UNTD NEWSLETTER



This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Association of Upper Canada as a means of promoting activities of the association and encouraging UNTiDies to maintain their special status as Naval Persons.

Editor: Cdr. Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2.

Contributions are invited, whether they be letters, anecdotes, UNTiDy jokes or information about members and former UNTD Cadets, ie. "Where Are They Now?"

You have the information we need.

Pass it along to the editor.



HUMOUR



Some of our best Humour comes from the ludicrous situations created by Integration of our Armed Forces. Perhaps you will get a chuckle out of this true story.



When the Naval Reserve Headquarters was moved from its excellent waterfront facilities that it shared with HMCS Star in Hamilton, the local militia promptly abandoned their decrepit armoury and moved into the empty headquarter's building. Thus the process of unification and integration became a reality with the sharing of messes, class-rooms and parade ground. Open spaces quickly became parking lots for army trucks and equipment. Naturally there was ill will on the part of the navy at this perceived take over.

The Commanding Officer of the Naval Reserve Division did his best to create harmony and co-operation between the units but it was not easy. One day he inadvertently overheard in the mess that the militia was planning to hold a Sunday afternoon cocktail party on the lawn between their building and the waterfront. It so happened that their schedule coincided with the return of a training cruise. The militia colonel panicked when he heard this. However, it was pointed out that with a little planning this event could be turned into a model of army-navy co-operation. All the army had to do was to provide a little working space on the jetty. The arrival of a ship might prove quite exciting to the Colonel's guests.

Thus the naval commanding officer watched with pride as the ship came alongside and the cocktail guests stood back, viewing the process with interest. He noted that the first heaving line to the jetty landed within a few feet of the Colonel's punch bowl. The second actually hit the table. As he watched the third line arch through the air, he suddenly realized with shattered expectations that the sailors were using the Colonel's punch bowl as a target.



LETTERS



Dear Editor,

Thank you very much for sending me a copy of SPINDRIFT, UNTiDy Tales of Officer Cadets. I sat down and read it from cover to cover with great enjoyment. You certainly must have burned midnight oil to have got this book out for the UNTD half-centenary reunion. Congratulations, indeed and BZ. It's a great idea and sure to attract further recollections from other participants who may have, for whatever reason, initially held back.

Now to answer your inquiry. Hal Lawrence (A Bloody War, Tales of the North Atlantic) was, indeed, SO UNTD to COND, 28.3.53 - 19.2.55 (following Herbie Little when headquarters moved from Ottawa to Hamilton). Sad to say, though, he died April 11, 1994. He had a good deal to say about his job (as Staff Officer UNTD) and the difficulties he had getting his masters to give it the priority he thought it deserved. His comments are in his unpublished book, A Sickly Season. His last months were spent in a frenzied attempt to complete a re-write and it remains unfinished. Incidentally, Hal's successor as SO UNTD was LCdr JRH Ley CD RCN (Ret'd). John lives in Victoria and his views on the UNTD in his time may be instructive.



Dick Donaldson, Victoria, BC.



Dear Sir,

Thank you for your (UNTD) donation to the Iroquois ship's fund. Due to our deployment in the Adriatic Sea our correspondence has been tardy. Your gift has helped the morale of the ship's company.



Lt. G. MacIsaac, D/SYO, HMCS Iroquois. SPRING REUNIONS ARE

A GREAT SUCCESS



The UNTD reunions in Kingston and Guelph this Spring were an overwhelming success, providing wonderful good times and nostalgia to those who attended and great satisfaction to the organizers.



On June 17 in Guelph, at the birthplace of the UNTD, 110 guests were welcomed enthusiastically to Creelman Hall by the University President and Vice-Chancellor, Mordechai Rozanski. The dining hall, itself a source of great nostalgia, was lined with UNTD displays and memorabilia from the University archives and the Baker family collection. The inimitable John Duggan, UNTD (OVC) 1949-53, was the master of ceremonies but appeared, at times, to lack concentration which is understandable as his wife had been seriously injured by a bull prior to his departure from Alberta.



Dinner music and a military atmosphere were provided by the excellent band of HMCS Star. As it turned out, this may have been their last public performance. DND announced in July that this band, one of the finest naval bands in the









































John Duggan, (49-53), as Master of Ceremonies, praises the effort and naval vision of Professor W. A. (Jack) Baker in creating the first UNTD program at Guelph Agricultural College in 1943.



country, dating back to 1943, would come to an end as a result of recent Liberal Government cuts to Armed Forces budgets.



Two of Guelph's UNTD (OAC/OVC) former commanding officers: John Carpenter, 1947-1958, and Dick Ellis, 1958-1964, although limited now in mobility, were in attendance to greet well wishers and add their good cheer. Also present, and given special notice by Vice-Admiral Cairns in his address, was Noel Langham, SO UNTD, 1957-1965. C. H. Little, SO UNTD, 1946-1952, was unable to attend but sent his best wishes contained in a message reported elsewhere in this newsletter.



Organizer, Gordon Wright, RCNVR (Ret'd) gave glowing credit to Rosemary Clark, Director, Advancement Programs at the University, for all her assistance in organizing the program. Both Rosemary and Admiral Cairns, a Venture graduate, were made honourary UNTD alumni for their support in making the reunion a great success. Our President, David Fry,

was duly impressed with the whole affair. His comment with the usual mischievous grin, "I didn't realize there were so many farmers in the Navy!"











































Gordon Wright, RCNVR, one of the first UNTD Training Officers at Guelph, and Jack Baker's son-in-law, was one of the principal organizers of the reunion. Both Baker's daughters, Ruth and Twink retain an interest in their father's Brain Child.







































John Duggan (OVC '49-53) poses with the guest of honour, Vice-Admiral Peter Cairns, Maritime Forces Command, who attended with Commodore Ken Nason, Canadian Forces Command and Staff College. Nason was the senior ranking







The Kingston Reunion on April 23, exceeded everyone's expectations and more than lived up to the wonderful program advertised in the Spring Newsletter. Eighty-three UNTD alumni and their wives or significant others from Toronto, Kingston, Ottawa, and Montreal proved that you can relive the good times of your UNTD experience. Congratulations to the planners: Co-chairmen, Andy Shaw and Gil Hutton; assisted by Ron Paquin, Bob Mackenzie and George Vosper of Kingston; Brian Ellis of Ottawa; and Father Tom McEntee and Gerry Lee of Montreal.



Following the Meet and Greet in HMCS Cataraqui, Cdr. Ron Paquin proudly conducted a tour of his impressive, new building; a Taj Mahal to those who remember the temporary WW II facilities. The Dine-the-Ladies was presided over by Andy Shaw of Ottawa with assistance from Vices: David (himself) Fry, Toronto; Bob MacKenzie, Kingston; and Cdr. John Langlais, Montreal. They had to be sharp to contend with the brilliant repartee of the likes of: Bob Wooton (Ottawa) waxing poetic, Gus Fraser (Ottawa) firing witty broadsides, along with general instigators;







































UNTD in attendance, until Cairns, a Venture graduate, was made an honourary UNTD for his support of the reunion. Two other senior UNTiDies present were Cdr Bob Williamson and Cdr Bob Bowman, retired commanding officers of HMCS Star along with Cdr Woodrow, the present CO.









































The Organizers: Ottawa - Andy Shaw, (Queens '61-63); Kingston - Ron Paquin, (U. Manitoba '60-63); Toronto - Gil Hutton, (McMaster '46-50).





Michael May (Ottawa), Aubrey Russell (Toronto), and Brad Sumner (Toronto).

Guest Speaker, Peter Trueman, UNTD UNB, 1951-2, spoke fondly of his UNTD days and told how the Navy broadened his horizons in preparation for his career as a TV Journalist. In responding to Jim Houston's toast to the UNTD, our illus- trious Godfather, C.H. Little, spoke of the value to Canada of the 6,000 men who joined the programme. Gil Hutton noted that the dinner proved that the high spirited, voluble and irreverent nature of the UNTD has not diminished over the years and as a result of recent reunions, a national sense of worth and solidarity is building anew.



On Sunday morning, Father Bill Thomas, UNTD Toronto and Father Tom McEntee, UNTD Montreal, conducted their patented ecumenical church service in the stained glass glory of Convocational Hall at RMC. Father Bill's sermon demonstrated how naval discipline, comradeship, loyalty and the challenge of the sea developed those qualities that prepared us better for life.

After repairing to the stunning opulence of the Senior Staff Mess at RMC, the question was asked, "Who knows how to pipe, Up-Spirits?" When the response was a bunch of blank faces, a typical UNTD recommendation was made; "Fake it, no one will know the difference." The tot issue was presided over by a very senior Chief Petty Officer and served in a half gill measure. The 96.5 proof Pusser's Rum, not issued in the Canadian Navy since 1970, had been smuggled in from the States by Gil Hutton when he found it was not available in Canada. Can't you picture that angelic UNTiDy look as he sailed through customs with nothing to declare? In true tradition, the beaming Chaplain, Bill Thomas, received the first tot and came around the buoy a second time (good thing he isn't a Baptist). The ladies helped to drain the barrel, including Elizabeth Fry who, all agreed, should have been an UNTiDy.



At the sumptuous Brunch that concluded the festivities, Gil Hutton introduced: the NOAC's new booklet, Why Canada Needs Maritime Forces; and Bob Williamson's anecdotal history of the UNTD, entitled, SPINDRIFT, UNTiDy TALES. Everyone went away glowing in their memory of good old times and looking forward to the next get together.













































Captain (N) Bob Duncombe (UBC '56-58), President of the White Twist Association

of Ottawa, introduced the guest speaker at the Dine-the-Ladies dinner.























































Peter Trueman, (UNB '51-53) noted TV Journalist, stood tall, all 6 feet 6 inches, as he addressed the dinner guest. He reminisced about his UNTD cadet experiences that broadened his horizons in preparation for a career in Journalism.













































President of the UNTD Reunion Dinner, Andy Shaw of Ottawa tries desperately to restore order after an outbreak of wit and oratory splendour by Aubrey Russell and Gus Fraser.













































Cdr C. H. Little, Father of the Post-War UNTD, 1946-1952, rises to respond to Jim Houston's toast to the UNTD.



Gus Fraser, (Carlton '58-61) delivers a brilliant and completely out of order oration to the delight of the dinner guests.















A LITTLE MESSAGE

Commander Herbie Little, SO UNTD 1946-1952 was unable to attend the Guelph Reunion but remembers his predecessor,

Jack Baker, well and sent the following message.



Greetings to all as you celebrate the origins of the UNTD at OAC with special reference to the founder, Professor, later Captain RCNR, A.W. Baker.



It was my privilege to develop a peacetime programme which made the UNTD an integral part of the RCN and its Reserve with the cadets dressed, accommodated and trained ashore and afloat as OFFICERS. The earliest among you will recall that being dressed as a seaman had its limitations. The record shows that well over 6,000 students graduated from this programme and small numbers, including young ladies, are still being prepared for service in both the Primary Forces and the Reserve.



Since 1985 when our UNTD name was restored, there have been many demonstrations of the continuing strength of this national programme. Associations have been formed, and reunions held in various parts of the country. Have you seen Commander Williamson's fascinating history of the UNTD called SPINDRIFT? I recommend it highly.



In conclusion, I leave you with a challenge! Your special training in both university and navy puts you all in a preferred position to speak out for a strong navy in a united country. Let us all pull together!



Commander C. H. (Herb) Little



ROYAL ROADS FOR SALE



Recently a new wing was added to Nixon Block, almost doubling the capacity of Royal Roads. After spending millions of dollars on this facility, the Canadian government, with typical "flip flop" wasteful party policy dogma, has now opted to close the college. The For Sale sign advertises: "Royal Roads University, seats for 2,000 students, fully equipped, on 650 acres of heritage waterfront property in a wildlife preserve, available now to your Provincial Government at a bargain price."



Last year 1,800 students had to be turned away from the University of Victoria, although they qualified for enrolment. Statistics Canada shows that British Columbia has the lowest number of university seats per capita of any province in Canada. It stands to reason that when the last class of Rodents leaves in June 1995, the college will become a provincial university, the parade ground will become a parking lot and the Canadian Armed Forces will take one step closer to oblivion.









































The new wing of the accommodation block at Royal Roads extends towards the library from the south end of Nixon Block. It arches over the upper level road to the gymnasium. Its eastern extremity is housed in glass reading rooms overlooking the Japanese Gardens and the lagoon. This picture was taken from the driveway in front of the Castle.

WESTERN ONTARIO REUNION



With the success of the Kingston and Guelph Reunions, there is now a call for a Western Ontario Reunion that would involve Windsor, London, Hamilton and Toronto. Your association is looking into the possibility of holding a reunion at HMCS Prevost in London next Spring. Stay tuned for further details.



HABERDASHERY FOR THE

WELL-DRESSED UNTD



Al Boothe, proprietor of Muir Cap & Regalia Limited, is once again offering UNTD pins (to prove to the world that you're a gentleman, scholar and former naval person). A mere $3.70 plus tax will secure for you a priceless button. UNTD ties at $20.00, made of finest acrylic, and blazer badges at $30.00, are also available. You may write of phone Mr. Boothe at:

Muir Cap & Regalia Ltd.

777 Warden Ave., Unit 14,

Scarborough, Ont.

M1L 4C3

Tel: (416) 757-2815











































SPINDRIFT

UNTiDy TALES



Have you got your copy yet? Don't wait too long; it's a limited edition and may soon go out of print. This is a collector's item - a must for every UNTD alumni. Reserve your copy by sending $15.00 to the Editor of the UNTD Newsletter.





































































NOSTALGIA A LA CARTE

THE UNTD ANNUAL MESS DINNER



There will be lots to talk about with old friends again this year at the Annual Reunion Mess Dinner. The success of the organization continues to attract UNTD alumni and you are sure to meet old friends that you have not seen for years.

Once you get started with, "Remember when ....;" you'll be assured of a great evening and for only $50.00!



Dinner music will be provided by the HMCS YORK combo and the guest speaker will be our own "Tall Tale Teller", Jim Houston, UNTD 1948. Jim and his wife Jackie experienced a unique travel adventure last summer, spending five weeks in the Western Siberian city of Chelyabinsk. The city, as big as Vancouver, has only recently been opened to visitors. Jim was invited there as part





































































of an industrial advisory group helping the Russians prepare for western capitalist investment. This will be a unique opportunity to see and hear how the Russians are coping with their change-over to a western form of economy. Don't miss the Adventures of Jim and Jackie in Siberia.



For reservations contact the Dinner Chairman, Errol Rowe, Hm (416)928-0320, Wk (416)927-3007. Hamilton area reservations may be made through Gil Hutton, (905)634-3720.



UNTD ANNUAL REUNION MESS DINNER



HMCS YORK WARDROOM



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1994

1800 FOR 1900 Hrs

RIG OF THE DAY

Any Naval Uniform, black tie or Blazer and Flannels with any service tie.

V.E. DAY SONG SHEET



WE'LL MEET AGAIN



We'll meet again,

Don't know where, don't know when,

But I know we'll meet again some sunny day.



Keep smillin' through,

Just like you, always do,

Till the blue skies drive the dark clouds far away.



So will you please say hello,

To the folks that I know,

Tell them I won't be long.



They'll be happy to know,

That as you saw me go,

I was singing this song.



We'll meet again,

Don't know where, don't know when,

But I know we'll meet again some sunny day.



I'LL WALK ALONE



I'll walk alone,

Because to tell you the truth,

I'll be lonely.

I don't mind being lonely,

When my heart tells me you,

Are lonely too.



I'll walk alone,

They'll ask me why and I'll tell

them I'd rather.

There are dreams I must gather,

Dreams we fashioned the night,

You held me tight.



I'll always be near you,

Wherever you are,

Each night in every prayer.

If you call, I'll hear you,

No matter how far,

Just close your eyes,

And I'll be there.



Please walk alone,

And send your love and your kisses

To guide me.

Till your walking beside me,

I'll walk alone.











SEEMS LIKE OLD TIMES



Seems like old times,

Having you to walk with,

Seems like old times,

Having you to talk with.

And it's still a thrill,

Just to have my arms around you;

Still the thrill,

That it was the day I found you.



Seems like old times,

Dinner dates and flowers,

Just like old times,

Staying up for hours,

Making dreams come true,

Doing things we used to do,

Seems like old times,

Being here with you.





I'LL GET BY



I'll get by, as long as I, have you.

Though there be rain, and darkness too,

I'll not complain, I'll see it through.



Though I may, be far away, It's true.

Say, what care I, Dear, I'll get by,

As long as I have you.





KISS ME GOOD-NIGHT SERGEANT-MAJOR

Private Jones came in one night,

Full of cheer and very bright.

He'd been out all day upon a spree.

He bumped into Sergeant Smeck,

Put his arms around his neck,

And in his ear he whispered tenderly.



Kiss me good-night, Sergeant-Major,

Tuck me in my little wooden bed.

We all love you, Sergeant-Major,

When we hear your bawling, "Show a leg."

Don't forget to wake me in the morning,

And bring me round a nice hot cup of tea.

Kiss me good-night, Sergeant-Major,

Sergeant-Major, be a mother to me.











LETTERS



Dear Editor,

I was delighted with Spindrift, which I received for Christmas and read in one go. It was a wonderful mixture of anecdotes and history. I learned so much about the UNTD that I didn't know before. I was pleased to see an anecdote in your collection by Richard Baker, one of my contemporaries. It looks like you have opened a mother load of lore.



I was impressed to learn that there are some six thousand UNTDs. It begins to explain why I am occasionally surprised to run into someone here in Southern California who has gone through the UNTD. I estimate that there must be over fifty: it makes me wonder if a California Reunion would be possible.

I have a suggestion for your association if I may. The phenomenon of World Wide Web is exploding. Would some institution, perhaps a college with a UNTD connection, or RMC, be willing to host a UNTD "Homepage" on one of its computers? How many UNTDs have personal homepages? Mine is, "http://DSNra.JPL.NASA.gov/-kuiper"



In keeping with the spirit of Spindrift, I have enclosed my own "UNTiDy tale:

"I joined the UNTD in 1962 at HMCS Donnacona. After two summers at HMCS Cornwallis, I took the Navigation Instructor's Course and in the summer of 1967 I was sent to HMCS Porte de la Reine as Engineering Officer. In August, Lt. Rideout, the CO, was succeeded by Lt. J. Hannam. One fine evening shortly thereafter, most of us were in our Red Sea rig on the open bridge enjoying an after dinner smoke. As the sun dipped lower, Hannam turned to me and said, "What time is sunset, Sub?"

I pulled the almanac down from the navigator's bookshelf, flipped back and forth quickly between the appropriate data in the daily table and the interpolating table near the back, and gave the answer.

Having expected me, a UNTD product, to plod laboriously with the mechanics of the problem, he scowled and said, "I don't want a guess. Calculate it properly."

I replied, "That time is good to the nearest minute, sir."

Hannam seemed speechless at my temerity until in the pregnant silence, the XO leaned over and whispered to him, "Sub-lieutenant Kuiper is an astronomer, sir."

That in fact is how I have been earning my living. Presently I am a research scientist at Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Radio Astronomy Manager for NASA's Deep Space Network. Sunset? What a piece of cake!



Thomas B. Kuiper, Los Angeles, CA.



HUMOUR



Making an UNTiDy Impression



I had the honour recently to be invited by Rear-Admiral Crickard to speak at the Second Naval Historical Conference held in Halifax on Oct. 8-9, 1993. The theme was, "In Quest of a Canadian Naval Identity"; my subject, "The UNTD and Canadian Society".



In making my presentation, my strategy was to impress the audience with the number of UNTD graduates that can be found in any distinguished naval gathering. I had done my homework and began a roll-call of those present: Dr. W.A.B. Douglas, Director General History, NDHQ; Dr. (Captain N) Mike Hadley, Conference Advisory Committee; Cmdre Drent, RCN ret'd; Cmdre Nason, Commandant of the Staff College; Cdr Roy Del Col, HMCS Hunter; Cdr Rollie Marshall, HMCS Scotian; John Holland, RCN ret'd and myself.



Pleased with the dramatic impact that I had made but careful not to omit anyone, I asked if there was anyone else? The audience broke into an uproar of laughter and all attention was focused on the front row where our host Vice-Admiral Cairns sat. Beside him was the most important guest at the conference with his hand in the air. I blushed as I quickly recognized Vice-Admiral Anderson, Chief of Defence Staff, - UNTD, HMCS Discovery, UBC.

Editor



TRIBUTE



















































LCdr Hal Lawrence (1920 - 1994)



Hal Lawrence, RCN 1939-65, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his part in the sinking of a German submar-ine. A dedicated career naval officer, with twenty-eight years service, he became a part-time lecturer at the University of Ottawa and Victoria in retirement. He developed into one of our finest naval literary giants with the publication of the award winning book, A Bloody War, one man's memories of the Canadian Navy 1939-45, and Tales of the North Atlantic.

