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MEDIA NEWS FOR COMMUNICATIONS WORLD, APRIL 14, 2001, BY GLENN HAUSER

THE LATEST ON ELECTRO-SMOG

Vatican Radio now has until the end of April to negotiate a 
reduction in its emissions. Italian Environment Minister Willer 
Bordon had given Vatican Radio a deadline of April 16th to comply 
with Italy`s strict RF emission regulations, or have its power cut 
off. This followed a survey which confirmed some Vatican emissions 
were as much as 20 volts per meter, far above Italy`s limit of 6. 
Vatican Radio agreed to cut its mediumwave broadcasts in half after 
Easter, and look into arranging more foreign relays for shortwave; 
but then Prime Minister Giuliano Amato overruled the Environment 
Minister, giving Vatican Radio the exstra time. The next target: 
US Navy antennas at Naples.

ANGOLA`S ECCLESIA TRIES SHORTWAVE AGAIN

Last year the Angolan Catholic station Radio Ecclésia, at odds with 
the Angolan government, tried broadcasting back to the country on 
shortwave via Radio Netherlands, but technical problems curtailed the 
service. Now Ecclésia is trying again, according to the Deutsche 
Telekom schedule via Wolfgang Büschel. A new daily service is to 
start April 15th on 15775 kilohertz, one hour each at 0500 and 1700 
UT.

CROATIA BACK WITH GERMAN RELAYS

After a break of about a year, Croatian Radio has resumed shortwave
broadcasts via Deutsche Telekom in Jülich, Germany. So far the 
transmissions have been mostly music with news headlines on the hour. 
Previously they had brief English and Spanish segments. The schedule 
via Volker Willschrey and Wolfgang Büschel is: to the Americas, 2300 
to 0500 on 9925; to Australia and New Zealand, 0500-0700 on 9470; 
0700-0900 on 13820, and Kai Ludwig observes that this is a domestic 
service relay.

LESS SHORTWAVE TO AUSTRALIA

Bob Padula in Australia laments that shortwave cutbacks are affecting 
services to Australia. The latest casualties: Switzerland, Far East 
Broadcasting Company, South Korea; some but not all broadcasts from 
THE Vatican, Austria, and Germany have been deleted. Nevertheless, 
Bob has set up a new electronic club called Shortwave Australia.

+++++++ following items were not aired ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

HOLZKIRCHEN MEDIUMWAVE CLOSES

The mediumwave 1593 kilohertz transmitter at Holzkirchen, Germany, 
which used to carry Radio Free Europe and VOA, was shut down April 
8th. Kai Ludwig points out, the mast was too close to residential 
buildings. But he and Wolfgang Büschel also note that the Serbo-
Croatian service it had been carrying is still heard quite well via 
Hungary on 1188. The US consulate in Munich said shortwave would 
continue from Holzkirchen. Those services are aimed toward the 
northeast.

IBB PROJECT IN SRI LANKA

Attention, construction companies in Sri Lanka. The IBB station 
transmitting this very program from Iranawila has issued a 
solicitation for the design and construction of a perimeter road and 
two concrete guard towers. A mandatory pre-proposal conference will 
be held at the site at 10 am local time May first. More information 
from Walter Patterson at the station.

VOA GREENVILLE SITE BECOMES AGROMEDICINE INSTITUTE

More than 600 acres of land near Greenville, North Carolina, once 
occupied by one of three VOA stations, are being turned over to the 
North Carolina Institute for Health and Safety in Agriculture, 
Forestry and Fisheries, or AgroMedicine Institute, for short. This 
report is from the local newspaper, the Daily Reflector.

Farming is second only to mining as the most dangerous occupation in 
the US, with fishing and forestry not far behind. The Institute, 
supported by three universities and various state agencies, hopes to 
improve conditions for farmers, foresters, and fishermen through 
research, education and outreach.

Ninety-six left-over VOA antenna towers still need to be removed 
from the site. HCJB would like to have them for the new plant it 
contemplates on the Ecuadorian coast.

ECUADOR WEBCASTING

The Voice of the Andes has started webcasting 24 hours in a variety 
of languages, prefaced by a more or less annoying commercial for 
substances such as cough drops. So more of their languages can be 
heard, only portions of the shortwave output in English are also on 
the webcast at http://www.hcjb.org, namely at 0000-0400, 0600-0830 
and 1130-1300 UT.

+++++++++++++++ above items were not aired ++++++++++++++++++++++++

JAPAN

Radio Japan has unveiled its on-line Japanese-language teaching 
service, available in 19 languages including English. Via Sergei 
Sosedkin, Konstantin Gusev in Moscow says the site 
http://www.nhk.or.jp/lesson/ is well developed but there is no 
archive of previously aired lessons. I find it has elementary 
romanized Japanese accompanying audio files to hear the expressions 
pronounced.

