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“The slave cannot free herself. She can be freed only by an owner. The condition of slavery does not require the collar, or the brand, or an anklet, bracelet or ring, or any such overt sign of bondage. Such things, as symbolic as they are, as profoundly meaningful as they are, and as useful as they are for marking properties, identifying masters, and such, are not necessary to slavery. They are, in effect, though their affixing can legally effect imbondment, ultimately, in themselves, tokens of bondage, and are not to be confused with the reality itself. The uncollared slave is not then a free woman but only a slave who is not then in a collar. Similarly a slave is still a slave even if her brand could be made to magically disappear or, if she has been made a slave in some other way, if she has not yet been branded. Indeed, some masters, somewhat foolishly, I think, dally in the branding of their slaves. Indeed, some, perhaps the most foolish, do not brand them at all. Such girls, however, when they come into the keeping of new masters, usually discover that oversight is promptly remedied.”
Renegades Of Gor, page 273

 
 

The small, heavy lock on a girls slave collar, incidentally, may be of several varieties, but almost all are cylinder locks, either of the pin or disk variety. In a girls collar lock there would be six pins or six disks, one each, it is said, for each letter of in the Gorean word for female slave, kajira; the male slave , or kajirus, seldom has a locked collar; normally a band of iron is simply hammered about his neck; often he works in chains, usually with other male slaves. 
Assassin of Gor, pg. 51

 
 

'What is the common purpose of a collar?'
'The collar has four common purposes, Master,' she said, 'First, it visibly designates me as a slave, as a brand might not, should it be covered by clothing. Second, it impresses my slavery upon me. Thirdly, it identifies me to my Master. Fourthly, fourthly,'
'Fourthly?' he asked.
'Fourthly,' she said, 'it makes it easier to leash me.'
He kicked her in the side. She winced. Her response had been slow.
Explorers of Gor, pg 70

 
 

"These collars are normally measured individually to the girl as is most slave steel. The  collar is regarded not simply as a designation of slavery and a means for identifying the  girl's owner and his city but as an ornament as well. Accordingly the Gorean master is often  extremely concerned that the fit of the graceful band will be neither too tight nor too  loose. The collar is normally worn snugly, indeed so much so that if the snap of a slave  lease is used the girl will normally suffer some discomfort." 
Priest Kings of Gor, Pg. 158

 

Types of Collars

  Barrens
-see Beaded-
 

"The red savages do not use steel collars. They use high, beaded collars, tied together in the front by a rawhide string. Subtle differences in the styles of collars, and in the knots with which they are fastened on the girls' necks, differentiate the tribes. Within a given tribe the beading, in its arrangements and colors, identifies the particular master. This is a common way, incidentally, for warriors to identify various articles which they own."
 Savages of Gor, Pg. 102

 
  Beaded
-see Savage, Barrens-
 

"The red savages do not use steel collars. They use high, beaded collars, tied together in the front by a rawhide string. Subtle differences in the styles of collars, and in the knots with which they are fastened on the girls' necks, differentiate the tribes. Within a given tribe the beading, in its arrangements and colors, identifies the particular master. This is a common way, incidentally, for warriors to identify various articles which they own."
 Savages of Gor, Pg. 102

 
  Capture   " . . . I looked in the rear-view mirror, terrified. About my throat, closely looped, was a  narrow golden chain. It was controlled by two narrow wooden handles, in his hands "It was a  girl-capture chain," I said "It is to be distinguished from the standard garrote, which is  armed with wire and can cut a throat easily. The standard garrote, of course, is impractical  for captures, for the victim, in even a reflexive movement, might cut her own throat." 
 Savages of Gor: page 180
 
  Coffle  

"The collars had front and back rings, were hinged on the right and locked on the left. This  is a familiar form of coffle collar. The lengths of chain between the collars were about  three to four feet long. Some were attached to the collar rings by the links themselves,  opened and then re-closed about the rings, and some of them were fastened to the collar rings  by snap rings."
----------------
"Another common form of coffle collar has its hinge in the front and closes behind the back  of the neck, like the common slave collar. It has a single collar ring, usually on the  right, through which, usually, a single chain is strung. Girls are spaced on such a chain,  usually, by snap rings."
Savages of Gor, Pg, 135-136

 
  Common  

"The common Gorean collar, on the other hand, is a flat, snugly fitting steel band. Both  collars lock in the back, behind the girl's neck."
Nomads of Gor, Pg. 16

"Most Gorean collars, decorated of not, are basically a flat, circular band, hinged, which  locks snugly about the girl's neck."
Slave Girl of Gor, Pg. 251

 
  Cord  

"On some rence islands I have heard, incidentally, that the men have revolted, and enslaved  their women. These are usually kept in cord collars, with small disks attached to them,  indicating the names of their masters."
Vagabonds of Gor, Pg. 341

