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Dave Taylor
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#004 - Berdan Sharpshooter Display Item / Rare 1864 Washington Arsenal Package Sharps Rifle Ammo: We see the Sharps factory made packages frequently enough, but finding US Arsenal made packages of Sharps rifle and carbine ammunition is a darn rare event. This complete pasteboard package of ten cartridges bears the label from the Washington Arsenal. This is the first such Washington Arsenal pack I have EVER owned. The lid is open on three sides so we can easily view the cartridges. About a thousand times rarer than a standard Sharps Ammo package but only priced marginally higher. I challenge you to find another. If you have a double set trigger Berdan Sharps rifle this would be a super accent display item. $1,850.00

 

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#012 - Mexican War Artillery Saber Belt - The Rarest Artillery Belt: Here is an opportunity for you to buy one of the rarest of the US enlisted belts of the 19th century. This is the Model 1839-40 white buff saber belt for the Light Artillery Saber. We see the belts for the 1832 artillery short swords on a regular basis. But this pre Mexican War belt for the artillery saber is THE FIRST I HAVE OWNED --- and that is saying a lot because I have been collecting this stuff for nearly 40 years. This utilizes the 2-piece interlocking US artillery buckle as we commonly see on the short sword belts (which are now being priced at over $2000 each!). But this belt has the long white buff leather saber hanger straps for use with the mounted artillery saber. These long saber straps are what make this belt so rare. Again --- this is the first of these I have owned since I began collecting in 1972. When a good friend and fellow dealer/collector offered me first shot, I jumped on the opportunity. Excellent condition and extremely rare.... $2,750.00

 

#016 - Fine Large Size Silver Handle Patriotic Bowie knife - A very 1860s Sheffield knife stamped on the ricasso “Best English Cutlery”. 13 inches overall with an 8 inch blade. This is an attractive patriotic bowie knife with a fierce American eagle near the pommel of the grip and the blade having the classic clipped point form so desirable with collectors. Perfect to display with Union soldier’s effects, and a very scarce knife... $1350.0

 

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#018 - Incredibly Cool 1812 to 1820s Arsenal Pack of Bayonet Scabbards: The scabbards are similar to 1816 US patterns with brass throats and drags, but they are British for the Bess muskets. There are four scabbards still present (one lacks the drag) but the cool part is the accompanying original thick brown paper wrapper with the original printed green label which reads “10 Bayonet Scabbards”. One of my bayonet guru friends informs me that he believes they are Hawke Moseley & Co. products which were in use from 1812 to 1830s. He says Bannerman and company offered these for sale in the old days and this must be the remnant of one of those ancient packages. If you have a display of War of 1812 or Mexican War weapons this would make one heck of a great addition. I doubt you will find another such item for sale anywhere this year --- $750.00

 

#020 - Magnificent Lincoln & Mary Todd From Life Large CDV Album: A treasure I purchased fresh from the family estate auction of Lieut. William W. McCracken 20th Ohio Volunteers... 1860s brass bound leather photo album for cartes de visites. The album is designed to hold fifty CDVs. Each page but three is full front and back and all the cartes are as new. The “meat and potatoes” found inside are the two MINT condition CDVs of the Lincolns. One shows Abraham Lincoln full seated leaning forward. The other shows Mary Todd Lincoln in as appealing a view of her as was taken. Each bears an Anthony / Brady back mark. Also present is an outdoor view showing soldiers posed around Grant’s Petersburg Headquarters building after it had been moved to Philadelphia at the end of the war. Another interesting view is one showing a European medal. And at the back of the album is a crisp autographed CDV of a War of 1812 soldier named John Hicks of New Jersey along with a separate printed biography on Mr. Hicks which tells of his service in three wars. (1812, Mexican, and Civil). There is also a seated CDV photo of Professor Samuel F.B. Morse inventor of the telegraph --- shown in the photo with him is an electric device but it does not look like a telegraph key. Other cartes include a from life Winfield Scott. Mass produced views of Henry Clay, Lincoln in bust, and Grant in bust, and Anna Dickinson. Also present is a retouched outdoor view of the Union League House in Philadelphia. There are seven CDVs of paintings or statues Christian in nature. There are a number of American cartes showing artwork of American scenes including one neat one of a mother playing soldier with her two kids in patriotic garb, another of a painting showing a little boy showing a little girl to play the flute, Washington kneeling before Martha, dozens of American views of lithos and paintings of 1860s life, a couple views of statues, and more. The album is beautiful though the front cover is beginning to separate. One of the nicest Civil War albums I have found in recent years, and this one is “as found” untouched and unaltered like the old days... and again Lincoln and Mrs. “from life” and mint.... $2,400.00

 

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#021 - Albumen Photo George Custer: This is a crisp from life albumen of General Custer, very striking, and very clear. Many decades ago some enterprising young person took this albumen photograph of General Custer, and meticulously cut around his profile, removing all the background from the photo, and producing a result like a doll cut out. This photo remained in this state until a few years ago when a current day collector mounted the albumen on an artist board backing and framed it. This has produced the fine result you see illustrated here. The image of Custer is just over 7 1/4 inches tall and is very clear. Almost clear enough to see all the detail on his buttons. The total image area is 9” wide by 12” tall. And this image has been framed with an ornate modern frame with an antique appearance. The frame is 16” by 19” and is 1 3/4 inches deep. Needless to say, I wish the albumen had not been trimmed those many years ago, but the result is present and the cost but a fraction of what the unaltered photo would bring. You will be very pleased at … $1,250.00

 

#022 - Group of 4 CDV’s of soldiers - All four of these are signed in ink, three are signed on the back, and one on the front. From left to right we have Capt. George W. Creasey 35th MA Inf. Co. B (Wounded 12/13/1862 Fredericksburg, VA POW 5/24/1864 North Anna River, VA (Confined at Macon, GA & Columbia, SC)* Paroled 3/11/1865) Second is Alfred L. Bates Private in Co. H 12 Mass. Next we have Otis H. Weed Private in Co. H 12 MA Vols. and finally we see Amos H. Fairbanks another private in Co. H of the 12th. He was wounded 5/8/1864 Spotsylvania Court House, VA $425.00 for the Group of 4.

 

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#024 - Wonderful CDV 2 Masted Ship moored in the harbor. US flag on staff- side of hull has what appear to gun ports the entire length. Image somewhat faded but still good. Views of ships are pretty darn scarce. $165.00

#030 - CDV General John Cochrane - Wonderful view showing the General wearing a common private’s blouse buttoned all the way to the throat. Really striking pose. Commanded the 65th NY Vols. Then brigadier in the Army of the Potomac. Battles include Fair Oaks , Malvern Hill, Antietam, Williamsport, Fredericksburg. In 1864 he was nominated for vice-president of the United States, with Gen. John C. Fremont for president. Rare view- $250.00

#031 - CDV Literate Corporal: Our yank is posed with The Websters Dictionary (title on spine clearly visible). He must have thought himself a scholar. Taken by J.H. Young of Baltimore MD. Kind of a funny view - $49.00

 

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#032 - CDV Major General Lovell H. Rousseau: Initially raised the Louisville Legion in 1861. - later promoted brigadier general of Volunteers attached to the army of Gen. Ormsby M. Mitchel. Later promoted to major general of Volunteers. He served valiantly at the Battles of Shiloh, Stones River, Chickamauga, the Tullahoma Campaign and around Chattanooga, TN. Also, on Sherman’s orders, he carried out a very successful raid on the Montgomery and West Point Rail­road in July 1864. Near mint, ink inscribed, Brady image bearing Anthony stamp. $165.00

#033 - Autographed CDV Gen. George B. McClellan: Nice standing pose boldly autographed on the reverse by Little Mac himself - signed in ink “Geo. B. McClellan / Maj. Genl. USA / Boston Feb. 5th 1863”. His career was controversial - truly loved and respected by his men, criticized by Lincoln for excessive cautiousness, removed from command,. and then a run for the presidency against Lincoln in 1864. He served as the Governor of New Jersey 1878 to 1881. Photographer’s imprint is “WHIPPLE 96 Washington Street, Boston.” $750.00

#034 - CDV Colonel Harvey S. Chatfield 102nd NY also 43rd NY aka “Albany Rifles” & 78th NY. In the 43rd he saw battle at Yorktown, Lee’s Mill, Williamsburg, 7 Days etc. He then served in the 78th as captain, then Lt. Col. 102nd NYSVI, The Van Buren Light Infantry. On June 4, 1865, he was promoted to Colonel, and served in that rank until the regiment was mustered out, July 21, 1865. During his service, his regiments fought at Yorktown, Williamsburg, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Groveton, Second Bull Run, Antietem, Chancellorsville, Get tysburg, Wauhatchie, Lookout Mountain, Resaca, Dallas, and Atlanta. No Backmark, with a pencil inscription on the back identifying him as, Harvey S. Chatfield, Lt. Col, 102NY $150.00

