ROYAL RUSSIA NEWS. THE ROMANOV DYNASTY & THEIR LEGACY, MONARCHY, HISTORY OF IMPERIAL & HOLY RUSSIA
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Saturday, 22 April 2017
This Week in the News - The Romanovs and Imperial Russia
Topic: News

 
Opposition to the release of the controversial film Mathilda, intensifies throughout Orthodox Russia
 
This Week in the News is a new feature on my Royal Russia News blog. It includes a link and brief summary to a full-length article published in the past week from a variety of English language media sources.
 
This new initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page - now, with more than 92,000 followers from around the world!
 
Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 22 April 2017

Tsar was taken to new home and told 'Citizen Nicholas, you may enter' then he, his wife and children were shot dead

Russian revolution 100 years ago saw rule of imperial dynasty come to an undignified end as the Romanov family’s bodies were burned, dumped in mine shaft and showered in acid. Andy Lines reports in 'The Mirror'. 

The Kremlin of Rostov the Great: Last Masterpiece of medieval Russia

William Brumfield writes about this magnificent ensemble, which has remained mostly unchanged over the centuries. 

The Corpse in the Kremlin's Front Yard Tests the Strength of Putin's Faith

Simon Shuster writes in 'Time Magazine' how the Russian Orthodox Church upped the anti this week in their campaign to have Lenin's remains moved out of Red Square, a challenge which ultimately tests the strength of Russian president Vladimir Putin's faith.

Orthodox faithful believe that the tomb honors a communist who didn’t merely persecute Christians – he ordered the murder of Tsar Nicolas II, who has since been canonized as an Orthodox Saint. 

As Russian Film Row Escalates, 'Experts' Malign Looks Of Last Tsar's Lover + Trailer For Matilda (In Russian, No Subtitles)

Opponents of 'Matilda' continue to fan the flames regarding the upcoming film about an affair between the ballerina, Matilda Kshesinskaya, and the Russian Tsar Nicholas II.

Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only, and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia. 


 


Posted by Paul Gilbert at 3:33 PM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 22 April 2017 3:58 PM EDT
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Roosevelt Wanted to Buy Livadia Palace in Final Days of World War II
Topic: Livadia

 
FDR arriving at Livadia Palace in February 1945
 
This article is an abridged version of the original published by the TASS News Agency on 22 April 2017

On April 22, 2017, a bust of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the 32nd President of the United States commonly known as FDR, will be unveiled in Yalta, on a street named in his honor. 

Back in the 1960s, one of Yalta’s oldest streets was named after Franklin D. Roosevelt. The city authorities decided to commemorate the 32nd US president’s participation in the 1945 Yalta Conference of the “Big Three” leaders of the anti-Hitler coalition.

Roosevelt impressed by Crimea

The conference was held in the Palace of Livadia, where the largest group of the US delegation was housed. The reason for the decision to accommodate the American delegation in the Livadia Palace was because of the physical condition of the US leader who had been bound to a wheelchair after contracting polio in 1921.

The palace left a great impression on the American leader. In fact, according to a transcript of a conversation with Stalin in February 1945, Roosevelt said that he felt very well in Livadia and stated that when he would no longer president, he would like to ask the Soviet government to sell Livadia to him. He noted that he was fond of breeding trees and would plant lots of them in the hills around the palace’s vicinity. 

“Roosevelt’s personal apartment was located on the ground floor and he could move around by himself, quite easily. It should be noted however that a slight lapse in security was permitted as the delegation and its leader were accommodated where the sessions were being held. Though the frontline was far away, security measures during the conference were unprecedentedly tight,” says Dmitry Blintsov, a research fellow at the Livadia Palace museum’s exhibition department.

The Livadia Palace and its picturesque park impressed the US leader so much that he asked Stalin, in earnest or not, to sell it to him. The transcript of Roosevelt’s personal meeting with Stalin of February 4, 1945 puts it as follows:
 
“Roosevelt says he feels very well in Livadia. When he is no longer president, he would like to ask the Soviet government to sell Livadia to him. He is fond of gardening. He would plant lots of trees in the hills around Livadia.”

Roosevelt arrived in Yalta accompanied by his daughter Anna. Winston Churchill’s daughter, Sarah, and one of the daughters of US Ambassador to Russia Averell Harriman, Kathleen, were also there. “I think their daughters provided psychological support to their fathers after the long and heated political debates so far away from their homes,” the historian suggests.

