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Wednesday, 9 July 2014
Faberge Exhibit Coming to Oklahoma City Museum of Art in 2015
Topic: Faberge


A peek inside the Imperial Peter the Great Easter Egg. Photo © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
 
More than 230 rare and storied treasures created by the House of Fabergé will be celebrated in a new exhibition at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. “Fabergé: Jeweller to the Tsars” will be on view from June 20 through September 27, 2015. The exhibition, drawn from the Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, will showcase Carl Fabergé’s fine craftsmanship in pieces of jewellery and adornments once belonging to the Russian Imperial family.

From dazzling Imperial Easter eggs to delicate flower ornaments and from enchanting animal sculptures to cigarette cases, photograph frames and desk clocks, Fabergé often turned the most mundane objects into miniature works of art. The vast majority of his designs were never repeated, and most pieces were made entirely by hand.  The success of his business was inextricably linked to the patronage of the Romanov dynasty and the close ties among the British, Danish and Russian royal families, who often exchanged works by Fabergé as personal gifts.

The “Imperial Tsesarevich Easter Egg” of 1912, which will be on view at OKCMOA, was a gift to Empress Alexandra from her husband, Emperor Nicholas II. The egg commemorates their son, Alexsei, who nearly died the previous year of haemophilia. For the shell, craftsmen joined six wedges of highly prized lapis lazuli and hid the seams with an elaborate gold filigree encasement. Inside the egg, a diamond encrusted Romanov family crest frames a two-sided portrait of the young child.

These objects were associated with refinement and luxury because the House of Fabergé was known for accepting nothing less than perfection as well as for being business savvy. Beyond the elegant showrooms in Moscow and Saint Petersburg, hundreds of the country’s finest goldsmiths, enamellers, stone carvers, gem cutters and jewellers were at work creating innovative and complex designs that could not be readily imitated. 
 
© Oklahoma City Museum of Art. 09 July, 2014
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 12:05 AM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 9 July 2014 5:03 AM EDT
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Tuesday, 24 June 2014
Fabulous Faberge Takes a Peek Inside Imperial Russia
Topic: Faberge

Copyright Notice: The following article was originally published in the June 19th, 2014 edition of the National Post. The author David Berry, owns the copyright of the version presented below.

As objets d’art go, there is not now nor is there likely to ever be anything more famous than the intricate Easter eggs designed by Peter Carl Fabergé. They were commissioned by the Russian czars from 1885 until the Bolshevik revolution made both imperialism and gilded, jewelled imperial presents fall sharply out of favour. Crafted by hand, extravagantly decorated, and each containing a special surprise inside, the Fabergé eggs evoke an opulent style and time with their name alone.

“The work is still a living symbol,” explains Nathalie Bondil, director of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, which has just opened a deep and detailed exhibit of the craftsman’s work, Fabulous Fabergé: Jeweller to the Czars. “But the name, it remains something completely historical — its history is done. It’s a bit like Napoleon: I can feel the same fascination, the same fetishism, because they symbolize a moment of great history. The power of suggestion is so, so strong.”

That was true even before they had a century worth of legend-building. Many of Fabergé’s greatest creations, including several of the 50 eggs he is said to have made for the imperial family (he made a handful of others for private clients), were either scrapped or sold by the Soviets as part of their “treasure into tractors” program, which aimed to both raise money and wipe out the traces of Russia’s royal past.

Nearly 100 years later, they are now some of the most sought-after pieces of Russian history in the world, particularly by the modern heirs to the Czars, the oligarchs who have made billions in the rush back to capitalism. Viktor Vekselberg, chairman of the Renova Group and Russia’s third-richest man, has bought 11 of the Imperial eggs for the $100-million total, and the recently rediscovered third egg just sold for about $35-million to a private collector, believed to be a Russian.

This hunger for the hallmarks of Imperial Russia’s pre-eminent designer makes the MMFA exhibit, on loan from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the most impressive collection of Fabergé works outside their homeland. Though it features a host of pieces, particularly miniature objects, the exhibit is organized around the four Imperial eggs Virginia has in its collection: The blue-and-gold Cesarevich, which reveals a diamond-encrusted portrait of Nicolas II’s heir Alexei; the relatively simple red gold Pelican, with a jewel-encrusted figurine of the bird perched on top; the intricate Peter the Great, which commemorates the 200th anniversary of the founding of St. Petersburg; and the Red Cross, presented during the First World War and featuring members of the Imperial family dressed as Sisters of Mercy.