 

#037 - CDV Confederate Jerome Pendleton 4th Louisiana Cavalry. A fine standing view showing the subject in regulation Confederate officer’s frock with belt and sword. The identification is verbal and was given when I bought this at auction. A note accompanying states “the index page to the album was faded and worn but it is believed that he served with the 4th Cavalry of Louisiana. He was related to the Tarrant family of Dyers burg, Tennessee.” Backmark is L, L, Prince of New Orleans. Slightest fading but overall very good. A rare Confederate photo… $950.00

#038 - Cdv And Autograph Gen. Butler In An Album Page - This cdv is from the collection of Kate Chase, the daughter of Salmon Chase, and is a fine wartime image in the original album page, which bears Butler’s distinctive signature. It depicts a seated Butler in the early war uniform of a brigadier general. He signed Miss Chase’s ornate white mount “Yours truly, B.F. Butler.” A very fine autograph and CDV of “Beast Butler” aka “Spoons Butler” the first title a result of his ordering all women of New Orleans showing disrespect toward Union soldiers to be treated as a prostitute plying her trade. ,The second title derived from rumors of his stealing silver spoons from dinner settings. Immediately after the war a mechanical bank shaped like a frog with Butler’s features was all the rage. Despite his negatives he was a pretty good General. Most historic…. $795.00

 

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#046 - CDV of Admiral C. S. Boggs. In December 1861 Boggs was given command of the gunboat Varuna. During the Capture of New Orleans, he commanded her with distinction: he destroyed six of the Confederate gunboats, and lost his own vessel. When he found the Varuna sinking, he ran her ashore, tied her to the trees, and fired his guns until the water was over the guntracks.” Commissioned Captain in July 1862, during the rest of the war he was commanding officer of the steam sloops Juniata and Sacramento, with the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron and the steam cruiser Connecticut in the West Indies. Identified on front in pencil, and on back in ink. the backmark is “Rockwood … NY” A most historic USN photograph… $150.00

 

 

#053 - Quarter Plate Tintype Armed Cavalryman: A very appealing ¼ plate tintype. Yank wears regulation shell jacket, saber belt, and holds his saber for all to see. Overall VG to Fine Condition. Great clarity and contrast… has a few spots and minor bends. Just the image, no case or frame. $325.00

 

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#059 - CDV Size Tintype Armed Cavalryman: Nice image which was originally a quarter plate and was trimmed down to cdv size to fit in a photo album. A nice clear view as you can see. Neat slouch hat and fatigue blouse… $200.00

#064 - 6th Plate Tintype Union Army Officer: Sharp image with great detail, Yank lieutenant showing his commercial 4-button blouse unbuttoned to expose his army vest. Fine, with patriotic mat. Half case. Classic image? $235.00

 

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#068 - Presentation Engraved War Date 1860 Staff Officer’s Sword Presented to Surgeon: - This is the 1860 staff officers sword which is virtually impossible to find made pre 1865, a true rarity in military collectibles. This sword is etched with the US coat of arms, military trophies, and floral designs. The knuckle-bow has floral scrolls and thunderbolts, and the guard has an eagle and arms on one side, with the opposite hinged clam shell guard bearing a beautiful engraved inscription which reads “ Dr. Carr/from/Capt. Craig”. This sword is missing the small ball, which helps keep the counter-guard either open or closed, but other than that is complete. I had helper Tom install a cosmetic “ball” for display purposes. The condition is “very good” The brass mounted steel scabbard is likewise “VG” showing just the right amount of age. The patina on the brass is rich, deep, undisturbed, and beautiful... the way you wish all your antique brass looked. As for our good Dr. and his friend Capt. Craig, I have found a handful of surgeons named Carr and a few Union Army captains named Craig. None of the possibles served in the same unit, so we will surmise that their relationship was professional with the gifted sword possibly for medical services rendered. I will leave the research project of determining which Dr. Carr and which Capt. Craig have the “doctor - patient” relationship. I am certain the relationship can be discovered but am equally certain that it will take a lot of hours of detective work to find it, hours that I do not have to spare at this end. ...An extremely scarce sword with a compelling and tantalizing inscription begging for research... a very fair deal at $1995.00

 

 

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#072 - MINT BLADE - 1865 Dated Mansfield & Lamb Cavalry Saber with Mint Blade - This is an outstanding saber. The blade is mint, mint, mint, and is deeply stamped “U.S./C.E.W./1865” and “ Mansfield & Lamb Forrestdale R.I.” in an oval marking. The scabbard is original, dent free, and smooth, shiny steel. The leather grip is in very fine condition. There is a stress line running the length of the grip on the back side but this is not visible when the saber is displayed on the wall. The twisted wire wrap is firmly in place. The brass guard is attractive shiny brass, with no blemishes. Pommel cap stamped “F/65” (Co “F” soldier # 65) … The original leather washer is present at the hilt. This light cavalry saber has one of the best condition blades available, A top end example…. $1,150.00

 

#073 - Weird 1845 Ames Heavy Cavalry Saber – Altered, changed … Early date 1845 Ames cavalry saber has had the blade cut down to 21 inches long, and has been honed into an imposing weapon. The ricasso is marked “US / JCB” and on the other side “N.P. AMES / CABOTVILLE / 1845”. Other than the shortened length, the blade is in very good condition, with no pitting or rust. There are some dings to the wide flat spine of this sword. The original leather washer is present, as is a great scabbard. This scabbard is another mystery. It does not fit a full length blade of a cavalry nor artillery saber… but it came with this cut down blade. I will let you figure out the mystery… No dents, no dings, no pitting. The sword has very good brass pommel, knuckle bow, counter guard, and branches that all have a deepening patina. The leather is VG also, and is missing a couple of sections of wire, and the wire that is there may have been replaced. This is an interesting piece for speculation, who did it, when, why. The various parts are worth the price of admission … $395.00

 

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#074 - Ames 1833 Mounted Dragoon Saber - Much better than most we see on the market today… bears needle etched 1835 manufacture date as well as full firm name and “United States” markings. The blade is a even gray tone, and has a few minor edge nicks on the edge. The guard, grip, wrap, etc are all excellent with just some surface flaking on the grip leather … of no consequence. The twisted dragoon wire is all original, and the scabbard is likewise very fine. There are just a few minor push dents near the drag. The rings are the rare early original split “key ring” style which is correct and mandatory on this early scabbard. Overall look is a dark chocolate patina. These ’33 dragoon sabers in nice shape are rarer than ice cream cones in hell… A fine example.. $2150.00

 

 

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#078 - Extra Fine Presentation Staff & Field Officer’s Sword 18th New Hampshire Vols. - Beautiful Clauberg Solingen 1850 Staff & Field Officer’s Sword with a stellar blade. This sword was “Presented to / LIEUT / Joseph H Cram / Co D 18th N.H. Vols. / By Members of his Comp / April 25th 1865” and is so engraved on the top scabbard mount. The sword blade is in near mint condition, with very strong etching and all the frosty factory luster. The ricasso has a stamped proof mark on one side, and the other side has “Clauberg / (knight) / Solingen”. The guard and pommel have finely cast floral and patriotic detail, including a patriotic shield cast into the pommel. The grip is very good, though it does have a small repair where a small tack was inserted into the wire at one location to help keep it tight. The grip is covered in rayskin, showing just a little wear and loss. The scabbard is in extra fine condition, and has brass mounts with floral details. The top mount has a well crafted presentation. Cram had quite a good war record serving in the 11th New Hampshire from 1862 through 1864 fighting at Fredericksburg and then Jackson Mississippi. He then served in the 18th NHV in 1864 and 1865 seeing battle at Fort Steadman and Petersburg, Virginia. Cram survived the war but died young at the age of 33 in 1873. He must have been quite a respected officer to have been given this fine sword. A great sword on all fronts.... the condition is truly top shelf... $3,250.00

 

#079 - Model 1840 Medical Staff Sword - This is the early design where the blade has an elliptical cross section. This became a lighter diamond cross-section in the later models. This sword here was sold by Schuyler Hartley & Graham New York and is so signed on the blade. The sword blade is just under 30” long and is completely straight and measures 3/4 inch wide at the hilt. The blade is etched on both sides. There is an “MS” on one side, and on the other side there is a caduceus with staff and snake. Both sides also have floral sprays as design elements. The scabbard and hilt are of a matching brass with a light bronze patina. The scabbard has heavily detailed cast ring mounts and drag and has 3 minor dents. The mounts have cast designs of laurel and other elements. The hilt is all made of cast brass also, and the grip has an eagle on both sides, with an acorn/pineapple finial. The languet is shield shaped, and bears 7 stars with a silver olde english “MS” attached. The sword is overall fine+ condition. I have “run up on” a handful of these Medical Staff swords in recent months… here is one I believe you will find priced more than friendly…. A fine Civil War sword for……. $1,850.00

