ROYAL RUSSIA NEWS. THE ROMANOV DYNASTY & THEIR LEGACY, MONARCHY, HISTORY OF IMPERIAL & HOLY RUSSIA
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Saturday, 21 October 2017
This Week in the News - The Romanovs and Imperial Russia
Topic: News

 
A monument befitting an emperor . . . the installation of a new monument to the Emperor Alexander III at Livadia is nearing completion. The monument is being built on the site of the former Small (Maly) Palace, where the emperor died in 1894. The official opening will take place in early November. 

Click here to read my article 'Monument to Emperor Alexander III to be Installed at Livadia', published in Royal Russia News on 25th March 2017:
 
* * * 
 
This Week in the News is a new feature on my Royal Russia News blog. It includes a link and brief summary to a full-length article published in the past week from a variety of English language media sources.
 
This new initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page - now, with nearly 123,000 followers from around the world!
 
Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 21 October 2017

ARTICLES:
 
Here's Why Nicholas II Was Made a Saint
 
Don't forget that a saint is NOT a person who never sinned. The family earned their sainthood by the unbelievable patience and love they exhibited during their trials and death. Michael Tare writes in 'Russian Faith'. 
 
Exile in Ontario: How the Russian royal family came to an end in Toronto
 
Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna went from living in a palace to dying above a barbershop. Chris Bateman writes for TVO.

Under fire: How Moscow’s Kremlin was shelled during 1917 + 11 Photos!

The Bolshevik uprising in Moscow took many lives, and the historic buildings of the Kremlin came under heavy artillery fire. Alexey Timofeychev reports in RBTH. 

The Trinity Cathedral at Ipatiev Monastery: Witness to History+ 9 Photos

Architectural historian and photographer William Brumfield writes about the Trinity Cathedral at the Ipatiev Monastery. Linked to the Romanov dynasty, it suffered during the Soviet period. 

The Refugees Who Built Modern Belgrade

A fascinating article about the influx of White Russian emigres who revolutionized the Serbian capital one hundred years ago. After the Revolution and the First World War, between 40,000 and 100,000 Russians found themselves in the newly formed Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, whose Karadjordjevic dynasty welcomed them with open arms and encouraged them to settle. Many prominent Russians who settled in Belgrade included Baron Pyotr Wrangel, Mikhail Rodzianko, and Nikolai Krasnov. Srdjan Garcevic writes in 'Balkan Insight'. 

134 years ago: A cathedral was built on the place of the Russian Empreror’s murder in St. Petersburg

On 18 October 1883, Emperor Alexander III ordered the Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood to be erected on the spot where his father Alexander II had been assassinated in March 1881. The construction was completed during the reign of Nicholas II in 1907. Stepan Ivanov reports in RBTH. 

Emotional ties: Russian royal Princess Olga Romanoff on Imperial ancestors and palace secrets

Fiona McCarthy writes in 'The Mail'. 

The Amber Room ‘discovered’ underground in Nazi bunker

"Here we go again!" . . . . authorities have green-lighted an expedition in Germany to search for the single most valuable treasure looted in WW2 in a cave used by the Nazis. Allan Hall reports in 'The Express'. 

3 sinister mysteries that still vex the rule of Peter the Great

Peter I was one of the greatest reformers in Russian history, and his rule has been scrutinized and written about by generations of historians in Russia and abroad. Mysteries remain, however; sometimes quite disturbing ones that still loom over his reign. Alexey Timofeychev reports in RBTH. 
 
* * * 
 


The new Russian language web site dedicated to Nicholas II and his family that was launched in Ekaterinburg on 14th October welcomed more than 20,000 visitors during its first week in operation. An English language site is planned for January 2018.

Click here to read more about the site which chronicles the lives of Emperor Nicholas II, Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, and their five children - Grand Duchesses Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Tsesarevich Alexei.
 