Nevertheless, despite the positive impressions from Livadia, upon returning home Roosevelt said that he had been shocked to see the devastation that the German Nazi forces had inflicted on Crimea.

“During my stay in Yalta, I saw the kind of reckless, senseless fury, the terrible destruction that comes out of German militarism… And even the humblest of the homes of Yalta were not spared… I had read about Warsaw and Lidice and Rotterdam and Coventry—but I saw Sevastopol and Yalta! And I know that there is not room enough on earth for both German militarism and Christian decency”

Franklin D. Roosevelt's address to Congress, 1945

 
Churchill, FDR and Stalin pose for photos in the Italian Courtyard of Livadia Palace, February 1945
 
Authentic Venetian glass

Little has survived from that time in the Livadia Palace. You can hardly find any authentic furniture, tableware or other items used by the Big Three back then. Even the interiors of some rooms are no longer as they used to be.
 
After Stalin’s death, the palace was used as a health resort.

The first-ever exhibition was organized here in 1974, ahead of the 30th anniversary of the Yalta Conference and a visit to the USSR by the 37th President of the US, Richard Nixon. “But it was not until 1993 that the Palace of Livadia was granted its museum status,” Blintsov says.

The historian shows us around one of the rooms, boasting about the authentic interior of the Yalta Conference period. It is the Waiting Room, which was given its name before the Bolshevik Revolution as it was here that guests used to wait to be received by the Russian Royal family. 

“These dark walnut panels and the wooden ceiling, the Venetian glass chandelier, the fireplace, the chairs and the table – all of these things were here during the Yalta Conference. The room was turned into Roosevelt’s study. He met with Stalin here twice. It was here that the issue of the USSR’s entry into the war against Japan was discussed,” the historian explains.

© TASS News Agency. 22 April, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 2:50 PM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 22 April 2017 3:13 PM EDT
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Friday, 21 April 2017
Russian MPs Pressing for Lenin to be Laid to Rest
Topic: Bolsheviks

 
Lenin's body, January 1924
 
This article was originally published by the TASS News Agency web page on 20 April 2017

A group of Russian lawmakers has submitted a bill to the lower house of parliament demanding to remove the remains of Bolshevik revolution leader Vladimir Lenin from Moscow’s Red Square, the press service of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDPR) said on Thursday. The legislators also cited the position of the Russian Orthodox Church that Lenin should have been buried some 25 years ago.

Six MPs from LDPR and the ruling United Russia party said that if the draft law was adopted the Russian government would determine the time and place of Lenin’s body burial taking into account the political climate and the overall mood of society.

The legislators also cited the position of the Russian Orthodox Church that Lenin should have been buried some 25 years ago and quoted President Vladimir Putin who said that this issue should be handled "carefully to make no steps that could split the society."

According to the lawmakers, the issue of Lenin’s burial "should have no historical, political or social background", stressing that the Bolshevik leader’s body "is neither a symbol of the epoch, nor a symbol of national unity."

The authors of the bill also cited the latest poll conducted ahead of Lenin’s birthday (April 22) by the All-Russia Public Opinion Center.

According to the survey, 60% of Russians are in favor of Lenin’s burial. Some 36% of them think Lenin should be buried immediately, while 24% said the communist leader should be moved from Red Square when the generation who honors him is gone.

Lenin’s embalmed body currently remains on display in the Mausoleum on Red Square for over 90 years despite numerous calls for his proper burial. His interment remains an issue of heated debate since the time of Perestroika. In 2016, the Russian Federal Protection Service (FSO) spent more than 13 million rubles (some $230,000) on preserving his body.
 
Most Russians (63%) have agreed with the idea that Lenin’s body should be buried, last year this figure was 60%, a survey conducted by the Russian Public Opinion Research Center showed on Friday.

"The majority (63%) essentially concurred that it is necessary to do that. However, 32% of those polled said this should be done immediately, while 31% are in favor of waiting for some time until this issue ceases to be sensitive for those to who cherish Lenin,’ the pollster said, adding that 31% of the respondents suggested "leaving things as they are."

Members of the Liberal Democratic Party of Russia (LDPR) and United Russia factions had earlier submitted to Russia’s State Duma (lower house of parliament) a bill on removing the body of leader of the 1917 Russian revolution Vladimir Lenin from the mausoleum in Moscow’s Red Square. One of the bill’s co-authors, Ivan Sukharev, said that the mausoleum could be relocated and turned into a museum dedicated to Lenin, but "not in the heart of Russia."