His views of the navy changed dramatic-ally when he was appointed Staff Officer, UNTD in 1953 and became exposed to the world of academe. These views are documented in chapter nine, Cadets of the Naval Reserve: Advanced "Guzintas", from his unfinished manuscript entitled, Sickly Season. "Guzintas" is Hal's colourful synonym for an academic education in Math (Two guzinta four - twice; two guzinta six - three times; etc.) The story of his remarkable UNTD connection has been made available, in memoriam, to your editor with the kind permission of his widow, Alma Lawrence of Victoria, B.C.



In a letter attached to his chapter notes, Mrs Lawrence wrote: "I am sorry to be so long in answering you, but I find going over Hal's manuscript rather a painful task as I spent so much time doing this when he was alive. I know Hal would love you to tell his story to your UNTD Association for he enjoyed telling naval stories and lecturing right to the end".



An edited version of Hal's experiences as SO UNTD has been added to a revised edition of SPINDRIFT, UNTiDy Tales, and could be presented at a Reunion Dinner or serialized in a newsletter.



EVENTS OF INTEREST



VICTORY IN EUROPE



To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Victory in Europe, a Dinner/Dance will be sponsored by HMCS Star on Saturday, May 6th, 1995 at the Hamilton Convention Centre. Dance to the Big Band tunes of the "Forties", sing songs of World War II and watch marching band performances by the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Tickets are $40.00 per person for tables of eight. Call, 1-905-572-2728.



MTB REUNION



The National Reunion for Canadian Coastal Forces - Motor Torpedo Boats will be held in Hamilton, Sep. 28 to Oct. 1, '95.

If you know anyone who served in motor torpedo boats, pass this message along. They should contact Mel Smith at:

1-905-389-1537





UNTD NEWSLETTER



This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Association of Upper Canada as a means of promoting activities of the association and encouraging UNTiDies to maintain their special status as Naval Persons.

Editor: Cdr. Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2.

Contributions are invited, whether they be letters, anecdotes, UNTiDy jokes or information about members and former UNTD Cadets, ie. "Where Are They Now?"



You have the information we need.





























































HELP HAIDA



Remember those days when, as a cadet, you worked part ship, cleaning, chipping paint or slapping it on with a brush. There was a certain pride in making the ship look smart for entering port. Before the tourist season begins at Ontario Place, Haida needs some help to look her best for all the visitors that are expected. Who has more experience in such matters than a former UNTD cadet. Your association is planning a work party for Haida on Saturday, April 29 from 10:00 to 15:00. We'll provide the pizza and beer if you'll muster with your friends and family for a little nostalgia of ship board life.



If we all can't make a financial donation to Haida then why not contribute a little elbow grease and have some fun at the same time. Mark this date on your calendar and when the phone committee calls, say you'll help Haida. For more information call our secretary, Doug Hain at (416) 239-7061.































































HART HOUSE PROJECT



Five hundred and fifty-seven University of Toronto graduates gave their lives in World War II. The Alumni Association would like to present a memorial in the form of a stained glass window in the tower room of Hart House to honour these graduates. If you are interested in this memorial project contact Major Ogilsby at 492-8532.



WHY BELONG?



The UNTD Association of Upper Canada is the only ACTIVE UNTD association in Canada with regular executive meetings, annual dinners, reunions and weepers. A semi-annual newsletter maintains communication and preserves a record of activities, information and interesting stories. To keep our association strong, RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP TODAY. Your $15.00 covers the cost of printing and mailing. We are the product of one of the finest naval training plans ever devised. Keep the memory alive and promote it with former UNTD colleagues. ANOTHER UNTD REACHES THE TOP



Congratulations to Bob Baugniet, who in July 1995, took up his appointment as Commander Naval Reserves and Senior Naval Reserve Advisor. He is the ninth commodore to hold this appointment since 1967 and the forth UNTD to reach this pinnacle.



The position of SNRA was created at the time of unification as a liason between the Maritime Commander and the Naval Reserve Headquarters, but in recent years has been changed from an advisory position to a command position with the addition of the title, Commander Naval Reserves. This office can only be held by a senior naval reservist.



For the record, the following is a list of SNRAs as confirmed by Cmdre Bennett in his copy of John M. MacFarlane's book, Canadian Admirals and Commodores, published by the Maritime Museum of British Columbia, 1994.

1967 - Cmdre Oland (HMCS Scotian);

1971 - Cmdre Leroyd (HMCS Discovery); 1974 - Cmdre Bennett (UNTD McMaster '48-51, HMCS Star);

1977 - Cmdre Smith (UNTD Windsor '49- 52, HMCS Hunter);

1981 - Cmdre Fox-Decent (UNTD Manitoba '54-57, HMCS Chippawa);

1986 - Cmdre Peer (HMCS Brunswicker); 1989 - Cmdre Orthlieb (HMCS Tecumseh); 1992 - Cmdre Michaud (HMCS Montcalm); 1995 - Cmdre Baugniet (UNTD McGill \ Sir George Williams '63-65, HMCS Donnacona).



As a UNTD historian, I find Bob Baugniet's entry into the navy to be an interesting review of the education system and naval officer training programs of the 1960s. It also illustrates how the UNTD helped retain for the navy, the capablities of a young man who was destined for greater things.



Those who were educated in the province of Ontario had the benefit of a grade 13 education, while other provinces such as Quebec, graduated their students at the end of grade 12. I personally found that the students from Quebec in my UNTD year seemed handicapped by deficiencies in mathematics when it came to advanced navigation courses or entry into Royal Roads. It may have been with this in mind that Bob Baugniet from Montreal, opted for the Venture Program in 1961 to obtain his senior matriculation. He was accepted into Royal Roads in 1962 but found that the math-science area was not his strength. McGill University gave him credit for some of his Royal Road's courses in an Arts Program and in 1963 he transferred to the second year there and joined the UNTD. In 1964 he transferred to Sir George Williams University (now Concordia), and upon completion of his third year of university, was promoted to Acting Sub-Lieutenant through the UNTD program. Still short a few subjects for graduation, he completed his degree in Political Science and English at night school. In the meantime, he joined Berger and Associates in public relations where he remained until accepting his present position of Vice-President, Corporate Affairs for Rolls-Royce Industries Canada Inc. in 1994.



For information on his naval career, I quote these details from VOX NAVALIS. From 1965 to 1975, Baugniet held various positions in HMCS Donnacona in Montreal. After promotion to Lieutenant-Commander in 1975, Baugniet transferred to HMCS Carleton in Ottawa. In 1977 he assumed command of that unit. He was promoted to Commander in 1979 and served as the Executive Officer in HMCS York. Then while serving as the Commanding Officer 1981-1985, he received his promotion to Captain (N) in 1983.



In 1986 Capt(N) Baugniet was appointed Senior Staff Officer (Navy) to the Chief of Reserves and in 1988 became the Commanding Officer, Maritime Coastal Defence (Seaway).



Capt(N) Baugniet was vested into the Order of Military Merit in the grade of "Officer" in 1987. He has held many positions with naval associations including: Past President of MDAC, Director of the Ontario Division of the Navy League of Canada, immediate Past President of the Royal Canadian Military Institute and member of NOAC.

Editor

NAVAL COLLEGE CLOSES



Royal Roads is no longer educating officer cadets. The magnificent grounds will remain under the control of the Federal Government. The "core area" of the castle and the academic plant have been transferred to the Province. The future of Royal Roads as a civilian university is still foggy. The University of Victoria and Camosun College will run courses there during the academic year 1995/96. After that the new "University of Royal Roads" is supposed to be up and running and is to offer its own courses. A museum is being established on the grounds to commemorate the 50 years that Royal Roads was a naval and military college.



To capture what is our memory of a national treasure, Maurice Robinson et al has published a timely book entitled, Royal Roads: A Celebration. This is a superb collection of photographs showing the college as it was just before the services era ended. It is available from the publisher, Natural Light Productions, 5135 Sandgate Road, Victoria, BC. V9B 5T7. Cost: $32.00 incl GST + $6.00 postage.



Jan Drent

Starshell, Summer 1995



If anyone attended the final graduation at Royal Roads or has a memory of UNTD activities there, please submit your recollection to the editor for posterity.



HMCS STAR CONDEMNED



HMCS Star, the first naval reserve division to house a UNTD programme in 1943, will come crashing down on Oct. 1, 1995. Star was also the first naval reserve division to be housed in a new building completely designed and constructed as a waterfront naval base. The buildings were opened on Oct. 1, 1943, fifty-two years ago to the day when the wreckers will move in to demolish a structure that has a long and nostalgic connection to the city of Hamilton's naval history. There is concern that the old Star will disappear with very little ceremony, other than a mess dinner scheduled for Sept. 30. At the moment, there is no plan to replace the building. The ship's company will be crowded into the first floor of the former COND headquarters building, providing about 40% of the space required. Meanwhile, house trailers have been moved into a quadrangle at the east end of the parade square to provide storage space and house some offices. The units have an ominous air of permanency.



How did this situation come about, you say? Well the old wartime structures have been condemned for awhile, but last year it was announced that a new building was to replace the naval reserve's oldest structure. A year later, the funds for the new construction were given a much lower priority while the budget for the wreckers remained in tact. So Star's ship's company have been placed in the unenviable position by their military and political masters of abandoning ship.



However, for the moment, Star still retains possession of the best piece of water real estate in the Naval Reserve. But without a building, and an Armed Forces Reserve Review Commission making the rounds, Hamilton's sailors are justifiably nervous.

As the edifice that housed the first UNTD programme comes tumbling down, marking the end of an era, a new regime was launched by a change of command at Star. The new commanding officer will not hold the rank of commander, a trend that appears to be spreading through the Naval Reserve, and he is the first C.O. of Star to be produced by the NROC programme (Naval Reserve Officer Cadet), Hellyer's equivalent of the UNTD. Although the change of command parade was the last formal event held in the old drill hall on September 24, it was a low profile, abbreviated event with a small guest list. Not even a simple Evening Quarters or a Sunset Ceremony was programmed to mark the close of a chapter in Hamilton's naval history.









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UNTiDy TALES



LCdr Hal Lawrence's story about his appointment as Staff Officer UNTD, was recorded in his unfinished manuscript, Sickly Season. It has been reprinted here with the kind permission of his widow, for those who were unable to attend the last Super Weepers. It will be continued as a serial in later newsletters.

By 1955, it had been sixteen years since I took the Queen's shilling; twenty-one if the time as Boy Soldier in the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals and the two years in the COTC at Saint Mary's University in Halifax are counted. In these years it had never occurred to me that there was any other career in which I could find satisfaction except the Navy. But by the end of my appointment as Staff Officer UNTD to the Commanding Officer Naval Divisions, I had been exposed to a different world and for the first time began to question that I might have done something else with my life. The navy's perspective began to look very narrow as I met some of the best academic minds in Canada. Despite the God-given trait of an irrepressible jubilance which seldom forsakes me, these two years became largely years of spiritual tribulation. I had to reconcile the academic life I saw every day with the physical life I'd been leading, and which we all might have to lead again as the Russians grew more ominous.



When I took the appointment in 1953, there were 1,200 reserve naval cadets in 32 universities and colleges from Memorial in Newfoundland to Victoria College in British Columbia. Their commanding officers at the university were reserve officers and usually professors. The Naval Reserve Divisions, only eight years after the war, enjoyed a plenitude unknown to their pre-war forbears. I remembered as if it was yesterday the near-fatal lack of trained officers at the beginning of World War II. I remembered Bill Spinney and John Todd of HMCS Moose Jaw who had not a day's sea time before we sailed on the operational trip on which we sank U-501 but, it was clear in retrospect, that we missed several other U-boats that would have been sunk had Moose Jaw a trained crew and not just a trained captain who had to carry us all. With a healthy UNTD, this could not happen again. In a future emergency there would flock to the colours, hundreds of trained reserve officers, graduates of the universities of Canada. I felt myself to be a Man with a Mission.

The first Staff Officer UNTD was Captain Baker, RCNVR with a Ph.D. He was followed by Schoolmaster Commander Herbie Little RCN with an M.A. He was followed by Schoolmaster Commander Bill Fowler with a B.A. Now me, a drop-out from Engineering at Saint Mary's University. The Chief of Naval Personnel, Rear Admiral Hugh Pullen, was showing great wisdom, I thought, in my appointment. Undoubtedly the time had come to take the training of these young cadets from the schoolmasters and entrust it to a practical man who was primarily a seaman with specialist training in gunnery and known to be a bit of a disciplinarian. I would make this the finest body of young men in the NATO navies. Yes, that's how I felt, a Man with a Mission; and it's not a bad way to feel when taking up a new appointment.



Headquarters in Hamilton, Ontario was not a bad place to work either. COND was the Commodore of my aircraft-carrier days - Ken Adams. His Chief-of-Staff was Captain Pat Budge who set about whipping the new command into shape with more than his accustomed energy. His hair greyer, his eyes bluer and more snapping than before, he stood taller if such a thing were possible. He had lived his life on the philosophy of challenge and response; push and if they don't push back, push again. It worked. He had raised himself to prominence among professional seamen. He would show the amateurs how things were done. One of the unattractive traits of professional naval officers is a slight contempt for the civilian.

The Commanding Officers of the sixteen UNTDs were not generally of military bearing. They tended to unbrushed uniforms and unshined shoes. Their naval experience was limited. Their salute was more in the nature of a vague professorial benediction than a snappy up-two-three-down. And we met them in our element, the Navy Headquarters, not theirs, the campus. Captain Budge and I exchanged amused and tolerant glances at their awkwardness. Budge was not troubled at all about whipping these retreads into shape. But I had a vague premonition of inadequacy, for, as I looked up these professors in their university calendars, I noticed the Ph.D.s, the post-doctoral studies. I read in their curricula vitae of the learned societies and the impressive list of publications. I remembered such men at Saint Mary's, inconspicuous in appearance and giants in their field. ..... (to be continued)



SPINDRIFT

UNTiDy TALES



Have you got your copy yet? Don't wait too long; it's a limited edition and may soon go out of print. This is a collector's item - a must for every UNTD alumni. Reserve your copy by sending $15.00 + $2.50 mailing payable to the Editor of the UNTD Newsletter. (See below)



UNTD NEWSLETTER



This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Association of Upper Canada as a means of promoting activities of the association and encouraging UNTiDies to maintain their special status as Naval Persons.

Editor: Cdr. Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2.

Letters, anecdotes, & jokes are welcome. UNTIDY TALES



Hal Lawrence's story continued..



COND, Hamilton, Ontario, 1953



It was at my first annual conference of Commanding Officers, UNTD, that I started to feel embarrassed about the navy. The Commodore agreed to make the opening address. He arrived late, talked banalities for twenty minutes, then left for the day. There had been an air of disappointment among the academics, who, because of their interest in the Navy, had cancelled lectures and meetings to travel to the conference at a new Naval Command in Hamilton, devoted, they thought, exclusively to the well-being of the Reserve Navy.

However, a year later at the second annual conference, my loyalties were really put to the test. There were eighteen UNTD Commanding Officers from across Canada. One was a Dean of Engineer-ing; Dean Mawdsley from HMCS Unicorn. He had flown in the Royal Flying Corps 1914-18. I remember Dr. Burwell Taylor, a medical doctor at sea during the Battle of the Atlantic; and a psychologist, Charles Aharens Ph.D. The spectrum of disciplines was embraced: history, philosophy, nuclear physics, French literature ... One such Commanding Officer, Harry Smith, went on to become President of King's College, Halifax.

I didn't invite the Commodore a second time, and Captain Budge readily agreed to chair the meeting. He strode in exactly at 0930 as the third stroke of the ship's bell faded. We all rose. He stood at the head of the table and inspected us. We might as well have been fallen in on the parade ground. It took about thirty seconds but seemed longer, much longer. Frayed medal ribbons seemed more frayed, faded gold-lace more faded.

The opening generalities were curt and we plunged into the agenda. As the morning progressed the atmosphere became heavier, almost sullen. These professors didn't know the Regulations as the Chief-of-Staff did: who would expect it? One commander had his item on the agenda answered by, "Read the Queen's Regulations. Your question is answered there. Next item." Some items from the previous year had not been acted upon: the chairman's remarks were caustic. With relief I heard eight bells strike and we rose for lunch. Budge strode out and I followed. I caught him as he left the building. "May I talk to you, sir?"

"About the conference?"

"Yes, sir."

"After lunch."

"It must be before we reconvene, sir." By then we had reached his car.

"Get in." I did.

"Well?"

"Things didn't go well this morning, sir."

He looked ahead out the windshield. It was cold. Outside, the white ensign in front of the headquarters building snapped in the brisk wind off the bay and the spray wetted the edge of the quay. "Those COs aren't used to being spoken to like that. I know some of them aren't very clewed up, but for busy men they give us a lot of their time".

"They get paid for it."

"Yes sir. But we are lucky to have men of their stature within the university interested in naval matters."

He continued to stare bleakly over the turbulent water. This was not going well; but I didn't think I had misjudged my man and plunged on. "If you were to draw an analogy between naval and academic rank, some of them in their field are senior to you in yours."

This struck home. He brooded. "Very well. I'll go easier this afternoon." I breathed a sigh of relief. "But not much!" he added.

Every UNTD had a full-time staff officer: so did every COTC and they were a pleasure to behold; permanent force captains and majors, most of whom had commanded troops in action; most had graduated from the army staff college; most were university graduates. If ever men were liable to convince the academic community that the military career was a profession towards which professors might, with advantage, point some students, it was these army officers. Not so the Navy. Our best officers were all at sea. Admiral Lord Nelson had said that the best place for his ships was outside the enemy's ports. It was a weakness of our generation of admirals that they took all the precepts of that forward-looking thinker, Nelson, and applied them uncritically to the situation in the 1950s. The scions of aristocratic families had flocked to the profession-of-arms in Nelson's 18th century England but the same situation did not exist in 20th century Canada. The young men in these universities of Canada had to be persuaded to join the armed forces. And the UNTD staff-officers were not the sort of men to so persuade them. They were mostly the odds and sods - reserve officers getting a degree themselves, or filling this job until something better showed up. A lot were just hangers-on. I made a few forcible comments to some of them about their office hours and their dress.



The cadets were different from those of my cadet years in Alaunia. Obedience to commands, other than the routine orders of the parade ground, boat hoisting and such things, were not quite automatic and not quite instantaneous. A UNTD cadet seemed to consider for a micro-second what you had just ordered, decide it was a reasonable request, then carry it out. Disturbing! Yet, in university after university, we noticed the enthusiasm with which these youths of the 1950s embraced our century-old traditions. We made it hard to get into the UNTD and hard to stay in. The strange law that makes the difficult desirable, gave us more candidates to choose from than either the army or the air force. Hundreds reached out for the ideals that the Navy offered them and aspired to earn a Queen's Commission. To be continued.....



This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Association of Upper Canada as a means of promoting activities of the association and encouraging UNTiDies to maintain their special status as Naval Persons.





























PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE



Greetings from the Bridge! As David Fry turns over the Watch, I am honoured to serve as President for the next two years. My naval background is very brief in time and modest in scope, having served in HMCS Star from 1961-1964 as a Sub -Lieutenant. I was at Cornwallis in 1961 and 62 under the watchful eye of Perry Hill, "Dutch" Holland and many others who shouted a lot. I was aboard Outremont and Swansea, then Oriole on the west coast. I look forward to renewing many acquaintances at the various social gatherings that we have planned.



The new Executive is listed on the next page and we will work together on a number of projects. Our first venture is the Biannual Mini-Reunion and Dine-the-Ladies Weekend in London on April 20-21. We look forward to working with our London liaison personnel for this event; Peter Schwartz and Kim Little. We are also considering a West Coast Reunion for the summer of 1998 and should have an up-to-date National Roster of all UNTDs that we can trace, sometime this year.



In addition to our social functions, we would like our membership to take a more active role in assisting the Friends of the Haida in their work in preserving this naval memorial. Some of our members have worked occasionally as volunteers in preparing the ship for public visitations as well as assisting in the gift shop during the summer. We are organizing a work party aboard Haida for Saturday, April 27, in the belief that the ship and its heritage could become a focal point for our efforts beyond our social agenda.































We are open to any suggestions which will bring us together for good times and good cheer as we maintain our special status as UNTiDies. I CAN BE REACHED AT (416) 239-7061.

Douglas Hain

























































































































CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE

Gil Hutton



You didn't know that the UNTD association of Upper Canada had a Chairman of the Board? Well you do now! In suggesting that such a position be created and that I fill it for the next two years, David Fry opined, according to John Heighton's minutes of the executive meeting, that "this was a position commensurate with his long service to the organization." The real reason is that Frank Sinatra is now too old.



To be (slightly) more serious, I intend, more or less, to concentrate on long term policy and the "big" picture. What Long term policy? Well, primarily - should we continue exactly as we have been for the last eight years or become a more active part of the naval community? We have been almost a "fraternal" organization, dedicated as our by-laws say to the "promotion of camaraderie among ex-UNTDs in Southern Ontario" and indeed, latterly in all of Canada. That is by no means a negligible goal. However, the NOAC, specifically, the Toronto Branch, in addition to its fraternal role, also promotes a strong advocacy of an effective Canadian Navy in the context of a consistent Maritime Policy for Canada. It has also attempted to educate Canadians

to this end. Sixty percent of NOAC's members are ex RCNVR of World War II











































and therefore 70 years of age or older. Another 25% are ex UNTDs, including a lot who are hopefully reading this message. Unless NOAC is to become much smaller and less effective, it must recruit more and younger members. Should the UNTD Association attempt to co-operate more closely with the NOAC, and for that matter, the Navy League, the WREN Association, HMCS York, etc. or should we attempt to form one association with several divisions? These are questions that need to be asked.