* * * 
 
Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only,
and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:00 AM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 21 October 2017 6:44 AM EDT
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Friday, 20 October 2017
Exhibition of Ivan Kramskoi's Portrait of Empress Maria Feodorovna in Ekaterinburg
Topic: Maria Feodorovna, Empress

Portrait of Empress Maria Feodorovna by Ivan Kramskoi (1881)
From the Collection of the State Hermitage
 
This article has been revised and edited from its original by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

From 14 October 2017, as part of the Hermitage Days, the Ekaterinburg Museum of Fine Arts will be presenting an exhibition of one masterpiece “Ivan Kramskoi. Portrait of Empress Maria Feodorovna from the collection of the State Hermitage”.

Ivan Nikolayevich Kramskoi was a Russian painter and draughtsman, a master of genre, history and portrait painting whose work most fully reflects the main world outlook in the second half of the 19th century.

The latter half of the 1800s produced some very worthy exponents of the art of portraiture – Vasily Perov and Nikolai Nevrev, Konstantin Makovsky and Nikolai Gay, Ilya Repin and Nikolai Koshelev, but even against that background Kramskoi’s work in the genre stands out for his steadfast attention to his models and thorough analysis of their individuality.

In the early 1880s, Ivan Kramskoi was considered one of the foremost Russian portraitists. This status was confirmed when he was invited to paint the portrait of Empress Maria Feodorovna at Alexandria (Peterhof) in the summer of 1881, soon after her husband’s succession.

Kramskoi based his work almost without alteration on a picture of Maria Feodorovna that had been taken in the studio of the photographer Sergei Levitsky. In doing so he was probably following the wishes of Emperor Alexander III who had commissioned the painting. The photographic portrait in a Russia-style formal dress was taken to show Maria Feodorovna in her new status and was intended to be distributed very widely. In December 1881 A. Felten and A. Beggrow’s shops selling prints produced a photogravure from Levitsky’s original.

The artist’s signature on the Hermitage portrait (I. Kramskoi / Alexandria / July 1881) includes an indication of where the painting was completed. That means that, despite the photographs he had at his disposal, the artist travelled to the imperial suburban residence for some sittings directly with the subject.

While working on one portrait, Kramskoi remained true to himself. Even in such an official painting he produced an enchanting image of the young Empress without a hint of flattery or idealization.

The artist probably saw the creation of a colourful symphony of gleaming precious stones as one of his chief tasks. The skill with which the Empress’s outfit and the shine of the diamonds were depicted is indicative of the great successes that Kramskoi had achieved in the realm of painting technique by the early 1880s, a time that is unjustly considered a moment of crisis in his creative biography.

In 1882 the Itinerants’ exhibition included three portraits of Empress Maria Feodorovna by Kramskoi, which were noted by the critics and repeatedly mentioned in reviews of the exhibition.

Right up until the revolution, Kramskoi’s portrait of Maria Feodorovna remained in the possession of the imperial family and was kept in the Anichkov Palace in St Petersburg. In 1918 the painting came into the Hermitage and for a long time it was unknown to specialists. In 2004, following serious restoration, it was displayed for the first time, in an exhibition at the State Historical Museum in Moscow.

The project of the Ekaterinburg Museum of Fine Arts, in the “exhibition of a single painting” format so popular at the moment, makes it possible to fully appreciate the artistic qualities of the Hermitage painting, one of the finest portraits in Kramskoi’s oeuvre.

The exhibition curator is Yury Yuryevich Gudymenko, leading researcher in the State Hermitage’s Department of the History of Russian Culture.

The exhibition runs from 14 October 2017 to 21 January 2018 at the Museum of Fine Arts in Ekaterinburg.

© State Hermitage Museum. 20 October 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 2:15 PM EDT
Updated: Friday, 20 October 2017 2:36 PM EDT
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SOVEREIGN No. 5 - COMING SOON!
Topic: Nicholas II

 
NOTE: This issue will be available in late November. NO pre-orders will be accepted at this time.
NOT available by subscription. Standing Orders available, click HERE for more information
 
I am pleased to announce that the next issue of SOVEREIGN, our popular bi-annual periodical dedicated to the life and reign of Emperor Nicholas II is nearing completion, and due to go to the printers the first week of November - Paul Gilbert

The No. 5 - Autumn 2017 issue will be our largest issues to date, featuring 7 full-length articles, including 6 first English translations of articles written by Russian historians and experts. The issue is further complemented with a multi-page news supplement, and illustrated throughout with more than 100 photographs and illustrations! 
 