The poll indicated that 39% of the respondents consider the Lenin Mausoleum a tourist attraction and are indifferent to the issue, while 18% said that the body of Lenin, the great leader, rightfully remains in the heart of the country.

On the other hand, 38% of Russians shared the view that it is wrong and unnatural to keep Lenin’s body embalmed in the Red Square mausoleum.

"Russian society is unprepared for drastic decisions on the topic of reburying Lenin’s body. There is no prevailing point of view, and it is not being shaped. The most acceptable option is to preserve the status quo, perhaps, with reservations and preconditions, but still that will be the status quo," noted Mikhail Mamonov, director of the pollster’s research projects.

The survey was conducted on March 9-10, 2017, with 1,200 people interviewed. The margin of error does not exceed 3.5%.
 
For more information on Lenin and the Bolsheviks, please refer to the following articles and news clips archived in Royal Russia News:

Lenin and the Bolsheviks  + 25 additional articles & news stories

© TASS News Agency. 21 April, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 7:00 AM EDT
Updated: Friday, 21 April 2017 7:20 AM EDT
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Thursday, 20 April 2017
Right Hand of Grand Duchess Elizabeth the New Martyr to Brought to St Petersburg
Topic: Elizabeth Feodorovna GD

 
Saint Elizabeth the New Martyr
 
This article was originally published on the Pravoslavie.ru web page on 20 April 2017

A reliquary with the right hand of the venerable Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna will be brought to St. Petersburg from May 5 to 11, from the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russian Synodal Cathedral “Of the Sign” in New York, reports the press service of the St. Petersburg Diocese.

The relic is being brought to mark the 100th anniversary of the tragic events surrounding the 1917 Russian revolution which eventually led to St. Elizabeth’s martyrdom, and that of millions more, including the Royal Family.

The sacred relic will remain at the Holy Trinity Cathedral of the St. Alexander Nevsky Lavra from May 5 to 9, and at the Cathedral of the Feodorovskaya Icon of the Mother of God in memory of the 300th anniversary of the House of Romanov from May 9 to 11.

St. Elizabeth’s hand will be ceremoniously met on May 5 at 12:30 at the St. Alexander Nevsky Lavra. A Moleben will be served before the relic, sung by the diocesan youth choir, after which all desiring to may venerate the relic.

The reliquary is being brought to St. Petersburg with the blessing of His Eminence Metropolitan Hilarion of New York and Eastern America (ROCOR), and Metropolitan Barsanuphios of St. Petersburg and Ladoga. The men’s youth choir of the Eastern American Diocese of ROCOR will also be in St. Petersburg from May 4 to 15, and will take part in the service before the relics on May 5 and 7 at the St. Alexander Nevsky Lavra and on May 9 at the Feodorovsky Cathedral.

© Pravoslavie.ru. 20 April, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 2:45 PM EDT
Updated: Thursday, 20 April 2017 2:49 PM EDT
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Wednesday, 19 April 2017
Monument to Nicholas II and Stolypin to be Established in Kuznetsk
Topic: Stolypin, Pyotr

 
Artist concept of the future monument to Nicholas II and Pyotr Stolypin in Kuznetsk.
My apologies for the poor quality of the image - PG
 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

A life-sized bronze monument to Emperor Nicholas II and statesman Pyotr Stolypin is to be established in the city of Kuznetsk, a town situated in Penza Oblast, Russia, located in the foothills of the Volga Upland.

A sketch of the monument made M.B. Grekovof the Military Artists Studio, has been presented to the town authorities for final approval. According to Natalya Babushkina, spokesperson for the press service of the administration of Kuznetsk, discussion with town authorities are now underway.

The idea for the monument originated in 2014 after the installation of a plaque on the platform of the railway station in Kuznetsk, marking a meeting between the last Russian emperor and Stolypin, in the summer of 1904. Stolypin was serving as governor of Saratov at the time. He later served as chairman of the Council of Ministers, then served as Prime Minister, and Minister of Internal Affairs of the Russian Empire from 1906 to 1911.

The meeting took place on 28th June 1904. Travelling to Samara, Nicholas II while passing through the Saratov province, stopped in the town of Kuznetsk, where P.A. Stolypin had been entrusted to meet the Emperor upon arrival. 

