ROYAL RUSSIA NEWS. THE ROMANOV DYNASTY & THEIR LEGACY, MONARCHY, HISTORY OF IMPERIAL & HOLY RUSSIA
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Saturday, 11 November 2017
This Week in the News - The Romanovs and Imperial Russia
Topic: News

Monument to Emperor Nicholas II in Belgrade, Serbia
 
Members of the Russian Armed Forces assemble in front of the monument to Tsar Nicholas II in central Belgrade today, for a ceremony marking the renaming of the park in honour of the Alexandrov Ensemble - commonly known as the Red Army Choir in the West - the official army choir of the Russian armed forces.

The renaming of the park honours the memory of 64 members of the Red Army choir, who lost their lives in a plane crash on 25 December 2016. The Red Army Choir singers and dancers were en route to Syria to entertain Russian troops there for Orthodox Christmas celebrations.

The monument to Tsar Nicholas II was established in the Serbian capital in October 2014, and consecrated by Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia and Patriarch Irinej of Serbia on 15 November 2014.

Click here to read 4 more articles about this monument to Russia's last emperor and tsar
 
* * * 

This Week in the News is a new feature on my Royal Russia News blog. It includes a link and brief summary to a full-length article published in the past week from a variety of English language media sources.
 
This new initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page - now, with more than 125,000 followers from around the world!
 
Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 11 November 2017

ARTICLES:

AN ADDRESS from the Head of the Imperial House of Russia, H.I.H. the Grand Duchess Maria of Russia, on the 100th Anniversary of the Russian Revolution of 1917

Her Imperial Highness’ message, released on November 4, the Day of National Unity, opens with the sad note that, while many are attempting to provide a fair assessment of Russia’s 20th century, “there were also attempts to open old wounds and to sow again the seeds of dissension among our people.” As opposed to such divisive tactics, the Imperial House head calls for an historical understanding based on party ideology, but on Russia’s deeply-entrenched spiritual and moral values. 

A century after the revolution, Russians build monuments to the czars

Russia did not officially celebrate the centennial of its 1917 Bolshevik Revolution this year. In fact, 100 years after the country upended its centuries-old monarchy, many Russians have begun to love and even worship their last czar. More than 25 monuments in honor of Czar Nicholas II have been erected in Russian cities since the collapse of the Soviet Union, and billboards with the message "Forgive us, our sovereign!" have also gone up. Declared a saint by the Russian Orthodox Church, the czar is respected now especially because of the way he died: murdered by the Bolsheviks together with his wife, his five children, and even his servants. Julie Masis writes in Globalpost.  

‘My God, can this be happening?’ How the Romanovs faced their gruesome deaths + 9 photos

When they so casually surrendered their authority in March 1917, Nicholas II and the man he abdicated in favor of, Grand Duke Mikhail Alexandrovich, could have barely imagined the mounting humiliations that would befall them in the coming months. And even in their hour of death they maintained the same demeanor of haughty dignity and otherworldly naiveté. 

Why didn’t Britain’s king save deposed Russian cousin after revolution?

The killing of Nicholas II, tsar from 1894 until his forced abdication in 1917, saw the collapse of Russia’s royal family. His grisly death in 1918 and the murder of the Romanov family by a Bolshevik firing squad at a house in Ekaterinburg also placed George V’s reputation under scrutiny.  

The Secret Alliance with Japan Shattered by the Russian Revolution

The Russian Revolution of 1917 changed the world. One of its little-known consequences was the destruction of a newly minted alliance with Japan, which could have changed the balance of power in Asia. It was also the closest diplomatic relationship the two countries had ever enjoyed. This article, first written for the centenary of the July 1916 treaty, looks at how it came to be signed. Vassili Molodiakov writes in nippon.com.
 
Mayfair jeweller marks Russian revolution centenary with Fabergé exhibition
 
While Putin and the Kremlin aren’t sure what to do with the centennial of the October Revolution, most Russians are focusing on the deaths of the czar, his family, and Rasputin. Anna Nemtsova reports in The Daily Beast.
 
Leadership In Russia: The Legacy Of Peter The Great

Any understanding of modern Russia really must go back 200 years to Peter the Great. More specifically, to his travels to the West from which he brought back to his motherland feats of science, engineering, arts, culture and manners which permeate Russian society even today. Shellie Karabell writes in Forbes.
 