VILLAGE VOICE ONLINE RADIO

The Village Voice, America`s largest alternative weekly newspaper, 
launched Voice Radio, an online radio station, ON April 11th. A press 
release claims Voice Radio delivers a smart, edgy, lifestyle driven 
format; music ranges from rock to jazz to blues and hip-hop, from 
techno to deep house to drum `n` bass, from blue-beat to back-beat and 
beat-box. Plus, live music from clubs and local venues and talk shows 
about pop music. Village Voice Radio, ``that breaks all the rules`` 
is accessible via http://www.villagevoice.com

WEBCASTS SUSPENDED

A union representing actors in radio commercials, the American 
Federation of Television and Radio Artists, has started charging 
broadcasters extra if the ads also appear on webcasts -- despite the 
fact that webcasts are not profitable and reach only a tiny fraction 
of the broadcast audience. This has prompted many commercial 
stations, especially those owned by the goliath Clear Channel 
Communications, to suspend all their webcasting until the issue can 
be resolved. Fortunately this has little impact on non-commercial
webcasters.

ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY ENDS WEEKLY BROADCASTS

However, labor union costs were a factor in the demise of weekly 
Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra broadcasts this week on National 
Public Radio. The broadcasts cost the orchestra more than they 
benefited, especially with a dwindling number of stations carrying 
them. Kevin Kelly of publicradiofan.com refers us to a detailed 
article about this in the independent weekly from St. Louis, 
Riverfront Times.

http://www.riverfronttimes.com/issues/2001-03-07/muse.html

However, a new NPR program, Symphony Cast will feature St. Louis and 
a variety of other orchestras in rotation.

BBC RADIO TWO SPECIALS

Although classical music is primary for me, I also enjoy the lighter 
music from BBC Radio 2 webcasts, especially in the 1800 to 2130 
period on Tuesdays, from http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio2

In the sw programs group, Paul David in Britain recommends BBC 
Radio 2, counting down the top 100 singers of the last century, this 
weekend. The first two hours were on Friday, but you may be in time 
to hear the last five-sevenths, or surely the last two-sevenths: 
Saturday the 14th at 1600 to 1900 GMT, and Monday the 16th at 1100 to 
1300. [later: never mind re webcast: it was blocked on Saturday!]

PUSHING RUSSIAN BUTTONS

Wired broadcasting still exists in Russia, and a station`s priority 
among the buttons on the receivers, really speakers, is all-
important. The St. Petersburg Times reports that Petersburg Radio has 
been shifted from the first button to the third button of wired 
receivers in Soviet-era apartments that only carry fixed channels. 
Now on the first button is the state run Radio Rossiya. The third 
channel is much weaker, and some apartments are wired to receive only 
the first button. The second button goes to the state-run Mayak, and 
this pattern is supposed to be followed nationwide. Until now there 
had been an exception for Petersburg Radio, which is a favorite of 
older listeners, and is now expected to die for lack of audience
and advertising. Naturally, there are political reasons for this, BUT 
I won`t go into THEM.

POWER LINE COMMUNICATIONS

German radio listeners are dreading the advent of powerline 
communications, sure to cause unbearable interference to mediumwave 
and shortwave. Now Harry Sarkas sends an article in EE times, linked 
in this script, saying a system with four wideband carriers in the 10 
to 30 MHz range will be introduced first in the US and Canada. And 
plans are also underway in Japan and Britain.

http://www.eetimes.com/printableArticle?doc_id=OEG20010406S0058

GHANA OPENS UP

GBC Radio 1, Accra, says the Ghanaian government will soon enact a 
broadcast policy to promote informative and pluralistic media in the 
country. I expect this opens the door to foreign missionary 
broadcasters, and perhaps to FM relays of overseas stations.

SPECIAL FROM SOUTH AFRICA

Wednesday, April 18th, is World Amateur Radio Day. Again this year, 
SENTECH in South Africa will make special broadcasts for the 
occasion, according to Kathy Otto via Alokesh Gupta. A 50 minute 
program on amateur radio providing disaster communications will be 
broadcast five times: at 1400 UT to South Asia on 21725; at 1800 to 
southern Africa on 3215; 1905 to Central and North Africa on 17590; 
2005 to Europe on 15475. Radio RSA abolished broadcasts to North 
America long ago, but UT April 19th only, this special will also be
aimed at us at 0200 on 9585. Comments and reception reports go to
armi@intekom.co.za

``PATRIOTS`` SQUABBLE OVER SHORTWAVE STATION

Nothing has been heard on 3260 uppersideband since the Norm Creek 
militia gathering in Kentucky. Clandestine Radio Watch and Cumbre DX 
report that the head of the Kentucky State Militia ordered the 
broadcasts to cease, and when Steve Anderson defied the order and 
continued them under a new name, United Patriot Radio, he was 
expelled. But now he ought to be free to pursue his own agenda.

My thanks for editorial research go to Mike Cooper and BBC 
Monitoring.

For VOA News Now, I`m Glenn Hauser.