On his return journey, Nicholas II passed through Kuznetsk once again, on the evening of 1st July. Stolypin met the Emperor on an empty platform at the station, after which the Emperor invited Stolypin to join him for tea in the Imperial train. During their meeting, the Emperor was much impressed by Stolypin, finding him “very talkative and frank”.  

Stolypin was a monarchist and hoped to strengthen the throne. He had the desire to make Russia a great and progressive power, and went down in history as a man of advanced views, a reformer, and an outstanding politician. 

The bronze monument to Emperor Nicholas II and statesman Pyotr Stolypin is expected to be established on the square in front of the railway station by the end of the year.

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 19 April, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:29 AM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 19 April 2017 6:40 AM EDT
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Sunday, 16 April 2017
HAPPY EASTER from ROYAL RUSSIA
Topic: Easter

16 APRIL 2017


 


Posted by Paul Gilbert at 12:00 AM EDT
Updated: Thursday, 13 April 2017 2:37 PM EDT
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Saturday, 15 April 2017
This Week in the News - The Romanovs and Imperial Russia
Topic: News

 
This Week in the News is a new feature on my Royal Russia News blog. It includes a link and brief summary to a full-length article published in the past week from a variety of English language media sources.
 
This new initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page - now, with nearly 92,000 followers from around the world!
 
Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 15 April 2017: 

Will Russia ever revert back to a monarchy?

Most Russians who want to see a tsar in power are young city dwellers. Modern monarchists claim the older "brainwashed" generations don’t understand because their communist schooling was negative. 

Everything you need to know about St. Petersburg's 5 main cathedrals

Beautiful colour photos of SS Peter and Paul Cathedral, Cathedral of the Resurrection of Christ on Spilled Blood, St. Isaac's Cathedral, Kazan Cathedral, and Smolny Cathedral. 

New film celebrates the genius of Peter Carl Fabergé

The scope of the Russian jeweller’s output was dizzying and the creators of 'Fabergé: A Life of its Own' have gained access to some of his finest creations. This film originally screened in select theatres across North America in 2015. 

The last tsar’s Scots Guards bring historic uniform to St. Petersburg

More photographs of the colonel-in-chief dress uniform donated to Tsarskoye Selo museum. 

Find 10 differences: Photos of Moscow today and more than a century ago

Take a black-and-white trip back in time to Red Square, the Bolshoi Theater and old-time Moscow streets. 

Who Is to blame for the 1917 Russian Revolution?

Conspiracy theories about the causes of the Russian Revolution emerged at virtually the same time that the Bolsheviks took power and have been discussed for the past century. Who caused the country's venerable monarchy to crumble so quickly: Freemasons, the British or the Germans? 

7 facts about the Cottage Palace, a gift from Emperor Nicholas I to his wife Empress Alexandra Feodorovna

This country house, built on the outskirts of the Peterhof estate near St. Petersburg, is a dacha that the emperor built for his beloved wife. Thе Cottage Palace combines luxurious palace interiors with familial comforts.

When I used to offer my annual Romanov tours to Russia, our groups always enjoyed a traditional Russian tea in this palace. It was always one of the highlights of our visits to Peterhof - PG 

Fabergé: Royal Gifts featuring the Trellis Egg Surprise

An exclusive loan arrangement between the Royal Collection of Her Majesty the Queen Elizabeth II and the Houston Museum of Natural Science will be the centerpiece of the new Dorothy and Artie McFerrin Gallery housed in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals when it opens April 10th. 
 
Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only, and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia. 
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 12:09 PM EDT
Updated: Sunday, 16 April 2017 4:26 AM EDT
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Romanov Photographs and Letters Presented on British Antiques Roadshow Programme
Topic: Antiques

 
Antiques Roadshow © 2017
 
Note: if any of our readers has any additional information about the origin of these photos and letters, and/or information on William Linton, please contact me at - royalrussia@yahoo.com - any information shared will be held in the strictest of confidence - Paul Gilbert
 


Antiques Roadshow © 2017
 
After being locked in a safe for nearly a century, a unique discovery was made last week on a popular British television program, which consisted of a largely unseen collection of letters and a private album containing photographs of the last Imperial Russian Family.

The collection was presented during an episode of BBC Antiques Roadshow, on Sunday, April 9,  at Pembroke Castle in Wales, and evaluated by British dealer Clive Farahar. 