If we remain as we are, do we continue to have a mess dinner every year and Weepers or a mini-reunion in alternate years? Should we have events involving special guests and significant others? Is a dinner cruise a possibility? First, the Board of Directors will discuss this and then poll you. But rest assured, the "promotion of camaraderie among ex UNTDs" will remain a priority. The wonderful memories of being a part of one of the navy's greatest recruiting ideas will live on with regular get-togethers. See you in London on April 20!



UNTD NEWSLETTER



Published twice a year in Spring & Fall

Editor: Cdr. Robert Williamson, RCNR

1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2.

UNTD information, letters, UNTiDy jokes, anecdotes, ie. your input is needed.

MESS DINNER WITH JOCK ALLAN

I hope you didn't miss it... the annual UNTD Mess Dinner, that is, with VAdm Jock Allan CMM, CD, at HMCS York last Fall. VAdm Allan is the most senior graduate of the UNTD and he came to tell us how he joined the service and through the UNTD program made a career of the navy. Inspired by the effort put forth by the Canadian Navy during World War II, young John Allan left northern Ontario to join the navy in 1949. He began as an ordinary seaman with the naval air squadron VC 920 at Downsview. His short career in the navy almost came to an end there when he went flying with one of the pilots in a Harvard Trainer. Exhilarated by the excitement of flying, he would cadge a ride whenever he could and try his hand at the controls. On this particular occasion he was in for more of a thrill than he had bargained for. While demonstrating a spin, the pilot found that he was unable to recover from the manoeuvre. The aircraft would not respond to the controls. Young John was ordered to bail out. This much adventure was more





































Head table guests from left

to right: Honourary Past

President, Mark Llewellyn;

Chairman of the Board, Gil

Hutton; VAdm Allan, Guest

of Honour; President, David

Fry; Cdr Herb Little, Staff

Officer UNTD 1946-1952; Bob

Duncombe, Ottawa Regional

Director.













































VAdm Jock Allan, CMM, CD, the most senior graduate of the UNTD program, relates his experiences in the navy to the guests at the UNTD Annual Mess Dinner at HMCS York on Saturday, November 18, 1995.









Some of the guests at Alex Wright's table facing the camera from right to left are: Ron Paquin, Joe Duffy, Frank Gallaway, Con Baker, Alex Langford, Doug Latimer, Al Eagle and Jim Houston.







































.





































than his alarmed brain could process. He had never used a parachute before and didn't even know if the thing would work. Nevertheless, struggling against the centrifugal force of the spin, he rolled over the side of the aircraft, only to find that part of his equipment was hung-up inside the cockpit. Flopping and twisting helplessly over the side of the aircraft in the slip stream, his alarm turned to panic. No matter how he struggled, he could not extricate himself from his plight. As he resolved to meet his fate, a moment of quiet inner peace set in. It was then that he realized the aircraft had stopped spinning and he thankfully clambered back into the back seat of the aircraft. It was there that the surprised pilot found a pale and shaken OS Allan after they had landed.



It was later established that the unusual behaviour of the aircraft was due to the fact that it had been fitted with wing rails for rocket launching at the firing range. In this configuration, the Harvard was not to be used for acrobatics.



Shortly after this, OS Allan applied for a university education. Since there was no ROTP in those days he was appointed to HMCS Cataraqui additional for Queens University UNTD in September of 1950. The training that he received at Cataraqui and at the coast in the summers with the UNTD program became the foundation of his career in the navy.



Editor

Enjoying the conviviality of the UNTD Mess Dinner after the port has been pass- ed are, on the right side: Lee Bush, Hal Wilkinson, un- identified, Fred Riche & Chas. Copelin. On the left are: Randal Kenny, Bill Ogdan, Warren Claxton, Ed File, Eric Van Allen, Reg Kowalchuk & Charles Bostock. ...All photographs courtesy Alex Wright...

DON'T MISS THE NEXT DINNER

Our Annual Reunion Mess Dinner is ALWAYS on the third Saturday in November, as it has been for the last eight years and will continue to be. We will send you reminders and invitations, but you know NOW when it will be. You also know when the 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000 Annual Reunion Mess Dinner will be. Please reserve the dates now and don't miss it.

























































































NAVY ON-LINE



Canada's Navy is now On-Line. Computer hackers, E Mail surfers and sailors alike can find us at: www.marlant.halifax.dnd.ca





LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



I look forward to receiving a copy of UNTiDy Tales, the story of the UNTD which I joined from the University of Ottawa in the autumn of 1952. I was fortunate to be selected for the Coronation Cruise in 1953. I served on the East and West Coasts, in Hamilton and at HMCS York and Carleton. I retired as a lieutenant and have always kept good memories of my years of service.

The Honourable Mr. Justice

John D. Richard

Federal Court of Canada



Would appreciate receiving a copy of SPINDRIFT, UNTiDy Tales. I so enjoyed my UNTD experience and have wondered over the years if someone would record the story for prosperity. Well done!

Jardine Neilson

Executive Director,

Canadian Dental Association

As a former UNTD (1960), I agree that it was a socially influential organization of young men in their formative years. The government spent their money wisely - a goodly long term investment. It provided









































structure, something lacking in many youths these days. Weren't we lucky!

Glenn Calder,

Gloucester, ON

U - 1047



I was an UNTiDy from the Fall '49 through the summer of '52 when I was commissioned as an Ordnance Sub. I look forward to reminiscences in UNTiDy Tales.

N. David Brewer,

Kanata, ON



Yes please. I would certainly like to have a copy of SPINDRIFT. Having started in the UNTD in 1946, I followed that route into a career in the Regular Force in 1950. I was always a great advocate of the benefits of the program.

G. Gordon Armstrong,

Captain, RCN (Ret'd)

U-2905



I was an UNTiDy a Prevost in London from 1962 to 1964 and spent the summers of 1963 and 1964 at Cornwallis. Never did make it out to Esquimault, alas, thanks to Paul Hellyer and Integration! My boss here at the National Archives, Jerry O'Brien, is also a former UNTD person, so the two of us are looking forward to reading SPINDRIFT, UNTiDy Tales.

Peter Robertson

National Archives

Ottawa, ON



MEMORIES OF A WARTIME UNTD



During my recent brief involvement with the UNTD Association of Upper Canada, I have noticed that most of the rollicking tales of the other members about their adventures at sea and ashore as UNTD officer cadets, do not seem to jibe with my recollections. I have come to believe that this is because my experience was with the wartime UNTD, before it was reconstituted after World War II. Let me spin you a salty dip or two about the UNTD as I remember it during the last two years of the war.



In September of 1943, I entered Victoria College of the University of Toronto in the Honour Maths and Physics course. I was promptly advised, along with the other male freshmen, that I was required to enlist in one of the armed forces as a university trainee. Recruitment into the navy or air force units was voluntary and subject to quotas. Recruitment into the army unit could also be voluntary, but had no quota restriction and was the automatic default choice. I chose to join the navy unit and came in under its quota. At our first orientation meeting in the lecture hall of the old red brick Chemistry Building, I learned that the navy considered there to be only two classes of university student, the Science student and the Arts student. Science students were made Stokers second class and Arts students, Ordinary Seamen. I thus was made a Sto 2 and remained so until the end of the war, there being no promotions in the ranks of the wartime UNTD.



Our routine during the university year consisted of evening naval lectures in the Chemistry Building on Wednesdays and Fridays, and basic training at HMCS York (the CNE Automotive Building) on Saturday mornings. We did a lot of marching drills at the CNE, carrying wooden rifles, and I remember thinking that even in high school cadets, we had old WWI Ross rifles to drill with. We did, however, develop some pride of unit and the UNTD was cited as the sharpest of the three services at the U. of T. November 11 Remembrance Service. Our only active service consisted of two weeks each summer in 1944 and 1945 "somewhere on the East Coast".

In 1944 "somewhere on the East Coast" turned out to be HMCS Stadacona in Halifax, which we reached by CNR passenger train. We had tickets to exchange for meals in the diner, but had to sleep as best we could on the seats at night. Some of the boredom was relieved by calling out to Ray Corley, a railroad buff, the numbers of all the locomotives we met along the way. It was dark as the train approached Bedford Basin. Nobody believed Martin Shubik when he called out "K240" - a corvette. All the train windows were blacked out and suddenly the war seemed much closer, especially when we were allowed to turn off the lights and look out over the basin to see the dark forms of ships forming up for a convoy. The naval officer in charge told us in conspiratorial tones that the low hill visible on the other side of the basin was the location of the naval ammunition magazine.



We were transported from the railway station in the back of military transports and at Stadacona we were met by a gunner's mate and a stoker petty officer. The gunner formed up the OS platoon (Arts guys) and doubled them down to the barracks. The stoker just called out, "Stokers, follow me". The barracks room was large and filled with double bunks, most of which were already occupied. Since it was after "lights out", the room was lit only by dim red night-lights and I recall having difficulty finding my bunk again after a visit to the heads. We were roused in the morning by the banging of a steel pipe on the iron bunk frames, to the cry of, "Wakey wakey wakey. Rise and shine. Leggo your c---s and grab your socks. You've had your time, let me have mine."



The two weeks passed quickly, with introductory classes in propulsion, gunnery, radar and ASDIC. A tour of dockyard and a British submarine was followed with a day a sea on a Fairmile. Morning route marches through the streets of Halifax with the entire ship's company and the Stadacona Band, were frequent occurrences. I still feel like marching whenever I hear "Hearts of Oak".

to be continued..... Warren D. Forrester

RR# 1 Hampton, ON. L0b 1J0

UNTIDY TALES



Hal Lawrence's story continued..

Third Instalment



COND, Hamilton, Ontario, 1953-54



In January of each year we set off on the annual selection boards for Probationary Cadets: there were three of us, Budge, a personnel officer and myself. The cadets were freshmen who had joined at the beginning of the academic year and so the Christmas examinations had already done some of the weeding for us. Together with the local Commanding Officer and Staff Officer, we would weed out some more. But three-hundred across Canada would make it - out of four-hundred who were probationary - out of a thousand who applied to join. Those probationary cadets who were confirmed in rank by our Board where in high spirits, for ahead of them was summer training on the coast and a cruise to Hawaii or the British Isles, with $180.00 a month -all found.

The first board was at Queen's University on board HMCS Cataraqui. After we finished, we walked around the building. Budge turned it into an inspection, for it was a drill night and all hands were on board performing drills. Budgie's eyes glittered as he surveyed the scene and his poised expectancy was that of a shark seeing sprats. He could no more stay out of this than a dolphin could refuse to swim. He signalled with the communicators: he took over the drill of the gun's crew: he showed the seamanship class a bewildering series of knots tied with flashing dexterity: then he commandeered the parade square, streaming out objurations.

"The other left, the other left!" he roared at one cadet who wandered aimlessly by on a departure course from the rest of the squad.

"Over there." He wrenched the cadet around, gave him a whack on the rear end with the rifle butt and sent him jogging off in search of his lost place.

After Evening Quarters, on our way to the wardroom, we passed the cadets surging into the gunroom mess.

"Did you see that? He hit him in the ass with a rifle," one of them marvelled.

After Budge left for the hotel, I went into the gunroom to meet the cadets more informally. We quickly settled into rounds of drinking and singing where I passed on to these eager young officers some of our wartime songs such as Wavy Navy and the song of Sioux's wartime flotilla to the tune of Lili Marlene. Our repertoire soon deteriorated to a Woodpecker's Hole, where upon, to restore a modicum of decorum, I sang a solo tune of Men of Harlech. Those noisy youngsters finally delivered me to my hotel about one a.m.

A new cadet year was under way and the administrative drudgery that went with it. I spent much of the time in Hamilton slugging it out with the paperwork and to help with this, I was sent an angel from heaven, - Gloria. Sub-Lieutenant Gloria Mauro, WRCNS: shorty, shapely, of Italian descent with hair of glinting black and tranquil hazel eyes that positively snapped when she was confronted with tardiness, carelessness, badly-typed letters, inaccurate lists and general inefficiency of anyone in the office including me. She had an enormous capacity for hard and painstaking work and an allegro approach to it. She thought the Day of the Reserves had come: she was a Woman with a Mission.

One of the criticisms of the UNTD was that it didn't provide any officers for the RCN, which was muddy thinking because it was intended to provide officers for the reserve and not the permanent force. And then there was the anomaly that when ex-UNTD sub-lieutenants did try to become permanent force, obstacles were put in their way. Permanent force officers were supposed to come form Royal Military College in Kingston, HMCS Royal Roads in Esquimalt and College Militaire Royale de St. Jean. But the military colleges were not doing the job that the government claimed for them. Cadets of the Service Colleges were only obliged to stay three years with the permanent force after graduation from a four-year course with all expenses paid plus a $180.00 a month salary. After three years, on the day, most resigned.

Gloria and I began to notice that willy-nilly, a number of our UNTD cadets had found their way into the permanent force, and it seemed they intended to stay. This was a chosen career and not a means of getting a free education. We wrote a submission to Ottawa, for Admiral Adam's signa-ture showing that there were sixty-one UNTD graduates now in the RCN. It was a good paper which showed the cost effectiveness of the UNTD and the great advantage of providing dedicated and trained officers for the RCN from the Reserves. We didn't get a reply.

to be continued...





SPINDRIFT

UNTiDy TALES



Have you got your copy yet? Don't wait too long; it's a limited edition and may soon go out of print. This is a collector's item - a must for every UNTD alumni. Reserve your copy by sending $15.00 + $2.50 mailing payable to the Editor of the UNTD Newsletter. (See below)



UNTD NEWSLETTER



This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Association of Upper Canada as a means of promoting activities of the association and encouraging UNTiDies to maintain their special status as Naval Persons.

Editor: Cdr. Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2.

Letters, anecdotes, & jokes are welcome.

UNTD LONDON REUNION WEEKEND





















































Some of the men who made the reunion possible - left to right: Paul Earnshaw, Commanding Officer of HMCS Prevost; Wynn Downing, Prevost 61-4; Brian Kerman, Prevost 61-4; Chairman Peter Schwartz, Prevost 61-4.















































Seated at the head table for Dine the Ladies in the Wardroom of HMCS Prevost are: Guest Speaker, Rear-Admiral Tom Smith, CMM, CD, Windsor UNTD '49; Dinner President Andy Shaw, Queens UNTD 61-3; his lady Lynn Waghorn; LCdr. Paul Earnshaw, RCN, CO HMCS Prevost, and Chairman of the Board Gil Hutton, McMaster UNTD '46-50 introducing the guest speaker.





































































Reverend Canon Bill Thomas, Western UNTD '59-63 conducted the Church Parade held on Sunday, April 21, in the beautiful setting of the London Club.















































Tom Smith was in rare form as he talked about the amazing accomplishments of a long litany of UNTD graduates. He felt we all can still make a difference in this period of Revisionist History, by speaking out against falsification to accommodate philosophies that intend to degrade the Canadian Armed Forces.













































Wynn Downing, UNTD Western '61-4, wearing his thirty year old UNTD uniform like it was yesterday, presents a quart of pusser's rum and a UNTD tie to Guest Speaker Rear-Admiral Tom Smith.





































Dick Blosdale, UNTD Western 58'-61 and wife Janice look very satisfied after the mess dinner which was catered by the London Club.





































Enjoying the Up Spirits and Brunch at the London club are: Jackie Houston; Bob Williamson, McMaster









































Gil Hutton administers Up Spirits to Aubrey Millard, McMaster UNTD '57, with real pussers rum in a gil measure.







































Joan and Ben Lamb with Jim Houston appear in the spirit of things after the mess dinner.







































UNTD '58-62 and wife Eileen; Donna Loft (Ed File's wife) and Jim Houston, McMaster UNTD '47-50.



HMCS STAR UP-DATE





























This recent picture shows the tree lined site on Hamilton Harbour where HMCS Star once proudly stood for over fifty years. The grass verge and parked army vehicles outline the former drill deck. The dark patch to the right is where the wardroom and quarter deck once stood. However, a new Star, similar to the HMCS Cataraqui design will rise on this site beginning with a special ceremony scheduled for 7:00 pm on Wednesday, September 25, 1996. To help celebrate this event, two new MCDVs; HMCS Kingston and HMCS Glace Bay along with Auxiliary Mine Sweeper, HMCS Anticosti will be alongside for your inspection. A reception will follow the ceremony. All former members of Star and the UNTD are welcome to attend to witness this turning of a new page in Hamilton's Naval Reserve history.









































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KINGSTON COMMISSIONING



HMCS Kingston, hull number 700, the first of the new Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels (MCDV) and name ship of the class will be commissioned in Kingston, Ontario on Saturday, 21 September, 1996 at 2:00 pm. In honour of this event, the UNTD Association of Upper Canada will hold a special reception and dinner for ex-UNTD and guests at the University Club of Queen's University on Friday evening, September 20, 7:00 pm for 7:30 pm; cost $40.00. The actual commissioning will be observed at Crawford Wharf at 2:00 pm on Saturday. Confirmation of dinner attendance should be made with Ed File, RR #1 Marysville, ON. K0K 2N0. Phone (613) 396-1140. Accommodation should be arranged separately.















































IN MEMORIAM



CDR (E) HENRY V. ROSS 1912-96 known to hundreds of ex-UNTDs as Harry, died on Thursday, 22 August, 1996. Harry was the beloved commanding officer of the UNTD at the University of Toronto from 1951 to 1959. In civilian life he was a professor of metallurgy at the university. He was a guest of honour at the first UNTD Association of Upper Canada Mess Dinner in 1988 and has attended most of the Reunion Mess Dinners since then. In 1993, at the age of 81, he drove with me to Halifax to attend the 50th Anniversary of the founding of the UNTD.



He led a very active life and looked much younger than his advanced years. He was an active member of the NOAC, the Archaeological Society of America and edited the excellent newsletter of the United Empire Loyalists of Canada, Governor Simcoe Branch (Toronto).



The story of how Harry managed to get on active service with the RCNVR in World War II is typical of this somewhat shy, quiet and very able man. Having graduated from Royal Military College in 1934, he held a commission in the Naval Reserve. In 1939, when he tried to go on active service, he was told that as a metallurgical engineer at Algoma Steel, he was in an essential civilian occupation. Harry became increasing frustrated as all his friends went off to war. In 1943 he was at an engineering dinner in Ottawa where he met RADM Stephens, Chief Engineer of the RCN. When the admiral heard Harry's story, he promised to try and help. He telephoned Harry the next day and directed him to appear before a special board at NDHQ. The Board consisted of three admirals, including Percy Nelles, Chief of Naval Staff. After a short interview, a stunned Harry Ross was told that the navy needed him and the necessary strings would be pulled to send him to war. He spent over a year as the engineering officer of an escort vessel on convoy duty in the Atlantic.



Wherever Harry is now, we can be sure that he is quietly but purposefully busy with several interesting projects. The naval community and many others will miss him.

Gil Hutton











































































































































CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE





The number of social activities and naval interest opportunities offered by your UNTD Association in the recent past and through the next year will astound you. They are beginning to exhaust us.



The Reunion Weekend in London was a wonderful success. It is described elsewhere in a photo essay for this newsletter. While attendance was not on a par with other reunions, it was a good beginning for London with an excellent venue and we all had a smashing good time.



We are planning a dinner in Kingston on the night before the commissioning of the first MCDV, HMCS Kingston (details on page 5). For all UNTD Association members, especially east of Toronto or ex-Queen's/Cataraqui, this will be a most important occasion. You are encouraged to attend with your wife or other guests. The enthusiasm of the young Reservists who crew these vessels reminds me of the old spirit of the RCNVR and the UNTD.



For those who will be unable to go to Kingston, HMCS Kingston, Glace Bay and Anticosti will be visiting Hamilton on September 25 (see page 7) and Toronto from September 26 to October 1, 1996 (see page 5).



Our STUPENDOUS, EXCITING ANNUAL REUNION MESS DINNER will be held as





































usual in HMCS York on Saturday, November 16, 1996 at 1830. Cost will be the same: $50.00.



The guest speaker will be Commodore Robert Baugniet, OMM, CD, Commander of the Naval Reserve. He is an excellent speaker, extremely knowledgable and another former UNTD who reached the top. Don't miss this annual event. It's going to be another good one.



