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Welcome to our Civil War Antique web catalog.

Please send all Checks and Money orders to :

Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

11-07-001 - Pistol Cartridge Box - Minty pistol cartridge box with what appears to be a stamp from W.H. WILKINSON & CO. SPRINGFIELD, MASS. The leather is in excellent condition and is fairly supple. 100% original. The flap is 6 1/4 inches wide and the box itself is 5 1/4 inches wide. Nice mid-war example showing straight-line tab stitching with no rivet. A great buy in this condition … near mint and only $225.00

 

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11-07-002 - Very Cool Eighteenth-century Officer’s Sword, probably made in France. Profusely engraved blade and steel hilt. Ivory grip with inset silver engraved plaque with military motifs. 34 inches overall, 28.5 inch clip-point blade that starts out 1.5 inches wide at the hilt and tapers slightly to 1 1/8 inch near the tip, with a broad central fuller. The blade is bright mixed with gray and some slightly darker areas. Both sides are engraved with a number of Cabalistic signs, numbers, and letters, mixed with military trophies. The ricasso shows the maker’s mark of an arm clutching sword descending from a cloud. This motif is “The arm of God” and is found on a number of early edged weapons of the 18th century. The steel guard is a simple stirrup hilt, engraved with a dotted border and multi-rayed star on a slight swelling midway up the knuckle guard. The langets have a wonderful reverse-S curve and are engraved with dots and a floral motif. The ivory grip is excellent and with a pistol-grip projection at the pommel to meet the knuckle guard. Inset in the grip is an oval plaque or locket engraved with a military trophy of arms featuring a drum, spears, etc. This is a very elegant military sword and the ivory grip is suggestive of the hunting style swords affected by some officers to show their status as gentlemen. Dating to the mid-1700s, there is no reason why it could not have made its way here in time to see service in our Revolution. A very fine with high quality craftsmanship and expensive ivory grip… $2,800.00

 

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11-07-003 - Fine Condition Civil War Cased Line Officer’s Epaulets with added stars for a General Officer. These are the regulation 1851 pattern gold officer’s epaulets in their original black japanned tin carrying case… classic Civil War pieces. The epaulets are in excellent condition and sport small CW staff buttons on the inner ends. These are a high-grade pair with nice bullion edging and a heavy cording of bullion between the crescent and the fringe. The width of the fringe indicates they are line officer’s epaulets, however they each bear the period rank insignia of a general’s star sewn in place. The captain who wore these must have attained the rank of brigadier at some point in his career and added the stars to reflect his final rank. The tin case is also in excellent condition, still has its fastener and the small lidded interior compartment, and the set displays impressively. A wonderful set of CW insignia … $525.00

 

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11-07-004 - Superb Condition Heavy Cavalry Saber with a “Screamer” of a Blade - This is an unmarked m1840 heavy cavalry saber, a German import with the screw at the scabbard throat, classically typical of the swords the north had to bring in to equip its cavalry early in the war before US manufacturers could tool up. The same thing happened in the Mexican War and some of the earliest US dragoon sabers were S&K imports. The ‘40’s commonly had the flat sharp edged spine, while this mint blade actually has a slightly rounded spine. This blade even has the cross brushing still present above the ricasso. The guard and pommel are in Fine condition and the leather grip and wire are in equally as nice. The original leather washer is present and in nearly new condition. The steel scab bard has a bright finish with minor surface discoloration in a few spots, but no dents or dings. Here is a superb condition example and priced very affordably… $650.00 DEJ

 

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11-07-005 - Standard Issue M1860 Cavalry Saber - This is the “Light Cavalry” saber that first appeared in 1857 and served alongside the M1840 in every theatre of the war and was carried into the Indian Wars as well. This is a ‘65 dated Mansfield & Lamb cavalry saber without a scabbard. The blade is in VG condition with some light surface discoloration. The leather grip is in VG condition with some minor cracking & crazing in the leather and some wear spots. It has the original twisted wire wrap. The brass guard and pommel have remnants of a rich brown patina, and the guard has the number “90” stamped into it. Just the saber, no scabbard $350.00 zbjjx

 

