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Welcome to our Civil War Antique web catalog.

Please send all Checks and Money orders to :

Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

11-06-001 - Hymn Book Given to Confederate P.O.W. – A nice large size early war hymn book in paper back and bearing the name of a soldier from the 24th Georgia. The book is overall good, but is missing the back cover and the last page in the back. Inscribed inside the tract is Byron E Fuller… and our research shows that this fellow was a rebel POW who died while incarcerated. There are NO soldiers named Byron Fuller in the Union Army and only one in the CSA. It was likely given to Byron Fuller of the 24th Georgia Volunteers while he was a prisoner of war. He was captured at Cold Harbor Virginia, and he died of illness at Point Lookout, MD. This book is also signed 2443 N- and also Ella Fuller. It is possible that this and his other effects were given to his wife after his passing, and she signed the book at that time. $295.00

 

 

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11-06-002 - Historic Naval Artifact - This unusual item has a very old label that reads “Knob from a stateroom on Genl. Williams wrecked by a snag on the Mississippi - pulled off just before she sank 15 minutes after striking - 1863 G.B. “ $125.00

 

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11-06-003 - ID’d US Civil War Cartridge Box - This is a US cartridge box with an original oval brass “US” plate. It has the tin liners but the divider in the left tin is missing. The tip of the latch tab is missing, but otherwise this box is complete. Made by “E. Gaylord, Chicopee, Mass.” and is marked as such on the flap. Inside the main flap in two locations is the stenciled “C. S. WILSON / Co. D, 1st Reg’t”. We tracked this man down on the Soldiers & Sailors website to be a Charles S. Wilson 1st Regiment US Veteran Volunteer Infantry. The box is in VG condi tion with some minor flaking on the back and in a few other areas. A darn fair deal at… $450.00

 

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11-06-004 - Fresh from the Major Crego collection recently auctioned in Sacramento are these Personal Items of Jonas Shattuck 26th Mass. Vols – (Major Crego began collecting in the 1930s and acquired these items in the 1950s.) Soldier Jonas Shattuck was a maker of luxury shoes and leather goods before the war and enlisted at age 40 as a private with the 26th MA Inf. in September of 1861. He was also one of over 500 men that re-enlisted in February of 1864. He served until August of 1865. While he was with the 26th he saw service at La Fourche Crossing, Port Hudson, and Vermillion Bayou, Louisiana. And they went up north and fought at Spotsylvania Court House, Winchester, Cedar Creek, and Near Newton, Virginia.
The set is a wealth of scarce Civil War personal items… Civil War white “dress” gloves, writing kits, sewing kit, mirror, suspenders, etc... One of the neatest items is his folding wooden shaving mirror with inscription in the lid telling that Shattuck used it in the war and his wife used it later. His suspenders are really interesting being made of hand woven fiber… though the leather portions appear to have been restored either by Shattuck family or Col. Crego. The suspenders have a typed family note giving the history. Also present is an 1861 diary converted to a sewing kit, an unmarked sewing kit roll-up style, and a Brooks Patent Military and Travelling Writing Case bearing Shattuck’s name and regiment stenciled inside.
The wooden folding travel mir ror is marked in ink on the wood back “Glass used by Grandfather Jonas Shattuck during the Civil War. After his death in 1890 used by Grandmother.” The 1861 Diary was converted into a sewing kit and only has one entry on De­cember 23rd 1861 “Remedy for Cholera, Equal parts Tincture of opium, Red Pepper Rhubarb, Peppermint, and Camphor, mix them for use, In case of diarrhea a dose is 10 to 12 drops in 3 or 4 tablespoons of water.”
The Brooks writing case is full of pencils, pens, paper, etc… it is missing the paper checker board and probably an ink well but otherwise seems to be complete. J. Shattuck has his name and regimental information stenciled on the case, and we also find the name of another soldier from his regiment “W. L.Weston” stenciled in 3 locations as well. Weston was a young cigar maker in Shattuck’s company who was captured at Cedar Creek VA and later died at the US hospital in Wilmington NC. These men must have befriended each other and after Weston was captured Shattuck held onto it for him.
The other housewife is about the same size as the Brooks kit and is a roll-up affair with patch material etc inside. Final item is a later period pair of brown gloves. Great historic set… $1,350.00

 

