dismantling a wall in one the rooms located on the second floor of the Alexander Palace, was discovered unique ceramic "Pot" bricks dating from tsarist times.
 
Historians note that the ceilings of the gloomy palace cellars were very low. Restorers have now deepened the floor by almost half a meter, after removing some seven thousand cubic meters of earth - enough to fill more than a hundred rail cars. The newly restored cellar will house a cloakroom and a café. It was during the restoration of the cellars that restorers discovered a hidden staircase which led directly to the emperor's personal chambers. The museum has yet to make a decision on whether to restore it or not. 

A large-scale restoration of the Alexander Palace began three years ago. The palace was closed to visitors from 1st September 2015, in order for the most difficult projects to commence, which include the reconstruction of the historic interiors, such as the Tsar’s Old Study and Moorish Bathroom, Imperial Bedroom, Mauve Study and Palisander, Maple and Crimson Drawing Rooms.

According to the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve, the estimated cost of work totals over two billion rubles [$35 million USD]. The restoration is financed by the federal budget and the museum’s own funds. Unfortunately, that is not enough. An estimated 700 million rubles [$12 million USD] are still required to complete the following seven projects:

Nicholas II’s Old Study — RUB 23,500,000.00
Moorish Bathroom — RUB 22,900,000.00
Imperial Bedroom — RUB 38,700,000.00
Lilac (Mauve) Study — RUB 42,100,000.00
Palisander Drawing Room — RUB 35,200,000.00
Maple Drawing Room — RUB 42,370,000.00
Crimson Drawing Room — RUB 30,100,000.00
 
The Alexander Palace is scheduled to open as a multi-museum complex in July 2018, however, the entire restoration is not expected to be completed now until 2019, or later due to the lack of funding to complete the project.
 

For more information on the history and restoration of the Alexander Palace, please refer to the following link: 

40 More articles on the history and restoration of the Alexander Palace + videos & photos

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 1 February, 2017 
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 10:52 AM EST
Updated: Thursday, 2 February 2017 11:54 AM EST
Permalink | Share This Post
Wednesday, 28 December 2016
The Alexander Palace. 1917 Exhibition Opens in Moscow
Topic: Alexander Palace

 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2016

A new exhibition The Alexander Palace. 1917 opened to the public on 21 December 2016 in the Grand Palace at the Tsaritsyno Museum-Reserve in Moscow. The exhibit is the second phase of The Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo and the Romanovs exhibition which opened at Tsaritsyno in June 2016. The exhibition is dedicated to the 220th anniversary of Alexander Palace and the history of the imperial residence and its crowned owners - from Grand Duke Alexander Pavlovich, the future Emperor Alexander I to Emperor Nicholas II. 

More than one thousand unique items from the historical collections of the Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo are on display for the first time since 1941. The exhibition is further complimented with additional items from the collections of the Pavlovsk State Museum, the Novgorod Museum Reserve and the State Archive of the Russian Federation (GARF) in Moscow.

The exhibition features grandiose paintings and portraits by European and Russian masters, porcelain and bronze works of the 18th - early 20th centuries, palace furniture, uniforms of the emperors, original letters, diaries, drawings, watercolours, copybooks, notes, photos and more. The museum has issued a small 64-page catalogue (see photo above) of the exhibit in Russian only.

The second phase of the exhibition - The Alexander Palace. 1917 - features hundreds of additional exhibits which reflect the private life of the last inhabitants of the palace Emperor Nicholas II and his family up until the summer of 1917. The exhibition will be updated every six months and supplemented with additional items from the collections of the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoye Selo.

In one of the halls is a Christmas tree, around which are assembled toys of Nicholas II’s children, including a puppet theatre, a sled, dolls of the grand duchesses. The exhibit also features the dress uniform of the Tsesarevich Alexei, dresses of the Grand Duchesses, their books, school notebooks, drawings and Christmas cards addressed to their parents.

The other two rooms showcase original documents relating to the renunciation of Nicholas II, amateur photos depicting the life of the Imperial family while under house arrest in the Alexander Palace during the spring and summer of 1917, and the personal camera of the Tsesarevich’s Swiss tutor Pierre Gilliard.
 