FIRST ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS BY RUSSIAN HISTORIANS AND EXPERTS:

The Emperor Nicholas II and the Muslims 
by Pyotr Multatuli
Translated from Russian by Irene W. Galaktionova and Neil P. Mayhew

- Pyotr Multatuli has a PhD in Historical Sciences, and his written a number of monographs and articles on the life and reign of the Emperor Nicholas II and his epoch. He is the great-grandson of the imperial cook Ivan Kharitonov, who was shot along with the Imperial family in the Ipatiev House in Ekaterinburg on 17 July, 1918.

The Achievements of Nicholas II 
by Andrei R.
Translated from Russian by William Lee

Transfer of the Romanovs to the Ural Soviet
The Mystery and Transformations of Vladimir Pchelin's Painting  
by Ignat Bakin
Translated from Russian by Irene W. Galaktionova and Neil P. Mayhew

Nicholas II as Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Imperial Army
by Sergey Vorontsov
Translated from Russian by William Lee
 
Dethroned by the Entente
by Alexander Sabov
Translated from Russian by Irene W. Galaktionova and Neil P. Mayhew
 
Automobiles of 'His Majesty, the Tsar' 
by Veronika Romanenkova
Translated from Russian by William Lee

ADDITIONAL FULL-LENGTH ARTICLES BY GUEST WRITERS IN THIS ISSUE:

True and Devoted Friend? - George V, the War, and the Offer of Asylum 
by Coryne Hall

This article is the final installment of a four part series on the relationships between Emperor Nicholas II and the British monarchs by royal historian and author Coryne Hall.

plus

Sovereign News 
a multi-page supplement featuring news highlights from Russian media sources, on Nicholas II, including exhibitions, new monuments, research, and more 

Click on the link below for more information or to order the current or back issues of Sovereign. The Life and Reign of Emperor Nicholas II, please visit our web site:
 
SOVEREIGN. THE LIFE and REIGN OF EMPEROR NICHOLAS II 

© Royal Russia. 20 October, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:30 AM EDT
Updated: Friday, 20 October 2017 3:34 PM EDT
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Wednesday, 18 October 2017
The Crown Under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs, Revolution
Topic: Exhibitions

 
On the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, The Crown under the Hammer highlights the dramatic shift in aesthetic tastes and artistic sensibilities ushered in by the fall of the last Russian tsars and the rise of the first Soviet commissars. The richly diverse material included in the exhibition, which unfolds across two sites on campus, is drawn largely from the Hoover Institution Library & Archives at Stanford, as well as from Stanford Libraries’ Special Collections, the Bowes Art & Architecture Library, and the Cantor Arts Center. A model of cross-campus cooperation and collaborative scholarship, this project spotlights the university as one of the world’s richest repositories of artwork and documentary material relating to the politics, society, and culture of late imperial and early Soviet Russia.

The exhibition will take place simultaneously at both the Hoover Institution and the Cantor. At the museum, provocative juxtapositions demonstrate the dramatic cultural shifts that took place in Russia in the first decades of the 20th century. Works on view range from easel paintings that reflect the Russian elite’s enormous affluence and respect for tradition, to mass-produced posters and printed matter that exemplify the Soviet regime’s forward-looking perspective and revolutionary agenda. The Soviet-era works also testify to the revolution’s enduring impact on artists around the world. “For a brief period after the revolution, the Soviet state supported remarkable avant-garde artists who worked in a variety of media and embraced the most cutting-edge visual languages of the day. The marriage of progressive aesthetics and radical politics in the early revolutionary years continues to inspire creative thinkers today,” said Jodi Roberts, the Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art at the Cantor and a co-curator of the exhibition.

The installation at Hoover provides an opportunity to examine the wealth of rare visual and documentary materials and historical objects housed in its library and archives. Since the 1920s, the Hoover has been collecting books, periodicals, pamphlets, posters, photographs, manuscripts, official and personal correspondence, and ephemera related to early 20th-century Russia and the Soviet Union.