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11-06-005 - 157th New York Items Fresh from the Family… Smooth side Canteen and GAR medals - This set came directly from the Pratt family of New York and they related that the owner was likely ancestor Melvin Pratt of the 157th NYV. The family retains the printed patriotic roster of the 157th with Melvin’s name printed thereon. I did not pursue the purchase of the memorial due to the unwieldy size and difficulty in shipping. The canteen here is stenciled 6 H A or G H A, and I do not know how that fits in with Pratt of the 157th NYV. I will leave it to you to play detective on that question. The 157th’s first battle was the disastrous one of Chancellorsville, where it lost 98 in killed, wounded and missing. The regiment sustained a fearful loss at Gettysburg, where it was heavily engaged on the first two days of the battle and was highly praised for its gallantry.
The canteen is in good condition complete with the cover, stopper, and strap, though the back side has quite a bit of wear to the wool cover. Also included are three GAR medals including a fine Gettysburg Veteran’s Medal, a standard GAR membership medal, and a New York Veteran’s medal. A fresh to the market set … $895.00 yxcejxz

 

 

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11-06-006 - Oval Framed Whole Plate Tintype Uniformed Yankee - Period frame is 14 x 12 Inches and holds a full plate tintype in an oval vi­gnette. The image shows our Yankee wearing his US belt and he has a cartridge box with strap hanging across his chest. He appears to be wearing an infantry frock coat as well. A decent old Civil War portrait priced darn cheap at $95.00

 

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11-06-007 - US Regulars Discharge Paper: This is the rare vellum document given only to soldiers in the REGULAR US ARMY --- the true professional soldier’s discharge… far rarer than the common paper examples given to the volunteers that we see at the shows. This is the Discharge Paper of Corporal John Philp of the 5th US Artillery - John Philp served for three years in the 5th in Batteries I and B. He was discharged on February 20th 1864 after the expiration of his service. The 5th saw action at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Bull Run, Gains’ Mill, and just about every other battle you could think of. John was originally from London England before he came to the US and fought for the North. A darn scarce Civil War document $125.00 zdjx

 

 

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11-06-008 - Unusual Tintype - Quarter Plate. Dead African American Woman in a Coffin. Full Case. Purple velvet pillow. Good condition but has some scratches next to the coffin. Weird darn subject --- I saw it and had to buy it. Just too weird $285.00 zbjjx

 

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11-06-009 - Unmarked Single Shot Pistol in Box - This is an unmarked single shot .28 caliber rimfire pistol. It is loaded by pressing the button on the underside of the frame and pivoting the barrel to the side so that a rimfire cartridge can be inserted. The hammer has a groove that functions as the rear sight when cocked. Gun is VG overall and functions, but the trigger return spring needs help and you have to hold the trigger forward when you cock the gun to allow the hammer to engage “full cock”. The wooden box is beautiful with fine inlay in the top. It is made from an 1850s fancy box, but was lined and fitted for this pistol by an earlier collector. Also included is a newspaper article from Milwaukee Public Museum is regarding a very similar pistol $195.00 zgex

 

 

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11-06-010 - Single Shot Flintlock from 1820’s - This gun was made by Wilkins Grantham of Lincolnshire between 1820-1823. 2 1/2 inch barrel. Thumb action safety. Bag handle. Proof marks on underside of the barrel. $495.00

 

 

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11-06-011 - Two Large Pieces of Bullet Struck Wood – From the early days of relic collecting… each is the size of a large man’s fist and these were likely cut during the 1880 to 1920 period. One of these is labeled Chancellorsville, and the other is not labeled but came from the same collection. These were part of the Captain Crego collection recently sold in Sacramento. Both pieces $150.00

 

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11-06-012 - Large Group of Battlefield Relics from the Captain Crego USA Collection - This group is a mix of labeled and unlabeled battlefield relics. Fragment of shell thrown into Ft. Jackson. Currycomb and Canteen from Gettysburg. Handmade nail from CSA trenches about 800yds North of Chancelorsville. Canister shot from Gettysburg 1st days battlefield. Three bullets from Shenandoah Valley. Horseshoe from Gettysburg Battlefield. 3 Bullets from Fredericksburg battlefield. Spurs from Shiloh. Large group of assorted bullets, shell fragments, nipple wrench, musket parts, and assorted metal fragments. A neat pile of early relics $350.00

 