* * * 
 


Portraits from the Peterhof State Museum Preserve on display in China
 
Portraits of members of the Romanov dynasty currently on display at the exhibition "Rarities of the House of Romanov from the Summer Imperial Residence in Peterhof", which opened in the Guizhou Provincial Museum in Guiyang City, China on 30th September
 
* * * 
 
Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 7:42 AM EST
Updated: Saturday, 11 November 2017 8:35 AM EST
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Friday, 10 November 2017
Tender Awarded for Recreation of Historic Interiors of the Alexander Palace
Topic: Alexander Palace

 
A stunning aerial view of the Alexander Palace, Tsarskoye Selo.
Photo © Neva Aero
 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

The final stage of restoration of the Alexander Palace will finally be completed by mid-2019, said Nikolay Mendelev in Business Petersburg on Friday. Initially, the restored residence of Nicholas II was scheduled to be completed by 17th July 2018 - to mark the 100th anniversary of the murder of the Russian Imperial family.

Last month, the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Reserve issued a tender for the recreation of the historic interiors of the east wing of the Alexander Palace. It was announced this week that the contract was won by the Design and Construction Agency Zhilstroy, LLC.

Zhilstroy’s bid for the tender was 157 million rubles. The reconstruction and decoration of the historic interiors is expected to cost more than 2 billion rubles ($34 million USD). According to Mendelev, the Russian government have allocated about 890 million rubles to the Alexander Palace. The rest of the funding was collected through the sponsorship of businesses in Russia.

The Terms of Reference provide for the reconstruction of the former rooms of Emperor Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, located in the eastern wing of the palace: the Tsar’s Old Study and Moorish Bathroom, Imperial Bedroom, Mauve Study and Palisander, Maple and Crimson Drawing Rooms. Zhilstroy notes that works under the new contract are expected to be complete within a period of 18 months. 

Click here for more articles and photographs on the history and restoration of the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoye Selo.

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 10 November, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 4:52 PM EST
Updated: Saturday, 11 November 2017 8:41 AM EST
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Thursday, 9 November 2017
Head of the Russian Imperial House to Meet with Patriarch Kirill in Moscow on Nov 18
Topic: Maria Vladimirovna GD

 
Head of the Russian Imperial House, HIH Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna
Photo© Russian Imperial House
 
This article has been revised and edited from its original by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

The head of the Russian Imperial House, HIH Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna, will meet with Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia during a visit timed to coincide with the centenary of the Great October Socialist Revolution.

After visiting the cruiser Aurora in St. Petersburg, Maria Vladimirovna will travel to Ryazan and Moscow, her chancellery's director Alexander Zakatov told Interfax.

"After St. Petersburg, she will visit Ryazan, an old Russian city, at the governor's invitation. The visit will conclude in Moscow, where meetings will also be held with public figures and the media. Maria Vladimirovna will attend a prayer service at Donskoy Monastery in honour of the centenary of the restoration of the Patriarchy. The Grand Duchess is on good terms with the Russian Orthodox Church, with His Holiness Patriarch Kirill, and their joint prayer service and meeting will take place in Moscow on November 18," Zakatov said.

Representatives of the Russian Imperial House have never asked the Russian people to repent of the killing of Nicholas II and his family members, he said.

"The Imperial House has never urged anyone to repent, nor demanded this, contrary to what some media sources have written. We say that repentance is a pure, good feeling, but when someone demands repentance from others and acts as an infallible judge, that is stupid and counterproductive. There are no sinless people, all must repent, but one should set an example for others with one's own repentance. Wise people will heed it," Zakatov said.

During the visit, Maria Vladimirovna will meet with politicians of various views and convictions, but will not politicize her visit, he said. "The House of Romanov does not take part in political struggle and rejects even a semblance of such participation," Zakatov said.

This year, the Russian Orthodox Church is marking one hundred years since the restoration of the Patriarchy. One of the central festivities will be a prayer service on November 18, the date of Tikhon's election to the patriarchal see in Moscow.

© Interfax / Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 9 November, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 9:21 AM EST
Updated: Thursday, 9 November 2017 9:28 AM EST
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Wednesday, 8 November 2017
Sale of Paul Gilbert's Royal Library
Topic: Books

 
At some point in the next few years, I will be moving back to England and settle into some form of “semi-retirement”. Once I am settled, I am happy to note that I will continue updating my Royal Russia News blog, as well as new publishing projects. 
 
