ROYAL RUSSIA: News, Videos & Photographs About the Romanov Dynasty, Monarchy and Imperial Russia - Updated Daily
« August 2011 »
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
Entries by Topic
All topics  «
400th Anniversary
A Russian Moment
Alapaevsk
Alexander I
Alexander II
Alexander III
Alexander Mikhailovich, GD
Alexander Palace
Alexandra Feodorovna
Alexandra Nicholayevna, GD
Alexandra Pavlovna GD
Amber Room
Anna Feodorovna, GD
Anna Pavlovna, GD
Antiques
Architecture
Auctions
Bagrations
Beautiful Orthodox Churches
Benckendorff, Count Paul
Bolsheviks
Bolshoi
Books
Catherine II
Chavchavadze
Chekhov
Collectibles
Conspiracy Theories
Constantine Constantinovich, GD
Cossacks
Country Estates
Crimea
Dmitri Pavlovich, GD
Dmitri Romanovich
Documentaries
Dowager Empress Maria
Eagar, Margaretta
Easter
Ekaterinburg
Elena Vladimirovna, GD
Elizabeth Feodorovna GD
Elizabeth Petrovna, Empress
Events
Exhibitions
Faberge
Ganima Yama
GARF
Gatchina
George Alexandrovich, GD
Grand Duchess Xenia Alexa
Grand Duke Mikhail Alexan
Grand Dukes
Holy Royal Martyrs
Imperial Russia
Jewels
Kazan Cathedral
Kerensky, Alexander
Kolchak, Admiral
Kolomenskoye
Kostroma
Kremlin
Kronstadt
Livadia
Maria Alexandrovna
Maria Feodorovna, Empress
Maria Pavlovna, Senior
Maria Vladimirovna GD
Marie Georgievna, GD
Massandra
Mikhail Nikolayevich, GD
Moscow
Museums
Nevsky, Alexander
Nicholas Alexandrovich GD
Nicholas I
Nicholas II
Nicholas Mikhailovich, GD
Nicholas Nicholayevich, GD
Nicholas Romanovich
Nobility
Numismatics
Oleg Konstantinovich, Prince
Olga Alexandrovna GD
Olga Konstantinovna GD
Olga Nicholayevna GD
Oranienbaum
Ostankino
OTMA
Palaces
Paley, Princess Natalia
Paul Alexandrovich, GD
Paul Gilbert
Paul I, Emperor
Pavlovsk
Peter and Paul Fortress
Peter III
Peter Nicholayevich, GD
Peter the Great
Peterhof
Prince Michael of Kent
Pushkin
Rasputin
Romanov
Romanov Descendants
Royal Russia
Russian Art
Russian Church
Russian Cuisine
Russian Film
Russian History
Russian Imperial House
Russian Monarchy
Russian Orders
Russo-Japanese War
Sergei Alexandrovich
Sergei Alexandrovich GD
St. Petersburg
St. Theodore's Church
State Hermitage Museum
Stieglitz, Alexander
Stolypin, Pyotr
Strelna
Succession
Tauride Palace
Tobolsk
Tsarevich Alexis
Tsaritsino
Tsarskoye Selo
Vladimir Alexandrovich, GD
Vyrubova, Anna
Winter Palace
Witte, Sergei
World War I
Wrangel, Pyotr
Yachts
Yalta
Yelagin Palace
Yusupov
Blog Tools
Edit your Blog
Build a Blog
RSS Feed
View Profile
You are not logged in. Log in
Saturday, 6 August 2011
The Bolshoi's Chandelier
Topic: Bolshoi

 

 The reconstruction of Moscow’s Bolshoi Theater, which dragged out for more than five years, is finally coming to an end. The solemn reopening ceremony is scheduled for October 2. Again, like so many times before, the eyes of spectators will be riveted on the magnificent crystal-gold chandelier.

One of Bolshoi’s key attractions, the 8-meter-tall three-level chandelier has been restored to its dazzling beauty, shining with 24,000 crystal-glass threads, ball-shaped pendants and “oak leaves”. It weighs about 2 tons and is 6.5 meters in diameter.

The Bolshoi’s chandelier as we see it now was installed before the coronation of Russia’s last Emperor Nicholas II, which took place at the Bolshoi Theater in 1896. The original oil-burning chandelier not only illuminated the theater hall, but also ventilated it through a special hole in the ceiling. Mikhail Sidorov, a manager of the firm that carried out the Bolshoi’s reconstruction, knows more about it.   

"The parterre used to be a standing area as designed by architect Alberto Cavos. Imagine standing here with lamp oil dripping on you from the chandelier. Standing tickets were the cheapest ones, bought mostly by poor clerks and students who did not care what would happen to their clothes. In 1863, the first gas station was built in Moscow, right near the Bolshoi Theater. And then this chandelier appeared. It arrived from Paris and was initially a gas-burning one. To prevent the flame from being blown out by the wind, the lanterns had special glass bulbs over them. In winter, however, cold air came in through the hole in the ceiling and caused the hot bulbs to blow up. The glass splinters fell down on spectators. Opera lovers who bought the cheapest tickets in the standing area were very courageous people indeed. When the first electric power station appeared in 1895, Bolshoi’s gas-burning chandelier was redesigned into an electric one in time for Emperor Nicholas II’s coronation. Electric bulbs were very expensive back them. One bulb cost 25 rubles, the average salary of a clerk. And the chandelier had 380 or 410 bulbs!"

It took months of meticulous work by best Russian restorers, 13,000 new pendants instead of the damaged ones, and more than 3 kg of gold leaf to restore the Bolshoi’s wonder.

© The Voice of Russia. 6 August, 2011



Posted by Paul Gilbert at 2:36 PM EDT
Updated: Sunday, 14 August 2011 11:52 AM EDT
Permalink | Share This Post

Newer | Latest | Older