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11-06-013 - Confederate Letter W/ CSA Postage - This letter is addressed to Mrs. Geo. W. Gift and is addressed in ink, with a two page letter in ink, and a CS 10¢ Stamp with a possible Wilmington Cancellation. The letter reads ; “Camp Randolph near decator Ga Company A Nov 9th 1863. Dier Sister i Seat my Self this morning to rite you a few lins to let you know how i am getting along Elizabeth i am geting along very well hear much better than i exspete that i would when i ferst got hear but Lizabeth i tel you that i se hard thins up her i could get along first rate if i did not hafter stan gueard that hurt me worst than eny thing else I stan guard one night an before i get over that why i hafter stan guard again An it keeps me always with a bad cole an sore throat an my eys heart me most constant But i belieave that i will go to the doctor and get him to dischardg me from that duty.
Lizabeth it is not worth my while to undertake to tel you what we hafter undergo hear it wold take all the paper that i have got an that wode not be a nuff But i will tel you one thing If a man walks rite strait he can make out very well But Wo unto the man that bring on stept out of the way they will hang him up to dry for a while Lizabeth i will tel you the truth thir is not a Negro in our cuntry that hafter obey orders as strick as we do an som few mean low life men is all the cose of it if not for such men as them why the rest of us could get along first rate but thir will be som goats among all flocks of sheaps you know that.
Lizabeth excuse all mistak an bad ritng for the wind blows an it is very col an a bad chance to rite. beshor an rite son as you get this youre affectnate brother and will be til death. “

Rebel letter with Envelope & CS Stamp - $165.00

 

 

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11-06-014 - Rare Identified Manual for Staff Officers in the Field - This book is inscribed “J W Fisher to “Poney” Ed K Russell June 16 / 62 Camp Lincoln, VA” Both of these men were members of the 67th New York Infantry which was stationed in Virginia at the time under McClellan. The owner of this book, Edmund Kirby Russell of Governor’s Island New York, was a career soldier staying in the service until 1898. He was a Cadet at the US Military Academy in 1858 later enlisting as Second Lieutenant 67th New York Infantry in June 24 1861. He made First Lieutenant April 14 1862, then Captain May 3 1863 transferring to the 65th New York Infantry July 4 1864. He made Major June 24 1865 and honorably mustered out July 17 1865. He got back in the game as Sec­ond Lieutenant 1st US Artillery May 11 1866 First Lieutenant Feb 21 1867 then Captain July 9 1884 and Major March 8 1898 finally retiring March 8 1898. He was Brevetted Major US Volunteers Dec 2 1864 for “faithful and meritorious services in the line of his duty and as a staff officer in the field” Scarce manual, great inscription… $250.00 ogjx

 

 

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11-06-015 - M1851 Colt Navy - Fourth model SN#147624, all matching serial numbers except the loading lever is not numbered which is acceptable and proper for navies in this serial range. From the 150,000 range we begin to see 51’s made without numbered levers. By the serial range of 175,000 it is downright common and standard to have no number on the lever. Overall grey and plum patina. Faint cylinder scene with serial number clearly present on cylinder. Barrel legend “ADDRESS COL SAML COLT NEW-YORK U.S.AMERICA”. Frame marked “Colts Patent” and brass trigger guard marked “36 cal” and “2”. Grips are VG+ and are a perfect fit to the frame. Mechanically perfect, nice and solid, a great example of a mid war Colt Navy revolver. $1,595.00

 

 

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11-06-016 - Steel Strap M1851 Colt Navy Revolver - One of the scarcest forms of “navy” is the iron strapped model where the back strap and trigger guard & strap are steel. Here is a very good representative example of that gun bearing serial number 71,904 --- all matched. (wedge not numbered). The gun is overall very good condition being 100% original and complete, & mechanically perfect. Metal is smooth brown patina showing honest handling wear but no abuse. Barrel legend is early “Address Saml Colt New York City”. Grips show wear but no abuse or damage. There is some silver plate in protected areas of the trigger guard. The cylinder scene is about worn away but the serial number thereon is very legible. The muzzle has moderately worn edges from period holster wear, very appealing. Early pre Civil War serial number 71904 with barrel legend “ADDRESS SAML COLT NEW-YORK CITY”. The frame is marked “Colt’s Patent” in early small letter style. The trigger guard has an “M” on the shoulder. $1,650.00

 

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11-06-017 - Extra Nice M1860 Colt Army - VG+ Martially marked Colt Army. SN# 99665 … all matching. VG cylinder scene with nice naval scene. Two faint cartouches on the VG+ grips. Barrel has minor handling wear, and the gun has a nice even patina. Hints of case color on the frame. The gun has inspectors “G’s” and “C’s” on various metal parts. Three screw style with cutout and notch for the shoulder stock. Mechanically perfect with just one nipple damaged. This is a solid mid-war Colt exactly as carried by Custer’s men in the cavalry. This is head and shoulders nicer than 80% we see at shows. A really nice looking army…. $2150.00

 