Each egg is used to explain some part of the world from which it sprang, including the tradition of eggs in the Orthodox church, the history of Imperial Russia and the role of Fabergé in imperial society. They’ve also been set against works by modern designers, which, as Bondil explains, is a way of taking the pieces of the pedestal and getting them into a conversation with the modern audience.

“We wanted to show it a new way, a way that wasn’t cute or kitsch or old-fashioned … I think sometimes because Fabergé is so well known, it can get a little overlooked, [treated] a little hands-off. But they should be conversational … each object represents so much more than itself,” she explains, before adding that there was a practical motive behind displaying other works with the Fabergé, too. “A lot of these works are miniatures, which are very, very small; they’re exquisite, but they’re not so easy to display.”

Fabulous Fabergé: Jeweller to the Czars is on until Oct. 5 at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. 
 
© David Berry / National Post. 24 June, 2014
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 7:07 AM EDT
Updated: Thursday, 10 July 2014 8:24 AM EDT
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Thursday, 12 June 2014
Prince Bernhard Secretly Sold Juliana's Faberge Tray
Topic: Faberge
Photo: Prince Bernhard and Queen Juliana of the Netherlands
 
The late Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands, has been accused of secretly selling off his wife queen Juliana's Fabergé tray.

The tray, which would be worth millions of euros today, was presented to Juliana's mother queen Wilhelmina by the Dutch community in Saint Petersburg 1901 when she married prince Hendrik.

It was kept in the Royal archives but appeared unexpectedly in 1974 in a catalogue issued by auction house Christie's.

Jewellery expert Erik Schoonhoven says in Royalty magazine, that his recent research shows that Bernhard sold the piece in 1963 to the London court jeweller Wartski and pocketed the money.

However, the tray belonged to Juliana because the pair were not married in community of property, Schoonhoven says.

It is the latest in a series of scandals surrounding the controversial Bernhard, who died in 2004. 
 
© DutchNews.nl. 12 June, 2014
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 5:02 AM EDT
Updated: Thursday, 12 June 2014 6:47 AM EDT
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Monday, 9 June 2014
A Jewel of an Exhibition: Incredible Faberge Pieces Owned by Russian Royalty go on Display in Montreal
Topic: Faberge


A Faberge egg decorated with a portrait of Peter the Great was given by Tsar Nicholas II to his wife, made by Mikhail Perkhin in 1903.
Photo © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
 
Copyright Notice: The following article was originally published in the June 6th, 2014 edition of The Daily Mail. The author Catherine Hardy owns the copyright presented below.

You may only know of the Romanovs through watching ‘Anastasia’ but the Russian royal family owned some seriously stylish ornaments.

To the Tsars of old, Easter eggs weren’t made of chocolate but were beautifully crafted Fabergé pieces with gold and precious stones.

An exhibition of 240 Fabergé objects will be on display exclusively in the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in Canada, the largest collection outside of Russia from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond.

The exhibition ‘Fabergé, Jeweller to the Tsars’, running from June 14 to October 5, will include four of the last 43 Fabergé eggs that were commissioned by the Romanovs.

Carl Fabergé, who lived from 1846 to 1920, was a Russian jeweller whose name has become synonymous with these beautiful and ornate objects, as well as luxury jewellery.

As well as showcasing his stunning works, the exhibition will explain the history and traditions of Orthodox Russia and the techniques of the House of Fabergé, which fell with the Tsarist regime.

The jewelled and glittering exhibits include enamelled picture frames, gold jewellery encrusted with precious stones, miniature animals carved from precious stones, rock-crystal flower vases and silverware.
 

 
Beautiful memory: A portrait of the Grand Duchess Tatiana, second daughter of the last Tsar. Photo © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
 
The star pieces of the exhibition will be  a small hard-stone portrait of a sailor from the imperial yacht Zarnitsa, a rare portrait of Tsar Nicholas II in a column shaped frame, and a portrait of the Grand Duchess Tatiana, second daughter of the last Tsar, thought to be the last artefact of the imperial family before their tragic murder.

Dr. Géza von Habsburg, conservation director of the Fabergé Company based in London, said 'With its five imperial eggs, the Fabergé collection of the Virginia Museum of Art is the largest of its kind outside of Russia. 