Finally, plans are under way for an East Coast UNTD Reunion in St. John's Newfoundland in June 1997. Next year marks the 500th Anniversary of the discovery of Newfoundland by John Cabot in 1497. The whole world is coming to the party. Our reunion will overlap with the NOAC (Naval Officers' Association of Canada) Annual General Meeting and Reunion on June 4 to 7, 1997. We will take part in some of their activities as well as hold some of our own. You will receive details before the end of the year. Hotel accommodations in St. John's are already booked solid, so we will be staying in Bed and Breakfast lodgings. Two events will be held in the historic CROWSNEST of World War II fame. Plan to stay for a holiday. Newfoundlanders are the world's friendliest people. Their hospitality never takes "no" for an answer. Bring a spare liver.



See you at one or all of our events soon.



Gil Hutton

Chairman of the Board







UNTIDY TALES



Hal Lawrence's story continued..

Final Instalment



COND, Hamilton, Ontario, 1954-5



In 1954, the RCN's hard line philosophy was outdated. The Navy was in the throes of technical and organizational changes. They were going to need officers with university degrees but were slow to accept this.

The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) was to present a brief to the Chief of Naval Personnel in Ottawa. Professor (and Colonel) Gordon Shrum Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia led the delegation. I had been to Ottawa to see the Director of Naval Training, Captain Philip Haddon, on the matter of summer courses for the UNTD. He took me in to see the Chief of Naval Personnel, Rear Admiral Hugh Pullen. The Admiral invited me to attend the meeting with Professor Shrum. The substance of the brief was simple; the permanent force naval cadets did not complete more than two years of a general B.A. because they were sent to the Fleet after their second year. The Canadian army and air force had recognized the importance of an undergraduate degree for their cadets. What was different about the Navy?

Admiral Pullen rose, face flushed, jaw jutting, lips compressed. He stared slowly around the table and fixed upon Shrum.

"Oh my suffering Aunt Nelly!" murmured Haddon to himself.

"I haven't got a university degree," announced Pullen in such a ponderous tone that he automatically invalidated all university degrees. He reached for a loose slip of paper and waved it violently back and forth over his head.

"I have," he continued with all the finality of Judgement Day, "I have," still fluttering the paper, "a Bridge Watchkeeping Certificate."

With averted eyes Captain Haddon and I sat out the rest of the meeting which as you can imagine wasn't very long.

It was clear however, that the Navy was going to change more in the next twenty years than it had since the advent of steam, yet we were still dragging some of our admirals, screaming and protesting, into the 20th century. One electrical officer, Bert Rowley, had come from boy seaman to Electrical Commander via the Torpedo Gunners Mate route. Now on his staff was a UNTD graduate, Electrical Sub-Lieutenant David McLay from McMaster University. His father was eminent in the field of physics and commanding officer of the UNTD at McMaster. From now on and in ever increasing numbers, our officers would have to come from the universities.

As I started my third year, it could be heard increasingly in the gatherings of RCN officers that, "Those UNTD cadets are not so bad really."



Despite my obsession to produce a cadre of professional reserves, I held tenaciously to the fact of naval life, - only through command of a ship could I enter the world-wide aristocracy of the sea. But I seemed to be growing apart from my sea-going friends. On my visits to the East and West Coast Fleets, I talked of the importance of the cadets' academic courses and earned the derisory nick-name of "Professor". Me, a university drop-out was accused of being overly addicted to Advanced "Guzintas".

But I'd suffered a sea change; never again would the Navy be quite the same for me, the end-all and the be-all. One day, Naval Headquarters announced my successor, LCdr John R.H. Ley. He was a junior to me by a few years, a fighter pilot. He had never been to university at all. I could not help but wonder how he would adapt to this extraordinary environment of the UNTD Cadet.







SPINDRIFT

UNTiDy TALES



Have you got your copy yet? Don't wait too long; it's a limited edition and may soon go out of print. This is a collector's item or a wonderful gift - a must for every UNTD alumni. Reserve your copy by sending $15.00 + $2.50 mailing, payable to the Editor of the UNTD Newsletter. (See below)



UNTD NEWSLETTER



This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Association of Upper Canada as a means of promoting activities of the association and encouraging UNTiDies to maintain their special status as Naval Persons.



Newsletter Editor: Cdr Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2.



Letters, anecdotes, and jokes are welcome. Take advantage of the "Where Are They Now" column to get in a personal item that makes the newsletter more interesting to readers. Don't be shy. Lets stop hiding our light under a basket.

UNTD WEST COAST MESS DINNER



The editor has heard from Peter Chipman that there may be a UNTD dinner on the West Coast possibly in May 1997. No other details are available at this time.





BOOK REVIEW



SEA FEVER

Captain John Caldecott Littler, RCN, CD, 1995, Kiwi Publications, Victoria, B.C. ISBN 0-9680370-0-3, 316 pp., illus. 53 photos, index, soft cover.



The seagoing memoirs of Captain John Littler were originally prepared for his family and friends from accounts taken from his journals and letters. This material has been edited and published in Canada by Cmdre Jan Drent (former UNTD).



John Littler first went to sea in 1927 at the age of seventeen. In the first half of the book he describes his adventures afloat and ashore as a cadet and later a mate in the British Merchant Marine, a system that produced officers with the highest professional standards and nautical skills. As he became a Master Mariner, he provides an insight into life at sea in the era of declining British Imperialism when British shipping in the Far East came into conflict with Japanese Expansionism.



In 1940 as the tiny RCN quickly expanded, mariners with John Littler's background were desperately needed and recruited by Canadian foreign agents. Through his non-biased eyes we get an excellent appraisal of the RCN's war effort. He commissioned the new corvette, HMCS Brandon and commanded her during the most difficult phases of the Battle of the Atlantic. Having won the trust and affection of Commodore Murray, he was appointed as Commander of the RCN's little known sea-training establishment on Pictou Harbour, Nova Scotia (later moved to Bermuda). He had a front row seat to D-Day when he served in the cruiser, HMS Belfast throughout Operation Neptune. Finally, because of his cruiser experience, he participated in the last stages of the Pacific war as Navigating Officer in Canada's new cruiser, HMCS Uganda. He was thrilled by her fighting efficiency and ashamed of the political actions that lead to her infamous vote to quit the war.



In the post-war navy, Captain Littler commanded the destroyer, HMCS Crescent and held key shore appointments on both coasts that brought him into close association with Cdr. Herb Little and the UNTD program. His observations in this section of his book will be of special interest to our newsletter readers. We also get the inside story behind the HMCS Micmac "incident". After a delightful year at the Imperial Defence College, he took the cruiser, HMCS Ontario, on her last foreign cruises and ended his career in 1961 with a staff position at COND in Hamilton.



By his writing style, knowledge and story telling abilities we can see why the unassuming Captain Littler was known as a "gentleman's gentleman" and proved to be an excellent trainer of men and cadets. He thrills us with his exploits and bold ship handling abilities. He lives now in retirement at Rivington, Vinegar Hill Road, R.D. #1, Kamo, New Zealand.



Editor



MEMORIES OF A WARTIME UNTD



Warren D. Forrester's story continued...

The Second Year



During the second school year, 1944-45, we continued our naval classes and drills on the campus and at HMCS York. After Spring Exams we headed of for another two weeks of "active" service on the East Coast. By this time, the War in Europe had just ended and the halifax V.E. Day riot was still in the news. We were sent this time, not to Halifax but to HMCS Cornwallis via CP Rail and the Dominion Atlantic Railroad under similar travelling conditions to those of the previous year. Upon arrival, we were signed on as temporary crew members of HMCS Quinte, a minesweeper converted for gunnery training duty. It was said that she had been sunk twice and raised each time. I can't recall what caused the original sinking, but the second sinking was said to have resulted from the salvage crew breaking into the rum locker after raising her.



We had all been issued hammocks and taught how to string them and lash them in rolls. These we slung fore and aft in the stockers' mess below decks, hoisting them tight to the deckhead during the day, and lowering them only for sleeping. This arrangement was very efficient since it occupied no deck space. The hammocks swung in unison with the rolling of the ship and the cocoon effect gave the illusion of security and privacy to its occupant. The galley was one deck up from the stoker's mess, so we had to carry our food along the deck and down a ladder to the mess before consuming it. I don't know whether this arrangement was necessitated by ship design or was intended to reduce food consumption; it certainly made one think twice about having a second helping.



We were assigned to watches as apprentices to the regular crew members, alternating periodically between the boiler room and the engine room. The Arts guys were likewise assigned to watches above deck doing ordinary seaman things. The stokers were a friendly and informal lot who treated us with candour and good humour. The Quinte had steam recipro- cating engines and boilers fuelled with light bunker oil. Air pressure in the boiler room was kept higher than the outside pressure to prevent possible backdraft from the flame jets. A favourite prank was to call an apprentice in the engine room to take a message from the boiler room. When he stuck his head into the voice tube funnel, he would receive a facefull of black smoke from some smouldering oily waste held to the funnel in the boiler room. Since the air flowed only one way through the voice tube, there was no way to return the smoke signal.

The only useful duty that I remember performing on the engine room watch was monitoring the temperature of the giant bearing where the connecting rods joined the crankshaft. This was done by letting the bottom of the bearing slap your hand as it came around (no rings on the fingers please). If it felt hot, we used large syringes to shoot jets of water and oil onto the bearing to form a lubricating lather. Another duty I remember, may or may not have been useful; mopping up the bilges after the bilge pumps had done their best. Several of us were sent down under the deck plates of the engine room with pails, tin cans, rags and an extension light to scoop up and wipe up any water and oil that had been left in the nooks and crannies of the bilges. Mostly we would lie in the restricted space between the deck plates and the bottom of the hull discussing some weighty problem in the glow of the naked light bulb. I still wonder whether this was a necessary chore or just a make-work project.



The ship went about its regular routine with us aboard; mostly taking gunnery teams out for practice shooting at targets towed by aircraft. One day we were required to steam from Cornwallis to Saint John. Midway across the Bay of Fundy we entered a thick fog. Some time later we ran aground on a mud flat, fortunately at slow speed so no damage was done, although we did have to be pulled free by a tug and escorted into port. We were told later that the watch officer was relying on the magnetic compass and ignored the radar officer's warning that there was land where there should not have been. The radar was right and the compass was wrong. We spent the next day steaming around on fixed courses to swing the compass. The radar scope was a simple cathode ray oscilloscope on which appeared a straight green line with a distance scale etched below it. A blip on the line at the zero of the scale marked the initiation of the radar pulse while blips of various shapes and sizes at various distances on the scale marked the reflection of parts of the pulse from objects at those distances. A trained operator could fairly well identify an object from the shape and character of the reflected blip. Land for example, gave a reflected pattern of many small spikes resembling grass. The radar antenna did not continually sweep the horizon, but could be aimed in any desired direction by the operator. Radar was still fairly new back then and perhaps the navigator could be excused for not trusting it.



The ship required bunkering in Saint John and my mess mate, Shubik, and I were detailed to place a pan under the hose connection on deck to catch any oil that leaked out, disposing of it overboard. It was a rainy, blustery day so we took the shortest path to the rail to make our dump. As we did so, a gust of wind caught the falling oil, spreading it out into a beautiful fan, plastering the side of the ship. Like a scene from John Winton's, "We Joined the Navy", the Captain was looking out his porthole when everything went black. The cause of this unexpected eclipse was uncovered and we were ordered over the side on a plank to clean off the oil. Shubik declared a vertigo condition and was assigned another punitive task while I was lowered over the side. Fortunately we were at anchor in the harbour so no great danger was involved, although I was at one point half submerged by the bow wave of a passing destroyer.



After returning to Cornwallis, Shubik and I requested to stay with the ship as she steamed around to Halifax on her next mission. This was approved by our supervising UNTD officer but denied at higher command, so when our two weeks were up we returned home for the rest of the summer.



By the time university re-opened in the Fall, the atomic bombs had been dropped and the war ended on V J Day. We handed in our uniforms and were formally discharged. It was my impression, at that time, that the UNTD had been disbanded. I heard no more of it until after my graduation in 1947 when it appeared to have been resurrected. I believe that my UNTD experience confirmed in me a fondness for the sea. Certainly it gave me confidence to find that I was not prone to sea-sickness and this contributed to my choosing a career in physical oceanography and hydrography with all the sea time inherent therein.



Warren Forrester, PhD,

RR #1, Hampton, ON. L0B 1J0



A NEW STAR IS RISING

Cover Story



Against a backdrop of three ships dressed overall and illuminated in the growing dusk from stem to stern, an impressive ground-breaking ceremony took place along the waterfront of HMCS Star on Wednesday evening, September 25, 1996.

After inspecting a smart fifty member guard of honour under the command of LCdr Neil Bell, the Deputy Prime Minister, Sheila Copps, MP for Hamilton East, took pleasure in announcing that a new $4.1 million facility will be constructed along the north revetment wall of Hamilton Harbour to house the Naval Reserve Division which has been in temporary quarters since last year. The Deputy Minister reminded the large audience of the valuable contributions that Star has made to the region's heritage and defense dating back to the War of 1812. Taking the opportunity to mention the Liberal party's job creation platform she proceeded to a back-hoe machine where an operator assisted her in breaking ground for Hamilton's new stone frigate.



The ever supportive Commander of Naval Reserves, Cmdre R. Baugniet, OMM, CD, proudly guided the Deputy Prime Minister through the ceremony. And a proud moment it was, with the Naval Reserve's new MCDV's; Kingston and Glace Bay, along with the Auxiliary Minesweeper, Anticosti, providing an impressive back- drop for the ground-breaking ceremony, the Naval Reserve's "star" has never been brighter on the local scene.









































Gathered at the STAR ground-breaking site and relishing the reality of the long awaited new construction are former commanding officers: Cmdre R. Bennett, CMM, CD, 1966-69; Cdr R. Williamson, CD, 1985-88; Cdr F. Lee, CD, 1971-75; Cdr A. Woodrow, CD, 1991-95, Cdr D. Mark, CD, 1988-91. All, with the exception of the '91-95 appointment, are products of the UNTD training system.



By September 1997, the ship's company of HMCS Star hope to be aboard a modern training facility similar in design to HMCS Cataraqui but with a much simpler exterior structure, in keeping with its harbour and industrial surroundings.

SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION



The following is a copy of a letter that your editor sent to the honourary Captain Bata in 1993 and a National Defence Policy Directive published in 1996. Are they related? Is someone up there really listening?

Dear Captain Bata,

I was very pleased to meet you at the NOAC Christmas Hoist held in the Wardroom of HMCS York on Dec. 3, 1993. Everyone present agreed with your thesis that the Navy needs more publicity and has generally done a poor job of public relations in the past. This is a theme that I have advocated for years and now that I am retired from command I continue to promote the Navy in any way that I can.

I am concerned about a short sighted policy in effect at this time which requires all reservist to retire and surrender their uniforms when they reach age 55. Anyone who reaches that age in the Naval Reserve is usually a senior officer or petty officer with a wealth of experience, knowledge and very likely holding a prestigious position in their community. Are these the kind of people from whom we should be stripping uniforms, telling them that they no longer have a place on oughout the uproarious but delightful dinner.



After dinner, Commodore Robert Baugniet, OMM, CD, Commander Naval Reserves and UNTD McGill '63 compared the old Naval Reserve that we all trained in, to his present command. In a nut shell, the Reserves now have very specific Coastal Defense and Naval Control of Shipping tasks with state of the art ships to work with. Best of all, the Naval Reserve now comes under the command of a commander who is a Reservist with Commodore rank and answers directly to the Maritime Commander. We were left with the opinion that the Navy and the Reserves have never been in better shape.









































celebrated their 50th anniversary with a hilarious, ribald, reunion dinner while stuffing themselves with delicious Atlantic baked salmon and white wine.















































WHERE ARE THEY NOW?



Editor's Note. It is planned to make this a regular feature of the newsletter.



Peter Chipman, UNTD Brunswicker '64 is now a singer and entertainer by profession in Vancouver. He runs his own company called CAPCAN Music Distribution which publishes songs and distributes fine quality digitally remastered compact disks. He was also, until recently, a partner with Barrie Jackson and Rick Daycock (both UNTD Chippewa) in the Cooper Boating Centre, a large yacht charter and sailing school in Vancouver. Unfortunately, Barrie Jackson, who until two years ago was serving in the Reserve Navy as X.O. of HMCS Discovery, died suddenly last summer from a massive brain haemorrhage at age 52.



Peter is a dedicated member of The Variety Club and has been involved with "special needs children" for over 18 years, performing on Telethons across North America. Funds raised have been used to finance capital projects for hospitals, child development centres and special equipment for independent living.



Recently, Peter released a collection of twelve of his favourite songs recorded on a CD. It includes songs such as: The last Farewell, You Light Up My Life and Ghostriders In The Sky, as well as Peter's After the Annual Reunion Mess Dinner, Bill Brown '62 Chippewa (hand extended) makes retribution for his sins by addressing the pleasure of Dinner President Andy Shaw '64 Cataraqui & Vices: SLt Steve Carius and David Fry '48 York, at the bar. Program Chairman, Errol Rowe '59 Cabot, awaits his turn in the background.























popular original songs: You Girl, Everybody's Writin' Songs, Rodeo Roadshow Man and Hey Daisy. The title song for this recording is a new release called, For All Those Years. One dollar from the sale of each CD or Cassette is donated to the Variety Club of British Columbia.













































Peter lives at: 10 - 5053 47th Avenue, Delta, B.C. V4K 1R2. Tel:(604) 940-0147 Fax: (604) 940-1705

The CD is avilable by direct mail or by calling: 1-800-JOE-RADIO (563-7234)

DREAM CRUISE BECOMES A NIGHTMARE

Cover Story



When polio broke out on board HMCS Athabaskan in June 1948, the ship's company were put in quarantine, including all the UNTD cadets who believed they had been drafted to a summer training dream cruise. This bit of UNTD history is covered in, Quarantined, on page 68 of UNTiDy Tales. Now, for the first time, we have an account by a cadet who was there. This story and pictures were submitted by Charlie Miller, 175 Talbot St. West, Leamington, ON., N8H 1N5.

Editor



After completing a three-week navigation course at the Navigation Direction School in HMCS Stadacona, Charlie Miller from Ontario Agricultural College and other "Untidies" from: University of Toronto, Queen's and McGill Universities, were sent to sea in the tribal class destroyer, HMCS Athabaskan, and the British cruiser, HMS Sheffield. Both ships were headed for the Caribbean, but the Athabaskan would transit the Panama Canal and end up in Victoria. There were 33 UNTD cadets on board Athabaskan when she sailed from Halifax on May 19. They made ports of call in: Guantanamo Bay, Jamaica, Panama City and Acopulco Mexico. In the tropics, summer temperatures soared to over 100 degrees fahrenheit every day.



While enjoying a pleasant leave in Los Angeles where the cadets watched the radio shows, "Meet the Mrs." and "The Beulah Show," things began to go wrong. A young naval rating who had not been feeling well, went on leave without reporting to sick bay. By time he got back to the ship it was too late. He and six others had contracted polio while in Mexico. He would die later and be buried at sea off Vancouver Island. Two cadets, Paul Presant of Blenheim, Charlie's roommate at OAC and Bill Purvis of the University of Toronto, came down with polio.



When the ship anchored off Victoria on June 29, 1948, the polio victims were sent to Veteran's Hospital where Paul Presant was to remain for several months. The rest of the UNTDs were put in quarantine at





William Head until July 13. They called the former army barracks, UNTiDy Lodge.



































UNTD Cadets in quarantine at William Head B.C., July 1948. The only cadets identified are in front L. to R.: L. Presnell, (U. Of T.); D. Corrigan, (OAC); C. Miller, (OAC).



Bill Purvis recovered more quickly and enroled in Law School. He became a successful lawyer in Toronto and is now deceased. Paul eventually completed his OAC studies in 1951 and went to work for the 3 M Company. He presently resides in London, Ontario. Charlie Miller went home to pick tobacco in Delhi for the rest of the summer in 1948. He remained in the Naval Reserve until 1957 and served in several ships: HMCS New Liskeard, Brockville, Porte St. Jean, Raccoon, Wallaceburg, and Portage, mostly on the Great Lakes. His daughter was christened on Portage in Sarnia, the same year that he received his Watchkeeping Certificate in 1957.

Although he left the RCNR in 1957, Charlie continued his association with the military by teaching communications to Army Cadets at Glencoe District High School. After thirty-five years of teaching, Charlie retired from Kingsville District High School as Vice Principal in 1987. He lives in Leamington.



Charles Miller







CAPTAIN LITTLER REPLIES



Many thanks for your kind remarks about my book, Sea Fever, in your March 1997 Newsletter. I would be delighted if you used bits from the book in your UNTD publications. The UNTD were very much a part of my training commander's job and I enjoyed every minute of it.



At Esquimalt I somehow convinced Admiral de Wolf that we could move two frigates from the reserve fleet using only one crew and the UNTD would make up the missing numbers. I got buoys placed in Bedwell Harbour and we were at last with our own little fleet; one fairmile and two frigates. I also got the dockyard barracks and our own parade ground as well as Naden's band once a week. In order to keep our young officers in good health, I started early morning runs. Later I received letters from parents saying that the physical and mental alertness of their sons had improved greatly. I did all this planning without referring to Ottawa. I was distinctly empire building and it was most rewarding. Harry de Wolf was my "backer" with Commodore "Duchy" Edwards approving every move.