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11-07-006 - Very Scarce M1841 Ames Naval Cutlass or Short Sword - A nice Mexican War 1846 dated example of this hefty weapon….
Brass guard bears rack numbers 2B/14 indicating real shipboard service. Slight bend in the knuckle guard. Very tip of the counterguard broken off long ago…. The blade is just shy of 21 inches long and has a few nicks on the leading edge. The ricasso is stamped “USN / 1846 / NWP” and the other side is stamped as well, though we can only see a few letters in the Ames firm marking here, the balance worn away. The overall length is 26 1/2 inches long. The brass cast grip has a fish scale pattern on it, as well as Eagles on the pommel. These are among the scarcer Ames edged weapons to find on the market. A good solid example priced right… $495.00 c

 

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11-07-007 - Import French Artillery Short Sword - This is a French short sword marked “Talabot / Paris” on the ricasso. The grip is cast with a concentric circle pat tern and the circular elements show up in the guard also. (Of some note is the fact that the Confederates made a good copy of this sword on their own.) The brass guard area has two proof stamps. The blade is 19 inches, the tip is a little bent. The double edged blade also has a few nicks along one side of it. The total length is 24 3/4 inches. A very affordable 1860 period weapon perfect to display with Civil War and even Confederate effects. $165.00

 

 

 

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11-07-008 - Leather Pistol Cartridge Box - Another mid-war example of the mid-size pistol cartridge box, this one showing just enough wear to show it was carried in the field. On the rear between the belt loops is a nice E. Gaylord/ Chicopee, Mass. stamp, one of the better known Civil War makers of accoutrements for the army. These boxes were carried by every cavalryman to carry the ammunition packets for his revolver and are a key piece in any Civil War or US cavalry collection. This one even has a dead-real soldier’s pencil inscription on the inside of the flap reading “Cogswell.” A quick look at the HDS rosters shows 143 men with this name in the Union army, but eliminating infantrymen, sailors, etc., would narrow it down considerably. Very good, solid condition…. $195.00 qqajj

 

 

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11-07-009 - Near Mint Leather Carbine Socket - Original Civil War US Army issue cavalry carbine thimble. Socket of thick sewn leather with leather strap and buckle riveted to the outside. Very good, solid condition. These were buckled to the D-ring on the lower right side of the saddle. When riding the cavalry trooper carried his carbine suspended from the carbine sling over his shoulder with the barrel pointing down and thrust through the socket to keep it from swinging wildly around while the horse was in motion. A basic and key piece in a Civil War or early cav alry collection. . $69.00

 

 

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11-07-010 - Leather Carbine Socket - Another example with the initials C.H.C., inspector’s mark on the fastening strap. $75.00

 

 

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11-07-011 - Extra Desirable “Colt’s Patent” Powder Flask For the ’49 Colt Pocket Revolver - An original Colt’s Patent Powder Flask. This flask has a truly lovely patina, and an attrac­tive Eagle on the front. There is a very slight separation at the seam on the right as well as a tiny dent, otherwise extra fine. Still nice enough to proudly display inside an original Colt case with a high finish Pocket Revolver. Fully func tional. This flask measures 4 1/2 inches tall including the spout, and those marked “Colt’s Patent” are getting really hard to buy at a fair price. $795.00

 

 

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11-07-012 - Cavalry Officer’s Saber Signed Horstmann - This is an Officer’s grade model 1840 cavalry saber with cast floral designs in the brass guard. The 32 1/2 inch blade is not etched but it is in VG+ condition and has a light pleasing patina. The ricasso is marked on both sides. One side says “HORSTMANN / & SONS” and the other side has “PHILADELPHIA / (crowned head in profile).” Horstmann bought the blades from abroad and assembled them and marked them here before selling them to Union army officers. The brass guard is cast with decorative leaves on the pommel and on two of the branches. The guard is in Fine condition and has a bright patina. The leather grip is original and in VG+ condition though there is a little wear on the leather wrap. The twisted wire is complete and original. The steel scabbard has a deep brown patina with a few dents evident in the photos. These cavalry officer’s sabers are getting very difficult to find at a fair price. Here is a nice solid example at an honest price… $1450.00 AB

 

 

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11-07-013 - M1860 Cavalry Saber by C. Roby - Here is an 1865 dated M1860 Cavalry saber made by the C. Roby com pany of Chelmsford, Mass. The blade has some age spots but no nicks or dings, and the markings on the ricasso are clear as day. “C. Roby / W. Chelmsford / Mass.” and “U.S. / 1865 / A.G.M” are both nicely visible. The grips have a bit of the leather worn away but are still in very good condition and have a complete twisted wire wrap. The brass has a nice aged patina, and the knuckle bow has the initials “G.H”. The counterguard has been stamped multiple times with rack numbers, to the point that it is now bent a bit. A very affordable US made light cavalry saber $550.00 xdbez