In the exhibition, treasures like the drafts of Tsar Nicholas II’s abdication statement take their place alongside newly accessible rarities, such as hand-tinted photographs of street scenes in 19th-century Moscow. Documentary materials that illuminate the tumultuous last years of Romanov rule can be examined alongside photographs of mass demonstrations on the streets of St. Petersburg in 1917, as well as striking examples of early Bolshevik propaganda. Bertrand M. Patenaude, research fellow at the Hoover Institution, lecturer in international relations at Stanford, and co-curator of the exhibition, said: “On their own, the Cantor and the Hoover routinely mount public exhibitions of consistently high quality. This collaborative enterprise has inspired the creation of something unique and memorable in the form of a thought-provoking and eye-catching art and history exhibition.”

Teams from both organizations have worked closely on the selection of objects on view at the Hoover and the Cantor, as well as on the development of public programs related to the exhibition. “The Crown under the Hammer is a great example of what can happen at a university art museum,” Roberts said. “Organizing this exhibition has been a truly collaborative process. The partnership between the Cantor and the Hoover has prompted specialists from a variety of fields to think again about the revolution and its legacy. It has given us the chance to re-consider what exhibitions at a premier university can be.”

Accompanying the exhibition will be a diverse program of public lectures and events, including a lecture by Patenaude on the Russian Revolution, and a film series that explores groundbreaking Russian and Soviet film. Montage Fever, a special film presentation organized by Pavle Levi, associate professor of film and media studies and faculty director of Stanford’s Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, will be on view in the Cantor's Lynn Krywick Gibbons Gallery from October 18, 2017–January 21, 2018.

© Cantor Arts Center / Stanford University. 18 October, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 6:41 AM EDT
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Monday, 16 October 2017
State Hermitage Museum to Open Branch in Ekaterinburg
Topic: Ekaterinburg

 
The new Hermitage-Ural Center will be housed in two buildings, including No. 11 Weiner Street 
 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

A branch of the State Hermitage Museum will open in Ekaterinburg by 2020, Russian Minister of Culture Vladimir Medinsky said on Monday. Note: Ekaterinburg will celebrate its 300th anniversary in 2023.

The opening of the Hermitage-Ural Cultural and Educational in Ekaterinburg is planned for 2019. "Restoration workshops will be located in the Urals branch of the museum," said the head of the department of culture of the city’s administration Tatyana Yaroshevskaya.

"We have set the goal to open the Hermitage-Ural Center in 2019. We have issued a tender for the restoration of the building which will house the museum, and anticipate that work will commence next year. We expect the project to take two years to complete," said Yaroshevskaya.

Deputy Director General, Chief Curator of the State Hermitage Museum Svetlana Adaksina noted that the museum does not plan to transfer exhibits from the main museum in St Petersburg to the Ural branch for permanent storage. "In the museum world, we believe that it is wrong to transfer exhibits to different museums for permanent storage, and are more in favour of holding temporary exhibitions in the Ural branch."

Adaksina also added that after the opening of the Hermitage-Ural Center, that larger exhibitions would be organized in Ekaterinburg, based on the new exhibition space.

About the Hermitage-Ural Center project

Ekaterinburg plans to house the Urals branch of the Hermitage in two buildings located in the city center. The house at No. 11 Weiner Street (currently a branch of the Ekaterinburg Museum of Fine Arts) will be used for exhibitions, while the house at No. 16 Vainer Street will house a storage facility, restoration workshops, and classes for conducting lectures. The total area of the two buildings equals 6,4 thousand square meters, at a cost of  600 million rubles.

On the southern side of the museum, builders will add a new entrance for group, and museum specialists will organize additional exhibition spaces, while designers will provide access to the attic of the building, where the memorial hall of the Hermitage-Ural Center will be located.

Ekaterinburg occupies a special place in the history of the State Hermitage Museum. In July 1941 two echelons were evacuated from Leningrad to Sverdlovsk with 1 million 118 thousand exhibits from the museum's vast collection. The museum’s treasures were carefully preserved in the building of the Sverdlovsk Art Gallery, throughout the Great Patriotic War. In October 1945, they were returned to Leningrad, but in 1947 more than 200 salvaged items were donated to Sverdlovsk for saving the collection.
 