'Its eggs, four of which are travelling to Montreal, are some of the greatest masterpieces ever created by Fabergé, who was, according to connoisseurs, the world’s most famous goldsmith'.

Fabergé is best known for his mastery of enamelled decoration, and the exhibition will reveal the full extent of his productions, from cloisonné enamelled Russian goblets to Western decorated cigarette boxes, walking canes and photo frames.

But his most famous legacy is his intricate eggs, mainly created for the Tsar of Russia, each containing a very special surprise inside.

One of the four eggs on display is the Tsarevitch imperial Easter egg, made in 1912 by master goldsmith Henrik Wigström.

A present for the Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna, it consists of six sections of lapis lazuli decorated with golden two- headed eagles and splays of flowers, with a diamond monogram of the Russian letters AF. Inside is a miniature portrait of Tsarevitch Alexi, the son of Tsar Nicholas II and Alexandra.

Tsarina Alexandra was the granddaughter of Queen Victoria, making her an ancestor of Queen Elizabeth II.
 
Nathalie Bondil, the MMFA’s Director and Chief Curator, says “This first major exhibition on Fabergé to be shown in Canada is a unique opportunity to discover the splendour of the decorative arts of the House of Fabergé, whose fate was tragically linked to the history and fall of the imperial house of Russia in 1917. 

The jeweller’s symbolic significance and artistry still exert their fascination, from the dollar princesses of yesteryear to the oligarch tsars of today who collect them.’ 
 
© Catherine Hardy / The Daily Mail. 06 June, 2014
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 4:50 AM EDT
Updated: Monday, 9 June 2014 5:00 AM EDT
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Tuesday, 27 May 2014
Bonhams to Auction Faberge Works on June 4th
Topic: Faberge


This Fabergé lily of the valley is expected to fetch £200,000 to £300,000. Photo © Bonhams
 
The coming week in London is set to be all about Russian art as the city's premier auction houses and arts venues kick off the fourth annual Russian Art Week. Auctions of rare and valuable Russian paintings, icons and works of decorative art will be held at all the major auction houses from May 20 to June 7, alongside a series of exceptional exhibitions of work by contemporary Russian artists at galleries and museums around the city.

Among the most valuable pieces in the June 4 sale at Bonhams are 11 Faberge works, showcasing the materials and techniques that endowed the legendary Faberge firm with its lasting appeal.

Among the lots that will see collectors from around the world descend on New Bond Street are a 1913 Faberge figure of a bourgeois woman crafted in semi-precious stones with sapphire eyes. The piece is offered with an estimate of £300,000 to £500,000. Faberge genre figures rendered in hardstone were as rare as Faberge eggs and only about 50 were ever produced. The piece now up for auction was once in the collection of Emanuel Nobel, a prominent Swedish industrialist based in St. Petersburg, who owned the largest collection of stone figures before 1914 and was one of Faberge's most important clients.

A jewelled gold and rock crystal lily of the valley Faberge study is also set to go up on the block. Estimated at £200,000 to £300,000, the delicate study possesses leaves made of nephrite unfurling from pearl buds that are covered in sparking rose-cut diamond dew drops. Faberge flower studies were particularly cherished by the imperial family, with lilies of the valley finding particular favour with Empress Alexandra Feodorovna and the dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna as well as their royal British cousins. 
 
© The Moscow Times. 27 May, 2014
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:20 AM EDT
Updated: Tuesday, 27 May 2014 6:27 AM EDT
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Monday, 21 April 2014
WARTSKI: The Story of the Shop Behind This Easter's Most Extraordinary Egg
Topic: Faberge


Wartski specializes in Russian works of art; particularly those by Carl Faberge

Outside the little Wartski jewelers’ shop in Mayfair, there is a queue. For four days only, in the run up to Easter, this venerable antique dealers just off Bond Street is exhibiting a priceless Fabergé egg. In the first two and a half days, 1500 visitors saw the egg, which had been lost for nearly a hundred years before turning up at an American flea market. 

The following article was originally published in the April 20th, 2014 edition of Russia Beyond the Headlines. The author Phoebe Taplin owns the copyright presented below.