On display in the last room are a group of chairs from the Semi-Circular Hall of the Alexander Palace, where the Emperor and his family spent their last night waiting for the automobiles to transfer them to a nearby railway station and exile to Tobolsk. After the Imperial family’s departure, photos of the deserted residence were taken by military photographer Andrey Zeest at the request of George Lukomsky, who was ordered to conduct an inventory of the palace and its contents. These unique  autochromes are also on display. 

The exhibition The Alexander Palace. 1917  and The Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo and the Romanovs. The Story Continues runs until 15 January, 2018 in the Grand Palace at Tsaritsyno in Moscow. 

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 27 December, 2016
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 8:22 AM EST
Updated: Wednesday, 28 December 2016 8:46 AM EST
Permalink | Share This Post
Saturday, 12 November 2016
Update on the Restoration of the Alexander Palace
Topic: Alexander Palace


The restoration of the Alexander Palace continues at Tsarskoye Selo. Few updates on the progress of the work have been issued since the palace closed its doors to visitors at the end of August 2015.

Earlier this year, more than 700 of the exhibits were transferred to the Grand Palace at the Tsaritsyno State Museum in Moscow, where they are currently on display in the exhibition The Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo and the Romanovs. The Story Continues. The second part of the exhibition, The Alexander Palace. Year 1917 will open on the eve of 2017, featuring additional 300 exhibits. Both exhibitions will run until 31 December 2017.
 


These current photos show the entire palace surrounded by a large blue fence, and work being carried out on the facade and roof of the palace. To date, the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve have not released any photographs of the restoration of the interiors.

The Alexander Palace is scheduled to reopen on 17th July 2018, marking the 100th anniversary of the murders of Emperor Nicholas II and his family.

The Royal Russia News Blog offers more than 40 articles on the history and restoration of the Alexander Palace, please click on the link below to review the articles, videos and photographs:

The History and Restoration of the Alexander Palace

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 12 November, 2016
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:54 AM EST
Updated: Sunday, 13 November 2016 3:28 PM EST
Permalink | Share This Post
Wednesday, 29 June 2016
Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo and the Romanovs. The Story Continues
Topic: Alexander Palace

This article has been written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2016

The Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo, like the Grand Palace in Tsaritsyno, was created at the behest of the Empress Catherine II. At first, the construction of both palaces proceeded well, however, they did not share the same fate. The Alexander Palace, unlike Tsaritsyno, was not only completed, but remained a favourite home to several generations of Romanovs for more than 120 years. A new exhibition which opened this week in the Grand Palace at Tsaritsyno in Moscow features more than 700 authentic objects that are associated with the life of these people, their hobbies, their loves, joys and sorrows.

The first owner of the palace was the Grand Duke Alexander Pavlovich, the future Emperor Alexander I. Exactly 220 years ago, in June 1796, he entered the New Palace of Tsarskoye Selo (as it was called until 1856), he had received as a wedding gift from his grandmother, Catherine II . He, among a succession of other emperors liked to visit and spend the summer with their wives and children, among them Emperor Nicholas I, the Tsesarevich Alexander Alexandrovich (future Emperor Alexander III), and Emperor Nicholas II. The last Russian emperor was not only born in the Alexander Palace in 1868, but it remained his main residence right up until his abdication and house arrest in 1917.

The history of the Alexander Palace as a museum is a short one. Before the Great Patriotic War the state rooms and royal apartments of the palace were open to the public. During the occupation of the city of Pushkin, the Palace was occupied by German military units. After the war the building was occupied by various Soviet institutions.

The fate of the works of art - paintings, sculptures, furniture, lovingly collected lived by members of the Russian Imperial family in the Alexander Palace is a sad one to say the least. Many of the items which filled the palace interiors, were lost during the war, and most of the remaining were distributed to different museums and other palace estate museums. According to a 2010 report in the Russian newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda, a total 5,615 items from the Alexander Palace were moved to Pavlovsk in 1957, where many of them remain to this day.

In 2009, the Alexander Palace was officially taken over by the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve, and soon thereafter the state rooms were open to the public. In the fall of 2015, the Alexander Palace began a large-scale restoration work, which is expected to be complete in July 2018.
 