 
  Custom   "Would you not like a smooth steel collar, one slender and  gleaming, or perhaps ornamented  and cunningly wrought, or enameled, perhaps to match your eyes and hair, one designed in  color and workmanship to enhance your style of beauty, one perhaps measured or custom-fitted  to the beauty of your own slave throat?"
Slave Girl of Gor, pg. 215
 
  Dance   A wrist ring was fastened on her right wrist. The long, slender, gleaming chain was fastened  to this and, looping down and up, ascended gracefully to a wide chain ring on her collar,  through which it freely passed, thence descending, looping down, and ascending, looping up,  gracefully, to the left wrist ring. If she were to stand quietly, the palms of her hands on  her thighs, the lower portions of the chain, those two dangling loops, would have been about  at the level of her kneels, just a little higher. The higher portion of the chain, of  course, would be at the collar loop  Kajira of Gor: page 143  
  Enameled   About their throats were matching red-enameled collars.
Assassin of Gor, pg. 88
---------------------------
The meal was served by slave girls in white tunics, each wearing a white-enameled collar.
Assassin of Gor, pg. 88
----------------------------
He indicated Elizabeth's yellow enameled collar, bearing the legend of the House of Cernus.
Assassin of Gor, pg. 154
-----------------------------
I no longer wore the black, enameled, belled collar, and snide ring, of the Chatka and  Curla.
Slave Girl of Gor, pg. 355
 
  Iron
-see Northern, Torvie-
 

"'Look up at me,' said the smith. The slender, blond girl, tears in her eyes, looked up at him. He opened the hinged collar of black iron, about a half inch in height. He put it about her  throat. It also contained a welded ring, suitable for the attachment of a chain.  'Put your head beside the anvil,' he said.  He took her hair and threw it forward, and thrust her neck against the left side of the  anvil. Over the anvil lay the joining ends of the two pieces of the collar. The inside of  the collar was separated by a quarter of an inch from her neck. I saw the fine hairs on the  back of her neck. On one part of the collar are two, small, flat, thick rings. On the other  is a single such ring. These rings, when the wings of the collar are joined, are aligned,   those on one wing on top and bottom, that on the other in the center. They fit closely  together, one on top of the other. The holes in each, about three-eighths of an inch in  diameter, too, of course, are perfectly aligned.  The smith, with his thumbs, forcibly, pushed a metal rivet through the three holes. The  rivet fits snuggly.  'Do not move your head, Bond-maid,' said the smith.  Then, with great blows of the iron hammer, he riveted the iron collar about her throat. A man then pulled her by the hair from the anvil and threw her to one side. She lay there  weeping, a naked bond-maid, marked and collared." 
Marauders of Gor, Pg. 87

 
  Jeweled   "The girl was naked, save that she wore many strings of jewels and armlets. Too, she wore  bracelets and anklets of gold, which had been locked upon her, and were belled. Her collar,  too, was of gold, and belled. A single pearl, fastened in a setting like a droplet, on a  tiny golden chain, was suspended at the center of her forehead." 
Rogue of Gor, Pg. 10 - 11
((looking for a better quote just cant remember where it is))
 
  Kurr  

"From my pouch I drew forth a leather Kur collar, with its lock, and, sewn in leather, its  large, rounded ring. 'What is it?' she asked, apprehensively. I took it behind her neck, and  then, closing it about her throat, thrust the large, flattish bolt, snapping it, into the  lock breech. The two edges of metal, bordered by the leather, fitted closely together. The  collar is some three inches in height. The girl must keep her chin up. 'It is the collar of  a Kur cow,' I told her." 
Marauders of Gor, Pg. 275

 
  Lock   "The small, heavy lock on a girl's slave collar, incidentally, may be of several varieties,  but almost all are cylinder locks, either of the pin or disk variety. In a girl's collar  lock there would be either six pins or six disks, on each, it is said, for each letter in  the Gorean word for slave, Kajira." 
Assassin of Gor, Pg. 51
 
  Message  

"'Did you note the collar she wore?' He had not seemed to show much interest in the high thick leather collar that the girl had  had sewn about her neck. 'Of course,' he said. 'I myself,' I said, 'have never seen such a collar.' 'It is a message collar,' said Kamchek. 'Inside the leather sewn within, will be a  message.'" 
Nomads of Gor, Pg. 40