Click on the link below to read the full article:

WARTSKI: The Story of the Shop Behind This Easter’s Most Extraordinary Egg 

© Russia Beyond the Headlines and Phoebe Taplin. 21 April, 2013


 


Posted by Paul Gilbert at 3:19 PM EDT
Updated: Monday, 21 April 2014 3:26 PM EDT
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Wednesday, 16 April 2014
Carl Faberge's Lost Third Imperial Easter Egg Goes On Display
Topic: Faberge

 
Faberge's Third Imperial Egg on display at Wartski in London, England. Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
 
The Third Faberge Imperial Easter Egg is displayed at Court Jewellers Wartski on April 16, 2014 in London, England. This rare Imperial Faberge Easter Egg, made for the Russian Royal family in 1887, thought to be worth tens of millions of dollar, was seized by the Bolsheviks after the Russian revolution. It was sold at auction in New York in 1964 as a 'Gold watch in egg form case' for $2450 - its provenance then unknown. Later a buyer in the US Mid-West bought it for possible scrap metal value until he discovered it's true value.
 
For more information on the Third Imperial Egg, please refer to the following links: 

 

© Getty Images. 16 April, 2014
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:24 AM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 16 April 2014 6:44 AM EDT
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Wednesday, 9 April 2014
Lost and Found Faberge Egg on Display for First Time in Over a Century
Now Playing: Language: English. Duration: 1 minute, 24 seconds
Topic: Faberge
 
The Third Imperial Easter Egg can be seen from April 14 to 17 at Wartski's showroom in London.
 
A Fabergé Imperial Easter Egg made for Emperor Alexander III of Russia that hasn't been seen in public for more than a century is to go on show in London after being saved from the melting pot by an American scrap dealer who only accidentally realised its value.
 
The Lost Third Imperial Easter Egg was made by Peter Carl Fabergé as a gift for Empress Maria Feodorovna for Easter 1887.

The 8.2 cm (3.2 inches) tall egg, made from gold and studded with diamonds and sapphires, was last displayed in St Petersburg in 1902.

It was seized by the Bolsheviks during the 1917 Russian Revolution and mysteriously made its way to the United States.

By chance, an unidentified man bought it at a market in the U.S. Midwest for $14,000, intending to sell it for scrap. Unable to find a buyer, he searched the Internet and realised that he may have found Empress Maria Feodorovna's lost Easter egg.

London antiques dealer Wartski, which specialises in the work of Fabergé, bought the egg for an unidentified private collector who has permitted it to go on show in its small showroom near London's luxury shopping strip Bond Street.

Slightly taller than a cup cake, the ridged yellow gold egg sits on its original tripod with lion paw feet. It is encircled with gold flower garlands strung from cabochon blue sapphires topped with rose diamond-set bows.

Like all Fabergé's eggs, it contains a "surprise" - a lady's watch by Vacheron Constantin with a white enamel face and diamond-set gold hands. The watch has been taken from its case and mounted in the Egg so it can be displayed upright.

The egg was made in the St Petersburg workshop of Fabergé's chief jeweller August Holmstrom between 1886 and 1887.

Only 50 of these lavish works of art were ever created, each of them aunique design and a certain mysteriousness is attached to all of them. After the revolution the Eggs were seized by the Bolsheviks. Some they kept, but most were sold to the West. Two were bought by Queen Mary and are part of the British Royal Collection. The remainder belong to museums, oligarchs, sheikhs and heiresses.

"In the hierarchy of Fabergé objects, the egg occupies the very, very highest level," said Kieran McCarthy, director of Wartski. "They each took a year to make from the original conception to the completion of it for delivery on Good Friday each Easter."

Fabergé eggs are considered masterpieces, affordable only by royalty or the very rich. Since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, some newly wealthy Russians have become enthusiastic collectors of Fabergé treasures.

Metals tycoon Viktor Vekselberg bought a collection of Fabergé Imperial Easter Eggs for $90 million from the Forbes family in 2004. The eggs were taken back to Moscow and put on exhibition in the Kremlin.

A Russian businessman with a passion for Tsarist treasures, Alexander Ivanov said he was behind the $18.5-million purchase of a Fabergé egg in London in 2007.

 The Third Imperial Easter Egg is one of 50 delivered by Fabergé to Emperors Alexander III and Nicholas II from 1885 to 1916, and until its recent discovery was one of eight lost eggs. Only two others of these lost eggs are thought to have survived the revolution.

"It just shows that you never know," said McCarthy, when asked whether hope remains that the other two will be found. "We never thought this one would turn up and literally it was on somebody who walked through the front door."