In March of this year, I made the decision to begin selling off the bulk of my personal royal library. This is a collection which spans a lifetime, and consists of more than 2-3,000 new, rare and second-hand royalty titles on Russian, European and British royalty. The bulk of my collection consists of books on the Romanov dynasty and Imperial Russia, but I also have a large number of titles on the Habsburgs, and the Hohenzollerns for offer.
 
The process of selecting, scanning, cataloguing and listing each book in my online shop is very time consuming process, and it will take me several years to complete this enormous task. I will be keeping some titles, which will be shipped to England, when I am ready to make the move. Among those are my unique collection of books on Nicholas II and his family - including many rare books which I purchased over the years during my numerous visits to Russia.   

The titles offered for sale are all one-of-a-kind, there are no duplicates! Books will be sold on a first come, first serve basis. The condition of each book varies and is noted with each listing. Titles are available in a variety of languages: English, Russian, French, and German. Please check individual listings before ordering.

All prices are in US dollars, payment can only be made by credit card through my secure online shop. I cannot accept any telephone orders for these titles.
 
I have sold over 300 books from my collection to date. Parting with my collection was a very difficult decision to make, however, the sheer cost to ship my entire collection to England would be financially impossible. I have received some very kind emails and letters from people who have purcahsed some of these books, and have noted that my books are going to "good homes, where books are still appreciated and enjoyed". It does bring me some comfort knowing that my books will be valued and treasured by others who share an interest in royalty. I would like to take this opportunity to thank each and every one of you who have purchased books from royal collection over the past year. 

Please note that I will be adding new titles on a weekly, so please bookmark the page and check back for new listings. 

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 8 November, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 7:57 AM EST
Updated: Saturday, 11 November 2017 7:42 AM EST
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Pavel Perelomov Photo Archive Donated to Tsarskoye Selo
Topic: Tsarskoye Selo

 
Historic photo from the archive of Pavel Perelomov. Photo © Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve
 
This article has been revised and edited from its original by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

The photo archive of Pavel Perelomov has been donated to the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve. The photographer's collection was donated by his daughter Ernestina Perelomova. In total, there are 223 pre-war photographs - including items lost during the Nazi occupation.

Pavel Ivanovich Perelomov (1901-1964) worked in the museum from 1934 to 1941. He photographed the interiors of both the Alexander and Catherine Palaces - when they were museums - before the Second World War, and also photographed museum items for inventory cards.

Of particular scientific interest are the images of the interiors of the Alexander Palace, where a large-scale restoration is currently under way: some of the photographs are shot in such angles that provide will assist artists and designers in recreating the historic interiors of the palace. 

Of special importance among the collection are photos of individual items from the palace, which were lost or stolen during the Nazi occupation of Tsarskoe Selo in the Second World War.
 

Historic photos from the archive of Pavel Perelomov. Photos © Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve
 
 

© Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Preserve / Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 8 November, 2017 


 


Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:22 AM EST
Updated: Wednesday, 8 November 2017 6:33 AM EST
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Tuesday, 7 November 2017
Faberge Masterpieces Highlight Upcoming Russian Art Auction in London
Topic: Faberge

 
Click here to view the Fabergé Masterpieces from the Christie's auction catalogue
 
Christie’s Important Russian Art sale in London on 27 November 2017 will be highlighted by an Important Collection of Fabergé Masterpieces and Imperial Treasures.  

Alexis de Tiesenhausen, International Head of the Russian Department, Christie’s: “Christie’s is honoured to offer an important collection of rare Fabergé works with impeccable provenance. This collection was carefully assembled over a period of thirty years by an avid admirer of Fabergé’s craftsmanship. 

The Works of Art section will be highlighted by an extremely rare and impressive imperial silver rhinoceros automaton by Fabergé (£300,000–500,000). This moving silver rhinoceros is one of only four known examples by Fabergé. It was a gift to Prince Vasili Alexandrovich from his grandmother Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna circa 1914-1915. Nearly 90 years later it was acquired by the father of the present owner from the descendants of Prince Vasili Alexandrovich. Another highlight is an exceptional and rare guilloché enamel and varicolour gold miniature model of a sedan chair estimated at £700,000–1,000,000. This miniature sedan chair was purchased by the rubber magnate Maximilian Othmar Neuscheller, an established and important client of Fabergé. Only a handful of such miniature furniture pieces by Fabergé are known, and it is exceptionally rare for one to come to market. The last piece of miniature furniture on the market made $2,280,000.