 

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#081 - Peterson 75 Non-Reg Officers’ Sword - These were one of the more popular swords carried by combat officers during the Civil War. Has a slightly curved 32 1/2 inch blade that is etched with “US” on one side, and an eagle with banner reading “E Pluribus Unum” on the other. The ricasso is stamped “W. WALSCHEID / SOLINGEN” and “PROVED”. The scabbard and mounts are steel in VG condition with a few rough spots on the quillon, and on the throat. The scabbard is original, and has a flared throat and ornate drag. The scabbard honestly looks like it was used to block a sword attack. There are numerous thin dents that could correspond with being hit with a sword blade. The iron guard has a cut out eagle with spread wings, finely engraved with nice details in the wings, feathers, and in the banner …“E Pluribus Unum”. The grip has lost about 30% of the shagreen covering, but still has the original twisted wire wrap. As you can see from the photo, a small section of wood has been lost from the grip right near the pommel. A nice affordable Peterson 75 … $595.0

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#087 - Imported NCO sword Sold by Horstmann & Sons - Classic foreign made sword marketed to the US military. The blade is in superb condition, with absolutely no nicks or pitting whatsoever. There are no markings on the guard or any of the brass on the sword. The scabbard is a VG+ leather with bright original brass fittings. The leather is getting a touch weak near the drag, but overall is very solid. The leather washer is compacted, and half gone, but is original. This is a great import at a great price. $470.00

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#098 - Rare 1862 Millard Contract Saber Ohio Officer Carried:- When this sword was purchased, the Ohio family who sold it to me related that it was carried by an Ohio man known as Col. Clark and they gave me a photo of the colonel and his wife which are also included with the saber. The sword is a fine and solid example of the scarce Millard contract light cavalry saber made in 1862 and one of only 10,000 made during their single contract. The condition is about fine... super grip with all the leather and twisted wire wrap. It has the original leather washer. The brass guard has a warm reddish patina. The blade is overall VG but has some very minor spots of surface texture pitting here and there, it is free from nicks and dings. Ricasso marked “US / CEW / 1862” and “D.J. Millard... “ The scabbard is also very good with just a little surface rust near the ring mounts and just a tiny 1/2 inch ding near the upper ring mount. Very minor. I will leave the research of Colonel Clark up to you. If you recognize his face in the photo --- you win the prize. Here is one heck of a good deal for you.... I have this priced where my competitors price just the sword.... $1,350.00

 

 

#100 - Mass Marked Ames Heavy Cavalry Saber - This Ames saber is the pattern 1840 wristbreaker. Overall VG to fine. The grip is super with excellent wire and twisted brass wire wrap. The blade is about fine with loads of original polish, overall shiny steel with a few age stains... Absolutely no pitting on the blade, and only 2 of the tiniest nicks. The stamping on the ricasso is light but we can still read the last part of the “47” in the date of 1847. Other side has “US/NWP”. The firm name is about worn away. The pommel has inspector marks “NWP” as well as a rack tiny number “59”.. This number is also found on the guard. The scabbard is inspected “ADK” and is also marked “MS” on the drag, showing ownership by Massachusetts. The scabbard is overall grey steel with some light texture pitting but no significant dents. There are a couple inconsequential “pushes” on the back side. A great early wristbreaker with Mexican War date plus state ownership markings. $1,475.00

 

#106 - Superb Presentation Inscribed Rush’s Lancers (6th Penna. Cavalry) Colt Navy Revolver: My favorite “gun find” of recent months. This 1851 Colt Navy is presentation engraved on the back strap and butt strap with an inscription reading... “Lt. H.P. Muirheid Philadelphia Light Cavalry Presented by C.H. Muirheid” The Philadelphia Light Cavalry is of course Rush’s Lancers, the famed 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry. This is the regiment that actually served as “Lancers”... carrying the ten or twelve foot long spears which were impressive but outmoded.
A native of New Jersey, Henry P. Muirheid (1835-1876) served as Captain, Company G, 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Rush’s Lancers, Army of the Potomac. Muirheid mustered in as 1st lieutenant of the Philadelphia-raised Company A in September 1861 (when this pistol was presented by his brother Charles) and was later promoted to captain commanding Company G on March 29, 1862. Captain Muirheid is mentioned in the Official Records for his leadership in the engagement near Hanover Court House on May 27, 1862 during the Peninsula campaign. During the Antietam campaign he commanded General Franklin’s 6th Corps Headquarters Escort. He served with distinction and acclaim until his health suffered a dramatic decline in early 1863. He was discharged on a surgeon’s certificate of disability on April 2, 1863. I wonder if Captain Muirhead might have suffered a heart attack or congestive heart failure as he went from being a vibrant combat officer to a near invalid in short order. Doubtless, the stress of Civil War combat service was the cause of this. Finding an inscribed Colt from such a famous regiment is a rare event indeed. The Colt is NRA “very good” condition. It is all original and complete... all matching serial numbers... mechanically perfect... good cylinder scene... all metal surfaces somewhat over cleaned. A rare and historic Colt ... $6,500.00

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#112 - Confederate 2-Piece Interlocking CS Sword Belt Plate (with or without the belt): This buckle is an extremely rare item to find in “non-dug” condition. This one is a spectacular Virginia pattern interlocking tongue and wreath buckle designed for use on a sword belt worn by officers or mounted troops. It is the pattern with attractive rounded serifs on the letters and a beautiful oak leaf decorated wreath. This design is figure 015 in Steve Mullinax’ book Confederate Belt Buckles and Plates. This one turned up at an estate auction in Northern Virginia in 2008 and was sold to me by the man who got it there this year (2010). He just couldn’t bring himself to sell it for a couple years. It is in perfect non-dug condition just as it was saved by the Virginian who wore it. It is shown here displayed on a belt I have owned for years--- a beautiful brown leather sword belt that had no buckle on it when I got it. I do not know whether the belt originally had a militia buckle or Confederate buckle on it during the Civil War. I have simply kept it as one of the best examples of such a belt I have found. The keeper stitching is popped on the leather allowing for any two piece buckle to be displayed there. The CS buckle displayed on this belt it makes it look like a twenty thousand dollar rig, which it would be if the buckle had come on the belt and was held in place by original stitching. If you would like to have the belt to accompany the plate I will sell the belt with the buckle for $7,500.00 If you want just the buckle alone the price is $4,500.00

 

#114 - Atlanta Georgia Confederate Officer’s Inscribed Sword: Fresh from an estate in north Georgia is this wonderful “as found” Confederate officer’s sword. It is a Boyle & Gamble Confederate foot officer’s sword made in Richmond, Virginia ... housed in a captured Union scabbard. The age, color, patina, and rust are IDENTICAL on both the sword and scabbard. I repeat, the age, color, patina, and rust patterns are absolutely identical on both pieces. There is no question these two pieces have been together since the Civil War. Neatly and simply engraved on the top mount of the scabbard is “W. N. Cook”. Careful and deliberate research indicates that the owner of this sword is 2nd Lieutenant W. N. Cook of Campbells Light Artillery (Georgia) which served at the Confederate Arsenal in Atlanta. Using the U.S. National Park Service data base we find that of the hundreds of Confederates named “Cook” only two carry the initials “W.N.” One was a private in the 18th Georgia Infantry. The other is our artillery officer. Further research to rule out federal usage shows only one US officer named W N Cook in the war. He served less than a month in 1862 and died before ever leaving New Hampshire. This is fresh to the market. I bought it at our last meeting of the OGCA from the militaria dealer who obtained it from the first picker in Georgia. This is dead real and as honest as any sword you can find. The CS Artillery unit served as guards at the Atlanta Arsenal as far as I can determine. Perhaps you can learn more. The brass guard and brass scabbard mounts are beautifully patinated. The steel sheath and some spots on the blade have ancient rust and some light scale (identical on both). The grip has 70% of the leather covering worn away. The balance of the leather is dry and untouched. The single strand copper wire is still firmly in place. Still dangling from the ring mounts are brass clips off a sword belt. A really appealing Johnny Reb sword.... $5,950.00