Portrait of Empress Maria Feodorovna, painted by Ivan Kramskoy, currently on display in Ekaterinburg
 
The Days of the Hermitage 

The Days of the Hermitage is currently underway in the Ekaterinburg Museum of Fine Arts for the second time, from 14 to 20 October. The key event of this years exhibition is one painting - a portrait of Empress Maria Feodorovna, painted by Ivan Kramskoy in 1881, is on display for the first time in Ekaterinburg.
 
A master class on the restoration of graphics will be presented, and for the first time, a virtual reality cinema will be open where the film "The Hermitage: Diving into History with Konstantin Khabensky" and a digital copy of the Jupiter Room in the State Hermitage will be shown.
 
A series of lectures on the Russian Imperial family will be presented during The Days of the Hermitage by scientific staff of the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg:

- 16 October (Monday) -  Russian Court Portrait in the State Hermitage Collection 
- 17 October (Tuesday) - The Reign of Alexander III. The Emperor as an Art Lover, Collector and Patron of the Arts 
- 18 October (Wednesday) - Our Dear Princess Dagmar. Empress Maria Feodorovna, Personality and Destiny
- 19 October (Thursday) -  Wardrobe of the Empress Maria Feodorovna. From the Collection of the State Hermitage Museum 
- 20 October (Friday) - Imperial Jewels. Jeweller and Applied Arts at the Court of Alexander III and Maria Feodorovna

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 16 October, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 8:12 AM EDT
Updated: Tuesday, 17 October 2017 8:41 AM EDT
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Saturday, 14 October 2017
This Week in the News - The Romanovs and Imperial Russia
Topic: News

 
On this day: 13 October 1928, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna died at Hvidøre near Copenhagen. The much loved and respected Dowager Empress died at the age of 80, having outlived four of her six children. Following services in Copenhagen's Russian Orthodox Alexander Nevsky Church, the Empress was interred at Roskilde Cathedral. She was interred next to her husband Alexander III in the Peter and Paul Cathedral on 28 September 2006, 140 years after her first arrival in Russia and almost 78 years after her death.
 
* * *
 
This Week in the News is a new feature on my Royal Russia News blog. It includes a link and brief summary to a full-length article published in the past week from a variety of English language media sources.
 
This new initiative is a courtesy to those who do not have a Facebook account, or for some reason cannot view the Royal Russia Facebook page - now, with more than 121,000 followers from around the world!
 
Royal Russia is pleased to offer our dedicated followers with the following full-length articles, on a variety of topics covering the Romanov dynasty, their legacy, monarchy, and the history of Imperial and Holy Russia, for the week ending 14 October 2017
 
ARTICLES

The Queen's Fabergé egg and the Russian craftsman's links to Sandringham

A jewel-encrusted Fabergé egg belonging to the Queen is the glittering star attraction of a new exhibition at the Sainsbury Centre in Norwich. 

Eat like a tsar: 4 inventive dishes cooked up by Imperial chefs

It's commonly believed that Russia’s royals wolfed down lavish, gourmet delicacies on a daily basis, cooked using only the finest ingredients. However, it wasn’t always possible to grow or source such exotic flavors, so Russian emperors were in fact reasonably modest in their eating habits – their personal cooks were forced to invent dishes from ingredients on hand in the country. Alexandra Kravchenko writes in RBTH. 

A Tale of Two Sisters+ 20 PHOTOS

It was the best of times. It was the worst of times. This is the tragic story of two sisters - Empress Alexandra Feodorovna and Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna. Two beautiful Russian princesses who lived fairy tale lives. Until one fateful day in 1918. 

Mathilde Director Admits Film Contains Historical Inaccuracies

Note that it is precisely the historical inaccuracies, among other things, that have evoked such a strong reaction against the film in Russian society. 

How much Russian blood ran through Romanov veins? 

Here are the hard facts about the ethnic origins of Russia’s tsars and tsarinas. 

Pavlovsk Palace + 80 COLOUR PHOTOS!

Take a moment to review these stunning colour photographs of the interiors of Pavlovsk Palace, by Russian photographer 'Andrei'.
 
* * * 

 
PHOTO: The Staraya Derevnya Restoration and Storage Centre of the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg is home to an extensive collection of furniture from the former Winter Palace. Visits are by guided tour only, Wednesday-Sunday. Admission is 500 Rubles.
 