The Lost Third Imperial Easter Egg can be seen from April 14 to 17 at Wartski's showroom in London. 
 
© The Voice of Russia. 09 April, 2014
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:15 AM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 9 April 2014 6:19 AM EDT
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Saturday, 5 April 2014
The Faberge Egg That was Nearly Melted for Scrap
Now Playing: Language: English. Duration: 2 minutes, 8 seconds
Topic: Faberge


A Faberge Easter egg which once belonged to Russian royalty but was feared lost or destroyed is to go on display for the first time in more than 100 years.

A scrap metal dealer in the United States bought the egg for about £8,000 ($14,000) thinking he could melt it down for gold.

It was only after reading a newspaper article that he realised its value; one of just 50 made for the Russian Royal family, it has recently been sold for around £20m.

The article was written by BBC reporter Roya Nikkhah who has taken a close-up look at the egg with Kieran McCarthy, director of Wartski, and Joanna Hardy, a jewellery historian.
 
For more information on the Third Imperial Easter Egg, please refer to the following link:
 

FOUND! A Lost Imperial Easter Egg by Faberge 

 
It is interesting to note that this particular egg was featured in the article, Empress Marie Feodorovna's Missing Faberge Easter Eggs, co-written by Annemiek Wintraecken and Christel Ludewig McCanless. The article was published in the Royal Russia Annual No. 3 in 2013 and consists of 8 pages and 10 black and white photographs. 
 
© BBC News and Royal Russia. 05 April, 2014
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:07 AM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 30 April 2014 1:01 PM EDT
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Friday, 4 April 2014
Faberge's Kelch Apple Blossom Egg on Display in London
Topic: Faberge

 
The Kelch Apple Blossom Egg (also known as the Jade Chest Egg), 1901. Sadly, the surprise inside is now lost
 
Copyright Notice: The following was condensed from an article originally published in the April 4th, 2014 edition of The Telegraph. The author Maria Doulton, owns the copyright of the article presented below.

Going to Harrods at 7:30 am for the launch of its month long Fabergé Easter at Harrods felt like being allowed into a museum before the doors open to the public. Walking down aisles of empty counters a pack of a dozen journalists, bloggers and photographers headed for the highlight: the 1901 Fabergé Apple Blossom Easter egg rumoured to be worth £30 million. Strategically positioned security staff marked the path through the labyrinth of display counters. And there it was: the moss green nephrite egg over which Peter Carl Fabergé had set delicate golden branches with white enamel blooms each with a diamond at its centre. Moss grows up the bottom of the realistic branches of the apple tree that cradles the egg. It drew the same response Peter Carl Fabergé would have hoped for: delight, surprise, awe and a coo or two.

Looking suitably like a mad professor with long white wispy hair and a strong accent, Dr. Prof. Rainer Vollkommer, Director of the Liechtenstein National Museum that has lent the egg to Fabergé, speculates what may have been inside the egg: “It would probably have been a jewel, like a necklace or a ring,” he says. “But we just don’t know for sure.”

The security guards looked nervous as photographers got too close to the glass display cabinet and set off the alarms several times. Miroslova Duma, Russian fashion editor, founder of website Buro24/7 and stylish representative of the new wave of Russian wealth peered at the egg and remarked that it was the first time that she had seen it. She contributed the  “Fabergé Cinescope” to the event that allows you to sit in front of a digital mirror and virtually try on a Fabergé jewel and share the result your friends, something that will appeal to modern tsarinas.
 

The Apple Blossom Egg was originally a gift from Alexander Kelch to his wife Barbara Kelch-Bazanova in 1901. In 1920, it was one of the six Kelch Eggs sold by Morgan to A La Vielle Russe, Paris. In 1928, it was sold to an unknown buyer in the United States. It remained in a private collection until 1994, when it was sold by Christie’s, Geneva to an anonymous Russian buyer. In November 1996, it was sold by Sotheby’s, Geneva to Adulf Peter Goop, Vaduz, Liechtenstein. In 2012, Goop donated the egg to the people of Liechtenstein. Source: Mieks Faberge Eggs

A Fabergé Easter at Harrods from April 1-21, 2014 
 
© Maria Doulton @ The Telegraph and Royal Russia
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 8:03 AM EDT
Updated: Friday, 4 April 2014 8:13 AM EDT
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