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#115 - Identified Twice-Wounded Confederate Officer’s Boyle and Gamble staff sword and the Colt 1851 Navy revolver of the twice-captured Yankee who brought it home as a souvenir!
I personally purchased these items directly from the family of James D. Gage, 1st R.I. and 1st N.H. Cavalry: Confederate Boyle and Gamble officer’s sword of Capt. Mallory L. Henley, 35th North Carolina Infantry and Gage’s own 1851 Colt Navy- relics of two early war volunteers on opposite sides who rose from enlistedmen to officers.
Gage enlisted at 20 in Manchester, NH, 10/1/61 and mustered into Co. K, First New England Cavalry 10/24/61, which was redesignated the First Rhode Island Cavalry in 1862, to the chagrin of the four New Hampshire companies forming its Third Battalion. He made Corporal 12/31/61. In May, 1862, his battalion made a celebrated charge on Confederate cavalry, infantry, and artillery holding the town of Front Royal, capturing 117 Confederates and freeing a number of Union prisoners. Gage was sick in hospital on 6/15/62, but returned 8/15/62 in time for Pope’s Virginia campaign, in which the regiment took part in all engagements. On 3/17/63 at Kelly’s Ford, “the first cavalry fight of the war,” in the face of enemy fire the regiment successfully charged across the river where another regiment had been repulsed. They then took part in the back and forth charges of the battle, losing 16 men captured who, “charged too far into the enemy’s lines.” Gage was apparently one of them, being listed as captured, but he was apparently resourceful: he is listed as having escaped the same day.
During the Gettysburg campaign, the regiment fought Stuart’s cavalry at Middleburgh, Va, 6/18/63. Having barricaded themselves inside the town, they repulsed several assaults, but without reinforcements had to cut their way out. 200 were captured, including Gage, who was paroled 10/15/63.
In January, 1864, the third battalion of the 1st R.I. Cav. was detached to form the nucleus of the 1st N.H. Cav. Gage transferred as of 1/7/64, with a promotion to Sergeant dated 1/5/64, and First Sergeant 7/1/64. The regiment fought at White Oak Swamp, Reams Station, and the Weldon Railroad, but saw most of its action in the Shenandoah at Winchester, Kearneysville, Tom’s Brook and two dozen other fights. Gage apparently took an active role and was well thought of, for he was commissioned (though not mustered) 2nd Lieutenant 6/10/65. He mustered out 7/15/65 at Clouds Mills, Va.
Obituaries suggest Gage was also wounded several times during the war, though the readily available rosters do not show it, which is not unusual. After the war he was involved with the reburial of Union war dead in national cemetaries and eventually became the Adjutant-General of the State of Nebraska with the rank of Brigadier General in the national guard.
Gage chose an interesting sword to keep as a souvenir of the war. Absolutely dead real is the name carved into the leather scabbard: M.L. HENLEY. The ONLY Confederate office this could be is Mallory L. Henley, 16th and the 35th North Carolina. (There isn’t even another plain “M. Henley.”) Henley resided in Henderson County when he enlisted at 22 on 5/5/61 and mustered as a private into Co. I of the 16th NC Infantry. This regiment served in Whiting’s, later A.P. Hill’s, division. Henley was wounded in the arm 5/31/62 at Seven Pines, Va., otherwise known as the first days fighting at Fair Oaks, where the regiment was heavily engaged.

The regiment also suffered heavily at Mechanicsville, Gaines Mill, Second Manassas and a number of other engagements. Henley was well enough regarded that he was offered and accepted a commission in the 35th North Carolina 10/7/62. He is listed as going into the regiment as a sergeant, but is immediately promoted 2nd Lieutenant and then 1st Lieutenant five days later, 10/12/62.
During Henley’s service with it the 35th served in Ransom’s Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia, and then was posted to the Dept. of North Carolina and South Virginia. It served briefly in the Dept. of Richmond, from July to Sept. 1863, and returned further south until October 1864 when it rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia. The regiment fought at Fredericksburg, Kinston, NC, Plymouth, Bermuda Hundred, Petersburg, and Ft. Stedman. During the Petersburg campaign it lost men almost daily. CWData lists an astounding 124 dates where they suffered combat losses.
Henley is listed as hospitalized with his second gunshot wound, this time to the left foot, on 5/19/64. Judging from the date, he is likely to have been wounded at Drewry’s Bluff or Bermuda Hundred. While recuperating he received a commission as Captain 6/25/64, and he returned to duty with the regiment 7/24/64 at Petersburg. His date and method of discharge are not given.
Gage’s pistol is a Colt 1851 navy, serial #138769, thus made in early 1863. In all likelihood this is the pistol issued to him upon his return from parole in October, 1863, and would have seen action in the Shenandoah and elsewhere. The pistol has minor wear to the bottom edges of the grips. The only defects a missing forward screw in the trigger guard and a broken loading lever latch. Otherwise NRA “very good” condition being all original and unaltered.
Confederate Henley’s sword is the classic Boyle and Gamble staff and field officer’s sword with the star over CS in a wreath in the brass guard, complete and unmessed with. The grip is nice, with full leather, though lacking the wire. The quillon has a slight downward curve, typical of a sword with some use. The blade is a characteristically Boyle and Gamble unetched blade with an unstopped fuller. The blade is mixed gray and bright with no pitting, rust or edge nicks. It even retains its washer at the blade shoulder under the guard. The scabbard is the typical top-stitched brass-mounted black leather with “M.L. HENLEY” neatly carved in block letters inside a rectangular border between the upper and middle mounts. Two small holes were punched in the middle mount for rivets that are now gone. Likewise a small pin secures the drag. The drag shows the wonderful wear along its bottom edge that we like to see on an actually field used sword from its contact with the ground. This is the classic, most sought, of all Confederate officer’s swords.
This is a great set of weapons, the type that practically never shows up any more. Most families long ago parted with granddad’s old revolver, let alone a sword with a non-family member’s name on it, and most dealers would split this set up. Here’s a chance to own an intact historical family group that embodies everything- cavalry, infantry, north, south, officer and enlisted. $22,500.00

#116 - US Model 1855 Rifleman’s Belt and Bayonet Frog with four piece buckle. Purchased by an old time collector from Bannerman’s in the 1940s, they advertised it as a “Confederate Army Officer’s Sword Belt” way back when. This is a VG+ black harness leather example. 100% complete except for the short tab on the frog that secures to the buckle. These were issued with Model 1855 rifles and other two-band short rifles that accepted the saber bayonet. The buckle is rather ingenious having the central interlocking buckle and then two flanking devices designed to hold the brass hooks of a knapsack. Overall VG to fine condition, just being a little dirty from years of storage. The tourist town dealers have been pricing these in the $1300 to $1600 range... Here is a heck of a deal.... $975.00

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#117 - New York and US Colored Troops Inscribed Klingenthal Officer’s Saber - This smaller size (33 inch blade) cavalry officer’s saber is engraved on the pommel in two lines. The top line is not legible, but the second line is a date “May 10”. The scabbard is also engraved covering most of the space between the two ring mounts. It is engraved in a fine thin line style, and it says “F S Goodrich / LIEUT 33d USCT May ‘10’ 1864 “. This inscription is very worn but totally legible. This sword came to Frederick S. Goodrich midway through his military career. He had first enlisted in 1862 in NY and saw service with the 115th NY in Company H for its entire service until early 1864. Goodrich was then offered and accepted a commission as a Lieutenant in the 33rd USCT. Many Union NCOs took commissions in “colored” regiments. His picture can be seen on Civilwardata.com, and is being shown here for informational purposes only. The sword is in good worn condition, the blade is gently curved with a bright appearance in most spots. There is some surface discoloration, and light pitting, and a few nicks on the sharpened cutting edge. The spine is clearly marked with Klingenthal’s logo and the blade also has 2 proof marks on the ricasso. The blade must have gotten loose at some point and a nail has been pounded in between the ricasso and the hilt, but by the looks of it, this happened a very long time ago. The grip has the full shagreen and twisted wire wrap. The brass on the guard has a smooth uncleaned attic patina, and has lovely cast decorative details. This is a well used sword that was “really there”. It is one of the more affordable inscribed swords and you will be pleased with this at $1,795.00

 

 

 

#120 - Presentation 38th Pennsylvania Officer’s Sword – SHOT IN THE LEG (by himself): Ames Foot Officer’s Sword w/ great presentation - Engraved on the top mount “Presented to / Lieut J. Wills / by / Stephen Mercer / Andrew N Kennedy / and others / June 1861”. This is John Wills 38th PVI. The sword itself is in very good condition save for a few nicks in the blade. The scabbard has lots of weak spots and bends, but is not broken through. The grip is VG+ with the original twisted wire wrap. The brass guard has a slight bend in it near the quillon. The blade is signed with the scroll style Ames marking, and the scabbard is marked on the throat “AMES MFG. CO. CHICOPEE MASS”. The brass mounts have a smooth light patina and are in VG shape, the drag is slightly dented, but nothing too serious. Mills served from May 1861 through August 1862. During the period the 38th PVI saw battle at Dranesville, VA, Mechanicsville, Gaines Mill, and Glendale. He accidently shot himself in the leg in the fall of ’61. An interesting Civil War presentation sword that is very affordable. $2,450.00

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#122 - Confederate Commanding Officer’s Frock Coat of the “Bloody Sixth” North Carolina, actually battle worn and showing the effects of his severe wound at Antietam! This is the coat of Robert Fulton Webb 6th NCST.