* * *

Disclaimer: the links published on this page are for information purposes only, and may not reflect the opinions of Paul Gilbert and/or Royal Russia


 


Posted by Paul Gilbert at 5:31 PM EDT
Updated: Sunday, 15 October 2017 6:01 AM EDT
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New Web Site Dedicated to Nicholas II Launched in Ekaterinburg
Topic: Nicholas II

 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

A new web site dedicated to the last Russian emperor and his family was officially launched today in the Ural city of Ekaterinburg. The comprehensive Russian language site was developed to mark the centenary of the death of Nicholas II and his family in 2018. The project was initiated by the Ekaterinburg diocese, and created with the blessing of the Metropolitan of Ekaterinburg and Verkhoturye Cyril.

The site chronicles the lives of Emperor Nicholas II, Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, and their five children - Grand Duchesses Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Tsesarevich Alexei.

A separate section is devoted to each family member, which includes a biography, photographs, diary entries, correspondence, memories, videos, and more. According to the projects manager Bishop of Sredneuralsky Evgeny, the site will be updated with additional information on a regular basis.

Bishop Evgeny notes: "This is not a finished project which we have initiated, but rather the presentation of a project that will continue to grow, and will be completed on 19 May, 2018, when the 150th anniversary of the birth of the last Russian emperor will be celebrated.
 

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 14 October, 2017 
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 4:57 PM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 14 October 2017 5:19 PM EDT
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Friday, 13 October 2017
Exhibition: Mihai Zichy at the Court of Russian Emperors
Topic: Exhibitions

 
Mikhail Alexandrovich (Mihai) Zichy, 15 October 1827 - 28 February 1906
 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

A new exhibition dedicated to the 190th anniversary of the Hungarian-Russian artist Mikhail Alexandrovich (Mihai) Zichy, opened today at the SS Peter and Paul Fortress in St Petersburg. Zichy, who spent much of his life in Russia, devoting his talents as an artist at the Russian Imperial Court.

Mihai Zichy was born on 15 October 1827 in Zala, Hungary. He received a university education in Budapest, and later graduated from the Vienna Academy of Arts. In 1847 he arrived in St. Petersburg at the invitation of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna (1806-1873) as a teacher of drawing and painting for her daughter, Grand Duchess Ekaterina Mikhailovna (1827-1894). From that moment the artist spent practically his entire life in Russia, in St. Petersburg, with the exception of his stay in Paris, Budapest, Vienna and Venice (1874-1881) and travels in the Caucasus (1881-1882).

In 1856, Zichy created magnificent watercolours depicting the coronation of Emperor Alexander II. For these works, the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts awarded him the title of academician. In 1858, Theophile Gautier in his book "Journey to Russia" devoted a whole chapter to Zichy, in which he praised him as a brilliant draftsman. This publication brought the artist fame and popularity in St. Petersburg society.

In 1859, Zichy was appointed court painter and held this post until his death in 1906 (Zichy died in St Petersburg on 28 February 1906, and buried in Budapest in March 1906). During these years, Zichy created a large number of drawings and watercolours, depicting moments of court life: official ceremonies, parades, celebrations, balls, social events, hunting scenes, theatre performances, family events. These works became a real illustrated chronicle of the life of the Russian imperial court during the reign of three emperors: Nicholas I, Alexander II and Alexander III. The latter decorated his rooms in the Gatchina Palace with Zichy’s works.

In 1895, Zichy created a series of watercolours depicting the death and funeral of Emperor Alexander III at Livadia on 1 November (O.S. 20 October) 1894.

Also Zichy is also famous for illustrations in the works of M.Yu. Lermontov, I.V. Goethe, T. Gauthier, N.V.Gogol, A.S. Pushkin, S.Rustaveli, verses of Hungarian poets S.Peterofi, I.Madach, among others.

The exhibition in the Peter and Paul Fortress tells about the life and work of Mikhail Alexandrovich Zichy in Russia and presents copies of the artist's works devoted to the life of the Russian Imperial Court from the collection of the State Hermitage Museum.