It was in Esquimalt that the UNTD cadets produced an excellent magazine called the White Twist. I regret that I no longer have a copy.



When I commanded HMCS Crescent and the training flotilla in the Atlantic, I got Admiral Bidwell to approve cruises to Europe and the Mediterranean. This resulted in one of the most emotional moments in my life when we visited Dieppe on Bastille Day. We were overwhelmed with the gratitude of the Dieppois. A cadet playing "Flowers in the Forest" on his bagpipes as I laid a wreath had everyone crying. I took a cadet guard of honour to Paris where we stopped the traffic while I laid a wreath for Canada on the Unknown Soldier's Grave.



My memoirs were never intended as a naval history but I should have mentioned Herbie Little in Sea Fever for he was the post-war father of the UNTD. We worked together quite well and I am glad that I was able to take him with me to Europe on that special trip to Dieppe.





When I was Chief of Staff to the Atlantic Command 1952 - 1955, I had a large yacht which required a crew. Alexis Troubetskoy, a UNTD cadet in Stadacona organized a permanent crew and we sailed most weekends. It was a very happy arrangement. I taught them seamanship in sail, fed them very well, and I relaxed from what was probably the toughest job in my navy career. Alexis left the navy as a lieutenant in 1958 to become headmaster of several fine private schools. He is now in Russia as head of the Tolstoy Foundation.

















































Captain J. C. Littler, RCN, shown here in 1958 was in command of HMCS Ontario at the time. He took the cruiser on her last cruise before she ended up in a Japanese scrap yard. Sea Fever

In retirement I sailed the Pacific in another yacht, Wanderer V, until I was 80. Now at 86, I am being treated for leukaemia, which involves hospitals and doctors, so I am no longer free to roam, but I am in good heart, living on broad acres of our own land and woods; no complaints, just lots of happy memories.



Editor's Note: UNTD excerpts from Sea Fever, will appear in future editions of this newsletters.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW?



Editor's Note. It is planned to make this a regular feature of the newsletter. This is the second such personal article to appear. Your comments are invited.



Roger Elmes UNTD McMaster 1962, reached the rank of lieutenant and served at HMCS Star for several years. He is now Dean of Social Sciences at Kwantlen University College in Surrey, B.C., just a stone throw from the U.S. border.



Roger Elmes on

the right, UNTD

McMaster 1962,

with Newsletter

Editor Bob Will-

iamson (centre),

UNTD McMaster

1957, and Ross

Bennett (left),

UNTD McMaster

1948, enjoy an

evening cruise

on Vancouver

Harbour in

Roger's 65 foot

ocean racer.

June 1997.

















NEWS ABOUT GIL'S CONDITION



In case you haven't heard, our Chairman of the Board, Gil Hutton, is literally a pain in the neck these days. Ever since he returned from the NOAC Conference in Newfoundland, he has been wearing a neck brace. That is because he fractured his neck in an automobile accident on the Trans-Canada Highway while driving to L'Anse aux Meadows.



The brace consists of a metal frame that holds his head stationary and makes it almost impossible to sleep. Each time that I have visited him at Central Park Lodge, he can hardly talk for yawning, and not being able to talk is a real inconvenience for Gil. Phone 905 522-2471.



Although education is his profession, what he really likes to do is sail. His letterhead is titled, Sailing Now to promote his business of cruising and overnight charters. He owns a 65 foot ultra-light ocean racer which he has sailed to Hawaii and back in 1992. He also participates in many local ocean races whenever he can. He parks his boat in the marina beside HMCS Discovery. Roger can be reached at: 12279 - 24th Avenue, Surrey, B.C. V4A 2E2, (604) 535-0211.





















































SPINDRIFT

UNTiDy TALES



Have you got your copy yet? Don't wait too long; this is a collector's item or a wonderful gift - a must for every UNTD alumni. Reserve your copy by sending $15.00 + $2.50 mailing, payable to the Editor of the UNTD Newsletter. (See below)

UNTD NEWSLETTER

This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Association of Upper Canada. Letters, anecdotes, suggestions and biographies are welcome.



Newsletter Editor: Cdr Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2.



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



Greetings from the East Coast. Many thanks for the Fall 1997 Newsletter. It is a vital link to the Association for those of us who are no longer resident in "Upper Canada".



I am able to keep an eye on the Navy from my cottage here on the Atlantic Ocean. The frigates exercise their Zodiacs here in Port Mouton Bay and the MCDVs come to the town of Liverpool for outfit-ting at the local marine shipyard.



A request. It would be helpful if in the next edition of the newsletter, you would include a list of the current directors with their addresses and phone numbers. It would be appreciated if you would pass on a request for a new Roster List. The last list was October 1991 and is now very out of date. This is important for those of us who do not live in the G. T. A.



I look forward to the Reunion on the West Coast in 2000. Please keep us informed of the plans so we can make arrangements. Thanks for the great job on the newsletter.

Charles Copelin, Past President

P.O. Box 127, Hunts Point,

Nova Scotia, B0T 1G0



I received the Fall Edition of your newsletter last week. It had a longer journey than most, travelling to Bermuda where I and my wife, Anne, lived for seven years, then forwarded to Halifax where we have now settled.



I look forward to reading "UNTiDy Tales" during the chilly nights ahead. I think my blood has thinned out somewhat, but I have some Goslings Black Seal Rum, the nearest thing to Pussers in my "survival kit". If you run across that old reprobate, Fred Lee, give him my best regards and address. Last week I met up with Pete Wilson, formerly from Truro, who was in my division for two years and actually introduced me to Anne. He has retired from the faculty of Technical University of Nova Scotia, and we had a great sail in his C & C.

Charlie Gun, Lt. RCN(R), Ret.

182 Spinnaker Drive, Halifax,

Nova Scotia, B3N 3C3





The Fall Edition of your UNTD News- letter finally reached me when I visited Ottawa last year. We are now living in England for the foreseeable future and really enjoy it.



I was saddened to read about the demolition of the STAR building. It certainly holds many wonderful memories for me. Please give my best wishes to anyone at STAR who might remember me.

The UNTD Newsletter subscription keeps me in touch with some of the most important days of my life.

J. Brian Ellis,

69 Charles Ave, Chilwell, Beeston,

Nottingham, England, NG9 5ED



"Spindrift, UNTiDy Tales" brought back a lot of memories. At least two cruises that I was on are outlined in detail. Also I had forgotten entirely about the civilian hats we had to wear in 1949 when mustering for "liberty boat". Some of us had straw fedoras which after being beer-stained and in some cases, sat-upon, made us look anything but officers and gentlemen. Fortunately the idea was seen to be counter-productive and was done away with rather quickly.

Don Kennedy,

1701-2170 Marine Dr.,

Oakville, ON. L6L 5V1



I was a member of the UNTD in 1943-44 at the University of Toronto and remember very well spending the summer of '43 in Halifax. This meant leaving behind my wife and son of 3 months. Late in August I was drafted to HMCS Quesnel, a corvette on the triangle run to St. John's and Boston. We were in St. John's when the blackout was lifted.



After graduation in June of '44 I became an Electrical Sub-Lieut. and spent the rest of the war in the signal school in St. Hyacinthe. After the war I had a career in the RCN as an instructor Officer. So I am looking forward to reading about those old days.

W. Bruce Arnold,

2 Joshua Court,

Brampton, ON. L6S 3W4







PRESERVING OUR UNTD HERITAGE

The UNTD Newsletter is accomplishing one of its important goals. It is collecting, preserving and relating the reminiscences of former officer cadets. The Editor is pleased to report that there has been a steady stream of books, letters, memoirs and diary notes arriving on the story desk during the past two years. Members have been encouraged to send in their stories, and slowly but surely they have responded. It seems that one published story generates an idea for another and increases the interest of our readers. It also increases interest in joining the Association. A number of membership applications have been requested along with extra copies of the newsletter.



The story "Dream Cruise Becomes a Nightmare" by Charlie Miller in the last newsletter, attracted a lot of interest including the following response.



Nov. 2, 1997

I recently read and enjoyed your "UNTiDy Tales" and the last edition of the UNTD Newsletter. I recognize many of the working and travelling experiences which we all enjoyed as cadets.



I am enclosing a copy of a diary which I originally recorded during a trip on the Athabaskan from Halifax to Esquimalt in 1948. Only recently have I transferred it from a little black book written in pencil to a more legible form. I am sending it to you and thought, perhaps, a note of its existence in the next issue of the Newsletter might be of interest to some of those UNTD Officer Cadets who were placed in Quarantine. (for names, see last picture in the diary)



Thank you for your contribution to the history of the UNTD and for the nostalgia that I enjoyed in your stories.



Donald K.A. Gillies

R.R. 1, Beeton, ON. L0G 1A0



EDITOR'S NOTE: Extracts and pictures from Don's Diary will appear in future editions of this newsletters.







BULLETIN BOARD



UNTD ALUMNI INVITED ON MILITARY

HISTORY TOUR OF EUROPEAN

BATTLEFIELDS



A thirteen day battlefield tour of Europe, November 5-16, 1998 is being organized by Rosemary Clark who helped to organize the 1994 reunion of UNTD Guelph alumni. Conducted by Jacques Pauwels, a PhD in history, who has lectured at the University of Toronto, the tour will visit Normandy and Flanders' Fields. The highlight will be November 11th at Ypres where the 80th Anniversary of the end of World War I will be celebrated. If you would like more information contact Rosemary Clark, Tel 519 822-4687.



SEASONED SAILORS VIDEO



A Seasoned Sailors Video Series has been produced to capture the sight and sound of surviving eminent naval persons along with their stories. Ten videos have been produced to capture Canada's World War II naval heritage before time runs out. Included in the list is the story of our own Cdr. C. Herbert Little. For more information contact: D.P. Ryan, Producer, P.O Box 74001, Ottawa ON. K1M 2H9; or internet address, http://www.oldsalts.com

IN MEMORIAM



Shortly after Captain Littler's letter appeared in the last Newsletter, he passed away. His life's story, as told in his memoirs entitled, Sea Fever, has already been reviewed in the March 1997 Newsletter. UNTD excerpts from his book will appear in future editions of this newsletters.



SPINDRIFT UNTiDy TALES



A must for every UNTD alumni. Reserve your copy by sending $15.00 + $2.50 mailing, payable to R. Williamson (See below)

UNTD NEWSLETTER

This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Assoc. of Upper Canada. Send Letters, anecdotes, suggestions to: Newsletter Editor: Cdr Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2.

STAR'S DEDICATION CEREMONY

All eyes looked upward as the distinctive whirl of a Pratt and Whitney radial engine purred above the Hamilton water-front on September 27, 1997. A gull winged, navy blue fighter swooped towards the spectators, giving rise to a spontaneous goose bump thrill. Little did the crowd, assembled for the dedication ceremony of the new HMCS Star naval building, realize that they were witnessing the last public flight of the Canadian Warplane Heritage Chance Vought Corsair. As the Minister of National Defence, Art Eggleton and MP Stan Keyes, unveiled the official dedic- cation plaque, Canada's only World War II naval fighter aircraft executed a perfectly co-ordinated low level, fly-past: a salute to the proud heritage of HMCS Star and its promising future. The naval air connection with HMCS Star is not just fortuitous. A Naval Reserve Air Arm was established there in 1946 and for several years thereafter a Swordfish and two Seafires were maintained on the ship's inventory.



Everyone, especially the out-of-town dignitaries were greatly impressed by the unique atmosphere created by the Corsair fly-by. But only a few were aware of the hidden significance of that flight. After the Canadian Government passed an Order in Council creating the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve (RCNVR) on January 31, 1923, Hamilton was the second community (after Montreal), to form a Naval Reserve Half Company. A local barrister, Lieutenant Ralph Howard Yeates, was asked to form and command this new RCNVR division. Coincidentally, this fly-past recalled the distinguished military career of Lt. Yeates as one of Canada's first naval pilots in the Royal Navy Air Service in World War I.



Ironically, on the eve of the 75th Anniversary of the formation of the RCNVR, Canadian Warplane Heritage announced that the historic Corsair will no longer grace the skies over Canada. Dedicated as a memorial to Canada's only World War II Naval Victoria Cross recipient, Lt. Robert Hampton Gray, RCNVR, the aircraft has been sold to a United States broker for $1,060,000.00. Consequently, one of the finest memorials to the RCNVR in Canada has been lost.



Less we forget why Robert Hampton Gray, RCNVR, is the only Canadian Navy Victoria Cross winner in World War II, here is a summary of his story, a piece of our heritage that can't be sold. Born in Trail, British Columbia, on November 2, 1917 to Scottish immigrant parents, he attended the University of British Columbia where he worked with Pierre Berton on the school yearbook. In 1940 he joined the RCNVR in Calgary and signed up for a Royal Navy officer training plan (there being no UNTD or other equivalent in Canada at the time). Once in England he transferred to the Fleet Air Arm and was promptly sent back to Canada for flight training at Kingston, Ontario as part of the Commonwealth Air Training Plan. By November 1941, he was flying operations on Hurricanes and sent to Africa. After a spot of leave, he was returned to England in June 1944 for a conversion course on Corsairs.



Assigned to the aircraft carrier, HMS Formidable, he was soon making raids on the German fleet harbouring in Norwegian fiords. He was Mentioned in Dispatches for undaunted courage, skill and determin-ation in carrying out his air to surface attacks. When HMS Formidable was trans-ferred to the Pacific, he was recommended for the Distinguished Service Cross for sinking a destroyer on July 28, 1945. He lost his life on August 9, 1945 while sinking another destroyer in Onagawa Bay. For repeated gallantry in the face of the enemy, he was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.



There were 200 Canadians serving in British Pacific Carriers in 1945. Another, Lt. Don Sheppard RCNVR, was Staff Officer in HMCS Star after the war. He had the distinction of being the only Canadian Corsair "Ace" and the first Fleet Air Arm pilot to accomplish this feat.



Robert Hampton Gray's story and Don Sheppard's success are a priceless part of our RCNVR history. It was thrilling to be reminded of this and the 75th Anniver-sary of the Naval Reserve at this auspic-ious dedication ceremony. A new building with a new MCDV along side and overhead, a flying memorial of a glorious heritage. What more could anyone ask for on opening day? Editor

REUNION MESS DINNER

Another Great Success



Hope you where there because the Reunion Mess Dinner (Dine Your Sweethearts) on November 15, 1997, was another great success. Former UNTiDies and their significant others, assembled from far and wide in the wardroom of HMCS York. The food was outstanding and served in a very professional manner. The theme of the dinner was support for the Haida, and guest speaker, Cdr. Robert Ashton Willson, CD, served as Captain of the naval museum, HMCS Haida at Ontario Place for the last ten years.



Willson joined the navy in 1951 as a UNTD Cadet at McMaster University. At the end of his first summer of training (1952) in HMCS Sioux, he transferred to Herbie Little's newly created Regular Officer Training Plan. In 1953 he was one of the first class of ten ROTP Cadets (Executive Branch) to train in HMCS Beacon Hill with UNTDs. By the end of 1953, he was a full-time midshipman in HMCS Ontario. He served in many ships, rising to command HMCS Annapolis 1975-77, but his talk was mostly about his first appointment as navigating Officer in HMCS Haida 1956-58. It was clearly a memorable experience and made his last









































Guest Speaker Cdr. Bob Willson shares a moment with Cdr. Herbie Little, post-war re-organizer of the UNTD, who was about to celebrate his 90th birthday.

appointment to the Haida museum all the more poignant.



He remembered how he was kidded about his first passage plan to Bermuda. He was instructed to sail south 'til the butter melts, turn right and head for the point on the radar plot where all the aircraft disappear. During a cruise in the Baltic, one of the ship's characters, LCdr. Bunji Taylor, made a scrap book of samples of all the different toilet paper that they encountered. He noted that every sheet of Royal Navy Standard Issue Tissue was stamped for identification purposes. One page of the book even contained some tree leaves where tissue was scarce.



In 1958, off Newfoundland, at the height of a Russian submarine scare, Haida went to battle stations to attack an unidentified twin echo on the radar which was suspected to be a Russian sub doing a RAS (Replenishment At Sea). As the Haida, with a bone in her teeth, entered a fog bank, she almost collided with a twin peaked iceberg.



The C.O. of Haida, Cdr Beck, was a man with an exemplary naval record. But Willson remembered Beck's one eccentricity that caused him, as Nav. O., a lot of grief. While on the bridge, Beck, who constantly studied the charts, would take them off







































Chairman of the Board, Gil Hutton flanked left and right by Norm Balfour and wife, Margaret; Conn Baker and wife, Ann, daughter of Admiral Debbie Piers. the chart table, fold them up like a road map and carry them with him in his pocket. The chart depot was always most unhappy with Willson whenever he tried to return these badly folded and generally mangled charts.



Such were the stories told by Bob Willson. Today, he is serving as the President of the Ontario Navy League. If you would like to support the Navy League or Haida, you can reach Bob at 416 927-1496.





























































































The Reunion Dinner attracted guests from far and wide. Cdr Herbie Little and Bob Duncombe were there from Ottawa, but the furthest of all were Murray Boles and Barrie de Veber. Both doctors, Boles with his wife came from Columbia, Missouri, while de Veber had just returned from a year in Riyadh, Arabia. Fellow diners were rocking in their chairs with laughter as they swapped funny stories about their intern days. Don't miss the next dinner.



Centre table guests at the Reunion Dinner are: from the left; Ruth (Baker) Wright, daughter of Capt. Jack Baker, Cdr Bob McRae, first CO UNTD U. of T., Cdr Herb Little, Hilda MacKinlay. From the right; Terry Doran's hand, Gordon Wright, Trg.O. UNTD O.A.C. Bob Duncombe, former CO Carlton & Ron MacKinlay, Program Chairman. In the background at the Head Table from the left; Cdr Larry Barwick, CO York, Doug Hain, President, Gil Hutton, Chairman of the Board, Bob Willson, Guest Speaker and Norma Kilgour.



















































TIME TO PAY UP



The Treasurer for the UNTD Association of Upper Canada has been reporting a DEFICIT for the last several years; not much, but over time it adds up. The simple fact is that the Association pays out more than it collects in membership dues each year. Here are some options we may have to consider to balance our books.



Increase membership dues. This is a strategy that would not be necessary if all members paid their dues. It is also unfair, because it transfers the burden to regular paying members.



Remove unpaid members from the list to reduce mailing and newsletter costs. This defeats the purpose of the organization which is to keep in touch with as many former UNTDs as possible.



One of the major costs of the Association is the printing of a newsletter. Cancel the newsletter and maintain communication by flyers or bulletins only.



What is your opinion? None of the above suggestions would be necessary if everyone paid their fair share to help maintain the Association's activities. Membership Renewals have been sent out. You can give us your answer by paying your dues and lending us all the support that you can.

Editor





CHAIRMAN'S MESSAGE



The UNTD Association of Upper Canada was founded in 1989 to "promote among ex-UNTDs, a special bond & camaraderie". We now have members from Victoria, B.C. and California to St. John's, Nfld. and the United Kingdom.



Opinion seems to be evenly divided as to whether we should seek to do more in the Naval Community. In the past six months we have undertaken to give more help, financial and otherwise, to HMCS Haida. Enclosed you will find a notice which may be of interest to you for a 75th Anniversary Reunion Weekend in HMCS York on May 1-3, 1998. (Battle of the Atlantic).



Our 9th Annual UNTD Reunion dinner last November was, for only the second time, a Dine-the-Ladies function. It was a fabulous success, and these are not my words, but those of many in attendance who spoke to me afterward. The most common question of the 55 guests was "Why aren't there more people here?" Perhaps word-of-mouth enthusiasm will

result in larger numbers in the future.



The Board of Directors and in particular, the Executive, have been unanimous in desiring that more of our functions in future be with spouses, and significant others.



As you may have otherwise been informed, our most important project now is the NATIONAL UNTD REUNION to be held in Victoria, B.C. in early July of the year 2,000. (This is only the one thousand nine hundred and ninety-ninth year of the Christian Era, but hardly anyone in the world seems to notice this so we will go along with the vast majority.)



Our next function will very probably be on Friday, May 8th 1998, consisting of a barbecue at HMCS York, preceded or followed by a visit to the replica of John Cabot's ship, the MATTHEW OR Plan B, a two hour sail in one of the Brigantines, PATHFINDER / PLAYFAIR. This will be with spouses and friends. Wear casual outdoor/weather gear. Details could not be finalized in time for the deadline of this Newsletter, but will be included in a separate notice when the newsletter is mailed during the first week of April.



Finally, Invoices for Membership Dues were mailed last week. PLEASE pay before you forget.



Yours aye,



Gil Hutton.