Among other pieces with distinguished Imperial provenance, is an exceptionally rare cigarette case given as a wedding gift to Emperor Alexander III from his wife Empress Maria Feodorovna in October 1890 (estimate: £250,000–350,000). Like the rhinoceros automaton, this cigarette case was acquired by the father of the present owner from the descendants of Prince Vasili Alexandrovich. The collection also includes a cigarette case by Hahn that was given by Emperor Alexander III to Tsesarevich Nicholas II for Christmas in the year of his 25th birthday (estimate: £70,000–90,000). A further highlight is a rare and exquisitely delicate snowflake brooch designed by Alma Pihl, in perfect condition and exceptional to see on the market (estimate: £40,000–60,000). This brooch was initially a gift from Emanuel Nobel to the wife of one of his business associates.

© Christie’s London. 7 November, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 12:00 AM EST
Updated: Monday, 6 November 2017 4:30 PM EST
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Monday, 6 November 2017
New Monument to Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna Established Near Moscow
Topic: Elizabeth Feodorovna GD

 
Monument to Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna (1864-1918), in the Romanov Walk of Fame,
at the Saint Nicholas Berlyukovsky Monastery. Photo © Imperial Orthodox Palestine Society
 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

On 31st October, a new monument to the Holy Martyr Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna (1864-1918) was established at the Saint Nicholas Berlyukovsky Monastery, situated on the outskirts of Avdotyino, a village on the Vorya River, 42 kilometres northeast of Moscow.

The monument was established on the eve of the 153rd anniversary of the birth of the Holy Martyr Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna, in "Romanov Walk of Fame" situated on the grounds of the Monastery.

The opening and consecration of the monument was a joint project of the Saint Nicholas Berlyukovsky Monastery of the Moscow Diocese, the Revival of Cultural Heritage Charity Fund, the Imperial Orthodox Palestine Society (IOPS) and the Head of the Romanov Walk of Fame project, Mikhail Leonidovich Serdyukov.

During the past six years, a total of ten monuments have been established on the "Romanov Walk of Fame" - a path within the grounds of the historic monastery which contains monuments to members of the Russian Imperial family who contributed to the history of Russia and Saint Nicholas Berlyukovsky Monastery: 

Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna and Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich (2017), Tsesarevich Alexei Nikolaevich (2016), Emperor Paul I (2015), Emperor Nicholas I (2015), Emperor Nicholas II (2014), Emperor Alexander II (2013), Emperors Alexander I and Alexander III (2012), and Grand Duke Mikhail Nikolayevich (2011). 

The creator of all ten monuments on the Romanov Walk of Fame is Alexander Apollonov (born 11 August 1947 - died 12 June 2017, in a fatal car accident). Appollonov was a noted sculptor, honoured artist of Russia, and a graduate of the faculty of sculpture of the Moscow State Art Institute.

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 6 November, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 11:22 AM EST
Updated: Monday, 6 November 2017 11:32 AM EST
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Saturday, 4 November 2017
This Week in the News - The Romanovs and Imperial Russia
Topic: News

 
The Royal Russia Facebook page reached a new milestone today, with 125,000 followers around the world.
Thank you to every one for their ongoing interest in support of my work - Paul Gilbert 
 
* * *
 
This Week in the News is a new feature on my Royal Russia News blog. It includes a link and brief summary to a full-length article published in the past week from a variety of English language media sources.
 
This new initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page - now, with more than 125,000 followers from around the world!
 
Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 4 November 2017: 
 
ARTICLES:

Inside Russia’s secretive cult of Tsar worship: How royalism is thriving 100 years after murder of Nicholas II

This article is a perfect example of BAD journalism, one which is written by a "journalist" who has NOT done his homework. Not only does it further add to the negative image of Nicholas II, but it also contributes to Russophobia.

Some of his comments will no doubt offend both Orthodox Christians and monarchists - i.e. referring to Ganina Yama as "religious Disneyland".

He adds that the remains of Tsesarevich Alexei and Grand Duchess Maria were placed "in the same drawer as the skull and gold-toothed jawbone of Adolf Hitler." The remains of Alexei and Maria were actually transferred to the Novospassky Monastery in Moscow in December 2015.