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11-06-018 - Savage Navy Revolver - 36 Caliber 6 shot revolver. One of the larger revolvers of the time and ingenious being a self cocking pistol. This has a nice dark patina with a rich brown color overall. The gun is 100% original, 100% complete and mechanically perfect. For some reason someone has traced around the edge of the cartouche on one grip and a “J” is carved in the grip as well. The top of the frame is marked with standard legend “SAVAGE R.F.A. CO. / H.S. NORTH PATENTED JUNE 17, 1856 / JAN. 18, 1859, MAY 15, 1860.” These are a highly sought after Civil War revolver and this is a good representative example priced very gently at $1,395.00 zajjjx

 

 

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11-06-019 - Double Barrel Percussion Shotgun – A bad ass weapon then and now. This gun has 29 1/2 inch barrels side by side. This gun is in original percussion ignition with decorative hammers. The gun is unmarked and dates to 1850 -1860 period. The stock is in very good condition with a few minor handling blemishes. The trigger guard is brass polished bright. There are several decorative brass inlays as well. This gun has a wooden ramrod that appears to be original. Fully functional, all original, and perfect to display with Confederate cavalry effects. A very big bang for the buck… $250.00 AEJ

 

 

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11-06-020 - Standard Civil War Enfield Musket: 1863 Dated Tower Enfield – The standard Enfield as used by tens of thousands of Yankees and Confederates. This is 100% original and mechanically perfect. It is totally complete except for the elevator slide on the rear sight which is missing. Overall Very Good condition with great lines and totally honest and attractive age patina. This gun has a nice plum patina on the barrel, bands, and rod. The lock has a nice bluish patina and is marked with a crown and “1863 / TOWER”. The barrel, bolster, and side of the hammer are pitted from period use. The nipple has been replaced, but all other parts are original, and replaced nipples do not affect the originality of an antique arm as the nipples are meant to be replaced after shooting. I got this from a man in eastern Ohio whose neighbor had been using it as a deer rifle up until a few years ago. Likely carried by an Ohio soldier and a very representative example of the Enfield rifle musket at an honest price. $1,250.00 zxhejvq

 

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11-06-021 - Extra Fine - Brass Hilt - Superb Quality Peterson #75 Non-Reg Officer’s Sword - This is a Fine Peterson 75 but instead of having the common cut-out steel hand guard, this has an elaborate and beautiful brass eagle guard. These are referred to as Peterson #75 because early sword scholar Harold Peterson listed this form as item 75 in his early book on swords. Most specimens have steel guards cut out in the design of an eagle. But out of every 50 such patterns we see we find a quality example made with a brass guard… like this one. This has a bright steel scabbard with brass mounts, and an excellent 32 1/4 inch blade with vivid patriotic etchings and rich luster. The wonderful blade has exc. etching of an eagle motif on one side and a US motif on the other. The back of the blade is marked “Iron Proof”. The riccasso is marked on one side with a circular “proved” stamp, and the other side has “W / CLAUBERG / (knight) / SOLINGEN”. The brass guard has a very detailed eagle and US design with a light age patina. The grip is fine/exc. ray skin and has a triple wire wrap. A completely top notch sword, head and shoulders above most we see. You will love this at… $1650.00 yabejx

 

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11-06-022 - Standard Peterson #75 Officers Sword – (read above description for more data.) This is a VG Peterson 75 with a steel scabbard with iron mounts, and an VG 32 1/4 inch blade. The wonderful blade has etching showing an eagle motif on one side and a US motif on the other. The back of the blade is marked “Iron Proof”. The riccasso is marked on one side with a circular “proved” stamp, and the other side has “SOLINGEN”. The iron guard has a detailed eagle and US design with a dark age patina. The grip is ray skin and has a triple wire wrap. An honest, attractive, and affordable officers sword. Even Phil Sheridan carried one of these, and he wrote that he found it “most agreeable…” I owned that sword years ago along with a letter from Sheridan relating him giving it to a friend, and for the life of me I don’t know why I sold it! $795.00 fbe

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11-06-023 - Super Murfreesboro Battle Letter with tragic death news, a Heroism Report, and battle description.