UNTD Star/McMaster, 1950



















DON'S DIARY

Part I



This is the first instalment of excerpts from the diary of Don Gillies, Ordinary Seaman/Officer Candidate, HMCS Prevost, a Math and Physics student at the University of Western Ontario 1945-49. It relates the story of the UNTD "Dream Cruise that Became a Nightmare" in 1948 aboard HMCS Athabascan. The record began when a classmate, Parker Alford, gave Don a little black book to keep a record of his experiences. Parker Alford went on to eventually become Head of Physical Science at Western. Don achieved a M.A. in Atmospheric Physics at U. of T. and in 1953 joined the Ontario Hydro's Research Division, retiring in 1987 as Manager of Environmental Protection. The editor notes how the jargon in the diary becomes more nautical as the writer makes the usual UNTD transition from civilian to sailor. The sentiments, routines and activities will be most familiar to anyone who joined the UNTD.



May 14, Friday, 1948: The Alford family was at the London station to see us off: including Parker's sister with a flowery hat, and Jan, his girlfriend. She kissed me on one cheek and Mrs. Alford kissed me on the other so I wouldn't feel neglected. What a royal send-off! When we got to Toronto, my brother Len and his fiancee, Mary Sanderson met me. I assured them that I would be home for their wedding on July 16th. As events unfolded, it was a promise I would not be able to keep.

May 15, Saturday, 1948: After a horrible night of jiggling in an upper bunk, we arrived in Montreal's Central Station at 9 am EST where we had a nine hour wait for the sleeper to the maritimes. We walked to the McGill University Radiation Lab where Parker, Gord Bowman and I were treated to an explanation of the cyclotron, cloud chamber and Beta-ray Spectrograph. Then we took in a movie, "Cass Timberlane" and walked to the top of Mount Royal. After dinner we boarded our train and I climbed into my upper berth above Chuck Moore and across from Verne Trevail and Parker. I settled down and prepared myself for the roughest means of travel since corduroy roads. Give me a nice smooth ship ride any day.



May 16, Sunday, 1948: It was a very drab day riding through New Brunswick. We saw the great Chaleur Bay where Jacques Cartier landed. Otherwise the countryside was most unimpressive. Time advanced an hour at Campbellford, causing some confusion over meal times. The food was good and we didn't want to miss any. We stretched our legs at Moncton. Boy was it cold! We arrived in Halifax at 8:50 pm and were lined up on the platform - all sixty of us, and then divided according to our final destination. Chuck Moore and Don Arscott stayed at Stadacona; Verne Trevail and I went to Athabascan while Park and Gord Bowman went to Portage for a cruise to Bermuda.



A Fairmile took about thirty of us over to the Athabascan. After getting our bedding, we made up our micks. I had a tough time getting mine level but decided to climb in anyway. Totally unlike my experience on the train, I fell asleep instantly.



May 17, Monday, 1948: Woke up feeling well rested at 6.30 am. Breakfast was drab and the weather was even worse. Cold!!! Brother, I never felt anything like it - there was a tang of salt air a mile wide and the sting of a cold north wind a foot thick. I was assigned to the top part of the ship for cleaning stations and nearly froze up there polishing brass until 10 am.



As you may have otherwise been informed, our most important project now is the NATIONAL UNTD REUNION to be held in Victoria, B.C. in early July of the year 2,000. (This is only the one thousand nine hundred and ninety-ninth year of the Christian Era, but hardly anyone in the world seems to notice this so we will go along with the vast majority.)



Our next function will very probably be on Friday, May 8th 1998, consisting of a barbecue at HMCS York, preceded or followed by a visit to the replica of John Cabot's ship, the MATTHEW OR Plan B, a two hour sail in one of the Brigantines, PATHFINDER / PLAYFAIR. This will be with spouses and friends. Wear casual outdoor/weather gear. Details could not be finalized in time for the deadline of this Newsletter, but will be included in a separate notice when the newsletter is mailed during the first week of April.



Finally, Invoices for Membership Dues were mailed last week. PLEASE pay before you forget.



Yours aye,



Gil Hutton.

UNTD Star/McMaster, 1950



















DON'S DIARY

Part I



This is the first instalment of excerpts from the diary of Don Gillies, Ordinary Seaman/Officer Candidate, HMCS Prevost, a Math and Physics student at the University of Western Ontario 1945-49. It relates the story of the UNTD "Dream Cruise that Became a Nightmare" in 1948 aboard HMCS Athabascan. The record began when a classmate, Parker Alford, gave Don a little black book to keep a record of his experiences. Parker Alford went on to eventually become Head of Physical Science at Western. Don achieved a M.A. in Atmospheric Physics at U. of T. and in 1953 joined the Ontario Hydro's Research Division, retiring in 1987 as Manager of Environmental Protection. The editor notes how the jargon in the diary becomes more nautical as the writer makes the usual UNTD transition from civilian to sailor. The sentiments, routines and activities will be most familiar to anyone who joined the UNTD.



May 14, Friday, 1948: The Alford family was at the London station to see us off: including Parker's sister with a flowery hat, and Jan, his girlfriend. She kissed me on one cheek and Mrs. Alford kissed me on the other so I wouldn't feel neglected. What a royal send-off! When we got to Toronto, my brother Len and his fiancee, Mary Sanderson met me. I assured them that I would be home for their wedding on July 16th. As events unfolded, it was a promise I would not be able to keep.

May 15, Saturday, 1948: After a horrible night of jiggling in an upper bunk, we arrived in Montreal's Central Station at 9 am EST where we had a nine hour wait for the sleeper to the maritimes. We walked to the McGill University Radiation Lab where Parker, Gord Bowman and I were treated to an explanation of the cyclotron, cloud chamber and Beta-ray Spectrograph. Then we took in a movie, "Cass Timberlane" and walked to the top of Mount Royal. After dinner we boarded our train and I climbed into my upper berth above Chuck Moore and across from Verne Trevail and Parker. I settled down and prepared myself for the roughest means of travel since corduroy roads. Give me a nice smooth ship ride any day.



May 16, Sunday, 1948: It was a very drab day riding through New Brunswick. We saw the great Chaleur Bay where Jacques Cartier landed. Otherwise the countryside was most unimpressive. Time advanced an hour at Campbellford, causing some confusion over meal times. The food was good and we didn't want to miss any. We stretched our legs at Moncton. Boy was it cold! We arrived in Halifax at 8:50 pm and were lined up on the platform - all sixty of us, and then divided according to our final destination. Chuck Moore and Don Arscott stayed at Stadacona; Verne Trevail and I went to Athabascan while Park and Gord Bowman went to Portage for a cruise to Bermuda.



A Fairmile took about thirty of us over to the Athabascan. After getting our bedding, we made up our micks. I had a tough time getting mine level but decided to climb in anyway. Totally unlike my experience on the train, I fell asleep instantly.



May 17, Monday, 1948: Woke up feeling well rested at 6.30 am. Breakfast was drab and the weather was even worse. Cold!!! Brother, I never felt anything like it - there was a tang of salt air a mile wide and the sting of a cold north wind a foot thick. I was assigned to the top part of the ship for cleaning stations and nearly froze up there polishing brass until 10 am.



During our "In Routine" we marched over to clothing stores on the base to be issued tropical garb and have an X-ray at the hospital. Saw Phil Chaplin, Don Ramsey and several others from McGill. Also ran into Chuck Moore and Don Arscott who informed me that they have been accommodated in the former wren's block at Stad. At 4.30 pm we returned to our ship to mark our newly issued gear. We saw a schedule for tropical routine today: up at 0530 and secure at 1230. I guess it's going to be hot.



Captain Pullen who is Captain D of Canada's destroyers, spoke to us today and I rather enjoyed his comments. After supper, Lionel Janna from Montreal who was with us on the west coast last year, dropped by. At 8.30 pm we listened to the Bob Crosby show on the radio and then watched a movie in the mess, "The Swordsman", starring Larry Parks and Ellen Drew. I am in the forward starboard mess, No. 5, up where it should be good and rough in stormy weather.





May 18, Tuesday 1948: We were supposed to leave harbour today but didn't because of dense fog. Visibility was reduced to 50 yards. We had the afternoon off but stayed aboard the ship because of the weather. The damp cold was so intense - nothing you could imagine unless you experienced it. What a depressing place! Nothing but fog, slums and bitter cold.



May 19, Wednesday, 1948: Finally the fog began to lift and we set sail in the afternoon. HMCS Portage and Swansea left earlier for Bermuda. As we were leaving Halifax Harbour the sun began to shine and it seemed like a good omen. Then the ship began to pitch and roll in the Atlantic ground swell and by 1630 many green faces began to appear. At supper, few had the stamina to face food. Vern Trevail and Doc from U. of T. were okay, but I could not fool my stomach forever and by 1900 I was as sick as everyone else. The heads were in the worst shape and many guys were just lying on the upper deck around the funnel. After rounds I crawled into my mick and fell asleep until shook for duty watch at 2330.



May 20, Thursday, 1948: I ate no breakfast but worked all morning and slowly began to feel better. Dinner was okay at noon and I went on watch again. This time I got to steer the ship from 1500 to 1600 and did quite well. New Jersey is abeam to starboard and we have a New York City radio station tuned in. My left arm is getting rather stiff as we received shots in each arm for typhoid and small pox. Although Halifax was dismal, now that the sun is shining brightly on a sea that is as blue as the sky, and the air is as fresh as a newly bathed baby, I feel His Majesty's Canadian Navy is a great life for summer employment.



May 21, Friday, 1948: We are opposite the coast of North Carolina today and have entered the Gulf Stream. The water has changed colour to a gorgeous medium blue and the weather has warmed considerably. The wind is still quite strong and my face looks like a shiny red apple. Tropical routine would begin tomorrow at 0530. We'll be on watch from 0400 to 0800 so it won't inconvenience us. While on watch we wear tropical gear: a T - shirt, shorts and knee length socks.

I was painting ship most of the day and have paint all over my hands, face and clothing. Most of us are dead tired from lack of sleep and bodies can be found sprawled in any quiet place especially on the locker cushions in our mess. We have all regained our appetites, except for poor Gus Higuchi. The ship's canteen supplies fountain cokes and chocolate bars to sooth our empty stomachs. Meals have suddenly become more enticing. We had spuds, roast fish, and cabbage salad for dinner with coconut cream pie as duff (dessert). The pie was excellent but too small.



May 22, Saturday, 1948: The fresh water on the ship is now being rationed and we cannot have a shower. I have given up washing in the morning and just lash up my mick (bed roll) and dash down to the galley for breakfast. Today when we came off watch at 0800, everyone else had turned to andT>

MATTHEW VISIT:

CHANCE OF A LIFETIME



The highlight of the Spring calendar was Friday, May 8, 1998 when the UNTD Association offered its membership the chance of a lifetime by organizing a steak barbecue and a private visit to the replica of John Cabot's ship, the Matthew. A caravel design, the replica was built in Bristol, England and sailed across the Atlantic to commemorate the 500th Anniversary of John Cabot's discovery of North America. (Columbus, also sailing in a caravel, discovered the Caribbean islands but not the mainland, five years earlier.) To view first hand, in small groups, the equipment, sailing methods and living conditions on this, a significant piece of our North American history, was indeed a special privilege. Seventy members and their significant others, took advantage of this never-to-be-repeated opportunity, just prior to the ship's return to England at the end of May.



Program Chairman, Ron McKinlay, with the help of Barbara Doran, (Terry's wife), began a shuttle service in vans and station wagons from York to Pier 4 at about 1700. In all, three groups of 25, enjoyed a private tour of the ship. When the first group returned at 1800, the B.B.Q. steak dinner began on the harbour front lawn at York. The Matthew was to be the centre piece for the opening of the new Pier 4 home of the Toronto Marine Museum, but that was unfortunately delayed until July. However, the Matthew did provide a lot of advanced publicity for this waterfront event.



What most visitors enjoyed about the evening was the opportunity to poke into every nook and cranny of the caravel. This was denied to the general public who were not allowed to go below decks. The primitive rudder device attracted a great deal of attention, along with its simple leaver connection that was used on the upper deck in good weather. Although small, there was surprisingly more head room in the living space than most people expected.



An additional feature of the evening was the social hour, beginning at 2000, when Terry Nash, First Mate of the Matthew, dressed in authentic 16th century garb, presented a thirty minute video, showing the research history, construction of the replica and its adventuresome Atlantic cr4 at about 1700. In all, three groups of 25, enjoyed a private tour of the ship. When the first group returned at 1800, the B.B.Q. steak dinner began on the harbour front lawn at York. The Matthew was to be the centre piece for the opening of the new Pier 4 home of the Toronto Marine Museum, but that was unfortunately delayed until July. However, the Matthew did provide a lot of advanced publicity for this waterfront event.



What most visitors enjoyed about the evening was the opportunity to poke into every nook and cranny of the caravel. This was denied to the general public who were not allowed to go below decks. The primitive rudder device attracted a great deal of attention, along with its simple leaver connection that was used on the upper deck in good weather. Although small, there was surprisingly more head room in the living space than most people expected.



An additional feature of the evening was the social hour, beginning at 2000, when Terry Nash, First Mate of the Matthew, dressed in authentic 16th century garb, presented a thirty minute video, showing the research history, construction of the replica and its adventuresome Atlantic crossing. It was fascinating to learn that very little was known about Cabot's momentous voyage of discovery until records were inadvertently found in an obscure monastery in Spain. Some visual highlights were pointed out by Terry, such as the fly-by of the Concord jet as the Matthew replica nd, she often made as much headway on the beam as she did on the bow.



There was far too much good stuff about the evening to report in the short space of this newsletter. Therefore let us conclude by saying that all the former UNTiDies were enthraled by the nautical program, and that the Association has once again outdone themselves by providing a most memorable social occasion with Terry Nash and the Matthew. Editor

UNTiDy TALES

From

CAPTAIN LITTLER'S MEMOIRS

The following stories have been extracted from Captain Littler's memoirs, entitled, Sea Fever. The book was edited and published in Canada through the efforts of Commodore ret'd, Jan Drent, a former UNTD and brought to the attention of your editor by Sam Huntington, a former cadet instructor and divisional officer.



After HMCS Micmac, the West Coast was a very pleasant change and I threw myself into the training programme. I realized that we were not providing a balanced sea and shore training for the university naval cadets. A plan was drawn up whereby two frigates; one from the fleet, and one from the reserve, would be manned from the allowed complement of the one frigate and the cadets under training. These frigates, plus one of our fairmiles, would be based on Bedwell Harbour in the San Juan Islands remote from the flesh pots for the period of sea training. It was also proposed that we take over the empty barracks in HMC Dockyard, Esquimalt. The plan was approved by my commanding officer, Commodore "Dutchy" Edwards, and forwarded to the Flag Officer Pacific Coast, Rear-Admiral Harry De Wolf, who ordered it put into effect right away. I started the spring of 1949 with my own barracks and a first-class, hand-picked team. Once a week, we had the HMCS Naden band for ceremonial divisions; while the frigates, Antigonish and Beacon Hill, were attached for the sea-training programme. We had some 500 UNTD cadets under training, plus about the same number of officers and men from the western reserve naval divisions to be passed through the appropriate HMC Schools in Naden.



It was a rewarding and hard-working two years; rewarding because the cadets in particular became splendidly fit, what with our physical fitness campaign, so that we easily trounced the rest at each year's Pacific Command track and field meet. Our 0615 training run each morning was tough but it paid off handsomely. I received letters from people like Colonel Bell-Irving, telling me how they appreciated their son's improvement in physique and outlook. From time to time the high spirits turned into pranks, of which the most famous was the night raid on Royal Roads Naval College. (see Spindrift pp 40-44).



As a sequel, I was required to wait upon our Admiral; but prior to this, I had been tendered an apology by my senior cadets to the effect that they hoped that their innocent prank had not caused me problems of their making. Furthermore, they had given me a well-produced operation plan worthy of the naval staff: complete with tide and meteorological details. I was received somewhat gruffly by Admiral De Wolf, who wanted to know what my young devils had been up to. In answer, I gave him the operation plan to read, and he became lost and obviously interested in the well-written detail. Suddenly, a thought came to his mind and he said, "Did you know about this beforehand?" I could truthfully say that I knew nothing until this morning early, when I was acquainted of it by the senior cadets involved. The plan had been concocted by my best senior cadet, a Peter Robinson of Montreal, who was a first-class athlete and a good brain. With an understanding grin, and the thought that perhaps I should start the early morning run at 0500 rather than 0615, he dismissed me to get on with more important work. I often wonder what happened to the cadets who stand out in my memory - Robinson, Hogg, Havelock, Kelso, and the Kings, J. & R. - and so many others.

....to be continued.

iral; but prior to this, I had been tendered an apology by my senior cadets to the effect that they hoped that their innocent prank had not caused me problems of their making. Furthermore, they had given me a well-produced operation plan worthy of the naval staff: complete with tide and meteorological details. I was received somewhat gruffly by Admiral De Wolf, who wanted to know what my young devils had been up to. In answer, I gave him the operation plan to read, and he became lost and obviously interested in the well-written detail. Suddenly, a thought came to his mind and he said, "Did you know about this beforehand?" I could truthfully say that I knew nothing until this morning early, when I was acquainted of it by the senior cadets involved. The plan had been concocted by my best senior cadet, a Peter Robinson of Montreal, who was a first-class athlete and a good brain. With an understanding grin, and the thought that perhaps I should start the early morning run at 0500 rather than 0615, he dismissed me to get on with more important work. I often wonder what happened to the cadets who stand out in my memory - Robinson, Hogg, Havelock, Kelso, and the Kings, J. & R. - and so many others.

....to be continued.

SPINDRIFT UNTiDy TALES



A must for every UNTD alumni. Reserve your copy by sending $15.00 + $2.50 mailing, payable to Robert Williamson (See below)



UNTD NEWSLETTER



This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Assoc. of Upper Canada. Send Letters, anecdotes, suggestions to: Newsletter Editor: Cdr Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2, or phone (905) 383-6084



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



Dear Editor,

Thanks for the copies of the back issues of the UNTD Newsletter. I devoured them in one sitting and found the Canadian Navy on the internet as you directed. Now if we could just get the UNTD on-line as well.



Tom Kuiper,

Radio Astronomy Manager,

California Institute of Technology,

Pasadena, California.



Editor's Note: Creating a home page on the internet for the UNTD was discussed at the last executive meeting. The process, cost and management are being investigated.



Dear Editor,

Thank you for your letter and copies of the UNTD Newsletter containing my story of the Wartime UNTD. It is no longer convenient for me to attend your functions but I did want to share my wartime memories in gratitude for the wonderful time that I had with you all at the Halifax Reunion.



Warren Forrester, PhD,

1904 Concession Six,

RR#1 Hampton, ON.



Editor's Note: With the help of people like Warren Forrester, we will continue to flesh out more details about the early years of the marvellous UNTD story.



Dear Editor,

After you published my letter about my UNTD Diary, I received a call from Jim Roberts who was on the 1948 cruise recorded in that diary. It was a thrill to hear from him again after 50 years and we shall get together and chat further. I look forward to receiving regular copies of the newsletter, and thank you for your continuing work in the UNTD.



Don Gillies,

4709 8th Line,

RR#1 Beeton, ON.

(905) 775-5800



Editor's Note: Don and his wife Jeanne have just bought a house at Craig Bay, south of Parksville on Vancouver Island and will take possession on Oct. 1 '98.

BULLETIN BOARD



HMCS UGANDA REUNION



There are a few UNTDs who will remember sea training on HMCS Uganda prior to 1950. They may be interested in knowing that there will be a ship's company reunion on September 4-6, 1998 in Hamilton, ON. For information call Bud Bergie at (905) 383-8323.



NEW NAVAL HISTORY

Ready For Release



LORDS OF THE LAKE: The Naval War on Lake Ontario, 1812-1814, by Robert Malcomson. Hardcover, 408 pp, 50 illustrations, ISBN 1-896941-08-7, $34.95. Publisher, Robin Brass Studio, 10 Blantyre Ave., Toronto, M1N 2R4.



Of all the struggles that took place along the border between the United States and Canada during the War of 1812, the most important was the battle for control of Lake Ontario. Armies on both sides depended upon it for transportation and supply. Therefore both nations threw men and materiel into a feverish effort to build vessels at Kingston and Sackets Harbour in order to maintain domination over the lake. Readers of Canadian and Naval History will enjoy Robert Malcomson's dramatic account of these events.



UNTD QUARANTINE PHOTO 1948



Front: Scotty Wilkinson, 2nd Row: Marion Magus, John Quincy, John Hobbs, Louis Champagne, Verne Travail, Chuck Miller

3rd Row: Joe Jarvis, Paul Parent, Glenn Peister, Gus Higuchi, Warren Brittain, Bob Grant, Al Coombes, John Bandy, Don Gillies, 4th Row: Weldon Findlay, Ken Lendon, Hugh Bird, Stan Potter, John Russell, 5th Row: George Inch, Jean Roy, Bob Nevins, Thompson, Jack Coon, Ken Corrigan, 6th Row: Alan Squires, Harold Snyder, Jim Roberts



Missing: Lloyd Pressnal, Andrew Hugessen, Robert Johnson, Alvin Tate, Gordon Glover, Stan Williams, John Wilkinson and Bob Morris (probably taking the picture)

In Hospital: Paul Present, Bill Purvis, & Bob Hutchinson (705 789-4306)

10TH ANNUAL REUNION DINNER



A decade ago several former UNTDs, inspired by the successful 1985 UNTD Reunion Dinners held in Hamilton, Halifax and Victoria, got together in Toronto and under the leadership of Richard Baker formed the UNTD Association of Upper Canada. This year the organization celebrated its 10th anniversary at the annual reunion dinner held on Saturday, November 21 in the refurbished wardroom of HMCS York. Guest speaker was none other than nationally acclaimed editor, defence critic and historian, Captain(N) Peter C. Newman. As a UNTD cadet at HMCS York in 1948, Peter became the editor of the UNTD Magazine, a venture that set him on the path to greatness. Now the author of several books, including, The Company of Adventurers and most recently, The Titans ( How the Canadian Establishment seized power), he lives with his wife, Elvy in Granthams Landing, B.C.