 

 

 

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11-07-014 - Attic Condition Union Army Regulation Foot Officer’s Sword - This is a VG Foot officer’s sword with a 30 1/4 inch blade. The blade is decorated with US on one side and an eagle motif on the other. It retains large amounts of the original factory luster. There is one small nick in the blade about 2/3rds of the way down that doesn’t detract at all but is mentioned for accuracy’s sake. The Brass has a rich dark patina, and is very appealing. The leather grip is in fine+ condition and the twisted wire is intact, though the flanking strands of single wire are mostly gone. The leather scabbard is split along the seam, not worth fixing because it is on the back side … but if you wanted to, it would be an easy fix. A very handsome sword with super blade … $950.00

 

 

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11-07-015 - Rare - Ivory Gripped Allen & Wheelock 22 cal. Sidehammer - This is the early model with the cylinder pin entering from the rear of the gun. It has a 2 1/2 inch barrel that is marked on the side “ALLEN & WHEELOCK WORCESTER, MASS. U.S. / ALLEN’S PATENTS SEPT. 7, NOV. 9, 1858.”. The cylinder has a roll engraved scene that is in Good condition. The gun has the serial number 396 under the barrel. The iron frame has an evenly dark patina, and is very appealing with the beautiful ivory grips. The gun cocks and fires, but the cylinder stop is a bit iffy. The front sight is the pin style, showing light wear. These are cute little guns and scarce in the common wood grip quality --- finding one with factory ivory grips is darn scarce. Great little gun $750.00

 

 

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11-07-016 - Original Civil War Cavalry Insignia. Just like the old days, I found three of these crossed saber devices at an auction --- out of an old collection --- and dead-real Civil War examples, not the restrikes. Perfect with all four attaching loops. These are very scarce indeed, and when these are gone I have no more. Priced each at $265.00 (less than I sold them for five years ago!)

 

 

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11-07-017 - Rare Colt Army Ammo - Hazard’s Colt Army Waterproof Cartridges - This is an original unopened package of 6 cartridges for the Colt Army Pistol manufactured by the Hazard Powder Co. of Hazardville, Conn. Wrapped in plastic which looks crappy in the picture, but package is excellent. All packs of ammo are scarce, but the 44 caliber army cartridges are extra scarce… $650.00

 

 

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11-07-018 - Civil War US Naval Cutlass with Leather Riveted Scabbard - This is the model 1860 Cutlass with 26 inch blade and 1862 date. The blade has a bright finish with just a few minor nicks. The ricasso is stamped “U.S.N. / D.R. / 1862” and the other side has the Ames scroll marking. The leather wrapped grip is in VG condition and has had all of the wire removed which is proper for this weapon. The navy directed that the twisted wire be removed because it interacted with the damp air causing green verdigris to form on the grip. The brass guard and pommel are in VG+ condition with only the slightest dings in the brass, and an attractive patina. A rack number or such is stamped into the counterguard and appears as “23M / 708.” This cutlass retains its original leather scabbard. The scabbard is held together with 40 brass rivets, and has a brass stud on the opposite side for attaching a frog. The leather is in VG or better condition though there is a minute repair near the drag end of the scabbard. A much better than average speciken $1,195.00

 

 

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11-07-019 - Extra Nice Civil War Belt with US Buckle and Cap Box - This belt is of supple harness leather and has the faint remnant of an oval makers mark still visible. The attractive oval US buckle has the arrow style hooks and is in Fine condition and has an attractive light patina. The cap box has the original wool and pick, and is the scarcer pattern with the side ears sewn to the inside of the outer flap. The box is nicely marked on the back, “Pittsburgh, PA”. Overall condition of the box is VG+ with some minor wear on the straps. Priced like it was a Christmas Gift --- $495.00

 

 

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11-07-020 - Mint Cap Box with Wool & Pick - This is a superb, top notch, extra fine, dark brown cap box stamped with “M. LUTZ / U.S. ORD. DEPT. / SUBINSPECTOR” and it is marked on the inner flap “H.G. HAEDRICH” . About as mint as I have found lately --- so nice that you would be hard pressed to improve upon it. I paid a lot because it is worth a lot, and am marking it up only a smidgen. $385.00

 

 