Robert Fulton Webb organized the Flat River Guards in Orange County, NC, a year before the war broke out. Mustering into Confederate service in May, 1861, they became Co. B 6th North Carolina State Troops, later nicknamed “The Bloody Sixth.” The regiment truly earned the nickname… they suffered 59 killed and wounded at First Manassas, 79 at Seven Pines, 50 at Gaines Mill, 52 at Malvern Hill, 66 at Second Manassas, 103 at Antietam, 29 at Fredericksburg, and 173 at Gettysburg.

Leaving behind a wife and three small children, the 38 year-old Mexican War veteran officer quickly rose from Captain of the company to Major of the regiment on 7/11/61. At First Manassas in Bernard Bee’s brigade they took part in the fierce fighting on Henry House Hill and aided in taking Ricketts’ and Griffin’s Federal artillery batteries. One of Webb’s extant letters recounts the mortal wounding of a comrade standing beside him amidst the wreckage of the captured artillery.

During the Peninsular Campaign Webb saw action at Eltham’s Landing and Seven Pines, and in the Seven Days Fight, where he received official praise according to his compiled service record. Webb took command of the regiment at Gaines Mill after Col. Avery was wounded, and led it at Malvern Hill, Thoroughfare Gap and Second Manassas, and at Boonsboro in Law’s Brigade, Hood’s Division.

At Antietam, attached to Stonewall Jackson on the Confederate left, they took part in the carnage of the Miller cornfield north of Dunker Church. Called into action to face Hooker’s attack that had shattered the divisions of Lawton and Jones, Hood charged north into the cornfield at 7:00 a.m. and at points engaged Federals on three sides, breaking Hooker’s attack but losing almost 1,400 men in thirty minutes of fierce fighting he characterized as, “the most terrific clash of arms, by far, that has occurred during the war.” Asked where his division was after the fight, he famously replied, “dead on the field.”

Among Hood’s casualties was Major Webb, severely wounded in the left arm. This is the very coat he was wearing that bloody morning, the left sleeve hurriedly cut away below the shoulder to give the surgeons access to his wound. (CSA Major R. W. York speaking at Webb’s funeral in 1891 gave a eulogy mistakenly referring to Webb’s shattered right arm… It was Webb’s left arm that was shattered and the wealth of documentation accompanying this coat shows that, notwithstanding the fact that the coat itself is perfect mute testimony to the event.)

Webb’s wound fortunately did not require amputation, but kept him from active duty for almost six months. He returned to duty on 3/1/63 as Lt. Colonel (dating to 6/1/62) and served thereafter with his wounded arm in a sling. He took command of the regiment in Hoke’s Brigade, Early’s Division, during the Chancellorsville campaign in the fighting around Fredericksburg (“Second Fredericksburg” and “Hazel River”), and at Winchester in June while Col. Avery took the brigade. Taken sick after Winchester, Webb was hospitalized at Richmond during the Pennsylvania campaign, but returned to the regiment as Colonel on 7/15/63 with rank dating to 7/2/63 (sometimes given as 7/3/63), after the death of Col. Avery at Gettysburg.

Webb’s active service ended at Rappahannock Station. Posted in earthworks on the north bank of the river at one of only three bridge crossings, in an attempt to blunt Meade’s thrust south in November, 1863, the entire garrison was taken in a direct assault by the Fifth and Sixth Army Corps under Gen. Sedgwick. The “Bloody Sixth” suffered another twenty men killed and wounded, and over three hundred captured. Webb was reported to have been captured with one arm in a sling and the other grasping his sword.

Interned at Johnson’s Island until the end of the war, Webb kept a diary (only part of which survives in Clark’s summary history of the regiment) and included a history of the regiment in his letters to a family friend, A.W. Magnum, now in the UNC library. Released upon his oath of allegiance in July, 1865, Webb returned home and lived until 1891. He is also the subject of published biography by a descendant.

The coat has an impressive provenance, having come to the collector’s market in 1979 directly from the elderly grandson of a 6th NCST officer, Capt James Calder Turner, who had kept the battle scarred coat as a souvenir. The grandson’s letter to the first owner accompanies the coat. Also accompanying the coat is correspondence from Webb’s Gt. Gt. Grandson to the previous owner of the coat… containing a wealth of historical information. At the time Mr. Turner sold the coat (long before the internet existed) he believed that Major Webb had lost his arm and died while a POW or shortly after.The research done in the subsequent three decades has added much to the known history. The previous owner had promised to sell the coat to Webb’s Gt. Gt. Grandson when the time to sell arose. He made the offer to do so this year but the Webb family could not justify the monetary expenditure at this time. Hence, and to our good fortune, the coat is now available for purchase.

As for the coat itself, it is a highly appealing and 100% genuine Confederate officer’s frock coat made of coarse butternut wool in double breasted form and retaining the galloons on the remaining right sleeve. It is a classic frock coat for field wear as would be expected in 1861 and 1862. The left shoulder retains the very upper part of the sleeve showing its hasty cutting away to get access to Webb’s wounded arm. The left breast of the coat shows some areas of light color staining, a small amount of mothing, and some loss of surface nap which is undoubtedly the result of cleaning off the blood which was spattered there at Antietam. There is very little moth damage, just a smidgen here and there. There is the usual collar and skirt wear and some other minor scattered mothing, but very little of it and the coat is very solid. The coat retains its full lining which is of the classic 1860s quilted form. When brought to the market some 31 years ago the coat had no buttons. The previous owner has sewn some eagle staff officer’s buttons on for display purposes. The coat is constructed with two rows of seven button holes each. It can be surmised that the original buttons and collar rank insignia were salvaged by Webb to furnish his new coat for service in 1863. It would have been after Webb stripped the buttons and insignia that he gave the coat to Captain Turner. The coat still retains the three gold braid galloons on the right sleeve, indicating Webb’s rank of major at Antietam, where he last wore the coat.

This coat with the striking missing sleeve is an impressive monument to sacrifice for a lost cause. The impact it makes on display is powerful and dramatic. This coat presents a truly rare opportunity to acquire not only an identified, but a truly historic Confederate officer’s frock coat. It is not only the field-worn coat of regimental commander, but the coat in which he was wounded at one of the most famous battles of the Civil War. Included with the coat is a thick file of letters, research papers, and archives records compiled by the previous owner. Despite the significant cost of this coat, I hope you will agree that the price is realistic and fair. Unlike the auction houses and tourist town dealers that take overpriced consignments with reserve prices of 150% of retail, this fantastic piece of history is priced at what I sincerely believe to be realistic fair market value and should prove to be a good investment for the future. $39,500.00

 

 