Peter spoke casually about his days as a UNTD cadet, career experiences, famous people and his books, inserting a number of humorous incidents. The most memorable was at Pearl Harbour. As a Commander on liaison duty in Hawaii, he made a courtesy call on the Admiral (CINC PAC). They got on well, and the admiral in typical generous American fashion, sent Peter on a tour of the harbour in the Admiral's barge. While viewing the wreck of the USS Arizona, Peter was surprised to see elements of the Pacific Fleet entering harbour and steaming towards him. He was even more surprised when each ship piped a salute. Somewhat sheepishly but with conviction, Cdr Newman, RCN(R), former UNTD, stood in the admiral's barge and took the salute for CINC PAC.



Among the notable attenders at the dinner were Cdr. Herbie Little who expressed his gratitude to the group for continuing a great tradition. Representing the founding father of the UNTD, Cdr. Baker, was his daughter, Ruth (Baker) Wright and her husband Gordon, a former UNTD Officer. Mr. Vice on the right, representing the third generation of the Baker UNTD family was their son Alex, a founding member of our organization and now president. Gil Hutton

COMMEMORATIVE NAVAL RESERVE

STAMP LAUNCHED



At the UNTiDy Reunion Mess Dinner, the Executive Officer of HMCS York, LCdr. Murakami, announced that on November 8, 1998, at Remembrance Day Parades across the country, the 75th Anniversary Commemorative Stamp for the Naval Reserve was launched. The 45 cent stamps are being sold in pairs, one of the WWII corvette, HMCS Sackville, Canada's Naval Memorial in Halifax and the other, HMCS Shawinigan, one of the new Kingston-class MCDVs. This marks the first time that commissioned Canadian naval warships have been featured on our postage stamps and consequently it makes them quite a collector's item. The Sackville stamp was unveiled aboard the corvette, while the Shawinigan stamp was unveiled aboard the MCDV in Trois Rivieres, Quebec, both on November 4, 1998.



Unfortunately with the increase in postal rates at the end of the year, these 45 cent stamps were only on sale for a few months, and not many people were aware of their availability. The stamps are very attractive and have drawn a lot of attention, perhaps because of their limited distribution. When used on Christmas Card mailings, it was found that they drew more appreciation than the christmas cards. These stamps are no longer available at postal outlets but sheets of them or only a pair, if you wish, can be obtained from Canada Post in Ottawa at cost, by calling 1 800 565-4362. For $1.20, collectors can also obtain first day covers containing the twin stamps cancelled by a ship's wheel emblem. In the lower left corner of the cover is the image of a signalman with his lamp. On the back is a short history of the Naval Reserve.



It is interesting to note that most 75th Anniversary accounts of the contribution made by the Naval Reserve to this country do not include the formation of the UNTD. The navy never has fully appreciated what an outstanding idea they had in this naval officer training program. (See the following story on UNTD recruiting.)

Editor



UNTD RECRUITING, A 55 YEAR HISTORY.

The following article was prepared for publication in the NOAC's Starshells newsletter.



When it comes to maintaining a strong naval reserve, we must apply that old adage, know your history or you are bound to repeat your mistakes. It would appear, as a nation, we haven't learned much from our history of trying to recruit officers for the naval reserve. During the early years of WWII the navy had no reserve officer training program and found itself desperately short of officers. Today, many naval reserve units, NRUs, in Canada have upward of a dozen or more empty officer billets. This does not give credence to the naval reserve motto of "Ready Aye Ready".

The University Naval Training Division, UNTD, was created in 1942 as a wartime pilot project at the Ontario Agricultural College in Guelph. The brain child of university professor, A.W. "Jack" Baker, it was intended to be an important recruiting arm of the navy in our nation's universities. Under the auspices of LCdr. McFetrick, the Commanding Officer of the local NRU, HMCS Star, the OAC program proved successful. With the blessing of Captain Brock, Commanding Officer Reserve Divisions, UNTD training spread to every university in Canada, with a recruiting and training officer established on every campus. For the first time the navy, in an ever expanding technological world, had its foot in the door of the country's brain trusts. It wasn't long before the officer billets of our NRUs and some regular force positions were being filled by graduates of this program. Between 1943 and 1968, some six thousand university students passed through the UNTD program. Then in the fullness of time, commanding officers of most NRUs were the product of UNTD training.



Unfortunately sweeping changes were brought about in 1968 when Defence Minister Hellyer introduced the Canadian Forces Reorganization Act. Like so many other navy institutions, the UNTD disappeared as an identifiable officer training plan. The position of Staff Officer UNTD was eliminated and recruiting offices on every university campus across the country were closed. That vital link with the country's university students was lost.



A very modified officer training program with greatly reduced numbers replaced the UNTD. Given the convoluted title of Naval Reserve Officer University Training Program, NROUTP, it didn't take long for this awkward designation to become NROC, Naval Reserve Officer Cadet. It applied to both men and women and they wore the universal green uniform of the Canadian Forces. All Naval Reserve Commanding officers found that because of low recruiting quotas, the supply of NROCs did not meet the demand and because there was no longer a direct connection with universities, recruiting of NROCs came from within the unit, ie. the naval divisions were feeding upon themselves. To prevent this, recruiting policies have changed to inhibit the recruiting of NROCs from the ranks of NCMs or non commissioned members. All of this has come at a time when NRUs have taken on the added responsibilities of manning the new MCDVs, Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels.



It seems that the end product of Hellyer's legacy is that there is now a serious shortage of naval reserve officers as well as NCMs. Naval divisions, having retired the last of the original UNTDs a few years ago, and unable to sustain their own officer ranks, are having to recycle commanding officers and parachute in regular force officers to command NRUs. Recruiting officers are now looking for a way to re-establish recruiting ties with universities. Without a wartime setting, as in 1942, that is unlikely to happen. Perhaps the best solution now is to recruit a surplus of NCMs to make allowances for those who remuster as officer cadets, "if" they enter university. With existing tight budgets and severe quota restrictions, that too is unlikely to happen. Thus the growing lack of naval reserve officers will continue in a tight downward spiral. As has proven to be the case with so many of Mr. Hellyer's changes to the Canadian Forces, the elimination of the original concept of the UNTD 1943 - 1968, has had consequences harmful both in the short and long terms.

Editor

DON'S DIARY

Part II



May 23, Sunday, 1948: We are located somewhere off the east coast of Florida. It has been three days since we last saw land which makes us real salty. When you look out on the featureless horizon, it is no wonder that the sailors in Columbus' day thought the world was flat.



We were supposed to have Sunday Divisions this morning, everyone mustered with their best spit and polish for hymns and prayers but it rained so hard it was cancelled. The weather has become very squally with terrible downpours followed by sudden sunny clear periods. On deck there is always a good breeze, but the air is very humid and in the mess it is extremely hot and sticky. We had ice cream for dinner but it melted before it could be eaten.



We sighted land late today - San Salvadore, the first land that Columbus saw when he landed in the West Indies. Tomorrow we will arrive in Guantanamo Bay and maybe get to play a little baseball.



May 24, Monday, 1948: After a routine breakfast of bacon and eggs (there was no cereal because all the fresh milk is gone), we started our first classes. There will be five subjects and today we took ASDIC (anti submarine detecting), until noon. After lunch we were assigned duties handling lines and fenders for entering harbour. Guantanamo Bay is a new U.S. naval base with an airfield and radio station. The land looks volcanic with a thin growth of small tropical vegetation, but there are no mountains around here. It is very hot and humid. I have consumed lots of water and feel like I have lost several pounds. We all have to take salt tablets. I didn't get ashore as my watch was on duty, so I used the time to fold and shorten my pant legs by three inches. In the navy you have to be your own tailor.



May 25, Tuesday, 1948: Up at 0530 for P.T. on the jetty. After running a mile my legs were so stiff I could hardly move. Spent the rest of the morning cleaning for Captain's rounds. After lunch, Vern Trevail and I went ashore to the PX where they have everything from souvenirs to house furnishings. The tropical scenery is lovely with oleanders, hibiscus, cacti and palm trees everywhere.



We went to the sports complex to play tennis but found that we did not have the right kind of shoes so we went swimming instead and played three games of pool. Indulged in ice cream sundaes and cokes all day from the soda bar.



May 26, Wednesday, 1948: Up early again, this time for boat pulling. We went ashore in the afternoon for more ice cream and bought a dozen post cards. After I got finished writing them, I found that the post office was closed. A couple of chaps have come down with sun stroke and another with pneumonia. With the air blowers pumping fresh air into the mess continuously it can be draughty and hard to avoid a chill early in the morning.



May 27, Thursday, 1948: This turned out to be a busy day. I was assigned to a stores party at 0900 and we went by truck to a huge refrigerated warehouse. Native workers loaded carrots, lettuce, tomatoes, one ton of spuds, ice cream, cabbages and so on. When we got back to the ship we had to unload all that food into the ship's food lockers and refrigerators. It was a very hot job. In the afternoon the ship moved to the oil jetty and then we cleaned and dressed the quarterdeck for an officer's cocktail party. After supper we had to scrub out our mess because an oil line had leaked during fuelling. After the party, the quarterdeck had to be cleaned up and then we were rousted out of bed to loosen all the awnings after a heavy rain.



May 28, Friday, 1948: Mustered at 0400 for leaving harbour. While stowing hawsers and fenders I lost my cap overboard in a driving rain, but managed to fish it out of the water. We anchored in Montego Bay, Jamaica at 1900 but it was getting too dark to see anything.



May 29, Saturday, 1948: Slept on the foc'sle last night where there was a bit of a breeze to relieve the stifling heat. Woke up at dawn to see many colourful native fishing boats on the bay where there was nary a ripple on the water. The shore line looked very pleasing with bathing beaches, large hotels and plenty of palm trees. But a closer look when we went ashore gave a different view of paradise. The streets were lined with broken down shops and houses. The mix of donkey manure on the pavement and the open sewers made a permeating stench. There seemed to be an abundance of tailor shops and liquor stores. We only stopped at the farmer's market where we bought some coconuts, pineapples, bananas and limes.

May 30, Sunday, 1948: We got out of some work this morning by going to church ashore. It was a nice clean church, the hymns were sung with gusto and there were plenty of "Praise the Lords".



When we got back to the ship there were dozens of native boys around the ship diving for pennies or selling their sister's favours. They were dancing and singing in their small boats or hanging on the anchor chain.



May 31, Monday, 1948: We were assigned as boat's crew today. I acted as stern sheetman on No. 1 cutter which took liberty men ashore. Swartz was coxswain and Warren Brittain was bowman. We had a busy day from noon until midnight. At 2000 we had to go and rescue the other cutter as it had run afoul of a fishing net.



The highlight of the day was the arrival of fresh bread. Spread with plenty of jam and peanut butter, it was the greatest treat that we had in several days.



June 1, Tuesday, 1948: I got my journal back from the instructor today and was told that it was disjointed and poorly written. I still have not figured out the style that he is looking for. One chap from Dalhousie wrote a caustic report on the decrepit state of the Canadian Navy. That was definitely the wrong approach.



There is a banana boat loading in the bay near our ship. The natives row out with a huge long boat piled high with bunches of green bananas which are passed up a long line of loaders to the deck of the ship.

June 2, Wednesday, 1948: At 0800 we slipped anchor and sailed out of Montego Bay as the rain began to fall again. We saw scores of flying fish skimming just above the water like hummingbirds for a hundred yards or more.



In the afternoon our watch rigged a swimming pool on the deck and everyone splashed about. It was full of salt water and very hard on the eyes. Tonight I go on watch from 2000 to midnight and again I will miss the movie. They have shown four different movies at least three times and I haven't seen one of them yet.



June 4, Friday, 1948: Today we passed through the Panama Canal. The ship entered the huge Miraflores Locks after breakfast. We were pulled along by little steam engines which ran on rails on either side of the canal. The water rose and carried us to the next set of triple locks called Pedro Miguel which boosted us 85 feet to Gatum Lake. Wearing bathing suits we washed down the ship's super structure with the lake's fresh water. Then we traversed the lowering locks and cleared the canal at 1600.



We steamed to jetty 16 at Balboa and went ashore at 1800. A ten cent bus ride took us to Panama City, an attractive community with expensive shops selling merchandise made of alligator skin, ivory, mahogany and leather. Banana splits were an outrageous price - 50 cents.



June 5, Saturday, 1948: We were on duty today and had to unload and store supplies: a ton of potatoes, a dozen crates of oranges and watermelons. We dropped a watermelon and had to eat it. We also snaffled several oranges. We watched everyone returning from leave, loaded with souvenirs and telling wild stories about the night clubs in Panama City.



June 6, Sunday, 1948: After lunch, Verne, Warren Brittain and I went ashore to visit the ruins of old Panama. The old city was built on an impressive site overlooking the Pacific with waves crashing on reefs and rolling up the sandy beaches. The pirate, Henry Morgan ravaged and burned this city 300 years ago for the millions in gold which the Spaniards stole from the Incas. Huge trees were growing through the stone walls and we were spit upon by a scrawny Llamas grazing in the ruins.



June 7, Monday, 1948: Ashore in Balboa we went to the American Army/Navy base called Fort Amador. Ice cream and milk shakes were dirt cheap. Cigarettes were seven cents a pack and chocolate bars, four cents. Portable radios which are $75.00 in Canada were only $36.00 and electric razors only $18.00, down from $32.00 in Canada. I wish I had more money to spend.



June 8, Tuesday, 1948: Left Balboa today with four days steaming to Acapulco. While I was lifebuoy sentry I saw porpoises playfully swimming beside the ship as though they were racing it.





UNTiDy TALES

From

CAPTAIN LITTLER'S MEMOIRS

The following stories have been extracted from Captain Littler's memoirs, entitled, Sea Fever. The book was edited and published in Canada through the efforts of Commodore ret'd, Jan Drent, a former UNTD and brought to the attention of your editor by Sam Huntington, a former cadet instructor and divisional officer.



Part II

After my stint as Training Commander on the West Coast, I was appointed Executive Officer of HMCS Stadacona 1950-51. During one summer when the band was on assignment elsewhere, we used a gramophone record of our band through loud speakers for Morning Divisions. One particularly wet morning we decided to hold Divisions in the Drill Shed. In making the necessary adjustments, the Gunnery Officer noticed that the band record had been tampered with. While starting with the usual "March Off", the music quickly became wild boogie woogie. The rain and the Gunnery Officers thoroughness certainly saved the Commodore from apoplexy and the rest of us from acute embarrassment.



After Divisions and the Commodore had left, I stood fast the university cadets (some 600 strong) and dismissed the rest of the parade. I instructed the Master at Arms to watch cadets to the right of the dias while I watched the left-hand side. I called the parade to "Attention". The cadets who had tampered with the gunnery school band record..."One pace forward...March".



Two cadets twitched and allowed their heads to side glance at each other. Then on quickly looking back, they found themselves "eyeball to eyeball" with the Master at Arms and myself. With hardly a second to spare, they took the required step and they spent several days cleaning the gunnery school steps and guns during leave time. to be continued..

























































































DON'S DIARY

Part III



June 9, Wednesday, 1948: Only twenty more days to go until we reach Naden. My watch, Blue Watch, had the morning watch from 0400 to 0800. The sea was slightly restless but otherwise quiet. After breakfast, communication classes almost put me to sleep.



I was lifebuoy sentry from 1600 to 1700 when we exercised emergency stations. The sea was calm enough to look at but was plenty choppy from the vantage point of our 20 foot, six man lifeboat. We rescued the kisbie floats that had been thrown overboard. One joy about raising a seaboat on a destroyer is that we had a power winch and did not have to use the coulee method as employed on the frigates.



Up again at 2330 to stand the middle watch. Boy was I tired! My eyes were so heavy that I had to force them to stay open. If I closed them for a moment, everything began fading away and I was asleep - even standing up. Below decks at 0400, I crashed on the leather cushions on the lockers which serve as storage for clothes and as benches at the mess table. I vowed that I would never sleep there but have done so often.



June 10, Thursday, 1948: Off the coast of Honduras. This was our first sunny day in the last several days. It is the rainy season now and cloudy most of the time. The sea is as calm as a mill pond and a dark blue - green colour as compared to the azure blue of the Atlantic.

Black smoke coming out of the stacks yesterday resulted in E.R.A.s and stokers getting loss of pay, as well as stoppage of leave and grog (rum). They are pretty mad at the captain, an old merchant navy type who is a mean old bugger. (Editor's note: several cadets reported that the captain was a modern Captain Bligh. They described his relationship with the crew

as similar to that of the captain in the film, "Mr Roberts". It was at this time that incidents aboard the Athabaskan, Crescent and Magnificent triggered a much-needed investigation called the Mainguy Report. "It moulded a Canadain navy, apart from the Royal Navy, to better fit our social values, traditions and character" [Cdr. Tony German]. It was a watershed in the navy's history and the UNTD were there).

During the afternoon watch we saw a huge school of porpoises. They swam under the ship and playfully jumped out of the water, stood on their tails or did flips. They certainly were a sight well worth watching. Played bridge after supper and worked on my journal which has to be assessed by Lt. Cook.



June 11-12, Friday/Saturday, 1948: Lucky me! After standing the second dog watch, I got to see the movie, "Stallion Road" which I quite enjoyed. Slept on the lockers until 0330 when I went to the bridge to stand third officer of the watch. Filled in the log every hour and answered 293 radar reports from the radar room. In the fore noon, I worked on one of the cutters doing as little as possible, soaking up the sun.



Arrived in Acapulco this afternoon. Mail call! Got a letter from Parker. Acapulco is a flashy place with ultra-modern round buildings and many yachts in the large, sheltered bay. A tourist centre - it is the Riviera of the west coast.



June 13, Sunday, 1948: Answered Parker's letter and went ashore with Verne this afternoon. Exchanged money at the Las Marinas Hotel (45 pesos for $10.00, should have been 48). Sat on the cool, hotel veranda screened by palms and tropical plants. We acted just like tourists. Later we rented bicycles at 40 cents an hour and cycled about the city taking pictures. Then we went swimming on a very smooth sandy beach with large rollers sweeping up the sand. Back aboard ship, after a shower, we saw a movie, "That Way With Women".



June 14, Monday, 1948: After the first full night's sleep in a long time, we were up at 0600 for P.T. on the jetty just as the sun was peeking over the mountains. Chuck Miller and I spent the morning painting the funnel from a swinging stage with not too much to hang on to. Boy was it hot! We couldn't take our shirts off because there were guests on board.



I took ten packs of cigarettes ashore with me because they are a great medium of exchange here. I bought a wild-looking flowered shirt for 15 pesos after a lot of dickering. We saw a terrific looking girl in one store. She reminded us of how long we have been away from home. Brought back lemons, coconuts and bananas to the ship. After supper, Verne, Brittain and I played horse shoes and beat the Coxswain and Chief Gunner's Mate, three game to none.



June 15, Tuesday, 1948: We left Acapulco today amidst cheering and arm waving from VIPs and pretty ladies decked out in large hats. This was the best port of call so far with none of the squalor of Panama or Montego Bay. After supper I hung washing on the foc'sle to dry in the fresh breeze. Just as it was about dry, it rained like the devil and now I have to go back on watch.



June 16/17, Wednesday/Thursday, 1948: We anchored in Manzanillo harbour this morning. No resort town here - just a small jetty, an oil depot, rail yard and board or straw hovels that look like something out of "Three Little Pigs". We stopped in this little backwater for only two reasons: to oil and paint the ship. Spent all morning painting the side of the ship from a whaler, then in the afternoon Verne and I painted the bow from a bosun's chair, nothing more than a glorified rope swing, twenty feet above the water. After dinner, about fifty of us went by bus to an isolated beach. It was really lovely although the six foot high breakers were really powerful. (Bob Morris from OAC in Guelph also remembers the six foot breakers on the beach. An ex-sea cadet, he sailed in the ship's whaler to an isolated beach. As they came ashore the whaler broached in the pounding surf. As Bob attempted to cut some of the tangled rigging free, he was almost crushed as the whaler was lifted and thrown onto the beach. The ship's cutter had to come to float a line ashore so that they could tow the whaler back to the ship. The crew returned in a beat-up old truck.)



June 18, Friday, 1948: Left Manzanillo at 1000. Verne and half the crew are quite sick this morning with diarrhoea and cramps - Montezuma's revenge.