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11-07-021 - Exceedingly Scarce Joslyn Army Revolver in near fine condition - This is the Standard cavalry model produced by the Joslyn Firearms Company in Stoning ton, Connecticut. These were manufactured early in the war, circa 1861-1862, with about half produced under US government contract, and the balance state purchased. It is known that Ohio armed the 5th Ohio Cavalry with these elusive sidearms. This is a 44 Cal. 5 shot revolver with an 8 inch octagonal barrel. This example is in near Fine condition with generous traces of blue finish, and spots of case color remaining. The grips retain their factory checkering in good detail, and the butt has an “H” carved into it. The top of the barrel is stamped “B.F. JOSLYN / PATD MAY 4TH 1858” and the loading lever and butt are stamped with 9’s and 0’s. This is an extremely scarce gun. Many collectors wait years to find one, and they seldom find one this nice. $4,500.00

 

 

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11-07-022 - VG++ Colt Model 1862 Police - 36 Caliber, 5 shot fluted cylinder, 6 1/2 inch barrel. Walnut Grips. Matching se rial Numbers #5984. Barrel marked “ADDRESS COL. SAML COLT NEW-YORK U.S. AMERICA”. Frame marked “COLTS PATENT”. Faint patent date on cylinder. Brass trigger guard and back strap. Overall VG+ con dition. Some areas have traces of original finish. 100% Original, complete, and mechanically perfect. One of the scarcer Civil War Colts, and this one even more desirable having the longest barrel available on this model. Friendly priced. $1250.00

 

 

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11-07-023 - Scarce Model 1862 Colt Pocket Navy - 36 Caliber 5 shot w/ 4 1/2 inch octagonal barrel. All matching serials #7728. Overall steel grey patina (attractive) and rumors of finish in protected areas. Barrel marked “ADDRESS COL SAML COLT NEW-YORK U.S. AMERICA” with part of “America” worn away. No cylinder scene remains. Fully functional. Fine varnished walnut grips. Overall grade of VG. All original and a tight solid antique Colt...
$850.00 zzyejj.

 

 

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11-07-024 - 1840 Heavy Cav Saber - 35 1/2 inch blade. Imported saber. VG Blade. No nicks. VG grip with original wire. Slight bend in guard. “15” on pommel. Dent free steel scabbard. Light surface rust. $575.00

 

 

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11-07-025 - Horstmann Philadelphia Marked M1840 Cavalry Saber - 36 inch Fine blade marked “HORSTMANN’S / PHILA” and on the opposite side “W”. Steel scabbard has heavy attic brown patina. No dents on the scabbard, but some age spots, dirt, and grime here and there. Brass guard has a dark deep patina. Grip is in fine condition though the wire is a touch loose. A nice signed heavy cavalry saber… $595.00
zxwqdjj-jaq

 

 

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11-07-026 - Import Heavy Cavalry Saber - Model 1840 Heavy Cavalry Saber with a 36 inch blade. Blade shows evidence of
at one time being sharpened. Dark gray patina, with a few edge nicks. Unmarked ricasso. Steel scabbard with
deep chocolate patina with a few minor dents near the drag. VG leather wrapped grip with complete original
wire wrap. VG+ brass guard with an attractive smooth patina and a few minor blemishes. Perfect to display with US or CS cavalry effects as both sides imported thousands of these grand old wristbreakers. Friendly price --- $495.00 qwtcge

 

 

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11-07-027 - Import 1840 Cavalry Saber - 33 inch VG blade, minor age spotting, no nicks, unmarked ricasso. Steel scabbard with dark patina and remains of old paint, minor wear, no dents or dings. Sword has original leather washer. Guard is in VG+ condition with areas of original gold colored gilt finish. Leather grip is VG with original wire wrap. $595.00 xrcejqw

 

 

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11-07-028 - Dealer Lot of 3 1840 Cavalry Sabers - Top: Horstmann Heavy Cavalry Saber, overall VG condition with a fine blade, steel scabbard. Fine, attractive guard. Middle: Unmarked Import Heavy Cavalry Saber, VG blade and Guard. Scabbard has a few repair spots. Bottom: Ames Heavy Cavalry Saber. Cut down blade to 21 inches, rare 1846 date, overall VG condition with good patina. VG+ Scabbard. One heck of a dealer special. All three sabers for $1,295.00

 

 