Letter from J. B. Stevenson of the 3rd Ohio to his brother Samuel Stevenson.
Murfreesboro, Tenn
Jan. 7th 1863

Dear Brother I seat myself to penn a few lines to you to let you know that I am all right yet. Of course you have heard of the Great Battle we were in it it was no such terifick fighting as thare was at Peryville. If our trops had fought like thay did at Peryvill wee would have wiped the secesh right of the earth but it came mighty near be ing the other way. At one time I thought the Cake was doe (done?). I think the whole fault lays on Gen Jonstan he aloud himself to be supprised on the morning of the 31st but taking all things into consideration we came out the best after all. We did not suffer as mutch as we did at Perryville. Charles McDonel and Thomas Mcullough are all the killed that we know of (in this company). Sgt Coper, Sgt Hearst, Oharra, J Patterson wounded there is some 2 or three missing. Mc Donald and Mcullough are buryed 30 yards west of the RR about 2 3/4 miles from murfreesborough in the side of a small grove. There is a tree marked (with) a peace of bark 4 in (inches) wide 3 feet long cut out of the east side of the tree. There is 7 of our regt buried together. McDonald (is) the third from the end nerest murfreesborau and McCullough the 4 (4th from the end) there names are marked on a board at thare head we have not our descrptive book here to give the length of them but I am shure a boxes 6 feet long would be long enough for eather of them. Thay can easily be found. I must say (regarding) Charlie McDonald that he was as good a solder as we had in our comp(any) He was as cool on the battlefield as enny man could be and he was no coward. I had been cautioning he to take good (aim) about a minute before he was shot and he did take good (aim) as though he was shooting at a squirrel. I saw him when he fell. He was killed almost instantly. I did not see McCullough when he was shot. It was after dark we made a dash on the enemy’s works after dark whitch I think was one of the most daring fets (feats) of the war. We rushed on them not knowing what was before us. Wee drove them out of their works and took possesun of them and held them until our ammunition run out and then we left them . … We went into there (their) works with a yell and left them with a yell… Mr Secesh left about the same time and we han’t seen him since nor dont want to for he is a wiry animal. Wee seen the elephant in evry shape imaginable I would like to writ more but at present the boys are all well safe except what I mentioned … our wounded are only slight. I am your brother with respect J B Stevenson to

Samuel Stevenson


This is one of the most exciting and detailed battle letters I have owned. I wish we could enter the commentary about soldier Charlie McDonald’s heroics into his service records at the National Archives. His descendants would certainly be proud. A superb battle letter on all fronts… $850.00

 

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11-06-024 - Murfreesboro Tenn, April 17th / 63

Dear Frank
It is with pleasure I sit to answer your of the 8th. It has been some time since I got a letter and I had become very anxious to hear from you. I was afraid you were sick but I am glad to hear that you are well and that the babe is no worse. I feel a good deal of anxiety for him but I know he is in good hands. I would like to be there so as to help you take care of him it seems that since Charley Jennings came to that place he has ???? the town with something exciting I don’t know but it is right for two or three to found one but I hardly think it is . I think they will get some fighting that will not be so agreeable as pounding an old man. You have not me whether mrs. Rolls had moved or not if she has I suppose you are some lonesome but you must make the best of it. I don’t think that it will be any better for her to live up there than with you. You stated that there was a battle expected here every day but we fail to see it. I don’t think they will attack us if they do they will beet with a warm reception for we have a few men and some big guns flanked in the forts around this town and old Rosy means to hold this place and he is the man that can do it if any one can. I must tell you about our divi sion Commander having a Sword Presented to him, it is the most beautiful think I ever saw the sword is a pretty blade and then there is a steel scabbard and a gold scabbard that belong to it. The gold one is the prettyiest thing I ever saw. There is a diamond set into the hilt of the sword that cost two hundred and then the initials of his names are set with diamonds and then the belt is leather all covered with gold and the sash must of cost as much as 4 or 5 hundred dollars then there was a set of silver and gold dishes presented with it. One wine pitcher cost two hundred and then there was a service that was solid silver laid with gold and he had a saddle and bridal and spurs the saddle was just as nice if not nicer than Gen. Roses the spurs are of solid gold and quite heavy, the rings in the gits are gold and the whole cost I have heard 3,000 dollars and was presented by the Officers of the Division. Probably you will see an account of it in the papers he is a good Gen and a perfect tiger to fight he went as Colonel of the Second Mich Cavalry and now he is a Major Gen. his name is Phillip H. Sheradin the Officers all went over to his headquarters the day that it was presented and some of them got Beastly drunk there are a great many men that are ruining themselves by drinking here the privates can’t get much but the officers can and there is to much drank for the good of the cause. Well I will have to close we are expecting our pay every day, the weather is very warm days but nights are cool the woods are all logged out. Give my love to all of our folks the health of the Reg. is good oh Hiram has gone home he started day before yesterday. this from your old man . -Arza

Wonderful early wild west letter… $450.00

 

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11-06-025 -SUPER wild west Military letter mentioning Indians, Indian fights, using a Gatling Gun, and more. A letter with as much western guts as you can hope to find….