The exhibition is organized with the support of the Legislative Assembly of St. Petersburg, the Consulate General of Hungary in St. Petersburg and the Administration of Budapest. 
 
The exhibition: Mihai Zichy at the Court of Russian Emperors, runs from 13 October to 26 November 2017, in the exhibition halls of the Sovereign Bastion in the SS Peter and Paul Fortress, St Petersburg.
 
A selection of watercolours by Mihai Zichy, from the Collections of the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg
 


© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 13 October, 2017 
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 8:23 AM EDT
Updated: Friday, 13 October 2017 8:49 AM EDT
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Wednesday, 11 October 2017
Tender Issued for Restoration of Historic Interiors of the Alexander Palace
Topic: Alexander Palace

 
Colour auto-chromes of the interiors of the Alexander Palace, taken in 1917
Photos © Tsarskoye Selo State Museum Reserve 
 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

As reported in an article in Royal Russia News back in February 2017, the Alexander Palace is scheduled to open as a multi-museum complex in July 2018, however, the entire restoration is not expected to be completed now until 2019, or later due to the lack of funding to complete the project.

The Tsarskoye Selo State Museum-Reserve issued a tender this week for the recreation of the historic interiors of the east wing of the Alexander Palace.

According to the tender documentation, the initial price of the contract is 47 million rubles. The work is expected to be completed by April 2019.

The Terms of Reference provide for the reconstruction of the former rooms of Emperor Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, located in the eastern wing of the palace: the Tsar’s Old Study and Moorish Bathroom, Imperial Bedroom, Mauve Study and Palisander, Maple and Crimson Drawing Rooms.

Skilled craftsmen will use documents, drawings, and a collection of colour auto-chromes (photos above) taken in 1917 to restore the interiors to their historic original. The reconstruction will also include the recreation and installation of interior finishing elements, such as wall coverings, carpets, and furniture, as well as the recreation of portraits and marquises for windows. 

The Alexander Palace officially closed its doors to visitors in August 2015. The permanent exhibition Reminiscences in the Alexander Palace, which included the former private apartments of Emperor Nicholas II and his family located in the East Wing of the palace closed on August 2, while the Suite of State Rooms closed on August 31.

© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 11 October, 2017
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 1:14 PM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 11 October 2017 1:23 PM EDT
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Monday, 9 October 2017
Videos and Billboards Highlight Life and Love of Nicholas II and Alexandra Feodorovna in Ekaterinburg
Topic: Nicholas II

 
This article was researched from Russian media sources and written by Paul Gilbert, Founder of Royal Russia © 2017

An information and educational campaign dedicated to the family of Emperor Nicholas II was launched over the weekend in the Ural city of Ekaterinburg. 

The campaign includes a series of videos depicting the relationship of Emperor Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, which will be shown on the city’s trams and buses. 

Also, 50 billboards with quotations from the private diaries and letters of the emperor and his wife will be displayed on billboards around the city. In addition, the videos, Internet banners, and web site Tsarskaya-family.rf will be made available online.

The Press Service of the Ekaterinburg Diocese issued the following statement:

“Today, the public will learn truthful information about the life of the holy Royal Passion-Bearers. How they lived, their relationships within the family and with their subjects, why they are considered the ideal family, relations of the Imperial couple, how they preserved their love over decades, and more. This information will be devoted to the information and educational campaign, which starts on the day of the Protection of the Mother of God with the blessing of Metropolitan of Ekaterinburg and Verkhoturye Kirill.”

On 14th October, a new web site Tsarskaya-family.rf will be launched. The site "will demonstrate an honest view of members of the Imperial family as a whole, and each of its members." The diocese also noted that this new information resource will provide the truth about the Emperor Nicholas "as opposed to the distorted information, currently spreading in society." The site will be updated regularly until 19th May 2018 - the  day which marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of Nicholas II.

Angela Tambova, official representative of the Ekaterinburg diocese, noted that the project is not connected with the release of Alexei Uchitel's controversial film Matilda, which is scheduled for release on 26th October.
 


© Paul Gilbert @ Royal Russia. 10 October, 2017 
 

 

Posted by Paul Gilbert at 3:11 PM EDT
Updated: Monday, 9 October 2017 3:29 PM EDT
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