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11-07-029 - Samual Saul of the 201st Pennsylvania Vols. CDV - On 8/18/1864 he mustered into “F” Co. PA 201st Infantry. It was the first ready for duty of the ten regiments furnished by the state under the president’s call of July 18, 1864, for 500,000 men, been recruited to the maximum strength in less than 30 days. Co. F was sent
McConnellsburg, where it was employed during the fall and winter in arresting and forwarding deserters, the main body of the regiment performed guard duty on the Manassas gap railroad near Gainesville and Thoroughfare gap until Nov. 13, and was then placed in Camp Slough, Alexandria, on guard duty. On May 26 1865, it was ordered to Fort Delaware, where it remained until the close of its term. It was mustered out at Harrisburg on June 21, 1865. The back of this CDV has the mans name “Sam Saul” in pencil, and in ink below “Mrs. Richard Earnest wrote to this lad during the Civil War. Very likely her lover.” $125.00

 

 

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11-07-030 - Seated Sheridan CDV - This is from Brady’s Washington DC photo studio, and shows a stern looking Sheridan with his Two Star uniform, and non regulation cap. A nice rare Sheridan pose. $265.00

 

 

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11-07-031 - CDV of Brig. General Giles Alexander Smith - Enlisted on 6/14/1861 as a Captain and was commissioned into “D” Co. MO 8th Infantry. On 8/4/1863 he was commissioned into US Volunteers General Staff and finally mustered out on 2/1/1866.
Promotions: * Brig-General 8/4/1863 * Major-Gen 9/1/1864 by Brevet (Atlanta & Savannah, GA)* Major-Gen 11/24/1865.
In a field report from Gen. John McDonald “ Company D, Capt. Giles A. Smith commanding, deserves great credit for his coolness and the condition in which he held his men during the fight. This CDV does not have a backmark, and the front has a few smudges on it, but is otherwise clear and sharp. $195.00 AJJ

 

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11-07-032 - CDV of Samual F Nevin of 42nd USCT - Enlisted on 9/14/1861 as a Private in “C” Co. PA 87th Infantry. He was discharged for promotion on 10/13/1864 later on 2/1/1865 he was commissioned into “G” Co. US CT 42nd Infantry. He finally was Mustered Out on 1/31/1866. While he was with the 87th Pa, they saw many minor skermishes in the states of Virginia, Maryland, and South Carolina. While he was in the 42nd they were on guard and garrison duty at Chattanooga, Tenn., in District of East Tennessee, and in Dept. of the Cumberland, and Dept. of Georgia during entire term. No backmark on this CDV but it is signed in ink on the back “Truly your Samual F Nevin 2nd Lieut. “G” co 23nd USCT” The vignette image is a nice bust view with good detail. $85.00 DE

 

 

 

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11-07-033 - Brevet Brigadier General George Ranney Myers. Colonel of 18th NY Infantry, Myers was brevetted General in March, 1865, for “faithful and meritorious” service. Very nice full-standing view of him leaning on a column, one hand on his holding his cap, wearing his colonel’s uniform, the shoulder strap insignia visible. No backmark. Modern collector’s pencil id on the reverse, but this is definitely Myers: his photo appears in Roger Hunt’s “Bevet Brigadier Generals in Blue.”

Ranney entered West Point in 1855, but left after six months. There might be a story there! Whatever it was, he returned to the military when the war first broke out, enrolling at age 24 at Albany 5/14/61 as Major of the 18th NY, for two years service (like all the other early NY volunteers, who enlisted before Washington specified three-year enlistments.) He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 11/11/61, and Colonel 8/15/62, and mustered out 5/28/63.

Myers’s regiment first served in Franklin’s Brigade, and then Newton’s Brigade of Franklin’s Division. Designated part of the First Corps and then the Sixth in May, 1862, they suffered significant casualties in the Seven Days Battles, particularly the battle of Gaines Mill (19 killed and 16 wounded), where they fought to fend off Confederate attacks on McClellan’s right. During the Antietam Campaign the regiment lost 58 men at Crampton’s Gap, where Myers led the regiment in a successful charge in fighting to clear the way for McClellan to get at Lee before he could concentrate his army. The regiment was also engaged at Antietam itself, Fredericksburg, and at Salem Church during the Chancellorsville Campaign when Sedgwick crossed at Fredericksburg and tried to come to Hooker’s aid. They mustered out 5/28/63, having suffered 4 officers and 35 men either killed or mortally wounded in battle, and others wounded or died of disease.