Camp Thomas A.T.
July 15th 1879

My dear Boy,
I recieved your letter some time ago, and was very glad to get it, and to see you had not forgotten me. You speak of a Mr. Norris from Baltimore as a friend of mine, Dr Norris is a friend of mine, and I used to know a youngster, one George Norris, but saw so little of him that I casually thought of him as a friend, I have not much news to write your, except that the Indians are very restless, There is a white man living near the Post who has an Indian wife, and he was told a few days ago, to go where there are many white people, that the San Carlos Indians had had three councils and had determined to attack this post. He came next day and told the commandant, and everybody has been on the look out ever since. The two Cos have slept under arms, the country about camp has been patrolled, thus has been practice with the gatling gun (which fires 450 balls per minute) and all sorts of doings.
I don’t bother about it, and know very well that no Indian can get near me without big giving the alarm. How would the Army Guards like a little Indian fighting? We would like very well to have a stronger garrison, 2 Cos against 2,000 Bucks stand a poor chance.
I got a new Gun the other day, a beauty, and better than the old one which I sold for $100.00
I went up to Puebla Veijo, 20 miles, not long ago to see a Mexican who had been shot in the neck, the bullet passed through his throat and struck his spine, he died in 4 days, a great many men die with their boots on in this country. 21 since Feb. near here, 2 on the 4th of July, So you see this isn’t a good place to live. The desperados who are driven from Texas and New Mexico, all take refuge in Arizona, and they are not an addition to good society.
Do you ever go to the Mill pond now? I suppose the “Daisy” is broken up by this time, I’ll put a good boat in it when I go back.
Good bye my boy, believe me in. affectionately your friend, Geo, C, Moran

Wonderful early wild west letter… $450.00

 

 

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11-06-026 - Extremely Scarce Civil War Navy Summer Issue White Trousers. The US Navy and Marines were the only service in the Civil War to make the commonsense provision for a lighter weight and color uniform for issue in hot weather. Classic naval “fall-front” trousers fastened by seven bone buttons, three vertically on the waistband, one of which also serves as the center of five buttons across the fall front. This agrees with Todd, American Military Equipage, who notes the various contractors used “five to seven buttons.” See also Echoes of Glory for a couple of variations.
Adjustment, like CW infantry trousers, is by a string through holes in the center rear of the waistband. Typical wide legs (the Navy did not use the term bell bottom.) Medium weight, sturdy linen construction. Color is a pleasant off-white or cream color. Handwritten lot or issue numbers and letter code in brown ink inside the waistband. Correct hand-stitched button holes. Two small patches show these were issued at one point. Some crossed out numbers inside the waistband may indicate they were issued out and taken back into ship’s stores at least once.
The previous owner of these found a small quantity several years ago and sold all but three or four. Reportedly, one pair bore a USNY Boston marking. Those he put up for sale were quickly absorbed by the collecting fraternity. Having run into a financial pinch this month he decided to sell one more pair and thus we have these for sale at this writing. They practically never show up out of the woodwork… and I know of no other examples on the market at this time. One of the scarcer pieces of Civil War uniform cloth but still very affordable compared to army clothing… $850.00

 

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11-06-027 - Scarce dated CDV of a very natty Civil War US Marine Corps officer in full regulation 1859 pattern USMC officer’s garb with his description of his uniform! He wears the officer’s undress fatigue jacket with its sixteen button front, gold laced collar, pointed cuff edged with gold lace, regulation shoulder knots, and correct fatigue cap with a hunting horn encircling an “M.” The regulation sash, white sword belt, and 1850 foot officer sword, adopted in 1859 for USMC officers, complete the outfit. He seems to have chosen a metal scabbard for the sword. The lower portion of the belt plate is visible and seems to be the correct 1851 eagle sword belt plate. His white trousers are probably made of linen, the material and color being authorized in 1859 for wear in warm weather. Probably newly commissioned and anxious to show the folks back home what he looked like in uniform, he has thoughtfully annotated the back of the card in ink: “Fatigue dress with Summer pants-“ and dated it, “Taken Aug 23d 1862.” The card also bears an Addis/McClee’s Washington photographer backmark and, naturally, no tax stamp, which agrees with the date. I seem to be on a little Civil War US Marine Corps kick in photography. Don’t let it fool you- images of wartime leathernecks are scarce….. $650.00

 