#124 - Gorgeous Identified 29th Pennsylvania Presentation 1850 US Staff and Field Officer’s Sword.
Actually presented to the officer by the men he commanded.
Wonderful condition regulation officer’s sword with a silver cast grip with gilt wire. Gilt brass pommel with a winged cherub bust in high relief just above the grip, and an eaglehead quillon with ruby eyes. 40.5 inches overall with a beautifully etched 32-inch blade. The brass mounts on the sword and scabbard retain tons of the original gilding. The blade is excellent: very bright, no blemishes or gray, etched with floral motifs, arms, and the motto “E Pluribus Unum.” An outstanding sword from a good regiment.
The browned steel scabbard retains 90% of the lacquer brown finish mixed with a little surface oxidation. It is a most pleasing brown tone, and is mounted with heavily cast, detailed and deeply chased separate gilt brass throat, upper mount, middle mount, and drag, all with deep floral motifs on the obverse and engraved with great detail on the reverse. The middle mount features a separately applied striking silver US eagle with arrows and olive branch posed in front of a panoply of US flags. The upper mount features an inset oval silver plaque engraved: “Presented to Captain Wm. D. Rickards by the Members of his Company K 29th Regt. P.V. as a token of their esteem for his soldierly and gentlemanly qualities.” Rickards must have been very well thought of by his men to merit not only a field-grade sword, but such a fine example.
The 29th Pennsylvania was raised in Philadelphia and mustered in during July, 1861. Rickards enlisted and was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant in Co. E on 7/8/61. The regiment’s first assignment was with Bank’s army in the Shenandoah, suffering its first battle casualties in Spring, 1862, at Edenburgh, Front Royal, and Winchester against Stonewall Jackson. During this period Rickards was promoted Captain and given command of Company K on 5/6/62.
Rickards is listed as captured at a date and place not stated, but was exchanged at Aiken’s Landing, Va., on 9/21/62, the period at which some other officers, including his cousin (William Rickards, Jr.), captured at Front Royal and Winchester were paroled and exchanged, so he may have been among the seven officers mentioned as captured during the latter part of May at those places.
In the meantime the regiment had joined General Thomas Kane’s 2nd brigade, Geary’s 2nd Division, 12th Corps in the Army of the Potomac, known as the “White Star Division.” In the Spring of 1863 at Chancellorsville they had six killed and thirteen wounded in the fighting to shore up the army’s right flank after the rout of the 11th Corps. At Gettysburg the regiment fought on Culp’s Hill on July 2 and 3, and Rickards’ name is on the Pennsylvania monument showing he was on the field. In the early hours of July 3 the regiment was involved in heavy fighting lasting seven hours against Stuart’s Confederate brigade, repulsing a Confederate charge and retaking Union breastworks the enemy had occupied the night before, suffering 15 killed, 45 wounded, and 14 missing in the process. A high proportion of the killed, four, were in Co. K, including Rickards’ Second Lieutenant.
In the Fall of 1863 the regiment went with the reinforcements to the Army of the Cumberland that eventually became the 20th Corps under Hooker. Captain Rickards is mentioned in reports of the Battle of Wauhatchie as commanding an advanced picket post of three companies entrenched at Wauhatchie Junction. During this engagement Geary’s isolated division fought off a Confederate night assault. Soon after, at Lookout Mountain the regiment took part in the “Battle Above the Clouds” that forced the Confederate withdrawal, suffering 3 killed and 6 wounded in the assault.
In April, 1864, the regiment joined Sherman for the Atlanta Campaign, during which they saw action almost daily. They suffered heavy casualties at Resaca in a vain attack on Confederate entrenchments, and at Dallas, Pine Knob, and Kennesaw Mountain. Captain Rickards’ three years of service expired shortly after these engagements and he was discharged July 8, 1864. The regiment went on to take Atlanta and take part in the March to the Sea, but its heaviest fighting lay behind it.
Most Civil War presentation swords are given by friends or relatives at home. This is very high-grade presentation sword given to an experienced officer by the men who served under his command. They don’t get much better, and compared with the prices we are seeing this year on similar swords coming out of Dick Johnson’s collection, this one is pretty competitively priced… $18,500.00

 

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#128 - Scarce Remington Contract 3-Band Springfield Pattern 1863 Musket - Remington is believed to be one of only two makers to produce muskets that exactly followed the model 1863 Springfield specs. The other is the S Norris & WT Clements Made for Massachusetts musket. This Remington contract is a rare piece. The gun is in VG/Fine condition and has matching 1865 dates on the lock and barrel. The steel parts are all crisp and gun metal grey in color. This has the last pattern Springfield rear sight with one leaf and a peep hole in the center of the leaf. The stock has sharp edges, normal handling dings, and a clear cartouche of “OWA” as well as a single letter “A”. A small piece of wood was long ago chipped out behind the hammer and was reattached using the same piece of wood. This was done long ago and is not visible unless you look very closely. This is tight, solid, totally original and complete, and very scarce. Finding this late war Remington for sale is a rare event. It is one of the scarcest of CW contracts to acquire, and this is a wonderful example. $1,850.00

 

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#130 - Spencer Rifle - Serial number 3173. The first Spencers were rifles, not carbines, but were issued nonetheless to mounted unites like Custer’s Michigan Brigade and Wilder’s Lightning Brigade. This is the standard early army model rifle of .52 caliber with 6 groove rifling, and the bore is clean with strong grooves. These guns have a nice long 30” barrel, and function just like the carbines do, with a tube of ammunition that loads into the butt of the rifle. This gun has a bit of case color on the right side of the receiver, and the rest of the metal has a smooth chocolate finish. The wood is very good in the butt stock, and good in the fore stock. Just in front of the receiver on the left, you can see where a piece of wood came off. This area has the same appearance as the rest of the gun, and it is likely that this happened in the early part of this guns life. The front sling swivel may be a replacement, and the screw that holds the hammer on, has had the head broken off. It is adhered in place now. $2,950.00

 

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#134 - Liege F & T 1861 Musket - This imported musket is marked on the lock plate “LIEGE / F & T/ 1861” and also a crown over “H” and is marked on the barrel “ELG”, “S”, and “FT”. This is the firm of Falisse and Trapman in Belgium which produced these 1842 French style muskets so heavily used by both Union and Confederate troops. The left-hand side of the stock near the butt is marked in a few locations with more letters, but they are kind of hard to make out. The slotted screws are all market with an H proof mark. The barrel is 40 1/2 inches long, and is a large caliber with a smooth bore. There is a bayonet lug present on the underside of the barrel. The ramrod is present, and is of a tapered style. The trigger guard plate has two ribs as part of its design. This gun was made as a percussion gun, and is missing the nipple. One of the nicest examples I have owned in quite a while... $795.00

 

 

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#135 - P53 Enfield w/ R.T. Pritchett Signed Lock – A good scarce CW Enfield signed by Pritchett. R. T. Pritchett was a noted member of the London Arms Trade and is remembered for his experi­mentation in rifling systems in the early 1850’s. Together with W.E. Metford he designed the bullet adopted by the army for the P53 Enfield, named the Pritchett bullet. This gun is fresh to the market from a garage sale picker in Michigan. This gun has no CS markings but really does whistle Dixie when you look at it. It is missing the ramrod, has a replaced hammer that looks confederate, missing the rear sling swivel, and has a severe crack from the wrist to the butt, and another couple cracks near the tang. The long range rear sight is missing the elevation adjuster but is otherwise complete. The gun does not cock and fire but I will leave that repair for you. The bore is exceptionally nice for a gun that shows all the rigors of war. A great old well-used Enfield, with likely CSA connection… $895.00

 

#136 - Bright Blue Finish - Near Mint German Made - Engraved Adams Patent Percussion Revolver - Made in Stuttgart by W. Pfeufer and so marked on the top of the barrel. This gun just drips with the original factory blue, retaining 95+% of the rich lustrous bluing. This is the 1851 Adams Patent, which was a very successful and often copied design, this one being a licensed and authorized brevet made in Stuttgart. This is 100% original and mechanically perfect. Six shot double action revolver and about .41 cal. The receiver is heavily engraved and looks spectacular with the blue finish. Finely checkered grips with a pleasant varnish finish. The aesthetics of this gun are top shelf, the overall appeal is likewise. Any Colt in this condition would approach ten thousand dollars in price. This is wonderful, it just fits well in your hand, and would look great in a display of Confederate officer’s effects. Pricing this one to move at $2,250.00

 

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#139 - “Jones” Brass Barrel Flintlock Pistol - This large pistol is 15 Inches long with a 9 1/4 inch barrel that measures around 68 Caliber. The lock is marked “Jones” and has no other markings. The hammer and the tang are engraved with a nice floral pattern. The brass barrel is stamped with two proof marks, which appear to be crowns over crossed scepters. There is an oval escutcheon on the back of the grip, and on oval one on the left hand side of the stock, both of which appear original. There are some horizontal cracks in the wood along the inlet channel near the muzzle on both sides of the stock. At the rear of the lock is a small chip with some filler there. The hammer cocks back to the half cock, but does not click into the final full cock position. The ramrod is a replacement, and is only 4 1/2 inches long as opposed to the 8 or so inches it should be. Great eye appeal ... Circa 1825 $975.00

 

#140 - “London” Brass Barrel Flintlock - 14 Inch overall measurement with an 8 5/8 brass barrel of about 50 Caliber. Nearly identical in design to the above gun, but a touch more elegant. The lock is somewhat pitted and no markings are obviously legible. The barrel has two large proof marks, and an elegant script “London” engraved on the top of the barrel. The ramrod is original. There is a small sliver of wood missing near the muzzle. and a small crack is present opposite the lock. The brass ramrod thimble is a little banged up. Mechanically perfect, very handsome, and a great early pistol from the days of yore. Priced easy on the pocketbook. $1350.00

 

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#150 - Extremely Rare Model 1841 US Cadet Musket – This is one of the true RARITIES in the field of American Arms Collecting. Only 450 of these .57 caliber cadet muskets were made with barrel lengths of 40 inches, 34 inches, or 31 inches. Flayderman cites 450 produced another source states 506 were made. This is the 34 inch example which is the most aesthetically pleasing of the three lengths. Stamped on the lock is… “(eagle) / US” and also “SPRING / FIELD / 1844”. These look like a miniature M1842 musket but are far more interesting due to the diminutive size. They are smooth bore, and were issued to the US Corps of Cadets at West Point. This gun is overall fine condition with strong stock edges, smooth metal surfaces with lovely age brown patina, sharp markings, and perfect mechanics. This is 100% original and complete including the ramrod. The barrel is marked… “V / P / (eaglehead)” and also bears the matched date of “1844”. On the stock behind the lockplate a “W”. Rarer by far than most Confederate long arms, and ultra desirable as having been produced at the US Armory at Springfield. Here is an opportunity to acquire a truly rare US musket….. $8950.00