Photos of full colonels are relatively uncommon: more than thirty captains and lieutenants for every colonel in a regiment, and they had to be men of character: as regimental commanders they were the real front-line commanding officers. $195.00

 

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11-07-034 - Wounded at Gettysburg! Alexander Gardner vignetted bust CDV of Captain Jasper Woodford, 3rd Wisconsin Infantry, who rose from Private to brevet Major. Signed in ink at the bottom edge: “ J. Woodford/ Capt. 3rd Wis” Woodford is shown in a vignetted bust portrait facing right, wearing his Captains coat and straps. The card has nice Gardner “Photographer to the Army of the Potomac” with “Washington Galleries” backmark.
The 3rd Wisconsin Infantry formed in June, 1861, and served in the east until late 1863. Joining Banks Corps in February, 1862, and it was eventually designated part of the 12th Corps, Army of the Potomac. They were engaged at Winchester, Cedar Mountain, Antietam (where it lost 198 men of 335 engaged), Chancellorsville (where it lost roughly half), and at Gettysburg, among other actions. At the beginning of the Gettysburg campaign they supported the cavalry at Brandy Station in June, at were one of the mid-western regiments sent to NY City to suppress the draft riots after the battle, on the assumption they would be less sympathetic to eastern city mobs. When the 11th and 12th Corps went west in the Fall of 1863, they became part of the new 20th Corps and took part in the Atlanta Campaign and the March to the Sea, fighting at Resaca, Marietta, Pine Knob, Kennesaw Mountain, and Peachtree Creek. They saw their final fighting and casualties at Averysboro and Bentonville in March, 1865.
Woodford resided at Darlington, WI, when he enlisted 4/18/1861 as a Private and mustered into Co F On 4/18/1861. He was captured at Winchester 5/25/62, but returned in time be promoted Sergeant and then 2nd Lieutenant by 4/21/63. At Gettysburg, the regiment defended the right of the Federal line and Woodford was one of four wounded July 1. After the regiment went west later that year, he became regimental Adjutant 3/11/64 and 1st Lieutenant of Co. G 7/1/64. Promoted Captain shortly after, 10/4/64, he returned to his old company, F, to command it. He must have been well thought of: he was brevetted Major (US Vols) 3/13/65, and was mustered out 7/18/65.

Woodford’s signature on the card looks a bit shaky. I am tempted to think it might be the effects of his wound, though I don’t know where he was hit. Perhaps it was the toll of his service: he certainly did enough active campaigning. He received enough promotions and recognition that he would be good research project. Wisconsin cards are tough to find in any case. Here is an officer with a good service record and wounded in the most famous battle of the war. The Gettysburg tourist town relic shops price these Gettysburg casualty cartes at $800 to $1500 each. Here is one with fantastic history priced where it makes sense --- $475.00

 

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11-07-035 - Very nice from-life CDV portrait of Custer by Brady: very clear and sharp with good tones. Obviously one of the best known and sought-after Civil War generals. If you are collecting Civil War material, you don’t need a recitation of his record! A vignetted bust view of Custer turned slightly to the viewer’s left, displaying his Major General’s stars and the top set of his Major-General’s button arrangement: double-breasted and set by threes. In one of his more formal portraits, he looks off in the distance with an air of command, but also displays his noted personal characteristic- his long curls, which do not show up in every portrait. Nice Brady/Washington mark on the lower front of the card, and the Brady/ New York & Washington backmark. A nice period pencil identification is on the top reverse: “Gen Custer/ Brevet Maj. Gen,” reminding us there was a time when his Civil War fame was highest and no one anticipated his fate at the Little Big Horn just eleven years later. A superb Custer image priced very realistically at $795.00

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11-07-036 - Very strong, from-life CDV view of Sherman as Four-star General by Howland, San Francisco. Sherman disliked Washington and stayed away from it as much as possible! Nice “B.F. Howland & Co. Artists” mark on the bottom front edge and Howland backmark and tax stamp on reverse along with a period
pencil date at the bottom: “April.8.66.”
Sherman’s record needs no restating. This is a very gutsy view of the well-known fighting general and leader of the March to the Sea. He remained in the army after the war, guided much of the strategy of the Indian Wars, and had a great influence in the army’s postwar reorganization, changes in uniform, etc.
Sherman assumed the rank of Lieutenant General in 1866. This view apparently predates the September, 1866, specification of three stars for that rank and four for general of the army, a rank which Sherman only gained after the election of Grant as President. As such, it is one of his scarcest views. $350.00

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11-07-037 - Ink-signed three-quarter seated CDV view of John M. Blair together with three buttons kept as mementos of his service. Shown wearing the 4-button fatigue blouse, one arm resting on a table with a small vase of flowers, his photo comes along with a card mounted with three of his general service eagle buttons, two large and one small. A typewritten collector’s note on the reverse reads: “Civil War buttons and signed CDV of Pvt. John M. Blair. Found in the Youngstown area and believe him to be from Co. C of the 89th Ohio Infantry.” We can’t say if the collector’s guess was right, but there was certainly a John M. Blair in that unit. He enlisted at age 20 on 8/31/62 as a private and mustered into Co. C of the 89th Ohio 8/31/62. He made corporal 6/5/64 and transferred to the 31st Ohio 6/5/65, from which he was discharged 7/20/65 at Louisville.