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11-06-028 - Scarce Ballard Carbine in 56-56 Spencer Caliber - This is one of the scarce Ball & Williams assembled car bines that were manufactured for and purchased by the state of Kentucky. (only 1800 made) The frame is marked on the left side “MERWIN & BRAY / AGT’S N.Y. / 1125” and on the right side is “BALLARD’S PATENT / NOV. 5, 1861”. At both of these areas the patina has been gently rubbed by the previous owner to better see the markings (not offensive just mentioned for accuracy’s sake). The gun retains both sling swivels, one on the barrel band, and one on the butt stock. It is a single shot, lever activated breech, with a two piece “split” breech block which utilizes the metallic Spencer carbine ammunition. The frame and barrel have a dark attic patina and the walnut stock is VG+, very nice. The rifled bore is in VG+ condition though there is a bit of darkening near the muzzle. Made in a very limited quantity of only 1800 guns in this caliber. These Ballard carbines are among the more affordable of the truly scarce weapons from the Civil War $1,950.00 abejzz

 

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11-06-029 - A top notch Federal regulation infantry overcoat for enlisted men, with infinite appeal. These are getting scarcer every day, as is most real CW cloth. This is the standard yankee soldier’s overcoat of sky blue kersey wool, buttoning with five eagle buttons on the front, single breasted, and complete with the cape which buttons with six small eagle buttons. The cloth tightening belt with its two buttons is present on the back and the coat is in excellent condition with great color. There is just a small area of moth damage on the standup collar, otherwise moth free. This coat is an actually issued and worn in the field example, and the lining was removed during its time of use. It originally turned up years ago in a Cleveland area Goodwill store. I sold it long ago to a very nice collector from Maryland. And when he passed away I bought it back (along with a wealth of other material) from his widow. Thousands of period photos show Union soldiers wearing these and they were worn on campaign and into action in many engagements. The greatcoat is my favorite piece of Union uniform cloth. This would look great on mannequin with a belt rig on it and it is realistically priced at…… $3950.00

 

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11-06-030 - 73rd Ohio Inscribed Sword / Owner Wounded in Action: A very appealing identified fighting sword from WIA officer in a fighting regiment. A “Peterson figure 75” officer’s sword with steel hilt and scabbard inscribed on the scabbard in fine script in two lines: “Wm. A. Pontius / 73rd Ohio”
Pontius has a good record. He enlisted at age 23 on 10/26/61 and mustered in as a sergeant in Co. A on 12/30/61. He made First Sergeant 3/1/63 and 2nd Lieutenant 4/16/64, when he transferred to Co. D. Promoted to 1st Lt. 5/9/64, he was transferred back to Co. A in August, and was made Captain of his old company 2/10/65. He was wounded at Bentonville 5/19/65 leading them and eventually discharged for his wounds.
The 73rd Ohio organized in 1861 and was sent east in early 1862 where it saw action at McDowell and Cross Keys. As part of the Army of Virginia at Second Bull Run they lost almost 100 killed and wounded out of little more than 300 engaged. Shortly thereafter they became part of the 11th Corps, Army of the Potomac. Serving in that organization at Gettysburg they lost 19 killed and 91 wounded. In Fall, 1863, the corps went west, eventually becoming part of the new 20th Army Corps and serving under Sherman. In this theatre they lost 12 killed at Lookout Mountain and more at Resaca, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, and Atlanta. At Bentonville, 1865, Pontius was wounded in the fighting where the regiment helped repulse assaults by Johnston, who had turned on Sherman’s pursuing troops and nearly inflicted a defeat. “This regiment was the right center of the first line of the brigade, and for one to two hours received and delivered a most murderous fire,” wrote the regimental commander in his report.
One of the real tell-tale details of the regiment’s war service is that their battle deaths, 4 officers and 167 enlistedmen, outnumbered their losses by sickness and disease, which is a real rarity for a Civil War regiment.
Modeled on the British 1827 pattern officer’s saber and produced by British and Solingen makers, this style of sword was very popular for field use because of its tough steel hilt and scabbard. Even Phil Sheridan used one of these as his “working” sword. Pontius’s sword is very good overall, showing just the kind of field use to be expected from an active officer and regiment. The drag has wear from ground friction, and the scabbard a few minor dings and dents, one of which is probably a “rattle dent” as some collectors term it, to tighten it in the scabbard and reduce noise during movement. The rayskin grip is partially worn through to the wood, which has a nice patina. The three strands of wire wrap are all present. The ricasso shows the common inset “proved” disk on one side and the maker’s mark of an arrow inside an oval of dots on the other.
These swords are surprisingly difficult to find identified and engraved, partly because they were often the officer’s field sword and the fancier one was left behind in the baggage, and partly because of the greater difficulty in engraving steel rather than a brass mount. Here is a scarce example carried by a fighting officer on Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign, the March to the Sea, and the campaign of the Carolinas….. $2950.00