The organizers of the exhibition The Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo and the Romanovs. The Story Continues managed to collect a significant part in the exhibition of objects from the historical collections of the Alexander Palace. They are complemented further with items stored in the collections of the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve, the Pavlovsk State Museum and the Novgorod Museum Reserve. Some items from these collections are on display at the Tsaritsyno exhibit for the first time since 1941. Among them are magnificent paintings by famous masters, European and Russian porcelain, bronze art, books from the palace library, as well as historical and personal uniforms of the emperors. The exhibited objects give visitors an idea of the decoration of the imperial residence under different owners.

Original letters, diaries, drawings, watercolours, copybooks, notes, photographs and postcards, provided by the State Archive of the Russian Federation (GARF) in Moscow, allow a more personal touch to the stories of the inhabitants of the Alexander Palace.

More than 700 exhibits of the exhibition The Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo and the Romanovs. The Story Continues present the history of the palace and its owners, beginning with the Grand Duke Alexander Pavlovich, the future Emperor Alexander I, and ending with the family of the Tsesarevich Alexander Alexandrovich, the future Emperor Alexander III.

But, as the name suggests, the exhibition is waiting for continuation: the second part of the exhibition project The Alexander Palace in 1917, which will open in December 2016, will be devoted to Emperor Nicholas II, his family and the last days of Alexander Palace as a royal residence. From here 100 years ago, on August 1, 1917, Russia’s last emperor Nicholas II and his family went into exile to Tobolsk.

The exhibition is a joint effort organized by the Tsaritsyno State Museum Preserve, the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve, and the State Archive of the Russian Federation (GARF).

The exhibition The Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo and the Romanovs. The Story Continues runs from 29 June, 2016 - 31 January, 2018 in the Grand Palace at Tsaritsyno in Moscow.
 
Click on the link below to view more photographs from this exhibition:

Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo and the Romanovs. The Story Continues - 30 Colour Photographs

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 29 June, 2016
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 8:41 AM EDT
Updated: Thursday, 30 June 2016 11:08 AM EDT
Permalink | Share This Post
Tuesday, 26 April 2016
Tsaritsyno to Host Alexander Palace Exhibit
Topic: Alexander Palace


Watercolour of the Alexander Palace by Alexei Maksimovich Gornostaev 1847
 
This article has been written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2016
 
The Tsaritsyno State Historical, Architectural, Art and Landscape Museum-Reserve in Moscow will host a new two-part exhibit this summer dedicated to the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoye Selo.

Tsarskoye Selo: the History of the Alexander Palace and the Romanovs will be devoted to the history of the Alexander Palace and the Romanov dynasty, from Empress Catherine II - who built the palace for her grandson the future Emperor Alexander I - to Emperor Nicholas II. It was in the Alexander Palace that the last Russian emperor was born in 1868, and where he spent much of his 22 year reign. After abdicating the throne in 1917, Nicholas II lived here under house arrest with his family until they were later sent into exile to Siberia.

The exhibition, which opens in the halls of the Grand Palace at Tsaritsyno in June 2016, will consist of two parts. In the first part, visitors will learn about the Alexander Palace and its inhabitants - members of the Russian Imperial family. The exhibit will focus on the personal history of each family member, highlighted with portraits, furniture, porcelain items, toys, costumes (gowns, dresses, uniforms, children's clothes), among other items from the Alexander Palace collection.

The second part, Alexander Palace. Year 1917 will open on the eve of 2017. This part of the exhibit focuses specifically on the 22 year reign of Emperor Nicholas II, and the years in which he and his family lived in the Alexander Palace up to his abdication, and the months in which they were under house arrest in the palace. The exhibit will feature a series of amazing vintage photos of the interiors of the Alexander Palace, which were taken immediately after the departure of the Imperial family on 1 August, 1917. These photographs have provided history with a rare look into the the private world of Emperor Nicholas II and his family. 

The permanent exhibition Reminiscences in the Alexander Palace, which included the former private apartments of Emperor Nicholas II and his family located in the East Wing of the palace closed on 2 August, 2015 while the Suite of State Rooms closed on 31 August, 2015. The Alexander Palace is scheduled to reopen on July 17, 2018, marking the 100th anniversary of the murders of Emperor Nicholas II and his family.
 