The "journalist" refers to the Church on the Blood as a "shrine to Nicholas II" - what a utterly ignorant statement to make! The Church on the Blood was built on the sight of former Ipatiev House, a memorial to the regicide which took place on the night of 16/17 July 1917.

If one dares to challenge the negative image of Nicholas II - so popular in the West - one is branded a tsarebozhniki (tsar worshiper). The "journalist" goes further, by lumping us all in with the same fanatical rabble who used violence as a means to protest the release of the controversial film 'Mathilda' - PG
 
Oliver Carroll writes in 'The Independent'.  

You can now buy a watch containing some real Romanov Blood

For the centennial of the Revolution, the brand Rocket is releasing watches stained with bodily fluids of a descendant of the Imperial dynasty - Prince Rostislav Romanov. According to the Russian media reports, the watches will retail for 7 million rubles - $150,000 USD! 
 
Why would any one want to own something like this? Am I the only one who finds the idea disturbing? There are other ways to remember those who died as a result of the Revolution, surely? - PG 

Russian Revolution: There’s nothing to celebrate about the 100th anniversary of Communism 

Historian John Lewis-Stempel says there’s nothing to celebrate about the 100th anniversary of the arrival of Communism, which simply replaced an autocratic sovereign with totalitarian dictators. In 1917 in Russia there were grievances almost without end. Lenin promised a snake-oil solution of “land, bread and peace”. In truth, the Bolsheviks exploited the fears of the workers, the poor and the peasantry for their own ideological ends.
 
Lenin, wrote Churchill, was transported from Germany “in a sealed truck like a plague bacillus”. An excellent article - PG

Century after revolution, some Russians crave return of tsar

Monarchy sympathisers are especially prevalent among the younger generation. 

A century on, White Russians cling to their roots

Catherine Melnik, great-granddaughter of Tsar Nicholas II's doctor, is proud of her Imperial Russian roots. Katy Lee writes in AFP News.   

History in Carvings: The Cathedral of the Dormition in Vladimir + 10 Photos

Architectural historian and photographer William Brumfield writes about one of the great masterpieces of medieval Rus’, one which has survived to this day. 

Collecting Guide: 15 things you need to know about Fabergé + 22 Photos

Russian Art specialist Helen Culver Smith takes us on a guided tour of the legendary jewellery house, looking at everything from the iconic imperial eggs to flowers, figurines and snuff-boxes, and the distinct styles of its various branches and workmasters. 

10 Russian kremlins you need to visit at least once

You always thought that Kremlin is the name of that red brick castle in Moscow - well, it is, but it’s also a general Russian term for a citadel in medieval Rus. In fact, there were over 400 kremlins in medieval Russia, but only around 20 of them have been preserved. Here are ten most exciting Russian fortresses.
 
* * * 
 


Costumes from the Film 'Mathilda' on Display in Moscow
 
A free exhibition featuring more than 70 costumes and accessories from the Russian film 'Matilda', opened yesterday in the GUM Department Store, which is situated on Red Square in Moscow. The exhibition will be held from 2 to 22 November 2017.

Among the costumes featured in the exhibit are ball and evening gowns, business, military and ceremonial uniforms, based on historical prototypes of the late 19th and early 20th century.

The film 'Matilda' by Alexei Uchitel was released on 26th October. The controversial film tells about the relationship of the future Russian Emperor Nicholas II and the ballerina Matilda Kshesinskaya.
 
* * * 
 
Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 2:09 PM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 4 November 2017 2:52 PM EDT
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Sunday, 29 October 2017
Special Offer from ROYAL RUSSIA
Topic: Books

 

14 April, 2017



Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:11 AM EDT
Updated: Monday, 30 October 2017 3:02 AM EDT
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Saturday, 28 October 2017
This Week in the News - The Romanovs and Imperial Russia
Topic: News


A portrait of Emperor Nicholas II - by the Russian artist Ilya Savich Galkin (1860-1915) - hidden from human eyes for some ninety-odd years, is now on display in the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg. It is one of the more than 350 items which make up the exhibition: 'The Winter Palace and the Hermitage in 1917. History was Made Here'.
 
Click here to read more about the discovery and restoration of this unique portrait of Russia's last emperor and tsar
 
* * * 

This Week in the News is a new feature on my Royal Russia News blog. It includes a link and brief summary to a full-length article published in the past week from a variety of English language media sources.
 