The album - which appears to be in a very good condition - contains a collection of photographs of Emperor Nicholas II and his family. Based on the video (which can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the bottom of this article), none of the photographs in the album appear to be new. Many have been published in various pictorials over the years, some of which may very well have been taken by Pierre Gilliard. It was common for members of the Imperial family to have copies of photographs duplicated, and shared with their relation and members of the Imperial household staff, for their own personal albums, or as keepsake memories. 

The owner claims that the letters belonged to his step-father’s uncle, William Linton, who was working as an engineer in Ekaterinburg in 1918. He further notes that the photo album had been given to Linton by one of the Empress Alexandra’s maids (possibly Anna Demidova). The maid asked his father to take the photograph album for "safekeeping". Given that Demidova was being held with the Imperial family in the Ipatiev House, it is highly unlikely that they could have been “passed” to Linton, unless perhaps, they had been smuggled out of the Ipatiev House?

But the real value of this collection lies in the letters. Never before seen, the owner claims that they have been lying in a safe for the better part of a hundred years. Below, is an excerpt from one of the letters:

“For the last two days they have been pumping the water out of an old shaft in the forest, around which they found traces of the ex-royal family, and I think there is no doubt that their bodies will be found down at the bottom weighed down with stones.” 

Clive Farahar is a British dealer and expert on books and manuscripts, he writes and lectures and is a member of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association. He is best known as an expert on the BBC's Antiques Roadshow, which he joined in 1986. 
 


Antiques Roadshow © 2017
 

 
© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 15 April, 2017
 


Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:02 AM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 15 April 2017 6:39 AM EDT
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Friday, 14 April 2017
Exhibition: The Last Empress. Documents and Photographs
Topic: Anna Feodorovna, GD

 
This article was researched from Russian media sources
and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

A new exhibition dedicated to the last Russian Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, nee Princess of Hesse-Darmstadt, will open on 26 April in the Exhibition Hall of the State Archive of the Russian Federation (GARF) in Moscow. The exhibition is dedicated to the 25th anniversary of the Russian Federation and the 25th anniversary of the State Archive. The exhibit will present original historic photos of Alexandra, by both professional photographers and members of the Imperial family and their retinue.

Visitors can also acquaint themselves with  the life of Russia’s last Empress and her family through the use of interactive screens in the exhibition hall, as well as via the Internet in a special section of the electronic reading room - Archives of the XXI Century. This new format showcases a vast collection of archival documents, developed by the ELAR Corporation (Moscow). For the first time through the use of interactive touch screens, visitors can access the personal fund of Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, which is stored in the State Archive. The collection consisting of more than 60 thousand pages of documents and photographs, tell about the life of Princess Alix and future Empress of Russia from her birth in 1872, to her tragic death in July 1918.

The exhibit will be complemented with a variety of multimedia from other archival sources, including photographs, letters, diaries, drawings, of Alexandra and her family, as well as vintage newsreels.

One very interesting area of the exhibit will demonstrate the methods currently being used to digitize documents and photographs from the Russian archives.

The joint anniversaries of the Assembly of the Russian Federation and the ELAR Corporation decided to celebrate in this joint exhibition project. On 26 April 2017, the State Archive of the Russian Federation (GARF) celebrates its 25th anniversary. It was established in 1992 and is the successor of the Central State Archive of the October Revolution and the Central State Archive of the RSFSR. The archive included in the State Register of especially valuable objects of cultural heritage of the peoples of the Russian Federation. In the same year, the ELAR Corporation marks its 25th anniversary, and is recognized as one of Russia's largest enterprises for the digitization and creation of information resources.

Inauguration of the exhibition The Last Empress. Documents and Photographs will be held on April 26 at 14:00 hours. in the Exhibition Hall of the Federal Archives, located at ul. B. Pirogovskaya, 17 in Moscow. Admission is free!. The exposition will run from April 27 to May 28, 2017
 
Organizers: Federal Archival Agency, the State Archive of the Russian Federation (GARF), and the ELAR Corporation.
 

 
© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 14 April, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 9:41 AM EDT
Updated: Friday, 14 April 2017 10:00 AM EDT
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Special Offer from ROYAL RUSSIA
Topic: Books

 

14 April, 2017



Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:11 AM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 15 April 2017 6:20 AM EDT
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