The exhibition will run from June 2016 to December 2017 in the Grand Palace at Tsaritsyno. 

For more information on the history and restoration of the Alexander Palace, please refer to the following link:

More Articles and Videos on the Alexander Palace 

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 26 April, 2017


 


Posted by Paul Gilbert at 4:25 AM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 30 April 2016 1:10 PM EDT
Permalink | Share This Post
Wednesday, 2 September 2015
Alexander Palace Officially Closed Until 2018
Topic: Alexander Palace


The Alexander Palace. Photo © Andrei Antipin
 
The Alexander Palace has officially closed its doors to visitors for extensive restoration work until 2018. The permanent exhibition Reminiscences in the Alexander Palace, which included the former private apartments of Emperor Nicholas II and his family located in the East Wing of the palace closed on August 2, while the Suite of State Rooms closed on August 31.

The restoration projects include the following:
  • Restoration of rooms with surviving historic decorations, such as the Suite of State Rooms including the Corner Drawing-Room, Mountain Hall, Large or Crimson Drawing-Room and Library Rooms, as well as the Reception Room and State or New Study of Nicholas II; 
  • Restoration of historic decorations (as of the late 19th – early 20th century) in six living and working rooms on the first floor of the West Wing, such as the Bathroom or Moorish Room, Study (Office) of Nicholas II, Bedroom, Lilac or Mauve Study, Palisander and Maple Drawing-Rooms;
  • Some rooms in the West Wing that were rebuilt in 1949 will be used as temporary exhibition and conference rooms after restoration. 
  • These works are scheduled for completion in 2018, depending on finances. If the palace reopens by 17 July 2018, that will be a major event commemorating 100 years since the tragic death of Emperor Nicholas II and his family.  
These projects are scheduled for completion in 2018. The Alexander Palace is scheduled to reopen on July 17, 2018, marking the 100th anniversary of the murders of Emperor Nicholas II and his family. 
 
© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 02 September, 2015
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 7:35 AM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 2 September 2015 7:41 AM EDT
Permalink | Share This Post
Monday, 20 July 2015
The Alexander Palace - Update on Restorations
Topic: Alexander Palace


The extensive restoration will include a reconstruction of several historical interiors, including the Maple Drawing Room above
 
The Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve issued the following statement earlier this week regarding the closure and restoration of the Alexander Palace
 
The Alexander Palace will soon be closing for restoration, hopefully till 2018. The rooms of Nicholas II and Alexandra Feodorovna will be open for visiting through July 31, the Suite of State Rooms through August 31.

The project for reconstruction, restoration, technical refurbishment and renovation of the Alexander Palace was designed in 2011 by a team of specialists led by Mr Nikita Yavein from the architectural workshop Studio 44 .

According to their design, the palace should become a multifunctional museum complex with permanent displays of recreated and restored rooms, temporary exhibition galleries, research and conference rooms, and a children’s creative center. The cellars (ground floor) will accommodate a café, vestibules with ticket offices, a cloakroom, a tour desk and a museum shop, as well as technical and other services.

The contractor for the work is PSB ZhilStroy Ltd. The cellars’ renovation and partial replacement of ceilings in the West Wing have been completed. The palace will close to start the most difficult replacement of ceilings, roof frames, outdated pipes and networks, and then the restoration and recreation of the interiors.
 

The restoration phase should include the following:

  • Restoration of rooms with surviving historic decorations, such as the Suite of State Rooms including the Corner Drawing-Room, Mountain Hall, Large or Crimson Drawing-Room and Library Rooms, as well as the Reception Room and State or New Study of Nicholas II; 
  • Restoration of historic decorations (as of the late 19th – early 20th century) in six living and working rooms on the first floor of the West Wing, such as the Bathroom or Moorish Room, Study (Office) of Nicholas II, Bedroom, Lilac or Mauve Study, Palisander and Maple Drawing-Rooms;
  • Some rooms in the West Wing that were rebuilt in 1949 will be used as temporary exhibition and conference rooms after restoration. 
  • These works are scheduled for completion in 2018, depending on finances. If the palace reopens by 17 July 2018, that will be a major event commemorating 100 years since the tragic death of Emperor Nicholas II and his family.  
Royal Russia has published numerous articles on the restoration of the Alexander Palace. For more information, please refer to the directory on the left side of this page, which includes links to other articles, videos and photographs:

Alexander Palace Closing on August 1 for Restoration

© Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve. 20 July, 2015
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:24 AM EDT
Updated: Tuesday, 21 July 2015 6:44 AM EDT
Permalink | Share This Post
Thursday, 14 May 2015
Alexander Palace Closing on August 1 for Restoration
Topic: Alexander Palace


The Alexander Palace at Tsarskoye Selo will close on August 1st, for a period of more than 2 years as extensive restoration work is carried out.
 
The summer of 2015 may be your last opportunity to visit the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoye Selo for the next few years. According to Olga Taratynova, the director of the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve, the Alexander Palace will close its doors to visitors from August 1 for a period of more than 2 years as extensive restoration work is carried out.
 
"Sadly, it is at this stage of the restoration work in which we are forced to close the palace to visitors. This is a necessity - the palace was passed on to us not in the best condition. Some work has been carried out, such as the deepening of basements, but we now have to concentrate our efforts on the first and second floors of the palace. For instance, all the buildings utilities must be upgraded, and further repairs to the roof need to be completed. Such extensive work make group and individual excursions to the palace impossible, "- said Olga Taratynova.

In 2014, the contracting firm of Zhilstroy Design and Construction Bureau LLC was selected to carry out the restoration of the Alexander Palace, who note that the cost of the work is estimates at 202.8 million rubles. According to Taratynova, the exact timing of the completion of the restoration cannot be guaranteed - a lot will depend on funding. According to preliminary estimates, at best, the palace is partially open two and a half years. "But this optimistic forecast", - added Taratynova.

The Alexander Palace was built in 1792 by order of Empress Catherine II and presented as a gift for the wedding of her favourite grandson, Grand Duke Alexander Pavlovich and Grand Duchess Elizabeth Alexeyevna. From 1904, the Alexander Palace became the permanent residence of Emperor Nicholas II. In 1918, the palace was opened to visitors as a public museum. During the Nazi occupation of Pushkin during the Second World War, the Alexander Palace housed the headquarters of the Gestapo, who converted the basement into a prison. The square in front of the palace was turned into a cemetery for soldiers of the SS. After the war, the palace was conserved in 1946 and handed over to the Academy of Sciences for storing the collections of the Institute of Russian Literature and the Pushkin Union Museum. The building was then occupied by the Ministry of Defense until 2010.

It should be noted that the no major repairs to the Alexander Palace had been carried out since 1957. In 1996, the palace received a grant from the World Monuments Fund (WMF), and began work to repair the roof of the building. That same year, the exhibition Reminiscences in the Alexander Palace was opened to commemorate the 200th Anniversary of the palace, which included the former private apartments of the last imperial family in the East Wing - Emperor Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra private apartments. After the departure of the Russian navy in 2009 the palace was officially handed over to the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Preserve. In 2010, three ceremonial halls in the central part of the palace - Portrait, Semi-circular and Marble - were opened.
 
In 2011, the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve tabled a master plan for the restoration of the Alexander Palace, which will ultimately create a multi-museum complex. It is expected that the restoration will be complete by 2018, the year in which Russia will mark the 100th anniversary of the murders of Emperor Nicholas II and his family at Ekaterinburg on July 17, 1918.
 
For more information on the restoration of the Alexander Palace, please refer to the following articles:
 

The Revival of the Alexander Palace

 

 

The Royal Russia web site and blog contain more than 30 articles on the Alexander Palace, its history and restoration. To review these articles, please refer to our directory situated on the left-hand side of this page. Click on the Alexander Palace, where you will find a list of the articles in chronological order. The articles contain numerous videos and dozens of historic and contemporary photographs. Note: each page of our blog holds 10 articles. Click on the Older link located in the bottom left hand side of each page to review more articles and videos on the Alexander Palace. 

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 14 May, 2015
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 12:23 PM EDT
Updated: Thursday, 14 May 2015 1:00 PM EDT
Permalink | Share This Post

Newer | Latest | Older