Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!
 
    Return to Home Page
 

College Writing 
Rubrics


 
Journal Rubric
Class Participation Rubric
Progress Toward Goals Rubric
JBHS Writing Rubrics
(Link to JBHS Writing Tools)


Criteria For Journal Grades

The following are descriptions of the criteria for grading the journals.  I am looking for thinking, creativity, effort and growth.  The journal assignment is designed to develop skill, confidence and ability to reflect through writing on a regular basis.  My goal is for each writer to take control of her own writing, finding her own topics and assigning herself her own writing and rewriting.

All journals should show evidence of having shared work at least once with a classmate or a conference with Ms. Fragakis.  The evidence could be written comments on the paper(s) or a summary of the conference.

A - A well organized journal of dated and numbered entries ranging from one page to five.  20% more than the required one entry per class session (40 for the quarter).  The writer has made the journal his own.  Many entries go beyond the assignments - asking new questions, finding new answers, playing with the content or form or writing additional drafts.  The writer takes risks, demonstrates thinking, shows substantial improvement (or maintains a high standard.)  The journal has many written comments from a classmate or other reader that demonstrate thoughtful reading.  Journals entries are read on the day they are assigned and journals are handed in on the day they are due.

B - A well organized journal with at least one dated and numbered entry for each class (33 for the quarter) ranging from one to three pages.  All assigned entries are completed.  Entries ask questions, persist in trying to find answers.  Some entries go beyond the class work and assignments and show clear improvement.  The journal has some written comments from a classmate or other reader that demonstrate careful reading.  Journals entries are read on the day they are assigned and journals are handed in on the day they are due.

C - A fairly well organized journal in which most entries are dated, numbered and fairly long and show a persistent attempt to fulfill the assignment and work toward her goals.  Missing 10% or fewer (29 for the quarter), but show some improvement.  Most assigned entries are completed, but few go beyond the class assignments.  The journal has a few written comments from a classmate or other reader.  Journals entries are usually read on the day they are assigned.  Journals are handed in close to the day they are due.

D -  The journal is inconsistently organized and entries are short or missing 10% to 20% (24 to 28 for the quarter).  Many assigned entries are missing.  Most entries are diary entries or written quickly without elaboration.  The writer appears to be going through the motions, shows no improvement and is not in the habit of writing regularly.  The journal has only one short written comment from a classmate or other reader.  Journals entries are usually read on the day they are assigned and journals are handed in more than three days after they are due.

F -  The journal is disorganized and missing more than 20% of the entries (23 or less for the quarter).  Entries show little or no effort.  The journal has no written comments from a classmate or other reader.  Journals entries are not read on the day they are assigned and journals are handed in more than five days after they are due.
 
 
 Return to Home Page  

 

Criteria For Class Participation

College Writing demands a high degree of class participation.  Students need to volunteer works in progress, opinions and questions and to work collaboratively to improve their work and the work of others.  Class leaders take responsibility to get discussion and readarounds started and to make small groups work.  They take risks with their writing, support their classmates and set high standards for the class.

The following are the criteria for grading your participation in class.

A - The student is consistently a class leader: daily volunteering, sharing ideas and work, asking questions and offering potential answers.  She is open-minded, respecting others' viewpoints and listening to others actively, and empathetically, making eye contact, nodding or responding aloud at appropriate times.  The student helps classmates improve their writing giving specific positive feedback and suggestions when they are asked for.  She always arrives to class with a positive attitude on time, ready to work and prepared with her journal, writing utensil, and assignments completed.

B - The student is frequently a class leader and always a positive participator: usually volunteering, sharing ideas and work, asking questions or offering potential answers.  He is open-minded, respects others' viewpoints and usually listens to others actively and empathetically, making eye contact or nodding or responding aloud.  The student usually helps classmates improve their writing giving specific positive feedback and suggestions when they are asked for.  He always arrives to class with a positive attitude on time, ready to work and prepared with his journal, writing utensil, and assignments completed.

C - The student is usually a positive participator: sharing ideas and work, asking questions and offering potential answers, but often must be asked to share.  She is sometimes open minded, respecting others viewpoints and listening to others actively and empathetically, making eye contact or nodding or responding aloud at appropriate times.  Other times, she is talking, giggling or making noise in side conversations.  The student sometimes helps classmates to improve their writing but usually gives generic "It was good" comments, examples of how the same thing happened to me or unasked-for suggestions.  She arrives to class ready to work, on time and prepared with her journal, writing utensil, and assignments completed less than 85% of the time.

D -  The student rarely voluntarily shares ideas and work, asks questions or offers potential answers.  When the others are talking, he is often talking, laughing or daydreaming.  The student rarely helps classmates improve their writing more often giving generic "It was good" comments, negative comments, examples of how the same thing happened to me or unasked-for suggestions.  He arrives to class ready to work, on time and prepared with his journal, writing utensil, and assignments completed less than 70% of the time.

F -  The student shares only when required.  When the others are talking, she is frequently talking, laughing or daydreaming.  The student does not help classmates improve their writing more often giving generic "It was good" comments, negative comments, examples of how the same thing happened to me or unasked-for suggestions.  She arrives to class ready to work, on time and prepared with his journal, writing utensil, and assignments completed less than 60% of the time.
 
 
 
 Return to Home Page  

 

Criteria for Progress Toward Goals Grade

You must have one piece of writing to demonstrate the progress toward each of your five goals for the quarter.  Each goal needs a different piece of writing for a total of five pieces.  In assessing each goal you need to point to specific examples in the text  and assess your progress using the terms significant, satisfactory, fair or very poor.  Explain clearly how each piece reflects the progress toward the goal and provide quotes or summary examples from the text of the example piece.
 

A - An A Progress Toward Goals grade demonstrates the writer's dramatic progress during the quarter with at least four of the goals assessed as making significant progress.  This progress is clearly demonstrated in the attached pieces of writing through clear, detailed explanations.  Each explanation contains many quotes/examples and makes a clear connection between the pieces and the stated goal.

B - A B Progress Toward Goals grade demonstrates the writer's substantial progress during the quarter with at least two of the goals assessed as making significant progress and at least two assessed as making satisfactory progress.  This progress is clearly demonstrated in the attached pieces of writing through detailed explanations.  Each explanation contains quotes/examples and makes a clear connection between the pieces and the stated goal.

C - A C Progress Toward Goals grade demonstrates the writer's adequate progress during the quarter with at least three of the goals assessed as making satisfactory progress and one assessed as making fair progress.  This progress is clearly demonstrated in the attached pieces of writing through clear explanations.  Each explanation contains at least one quote or example and makes a connection between the pieces and the stated goal.

D - A D Progress Toward Goals grade demonstrates the writer's poor progress during the quarter with only one or two of the goals assessed as making satisfactory progress and only three assessed as making fair progress.  This progress is demonstrated in the attached pieces of writing with explanations.  Each explanation makes a connection between the pieces and the stated goal.

F - An F Progress Toward Goals grade demonstrates the writer's lack of progress during the quarter with the goals assessed as making only fair or very poor satisfactory progress.  This progress may or may not  be clearly demonstrated in the attached pieces of writing often with little or no explanation.  The explanations do not make a connection between the pieces and the stated goal.
 
 
 
 Return to Home Page