The 89th was part of the 14th Army Corps. Serving first in Kentucky and West Virginia, they joined Rosecrans in Tennessee, fighting at Hoover’s Gap where they supported the Lightening Brigade. At Chickamauga they suffered heavily: 19 killed, 7 wounded, and another 157 captured after they ran out of ammunition and were surrounded. (Many of those taken then died in southern prisons.) Blair was apparently among a lucky 135, including sick and wounded, who survived the battle. He remained in service with the regiment, which received a few new recruits and then went on to fight at Missionary Ridge, Resaca, the March to the Sea, and the campaign of the Carolinas.

A nice little grouping of a soldier who “saw the elephant.” $135.00

 

 

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11-07-038 - Scarce US Model 1855 Rifleman’s Belt and Bayonet Frog with four piece buckle - This is a VG black harness leather
example. 100% complete with one repair just next to the frog. If you look closely you can see it. These were issued with Model 1855 Harpers Ferry rifles and other two-band short rifles that accepted the saber bayonet. The buckle is rather ingenious having the central interlocking buckle and then two flanking devices designed to hold the brass hooks of a knapsack. Overall VG condition showing just honest wear, and of course the expert repair. Years ago these sold for 1200 to 1500 dollars each. I picked up two out of the Captain Crego collection sale in Sacramento for old timey prices... Here’s a heck of a deal… $775.00

 

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11-07-039 - Artillery officer’s effects of Captain Thomas Hart Benton Correll, 1st US Colored Heavy Artillery, late 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
I have owned many sets of officers’ material over the years, but I can’t recall even seeing much related to the US Colored Troops. They were a somewhat special group. When it was decided to enlist black troops in the Union Army, the government gave them one benefit denied to volunteers early in the war: experienced officers. Notices went out to soldiers already in service inviting applications for commissions in the USCT. But it took a strong character to apply. Not only the troops themselves, but their officers, were liable to considered by Confederates part of a servile insurrection and if captured denied quarter, as more than a few were. Thomas H.B. Correll, serving in the 104th Ohio, was one of those who nevertheless applied and were selected for commission.
Given Confederate hostility to black troops and their officers, he must have been dedicated to the cause! Correll was 21 years old when he enlisted on 8/5/62 and mustered as a Corporal on 8/30/62 in Company B, 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, organized at Camp Massillon, Ohio, in Fall, 1862, to serve three years. During the period that Correll served in the unit they were stationed in Kentucky, seeing some action right off the bat at Fort Mitchell near Covington in September, 1862. For the remainder of the year and into the following Spring they remained in the state with other units to counter Confederate influence and keep it in the Union. A cursory search shows that Correll published a letter in the Bucyrus (Ohio) Journal, 5/1/63 datelined Crab Orchard, Kentucky, that might reveal more about his experiences, though we haven’t had time to obtain a copy. In summer, 1863, the regiment moved out to join Burnside’s forces in Tennessee and participated in the siege of Knoxville where they lost one man killed and several wounded.
The regiment remained in the Knoxville area afterward and Correll was detached for duty with the Quartermaster Department 10/1/63 until Spring, 1864, when he decided to apply for a commission in one of the new black regiments being raised. He was successful and was discharged 3/23/64 to accept a promotion to Captain dated the same day in the 1st US Colored Heavy Artillery which was organizing in Knoxville. Correll was given command of Company D and remained with them for a year and a half, until his resignation 9/30/65. During this period they engaged in operations against Wheeler’s cavalry in August, 1864, and in various operations and expeditions from January to April, 1865, in northern Alabama, east Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, and western North Carolina.

Correll preserved his officer’s frock coat, trousers, vest, sash, epaulets with their case and one shoulder strap. The frock is a standard line officer’s nine button coat with just one eagle-A button missing from each cuff and one off the back. It is in good solid condition with a couple of small moth nips near the cuffs and a couple on the body that have been closed up with a couple of stitches of thread. The lining is good, with just the expected signs of actual wear and use. As always the interior silk is a light green color.