 

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#158 - Very Scarce Bliss and Goodyear 28 caliber Percussion Pocket Revolver: Something about these tiny little guns is just plain appealing. They are so small they look like toys. Only 3000 were produced making them darn scarce. This one is all original and complete with traces of blue finish in protected areas. It cocks and indexes but is a little gummy in indexing. This was part of my personal collection of “small guns” until I bought another with about 70% finish a few weeks ago. The higher finish gun replaces this one for my collection, and now someone else can enjoy this great little gem. Fine to display with soldier effects, or gambler effects, or saloon girls effects... Neat piece. $750.00

 

#161 - Neat Cowboy Gun - Colt 4 1/2 “ Octagon Barrel Revolver - This is the 5 shot 38 caliber revolver that Colt produced circa 1873 by converting the 1862 Pocket-Navy revolver from percussion to metallic cartridge. Marked 36 Caliber on the trigger guard, a carry over from the percussion parts used. . The serial # is 17904 and matches in all locations. The cylinder has a nice stage coach hold-up scene that is highly visible. The grip is excellent with just a little wear near the butt. The barrel has about 40% of the original factory blue and has a one line address “ADDRESS COL SAML COLT NEW YORK US AMERICA” on the top. One of 4,000 made of this style, and in NRA “fine” condition. Tight, solid, crisp action, 100% original and complete... Priced fairly at... $1,775.00

 

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#162 - Rare New York Made 1840s Percussion Pistol by R. S. Clark :
A very fine gentleman’s belt pistol with attractive silver mountings. The percussion lock is engraved “R.S. Clark” listed by Sellers as a gun maker in Albany New York. The lock is secured with a single screw. The stock is straight grain walnut, checkered on the grip. The butt cap is finely engraved silver as is the lower ramrod thimble. The trigger guard is finely engraved steel. The escutcheons around the barrel key are silver, the left escutcheon is replaced. The nose cap is silver. The octagon barrel is roughly 50 caliber and is engraved on the top “Fall Proof” ... marked thus because it has a patent breech where the barrel can be lifted out of the channel without having to remove the tang screw. Condition is overall Very Good. There is a replaced sliver of wood along the right side of the stock’s top edge along the channel. There is a sliver of wood missing along this channel on the left side. There is superbly executed hand engraving on the butt cap, trigger guard, lock, hammer, barrel tang, and the breech. It is very finely crafted and solid. In front of the trigger guard, the initials “GV” stamped into the wood. Finding American made pistols of this quality from this time period is quite rare. Here is a very handsome pistol... $1,150.00

 

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#167 - Model 1826 US Navy Flintlock Pistol - This gun has an 8 5/8” barrel, secured with a single barrel band. Caliber .54 and it is estimated that only 3,000 of these were made. The gun has a front sight mounted onto the barrel, and the rear sight is oval shaped andintegrated with the tang. The lock is marked “U.S. / S. NORTH” and behind the hammer is the date “1828”. Opposite the lock, is the original steel belt hook to allow the gun to be attached to a belt. A partial cartouche is visible. The barrel is stamped “US/AH/P”. There is a very minor crack in the stock (left side) about 1 inch long, mentioned only for accuracy’s sake. This was the last model of martial pistol made by Simeon North. These are scarce in general and extremely rare in original flint. I have examined this flintlock carefully. There is no visual indication of alteration or reconversion on the barrel. The touch hole is small and perfectly centered. There is no sign of welding of a closed bolster or nipple hole. The brass pan does show evidence of being repaired or replaced with a replaced screw clearly evident. This can be seen only when the lock is removed from the gun and viewed from the back. All other lock parts appear untouched. The lines and color are very appealing, the rarity is high, the price very realistic... $4500.00

 

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#172 - Ultra Rare Civil War Slouch Hat of Chaplain John Neil McLeod 84th New York Infantry -
I obtained this at auction along with Chaplain McLeod’s combination trunk-bed, frock coat, captured Confederate canteen, Union canteen and mess gear, and more … all stored inside the trunk. It cost me nearly $400 just to have the stuff shipped to me.
This hat is a classic “dead-on” Civil War slouch hat constructed of the finest high grade felt. It has the standard grosgrain edge binding, and the original narrow silk band around the base. The sweatband inside is long gone. The condition is very good with a couple small tears. It is solid enough to display on a wig-stand and has great eye appeal. Slouch hats from the Civil War are about 100 times rarer than the forage caps (bummers’ caps)… yet are still relatively affordable. This is the real-deal and looks great displayed with US or CS uniform items.
Chaplain John Neil Mcleod - 84th New York Volunteers. Mcleod was a Minister in the Reformed Presbyterian Church - Saint Andrews Society, and acted as such from 1833 until his death in 1874. He was a graduate of Columbia College. He served as Chaplain of the 84th New York in 1861-1863. We also have evidence that he was stationed at Camp Paulding in Baltimore in 1863. McLeod served from 1861 to 1863 which dates this old hat nicely to the early war period. A great item priced very realistically at $4,950.00

 

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#174 - Civil War Hand Grenade Cap Tins! Here is a rare find! original tin boxes with labels for hand grenade caps. Each of these tins has a complete original label which reads, “100 / Du PONT SPECIAL / HAND GRENADE / CAPS”... I believe these are caps for the United States Hanes or Ketchum percussion grenades. DuPont supplied most of the gun powder to the Union Army during the Civil War. They obviously supplied the caps for the hand grenades as well. These tins are extremely rare, these being the first I have found and among only a handful I have seen over the years. The condition of each is very good showing some light rust. Each has its original lid with label. These tins each measure about 2.5” x 2” x 1.5”. and have completely detachable lids with the original labels. If you have a Ketchum grenade in your collection I don’t know where else you are going to find a tin of caps for it. Priced each $475.00

 

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#175 - Exquisitely Engraved Presentation Foot Officer’s Sword – One of the prettiest and lengthy inscriptions I have seen. On the throat mount, “David T Johnson / of / Ansonia Conn / Captain Co. F. 23rd Regt.” and on the middle mount … “US Service / Nov. 14 1862 to Aug. 31 1863” This sword has a superb, nearly new 30 1/2 inch blade, a Very Good guard, with a small bend, original wire, and good leather. The scabbard has the engraved presentation on the two brass ring mounts and we have repaired the leather about 3 inches from the drag where the leather had separated. There are pleasing flourishes and adornments with the engraving that really set this apart from most other presentation work we see. Captain Johnson and his men in Company F under command of Major Miller were held in New York until December 30th 1862, when they embarked on the ship “Planter” for the south. It was wrecked January 14, 1863, on Stranger’s Key, Bahama Islands. After obtaining assistance from Nassau, this detachment finally arrived at New Orleans March 4th 1863. They saw action at La Fourche Crossing, Brashear City, and Bayou Boeuf, La. taking numerous battle casualties. Their service in the defenses of New Orleans was noble and effective and this is a truly wonderful and attractive Civil War combat officer’s sword. You will be well pleased at $3,250.00

 

 

#176 - Neat Foot Officer’s Sword - This is an unmarked Union army sword with a full leather scabbard. The throat of the scabbard is engraved “A. M. Jr.” and the top two ring mounts are in VG condition. The drag has a couple substantial dents. The leather is soft and supple and shows wear. The seam is split near the drag for about three inches. The sword is overall VG condition, with a soft gray finish on the blade , with some light spotting and a few minor nicks. The leather grip is in excellent condition and has the original wire wrap. The guard and pommel have a rich ochre patina that matches the scabbard mounts well. I wish we knew who this belonged to , but there are too many “A M”s to research… Nice Civil War sword… $950.00

 

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#177 - Model 1860 Naval Cutlass w/ scabbard - This regulation cutlass has the proper slightly curved 26” blade that is marked with an “1861” date on one side, and a scroll style Ames Mfg. mark on the other. The blade is a smokey grey and has a couple really minor nicks towards the tip but is in VG condition overall. The brass basket guard has minor handling dents but nothing detrimental. It is stamped with “No 67” as an identification mark. All of the brass is bright with a few minor areas of green patina forming. The leather grip is fine just showing some expected wear and light loss of leather. It has no twisted wire wrap which is proper as the wire was removed later by USN directive as the brass in contact with leather in salt air caused too much verdigris to form.. The leather scabbard is likewise VG and the early style with rivets along the entire length of the back seam. Also present is the original buff frog showing considerable age. The scabbard has had a couple repairs to strengthen up two weak spots, and a reinforcing drag was long ago fashioned out of leather A great early 1861 dated cutlass… $1175.00