 
  Northern
-see Torvie-
  "'Look up at me,' said the smith. The slender, blond girl, tears in her eyes, looked up at him. He opened the hinged collar of black iron, about a half inch in height. He put it about her  throat. It also contained a welded ring, suitable for the attachment of a chain.  'Put your head beside the anvil,' he said.  He took her hair and threw it forward, and thrust her neck against the left side of the  anvil. Over the anvil lay the joining ends of the two pieces of the collar. The inside of  the collar was separated by a quarter of an inch from her neck. I saw the fine hairs on the  back of her neck. On one part of the collar are two, small, flat, thick rings. On the other  is a single such ring. These rings, when the wings of the collar are joined, are aligned,   those on one wing on top and bottom, that on the other in the center. They fit closely  together, one on top of the other. The holes in each, about three-eighths of an inch in  diameter, too, of course, are perfectly aligned.  The smith, with his thumbs, forcibly, pushed a metal rivet through the three holes. The  rivet fits snuggly.  'Do not move your head, Bond-maid,' said the smith.  Then, with great blows of the iron hammer, he riveted the iron collar about her throat. A man then pulled her by the hair from the anvil and threw her to one side. She lay there  weeping, a naked bond-maid, marked and collared." 
Marauders of Gor, Pg. 87
 
  Plank   The primary holding arrangement for women on the benches, however, are not chains. Each  place on the bench is fitted with ankle and wrist stocks, and for each bench there is a  plank collar, a plank which opens horizontally, each half of which contains five matching,  semicircular openings, which, when it is set on pinions, closed, and chained in place,  provides thusly five sturdy, wooden enclosures for the small, lovely throats of women. The  plank is thick and thus the girl's chins are held high. The plank is further reinforced  between each girl with a narrowly curved iron band, the open ends of which are pierced; this  is slid tight in its slots, in its metal retainers, about the boards, and secured in place  with a four-inch metal pin, which may or may not be locked in place. 
Savages of Gor: page 60
 
  Plate   Ho-Tu grinned. "Call the smith!" said he to the guard. "Plate collars!" (...)When the smith arrived, he took, from a rack in the wall, two narrow, straight bars of iron,  not really plates but narrow cubes, about a half inch in width and fifteen inches in length. The girls were then motioned to the anvil. First Virginia and then Phyllis laid their heads  and throats on the anvil, head turned to the side, their hands holding the anvil, and the  smith, expertly, with his heavy hammer and a ringing of iron, curved the collar about their  throats; a space of about a quarter of an inch was left between the two ends of the collar;  the ends matched perfectly; both Virginia and Phyllis stepped away from the anvil feeling  the metal on their throats, both now collared slave girls.
Assassin of Gor, pg. 153
 
  Rope  

"I rose to my hands and knees. I felt a length of sleen rope tied on my neck."
"'This rope is rough and course,' said Ladletender, fingering the rope collar."
Slave girl of Gor, Pg. 188,215

 
  Savage
-see Beaded-
  "The red savages do not use steel collars. They use high, beaded collars, tied together in  the front by a rawhide string. Subtle differences in the styles of collars, and in the knots  with which they are fastened on the girls' necks, differentiate the tribes. Within a given  tribe the beading, in its arrangements and colors, identifies the particular master. This is  a common way, incidentally, for warriors to identify various articles which they own." 
Savages of Gor, Pg. 102
 
  Shipping  

"'What sort of collar do you wear?' 'A shipping collar, Master. It shows that I am a portion of the cargo of the Palms of  Schendi.'"
Explorer of Gor, Pg 79 - 80

 
  Steel  

My eyes suddenly noted her one piece of jewelry -- a light, steel like band she wore as a collar.
Tarnsman of Gor: page 26

 
  Torvie
-see Northern-
  "'Look up at me,' said the smith. The slender, blond girl, tears in her eyes, looked up at him. He opened the hinged collar of black iron, about a half inch in height. He put it about her  throat. It also contained a welded ring, suitable for the attachment of a chain.  'Put your head beside the anvil,' he said.  He took her hair and threw it forward, and thrust her neck against the left side of the  anvil. Over the anvil lay the joining ends of the two pieces of the collar. The inside of  the collar was separated by a quarter of an inch from her neck. I saw the fine hairs on the  back of her neck. On one part of the collar are two, small, flat, thick rings. On the other  is a single such ring. These rings, when the wings of the collar are joined, are aligned,   those on one wing on top and bottom, that on the other in the center. They fit closely  together, one on top of the other. The holes in each, about three-eighths of an inch in  diameter, too, of course, are perfectly aligned.  The smith, with his thumbs, forcibly, pushed a metal rivet through the three holes. The  rivet fits snuggly.  'Do not move your head, Bond-maid,' said the smith.  Then, with great blows of the iron hammer, he riveted the iron collar about her throat. A man then pulled her by the hair from the anvil and threw her to one side. She lay there  weeping, a naked bond-maid, marked and collared." 
Marauders of Gor, Pg. 87
 
  Turian  

"She wore the Turian collar, rather than the common slave collar. The Turian collar lies  loosely on the girl, a round ring; it fits so loosely that, when grasped in a man's fist,  the girl can turn within it; the common Gorean collar, on the other hand, is a flat, snugly  fitting steel band. Both collars lock in the back, behind the girl's neck. The Turian  collar is more difficult to engrave, but it, like the flat collar, will bear some legend  assuring that the girl, if found, will be promptly returned to her master."
Nomads of Gor, Pg. 29