This new initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page - now, with more than 124,000 followers from around the world!
 
Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 28 October 2017

ARTICLES:

The Hunt for Red October

While Putin and the Kremlin aren’t sure what to do with the centennial of the October Revolution, most Russians are focusing on the deaths of the czar, his family, and Rasputin. Anna Nemtsova reports in 'The Daily Beast’. 

Where the Romanovs got the gold for their uniforms

The gold embroiderers of Torzhok (240 km north of Moscow) worked for the Romanovs and then for the Soviets, but in the 1990s their factory and traditions almost disappeared. How did they come back to life to serve the Russian elite again today? Peggy Lohse reports in RBTH. 

5 minutes with... An onyx polar bear by Fabergé

Russian Art specialist Margo Oganesian tells of the detective work that went into tracing the provenance of this precious bear — offered in London on November 27 — and its revelation of the bond between two dynasties with a shared love of Scotland. 

Interview: grandson of Alexander Kerenksy, Russia’s last leader before the Bolshevik revolution

The socialist Head of the Provisional Government Alexander Kerensky, the most open opponent of the throne and the dynasty met Emperor Nicholas II during the latter's house arrest at Tsarskoye Selo in August 1917. His impressions of his meetings with Nicholas were recorded in his memoirs, published after his escape from Russia. Kerensky’s efforts to establish "criminal actions" on the part of the emperor, to reveal activities which involved him, which were damaging to the country, and to expose treasonous relations with the enemies of the state was a failure. Even after emigrating, he could not find the courage to acknowledge that the entire undertaking with the purpose of establishing that Nicholas II was guilty of high treason was an absolute failure - PG
 
Michael Hughes interview published in 'The Conversation'. 

Winter Palace illuminated red in commemoration of the 1917 Revolution

For one night, the Hermitage was returned to the same color it had been painted during the Revolution 100 years ago. 

Kremlin stars: Symbols of the USSR turn 80, but will they stay? + 10 Photos

In 1937, 20 years after the Revolution, the double-headed eagles – which symbolized the Russian Empire – were replaced by the five-tipped red star - one of the main Soviet symbols, on top of the Moscow Kremlin’s towers. Twenty-seven years after the fall of the Soviet Union they continue to shine, but the likes of the Orthodox Church, monarchists, and anti-Communists want them taken down. 

On the Canonization of the Royal Martyrs

As we continue to commemorate the centenary of the Russian revolution, which overthrew the Tsar and led to the martyrdom of millions, including the members of the royal family themselves the following year, we here take a look back at what kind of attitude the Russian people had towards the Tsar and his family in the period leading up to their glorification by the Moscow Patriarchate in 2000. Archpriest Alexander Shargunov writes for Pravoslavie.ru. 

Royal pets and Russian revolutionaries

The Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts in Norwich presents two parallel exhibitions: ‘Royal Fabergé’ and ‘Radical Russia’. Arthur House writes in 'Apollo. The International Art Magazine'. 

The Tsar Bell: How Russian craftsmen made the impossible

The Tsar Bell is the biggest bell in the world and is kept at the Kremlin in the same location as its royal companion, the Tsar Cannon. The bell has never been rung, but recently the sound that it would have made has been produced using a computer simulation. Alexey Timofeychev reports in RBTH. 

In search of Russia's lost gold

One hundred years ago, the Bolsheviks captured the entirety of Tsar Nicholas II’s family gold reserve – or so they thought. Lina Zeldovich reports in BBC Travel. 

The Romanovs' Irish nanny to the daughters of Nicholas II and Alexandra Feodorovna

An idyllic early childhood under nanny Margaretta Eagar's care before a fateful end in 1918 Mary Kenny writes in 'The Independent'. 

A century after the Russian revolution, the last tsar stands tall

The events of 1917 still divide Russians – Lenin may dominate the landscape but he has a rival in Nicholas II thanks to a resurgent Orthodox church Shaun Walker reports in 'The Guardian'.
 
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On 20th October, Russian artist Igor Ryazantsev presented his portrait of Emperor Nicholas II
to the Museum of Grigory Rasputin, which is located in the Siberian village of Pokrovskoye
 
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and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 12:21 PM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 28 October 2017 1:34 PM EDT
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