The vest is dark blue, in very good condition, with a roll-over collar and six of its nine small eagle-I buttons in place, (this vest being a carry over from his service in the infantry), three-pocket front, and its sizing belt and buckle present on the reverse. Correll’s dark blue trousers show the correct red piping on the seam for an officer of artillery, and have the absolutely correct belt tightener for officer’s trousers, horizontal pocket flaps and buttons for suspenders. As with the coat, there are just minor signs of real wear: a little abrasion along the piping and some mothing at the waistband
above the right pocket. The red piping on the outside of each leg shows that for some reason the moths like to nip at that red cloth but no the blue wool.

Correll’s sash is the regulation officer’s sash with knots and tassels, maroon in color, with some minor fading along the top of the tassels. The epaulet case has some dings and dents, but the epaulets are nice: gold bullion with standard line officer’s fringe. There are no regimental or rank insignia on them, but he did keep one of his captain’s shoulder straps.

This is a really nice looking set from an officer with some wide-ranging service and is a good example of a typical line officer’s uniform from the Civil War that looks great on display. It is also a reminder of the dramatic and complex social changes going on: the recruitment of black regiments to fight, and the appointment of white officers to command them. In this day and age finding a complete uniform is a rare event… and this one I obtained from a man who was given the uniform when he was a boy in the 1960s by his neighbors (Correll’s family) because the youngster liked “army stuff”. He kept the set four decades and sold it to me. Priced extremely fairly to you at… $7,950.00

 

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11-07-040 - Of primary importance to the soldier, rivaled perhaps only by the canteen, was the haversack. Used by every soldier to carry his mess gear and rations, these were an essential part of every soldier’s kit. An army marched, and fought, on its stomach. One CW recruit was warned by a friend’s father, a veteran of 1812, that obtaining food would be their primary object while in service and to miss no opportunity to do it. A CW veteran recalled looking for every opportunity to gather them up from inexperienced new regiments who might drop them on a march.

This is the regulation US Civil War issue version: black tarred canvas with a simple wide shoulder strap of the same material sewn to the reverse corners and a single fastening strap and buckle for the flap. The body of the bag and the flap are pretty solid, with just a few small tears and a minor hole or two. The shoulder strap is full length and as is usually the case there are weak spots near the attachment points to the bag from flexing and bending, and some partial tearing, but it is all there and lays out nicely for display. The fastening strap for the flap is pretty much all there, retaining five of the fastening holes, but is slightly stiff and has some weak spots. The buckle is gone, but the small leather chape which secured it to the bag is still there. I suppose the buckle could be restored, but I would leave it as is. No rice bag, or liner, but the interior tin buttons for it are still there.

Laid out open in a display with a canteen and mess cup on it, and some other personal effects, just as soldier would have set it down during a rest, this looks great! Speaking as a collector, these have always been rare, even in the old days. They were too useful after the war for schoolboy bookbags, etc. Bannerman’s had stacks and stacks of knapsacks to the day they closed, but these were always scarce, and this is one of the regulation issue examples, not one of the small unpainted ones that are likely postwar or militia. $1,395.00

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11-07-041 - Nice pair of Civil War line officer’s epaulets. Gold bullion strap, gilt crescents, medium width bullion tassels indicating a lieutenant or captain wore them. Staff officer buttons on each, but this style of strap has a hinged bottom to pass under and over a bracket on the coat shoulder and the button really actuates a catch to secure both sections over a second smaller bracket near the shoulder. Red velvet and morocco leather undersides, a little bit of staining around the edges. On the top side loads of gilding still on the crescents, bullion binding, bullion tassels, etc. No rank or regimental insignia as is often the case since they were attached with pins and usually removed for cleaning. A dandy set. Great for an officer’s display with sword and belt laid out. $225.00

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11-07-042 - Nice pair CW period epaulets. Gilt strap bound and edged with bullion, brass gilt crescents with narrow gold bullion fringe. Yellow silk underside with doubled wire hook and interior padding. Wear and some separation lines to the edges of the silk and a couple of spots at the shoulder pad. Still a solid set with about 70 percent gilt on one crescent and 50 on the other. This is the style designed to pass under a cloth strap on the shoulder and hook over a second strap or thread loop. The very narrow fringe and the method of fastening probably indicates state issue or private purchase. $175.00

 

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