 

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11-06-031 - “And a few Marines…” Well, one Marine shown twice: once in his full dress 1859 uniform with his shako on the table beside him and a second image of the same leatherneck in his undress coat with his USMC forage cap next to him. An incredibly rare pair of 6th plate tintypes. You can search for years for any USMC photo showing either uniform and be lucky to find one. Here we have two portraits of the same Marine wearing the dress and fatigue uniforms. I have NEVER seen this previously! On the left our man wears the regulation double-breasted enlisted Marine frock with the characteristic fringed brass shoulder scales and regulation USMC white belt with sheet brass plate. At his elbow on the table sits his USMC shako with its elaborate USMC front plate. On the right he has taken the same pose, but donned his 1859 pattern undress coat with regulation white belt with plain sheet brass buckle, and his forage cap next to him showing the regulation hunting horn with an “M” in the loop. There is some very light gilding applied by the photographer to the highlights. Marines took part in more than fifty major and minor engagements at sea in naval battles and raids on Confederate shore installations and on land starting with First Bull Run, where a battalion was present, right through the attack on Fort Fisher in 1865. They were never numerous, wartime strength was only about 4,000 men, with many on sea duty, making any image of them scarce. I have collected Civil War photos for nearly forty years… and in those forty years, and among the five thousand + photos I have owned or sold this is the only matched pair of USMC images I have ever found showing the same leatherneck wearing each style of dress. From an 1860s military photo-historical perspective, this is about as scarce as it gets. I wager you will never see another pair such as these… $2,200.0

 

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11-06-032 - “Guard Against Cavalry – Guard!” This yank looks like he is not easily intimidated! Wonderful 6th plate tintype with great character: a veteran infantryman holding his fully cocked rifle at a high guard position to ward off cavalry or prepare to fire. This guy wears an infantry frock coat showing the attachments for shoulder scales and also displays his veteran service stripes on his forearm. His cap is pushed slightly back and to the side at a rakish angle making his face clearly visible to the camera. Slight discoloration to the upper left does not affect the clarity and crispness of the image. His rifle sling, cartridge box, waist belt, cap box and plate are clearly visible. He may even have tucked a knife in his belt. The photographer applied just light touches of gilding in the photo, which is great because it does not obscure the detail of the belt plates or buttons. A corps badge or other insignia is just visible on the top of the cap, but the angle prevents an exact identification. His pants are bloused into a pair of boots. With the frock and veteran stripe given to soldiers who reenlisted it suggests a photo taken just before the 1864 Spring campaigns. The rifle is an Austrian Lorenz. The whole pose is defiant, “thus far and no further.” It’s tough to find such images with “guts” anymore… One of the best I’ve found lately… $750.00

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11-06-033 - Excellent condition pair of Mexican War Era Lieutenant’s epaulets with their rare original cardboard box bearing the military goods dealer’s label, and a very scarce original pair of white gloves. The epaulets are gold with bullion-bound flat strap sections and the rounded shoulder edges topped with metal crescents and from which hangs narrow bullion braid. The undersides are padded yellow silk, and have doubled-wire hooks at the collar end to hook into a loop on the uniform shoulder.
The reddish orange cardboard fiddle-shaped box is also in excellent condition with a paper label on the top reading, “Wm. H. Smith & Co. / Maiden Lane New York / Importers and Dealers in / Military Goods, / Guns, Pistols, Cutlery &c.” On the lower edge of the label is a handwritten note on the contents: “1st Lieut.” And, there is a similar label on the lower front edge of the box with the notation: “Gilt Lieutenant” and an inventory number.
Smith was at this address and under this business name only from 1846 to 1852. Gilt epaulets are regulation for artillery and dragoon officers prior to 1851 and for all officers after that. Since most of Smith’s business predates the change, these are likely for one of those services. That he noted they were gilt on one of the box labels implies that he was also stocking silver ones at the time. That there is no rank bar on them also suggests an earlier date since before 1851 the rank was indicated by shoulder straps worn over the epaulet, though after that officers usually affixed the insignia to the epaulet using pins.
These are a great early set of officer’s insignia by a documented US maker preserved in their remarkably fine condition cardboard box. The white dress gloves with them are perhaps even rarer. Epaulets, box, and gloves all for $550.00

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