June 19, Saturday, 1948: Another lovely warm day spent painting the superstructure of the ship. We are hurrying to get everything painted before we reach San Pedro where there are expected to be a number of receptions and parties. Classes today were held in gun drill.



June 20, Sunday, 1948: I slept with a blanket on me all night for the first time in four weeks. The sea temperature has dropped 15 degrees in one day. What a change! we are now taking heavy swells and salt spray across the foc'sle.



June 22, Tuesday, 1948: Arrived in Los Angeles Naval Base, Long Beach at 0700. Red Watch left at 1030 for a tour of Warner Brothers Studio and dinner at the Brown Derby. Verne and I went ashore in the afternoon and planned to catch a train to Los Angeles but were picked up by a guy in a new Ford coupe. He said he was going to Pasadena and that was fine with us. We drove through Long Beach and Los Angeles. In Pasadena we saw the famous Rose Bowl and visited Bullock's Department Store - the most modern and expensive store that I have ever seen. Articles had no prices on them. If you had to ask, you couldn't afford them. Moe took us home for dinner and then dropped us off at the Pasadena Auditorium where we saw the great musical "Oklahoma". After the show, we took a bus back to Los Angeles and got off at the corner of Hollywood and Vine (doesn't that sound grand). It was there that we bumped into two guys from the ship, Jim Roberts and Gus Higuchi. We had a few drinks in the posh Hollywood Knickerbocker Hotel, where they thought we were Limeys and then began the two hour trek back to Long Beach and the ship.



June 24/25, Thursday/Friday, 1948: After standing duty yesterday, to-day is our day for 36 hour leave. Through a mix-up, our watch was done out of a tour of R.K.O Studios and supper at the Brown Derby, so Verne and I headed for the YMCA in Hollywood. We visited NBC and CBS studios and managed to get tickets for a show with Hayvan MacQuarrie in "Noah Webster Says". At 8.00 am next morning, we went to the Tom Brenneman's show, "Breakfast in Hollywood", a very popular program with Gary Moore as Master of Ceremonies. We sat with two girls from Oregon. It was a most enjoyable breakfast and we enjoyed their company and the show very much. After window shopping, we returned to the ship.



DON'S DIARY

Part IV



June 26, Saturday, 1948: The weather is cool and foggy. We left Long Beach Harbour at 0600. Next stop Canada! Just a few more days and we will be in Victoria and then I can go home for Len's wedding.





June 28, Monday, 1948: This was a very eventful day. When we reported for the middle watch at midnight, the fog was so thick that we could not see much beyond the bow of the ship. With the fog horn booming every two minutes, I was assigned to stand watch in the "eyes" (far forward) of the ship. The cold mist and spray was slapping me in the face. Boy was it raw! At 0930 there was a great stirring in the bowels of the ship as a second engine was revved up and brought on line. The ship shook from foc'sle to stern with this unleashed power as she increased speed from 16 to 28 knots. The wake from the ship's props rose above the stern and spray from the plunging bow was hitting the bridge. The guys on duty for the forenoon watch reported that we had changed course for Astoria, Oregon to take a sick man to hospital. We heard that during the middle watch, a sailor - 23 year old chippie (carpenter), had been carried down to sick bay. By the forenoon he was on oxygen and four men were applying artificial respiration to keep him alive. After lunch, the guys in the mess were buzzing with the news that the sick sailor had died and we resumed our course for Esquimalt. By the end of the day, six more chaps had taken ill and the steward's mess was cleared out as an isolation ward. Two of the ill were UNTD cadets.



June 29, Tuesday, 1948: We arrived in Esquimalt seven hours ahead of schedule. Flying a yellow quarantine flag, we moved from the isolation depot to the jetty at 0800 where the dead man and the sick were taken to the hospital by stretcher. We returned to anchor. There were wild rumours and since we did not know what had caused the sickness, the uncertainty was worrisome. By 1530 a flag officer came aboard and we were mustered on the quarter deck. The news was disheartening. The sickness was diagnosed as polio and that required a quarantine period of 14 days. It was a bitter disappointment realizing that I would be unable to get to Len and Mary's wedding. All we could do was sit and pray that no one else got sick.

Editor's note: It is reported that the senior officer was Commodore H. Brock who read the riot act about using proper channels because the stokers had sent a letter to the Vancouver Sun about conditions on board the ship. The UNTD cadets had also complained in letters home to their parents and consequently some Members of Parliament were asking questions. All this on top of a health quarantine. A dream cruise was becoming a nightmare for the navy as well.

June 30, Wednesday, 1948: Another chap was taken ashore with polio. Everyone is glum. All we can do is sit and wait to see if we get sick or not. Editor's note: Everyone was also dreading a visit from Canadian customs because a lot of foreign goods had been purchased at low prices. There was no need to worry. Because of the quarantine, the custom official only stood at the rail and asked if anyone had anything to declare. Receiving no response, he made a hasty retreat. The weather is beautiful and the food is outstanding. We had strawberry short cake today. I guess they are pampering us to keep our spirits up. (Bob Morris reports that he gained 15 pounds during this extended holiday)



July 1, Thursday, 1948: The ship was dressed overall at colours, 0800, for Canada Day. The officers challenged the petty officers to a darts competition. The officers, carrying whisky bottles were dressed in pyjamas, bath robes and straw hats. Carrying a sword and gun, one 6 foot 5 inch officer was policing fair play. As we celebrated Canada's birthday, our time in the Caribbean and Central America, made us appreciate what a fine country we live in.



July 2, Friday, 1948: We weighed anchor and after fuelling, went to the jetty at HMC Dockyard. As the First Lieutenant's messenger, I had a first hand view of all the drama of a burial at sea for Petty Officer Zimmerman who had died from polio. (It has been reported that he had been married in Vancouver just before leaving for the east coast to join the Athabaskan). At 1400, the naval parade with the casket carried on a gun carriage by 24 sailors came up to the ship. The funeral service ensued with the body and padre on the ship and friends and family on the jetty. After a solemn service, we went to sea. The casket slid down a greased chute into the water as a firing party fired a salute and the last post was played.



Several more men went ashore ill today. There are 9 confirmed cases of polio (including three UNTD cadets: Paul Presant, Bill Purvis and Bob Hutchinson).

July 3, Saturday, 1948: We weighed anchor at 0900 and went to the jetty at the isolation station. Most of the crew were landed to live in the shore barracks of the quarantine station. This is the station to which all immigrants who came from Asia during the building of the CPR, were held to prevent communicable diseases from entering Canada. We are in a good clean building, two men to a room. The floors are mastic tile and the walls are painted a bilious green. Verne and I share a room

with a window overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca, a lighthouse and the distant snow-capped mountains of Washington State. We have our own galley which served strawberries and cream today. After supper we played baseball. No one else has taken ill and those in hospital are improving. The future is starting to look a lot rosier than a few days ago when it seemed like we were all awaiting execution.



July 4, Sunday, 1948: This is turning into a vacation. Got up at 0800 (imagine that in the navy), had a great breakfast and walked along the beach. After a fine lunch, highlighted by chicken and ice cream, we played baseball. After supper the P.O.s beat us, 15-8, so now we are even.

(Editor's note: The next several days were a continuous round of eating, sleeping, bathing, playing cards, competitive tournaments of baseball and horseshoes with beach parties where the old salts from the Royal Navy hauled out renditions of risky songs that the UNTiDies had never heard before.



July 11, Sunday, 1948: Another wonderful sunny warm day. I pitched for the UNTiDies team and we beat the stokers for the baseball championship. Now we are kings of the ship. Earlier, the coxswain and I won the horseshoe tournament.



John Bandy, a fellow UNTiDy, cut my hair finally. It may look like a bowl was used, but it was either that or move my ears.



July 12, Monday, 1948: We returned to our ship today after cleaning out our quarantine barracks and having a last glorious hot bath. There was no fresh milk on the ship, reminding us that the holiday was over.



Editor's note: Don missed the wedding and spent the rest of the summer working on the family farm near Emo, in the Rainy River District of Northwestern Ontario. Thanks to his spirit of adventure and joy of recording same, we have a document that is an important part of our heritage and rekindles the memories of when we joined the UNTD.



Editor's note: Bob Hutchinson's report

Medical officer tried to claim that all nine polio victims had been together in a bar or (Myth whore house) in Manzanillo. Bob says not true. Some target Manzanillo because of the Montezuma's revenge outbreak. Unable to make any connection. Bob does not recall any situation where all 9 were together at the same time or place.





























































































LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



Dear Editor,

I was very excited to receive copies of Bob Morris' long lost pictures of the 1948 UNTD cruise. They roused old memories of yesteryear and proved that I really did have hair at one time. My sincere thanks to you for your work in keeping the UNTD memories alive. My wife points out that she rescued my original UNTD diary notes (DON'S DIARY) from oblivion on one historic occasion. Thank goodness for those among us with a sense of history.



Don Gillies,

1229 Saturna Drive,

Parksville, B.C.

V9P 2T5



Dear Editor,

Just a note to say how much I enjoyed the UNTD Reunion Dinner on November 21, 1998 and to express the hope that you'll ask me to attend the West Coast version in 2000. Please put me down as one of your subscribers.



Peter C. Newman,

P.O. Box 46,

Granthams Landing, B.C.

V0N 1X0





















































OBITUARY



Cdr. John Carpenter, BSA, MSA, CD, Ontario Agricultural College faculty, Microbiology, December 10, 1998. He became the second Commanding Officer of the Guelph UNTD in 1947, preceded by Cdr. McCrostie and succeeded by Cdr. Richard Ellis. He served in the RCN 1943-45. His widow, Ruth lives at 61 Lyon Ave., Guelph, ON. N1H 5C7.

Lt. Bob Morris







SPINDRIFT UNTiDy TALES



A must for every UNTD alumni. Reserve your copy by sending $15.00 + $2.50 mailing, payable to R. Williamson (See below)







UNTD NEWSLETTER

This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Assoc. of Upper Canada. Send Letters, anecdotes, suggestions to: Newsletter Editor: Cdr Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2.







































































































































UNTD INTERNET



At the executive meeting of the UNTD Association on July 13, 1999, a web page manager was invited by Doug Haine to provide information about putting the UNTD Association on the internet. It was felt that with the Year 2000 Reunion coming up, the association needs a web page to improve its communication system. Recently released statistics show that 22.6 % of all Canadian households are on the internet and that "connectedness" appears to increase substantially with education and affluence. In the near future a proposed merger between Rogers Communications Inc. and Microsoft Corporation, will make interactive cable TV with e-mail and Net surfing, available to almost anyone.

Although the cost of getting a web page on the internet is gradually decreasing, it is still too expensive for the UNTD Association to undertake on a stand alone basis. To create, serve and maintain a web page would cost about $1,700 for the first year. Each year thereafter would require a smaller user & maintenance fee. However, as an alternative, Executive members, Rev. Bill Thomas & Cdr. Bob Williamson have been investigating piggyback scenarios with established web sites such as the Naval Reserve and the Anglican Church.

In the meantime, to see exactly where we stand, with the membership in relation to the internet, the executive has asked that the editor of the newsletter conduct a survey. If you are on or have access to the internet, send an e-mail message to Rev. Bill Thomas stating:

your interest in a UNTD web site,

your name and internet address. Rev. Bill Thomas can be found at:


Up again at 2330 to stand the middle watch. Boy was I tired! My eyes were so heavy that I had to force them to stay open. If I closed them for a moment, everything began fading away and I was asleep - even standing up. Below decks at 0400, I crashed on the leather cushions on the lockers which serve as storage for clothes and as benches at the mess table. I vowed that I would never sleep there but have done so often.



June 10, Thursday, 1948: Off the coast of Honduras. This was our first sunny day in the last several days. It is the rainy season now and cloudy most of the time. The sea is as calm as a mill pond and a dark blue - green colour as compared to the azure1e of the Atlantic.



Black smoke coming out of the stacks yesterday resulted in E.R.A.s and stokers getting loss of pay, as well as stoppage of leave and grog (rum). They are pretty mad at the captain, an old merchant navy type who is a mean old bugger. (Editor's note: several cadets reported that the captain was a modern Captain Bligh. They described his relationship with the crew as similar to that of the captain in the film, "Mr Roberts". It was at this time that incidents aboard the Athabaskan, Crescent and Magnificent triggered a much-needed investigation called the Mainguy Report. "It moulded a Canadian navy, apart from the Royal Navy, to better fit our social values, traditions and character" [Cdr. Tony German]. It was a watershed in the navy's history and the UNTD were there).

During the afternoon watch we saw a huge school of porpoises. They swam under the ship and playfully jumped out of the water, stood on their tails or did flips. They certainly were a sight well worth watching. Played bridge after supper and worked on my journal which has to be assessed by Lt. Cook.



June 11-12, Friday/Saturday, 1948: Lucky me! After standing the second dog watch, I got to see the movie, "Stallion Road" which I quite enjoyed. Slept on the lockers until 0330 when I went to the bridge to stand third officer of the watch. Filled in the log every hour and answered 293 radar reports from the radar room. In the fore noon, I worked on one of the cutters doing as little as possible, soaking up the sun.



Arrived in Acapulco this afternoon. Mail call! Got a letter from Parker. Acapulco is a flashy place with ultra-modern round buildings and many yachts in the large, sheltered bay. A tourist centre - it is the Riviera of the west coast.



June 13, Sunday, 1948: Answered Parker's letter and went ashore with Verne this afternoon. Exchanged money at the Las Marinas Hotel (45 pesos for $10.00, should have been 48). Sat on the cool, hotel veranda screened by palms and tropical plants. We acted just like tourists. Later we rented bicycles at 40 cents an hour and cycled about the city taking pictures. Then we went swimming on a very smooth sandy beach with large rollers sweeping up the sand. Back aboard ship, after a shower, we saw a movie, "That Way With Women".



June 14, Monday, 1948: After the first full night's sleep in a long time, we were up at 0600 for P.T. on the jetty just as the sun was peeking over the mountains. Chuck Miller and I spent the morning painting the funnel from a swinging stage with not too much to hang on to. Boy was it hot! We couldn't take our shirts off because there were guests on board.



I took ten packs of cigarettes ashore with me because they are a great medium of exchange here. I bought a wild-looking flowered shirt for 15 pesos after a lot of dickering. We saw a terrific looking girl in one store. She reminded us of how long we have been away from home. Brought back lemons, coconuts and bananas to the ship. After supper, Verne, Brittain and I played horse shoes and beat the Coxswain and Chief Gunner's Mate, three game to none.



June 15, Tuesday, 1948: We left Acapulco today amidst cheering and arm waving from VIPs and pretty ladies decked out in large hats. This was the best port of call so far with none of the squalor of Panama or Montego Bay. After supper I hung washing on the foc'sle to dry in the fresh breeze. Just as it was about dry, it rained like the devil and now I have to go back on watch.



June 16/17, Wednesday/Thursday, 1948: We anchored in Manzanillo harbour this morning. No resort town here - just a small jetty, an oil depot, rail yard and board or straw hovels that look like something out of "Three Little Pigs". We stopped in this little backwater for only two reasons: to oil and paint the ship. Spent all morning painting the side of the ship from a whaler, then in the afternoon Verne and I painted the bow from a bosun's chair, nothing more than a glorified rope swing, twenty feet above the water. After dinner, about fifty of us went by bus to an isolated beach. It was really lovely although the six foot high breakers were really powerful. (Bob Morris from OAC in Guelph also remembers the six foot breakers on the beach. An ex-sea cadet, he sailed in the ship's whaler to an isolated beach. As they came ashore the whaler broached in the pounding surf. As Bob attempted to cut some of the tangled rigging free, he was almost crushed as the whaler was lifted and thrown onto the beach. The ship's cutter had to come to float a line ashore so that they could tow the whaler back to the ship. The crew returned in a beat-up old truck.)



June 18, Friday, 1948: Left Manzanillo at 1000. Verne and half the crew are quite sick this morning with diarrhoea and cramps - Montezuma's revenge.



June 19, Saturday, 1948: Another lovely warm day spent painting the superstructure of the ship. We are hurrying to get everything painted before we reach San Pedro where there are expected to be a number of receptions and parties. Classes today were held in gun drill.



June 20, Sunday, 1948: I slept with a blanket on me all night for the first time in four weeks. The sea temperature has dropped 15 degrees in one day. What a change! We are now taking heavy swells and salt spray across the foc'sle.



June 22, Tuesday, 1948: Arrived in Los Angeles Naval Base, Long Beach at 0700. Red Watch left at 1030 for a tour of Warner Brothers Studio and dinner at the Brown Derby. Verne and I went ashore in the afternoon and planned to catch a train to Los Angeles but were picked up by a guy named Moe in a new Ford coupe. He said he was going to Pasadena and that was fine with us. We drove through Long Beach and Los Angeles. In Pasadena we saw the famous Rose Bowl and visited Bullock's Department Store - the most modern and expensive store that I have ever seen. Articles had no prices on them. If you had to ask, you couldn't afford them. Moe took us home for dinner and then dropped us off at the Pasadena Auditorium where we saw the great musical "Oklahoma". After the show, we took a bus back to Los Angeles and got off at the corner of Hollywood and Vine (doesn't that sound grand). It was there that we bumped into two guys from the ship, Jim Roberts and Gus Higuchi. We had a few drinks in the posh Hollywood Knickerbocker Hotel, where they thought we were Limeys and then began the two hour trek back to Long Beach and the ship.



June 24/25, Thursday/Friday, 1948: After standing duty yesterday, to-day is our day for 36 hour leave. Through a mix-up, our watch was done out of a tour of R.K.O Studios and supper at the Brown Derby, so Verne and I headed for the YMCA in Hollywood. We visited NBC and CBS studios and managed to get tickets for a show with Hayvan MacQuarrie in "Noah Webster Says". At 8.00 am next morning, we went to the Tom Brenneman's show, "Breakfast in Hollywood", a very popular program with Gary Moore as Master of Ceremonies. We sat with two girls from Oregon. It was a most enjoyable breakfast and we enjoyed their company and the show very much. After window shopping, we returned to the ship.















































LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



31 May, 1999

Dear Editor,

Many thanks for your letter and the UNTiDy Tales extract about Captain Budge taken from Hal Lawrence's memoirs. I was most interested in Hal's story as he and I were V.R. Mids together in Halifax and friends until he died. I will pass on the story about Budge to the editor of Starshell and for the Budgie Booklet currently being assembled.



Peter Chance,

Sydney, B.C.



20 July, 1999

Dear Editor,

I have enjoyed your excellent series on the "Dream Cruise of 1948" but I wonder if you are aware of the shocking and shameful events which transpired at Royal Roads in the summer of "59?



That glorious summer began in the most promising manner. Rather than the usual crowded, fetid barracks we had so "enjoyed" at Stad and Naden, we were assigned private rooms in the dormitory at Royal Roads. Little did we realize that the forces of darkness, the agents of chaos were amongst us.



A certain training officer; a UNTD grad, whose name must remain confidential (although he was named by Stevie Cameron in her book "On The Take", in her list of the patronage appointees of the Mulroney government), managed to alienate so many cadets that, late one night, a ruthless band of revolutionary cadets conspired to irrigate him with a fire hose while he slept in the room next to mine. I heard the commotion and to my everlasting shame and regret, taking my role as Cadet Captain far too seriously, forced the rebels to cease and desist.



On the same night, the same or other seditious members of our organization removed, by stealth, the caps of dozens of sleeping cadets, in anticipation of admiral's inspection at 0900 the next morning. The hours between 0700 and 0900 were, as might be imagined, fraught with alarums and excursions. The headgear miraculously reappeared only a scant ten minutes before the admiral's arrival.



Perhaps the most shocking, the most prejudicial to good order and discipline, act of the summer was perpetrated by a cabal of apostates led by a prominent member of this alumni, who has since gone on to become a professor, a priest and a psychotherapist. They somehow enticed a rustled cow to ascend to the third floor of the dormitory (see pp. 163-66 UNTiDy Tales). As any farm boy knows, cows will not go down stairs. For all we know, it may still be there. Perhaps we will find out when we stay at Royal Roads for the Great 2000 Reunion.



And finally, I must be honest now, of all the many hundreds of cadets I had occasion to inspect that summer, the most pusser, the most impeccably turned out, the most promising officer material on the parade square, was definitely not the editor of this newsletter.



C.C. John Heighton,

HMCS York, 56-59,

4845 Escarpment Sideroad,

RR# 2, Caledon East, ON.

L0N 1E0



Editor's Note. John Heighton was a fine Cadet Captain. Little did he realize as he monitored my defaulter's laps around the circular driveway at Royal Roads, that he was honing the leadership skills of the future C.O. of HMCS Star, during whose appointment the Naval Division was awarded the Mainguy Trophy as the Most Improved Naval Division in Canada. Not too shabby eh John!



UNTD NEWSLETTER

This newsletter is published twice a year by the UNTD Assoc. of Upper Canada. Send Letters, anecdotes, suggestions to: Newsletter Editor: Cdr Robert Williamson, 1 Clonmore Ave. Hamilton, Ont. L9A 4R2,

Or: e-mail

Abraxas@worldchat.com