 

 

#178 – Fine Ames Model 1840 Light Artillery Saber - The 32 inch blade is in Fine condition and is smooth with no nicks or pitting. The scabbard is likewise in fine condition with a few minor nicks and some age staining. The drag is stamped with an “H”. . The ricasso is marked “AMES MFG / CHICOPEE / MASS” on one side and “U.S. / ADK / 1863?’ “ It is either an 1863 or ‘62 but I’ll leave that to you to decide as my eyes aren’t what they once were. The brass guard and pommel show only honest handling age. The quillon has “51” stamped into it. The leather grip rates a 7 on a scale of 1 to 10. This fresh piece is a fine deal at $995.00

 

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#179 – Model 1850 Staff and Field Sword - This highly sought sword has a 33” slightly curved blade that has been cleaned lightly but is still in fine condition. The blade has etching on both sides with “US” on one side and an eagle with spread wings and banner reading “E Pluribus Unum”. There is no maker name present on the sword, but as you can see, there is a stamped brass “Proved” mark on the ricasso. The grip is shark skin covered, and is in VG condition just showing light handling age. . The original triple wire wrap is still firmly attached as well. The brass guard is in fine+ condition and has “US” and floral motifs cast into it. The pommel is also decorated with standard shield and laurel leaves. This sword is housed in its original brass mounted steel scabbard in extra nice condition. It is a deep brown smooth steel with nice brass mounts. Each of the two ring mounts have stars as decorations, and the scabbard rates about Fine overall. Great sword for $1795.00

 

 

 

#193 - Artillery Shell Jacket : Superb unissued example with a moth nip in the sleeve. Wonderful deep royal blue wool and rich crimson piping. Both sleeve linings intact, no body lining --- but you can't see the lining when you display these any way. Super bargain price $1,395.00

 

 

 

 

#196 - Incredible Find 5 Tintypes Sioux Indians Circa 1860s -1870 - This great group of tintypes was purchased as a set from a good friend who hunts rare photos. I saw them and had to have them… I haven’t owned anything like them ever in the forty years that I have hunted antiques, and I think they are freaking fabulous. Look at the photo illustrations carefully… there is some incredible detail… the illustrations will tell you more than I can in text. I will comment on some of the aspects… one of the Sioux is apparently a Law-Man with a sheriff’s badge on his breast. The horizontal view tintype features a white man in the center who may have been an Indian Agent. A teenage brave with silver arm bands is shown in two of the tintypes. One view is incredible with a woman SMILING while looking over the brave’s shoulder as he READS something. These tintypes are the real deal… actual “from life” images of real Sioux Indians as they looked and lived nearly 150 years ago. True wild west stuff.
Present with the lot is an identification note that came with the horizontal image that states those pictured are: Top Row ( Red Eagle, Goes To war & blackface) Bottom Row (Jamies Red Eagle, Joe American Horse, Assie Goes to War). We did some research and found some information about those present. In 2008 Joe American Horse was 72 years old, and took part in the reburial of his grandfather Chief American Horse who had died in 1908. Chief American Horse, an Oglala Lakota warrior and spiritual leader, died in Pine Ridge in 1908. And was a peacemaker who led a delegation to Congress in 1891 to testify about the 1890 wounded Knee Massacre. Which resulted in a re-issue of rations and in fairer treatment of the Lakota. Surprisingly, the cost of the re-burial was paid for by Yoko Ono.
(No joke)
Red Eagle was a known friend of Chief Sleepy Eye. Chief Red Eagle, in whose teepee Sleepy Eyes died in in 1859, saw to his burial on an island in Bullhead lake in the presence of Red Eagles 12 Year old son. Sleepy Eyes was later reburied in Sleepy Eye, Minnesota in 1902 with Red Eagle present for this as well. This initial research needs more digging, but what we can know for sure is that this is one heck of an historical lot of photos. All the tintypes are solid and stable, but they show some rough handling and evidence of being displayed hanging on nails at one time. The illustrations clearly show rubs and age spots. I had thought researching US Navy records was difficult, then I tried these Native Americans. Indians are a lot harder to research… but the job on this lot is started and is historically important. Feel free to call for more details… I assure you that this rare group of images would be nearly impossible to find again on the market… they are CDV sized tintype images. $4500.00

 

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#200 – Presentation 100th New York Infantry Smith & Wesson No. 1 Revolver: –
A fine Civil War small size 22 caliber Smith and Wesson personal defense weapon. SN 26503. This model is the 7 shot 22 caliber revolver with a 3 1/4 inch barrel. The barrel has hints of blue, and the brass frame has 80% of the silver finish (thinning). The rosewood grips are fine w/ minimal handling wear. The backstrap is engraved “Presented by Co A to Lieut. Wm L Mayo”. William Mayo has a really interesting Civil War service record. He was commissioned Lieutenant in Co. “A” 100th New York Vols where he served from Sept. 23rd 1861 through May 25th 1863. He was promoted to Captain Oct. 14th 1862, and commanded his company in the terrible Virginia Peninsular Campaign and through their fights in South Carolina. The 100th was initially assigned to Naglee’s 1st brigade, Casey’s 2nd division, 4th corps. It fought hard with McClellan, its losses at Fair Oaks being particularly severe with 176 killed, wounded and missing. Mayo is buried in Parke Cemetery, Wesley, Cattaraugus Co., in the southeastern part of the state. A superb presentation inscribed revolver in extra fine condition.. $2,650.00

 

#207 - Model 1850 Foot Officers’ Sword
– The standard edged weapon for infantry lieutenants and captains serving on the line, and this one having prettier brass mounts than most. Has 30 3/4 inch blade, etched on both sides with US and Military design motifs. The blade is VG+ condition w/ steel grey patina. The guard, pommel and scabbard mounts all have a matching deep bronze patina mixed with yellow color on the high spots. The ray skin grip is VG+ and complete with a triple twisted wire wrap. The leather scabbard is solid and strong, and fits the blade perfectly. The brass mounts have nicely decorated engravings of federal shield, eagle, leaves, etc… much better than most we see. The condition is really nice with the only slight defect being a small seam separation in the scabbard near the drag. This is inconsequential. You can hold the scabbard horizontally and it will not bend. A very handsome example, better decorated than most combat officer’s swords, and very solid. A good deal at $1250.00

 

 

 

#210 - Anderson Zouaves Inscribed Colt Pocket Revolver:
A most appealing Civil War Colt with strong battle history. Revolver is a ’49 Colt Pocket with 4 inch barrel, one line New York Address, and all matched serials of 199,130. The Colt is NRA “very good” condition… 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Inscribed on the butt strap is “E.S. Lundy / 214 W. 40th St. N.Y.”. A quick check of the NY rosters finds our man easily. He is Edgar S. Lundy 62nd New York … aka… Anderson Zouaves. Lundy served the entire war 1861 through 1865. The unit served at all the BIG BATTLES including The Peninsula, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Cold Harbor etc. It left for Washington on Aug. 21, 1861, and in October was assigned to Peck’s brigade, Buell’s division, Army of the Potomac, which in March, 1862, became the 1st brigade, 1st division, 4th corps, Army of the Potomac, and reached the Peninsula in time to share in the operations before Yorktown, the battle of Williamsburg and the battle of Fair Oaks. In the Seven Days’ battles the 62nd was closely engaged and suffered heavy loss. It arrived with the corps at Falmouth in time to participate in the battle of Fredericksburg, after which winter quarters were established across the river. In the Chancellorsville campaign the regiment met with its greatest losses, having been transferred in the preceding October to the 6th corps, and the 2nd and 3d divisions of which carried Marye’s heights in a brilliant assault. It fought at Gettysburg; moved with the 6th corps through Boonsboro, Funkstown and Rappahannock Station; engaged in the Mine Run campaign, and went into winter quarters near Brandy Station. A top notch gun with superb history. A very tight Colt with iron clad Battle History priced fairly at $3,250.00

 

#211 - Fine Emerson & Silver NCO Sword - This is an 1863 dated NCO sword with all matching inspector marks “DFM.” The ricasso is stamped “EMERSON / & / SILVER / TRENTON / NJ” …the reverse is marked “U.S. / DFM / 1863” The blade has some slightly rough spots but it is as straight as an arrow and nick free. The scabbard is steel with a brass throat and drag. All of the brass has aged nicely and has an attractive light age patina. A good solid war date NCO sword. $495.00

 

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