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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

10-08-001 – Extremely Scarce Sharps Model 1852 Carbine - This is the early 1850’s production Sharps in the standard 52 Caliber. It features the pellet priming system, and was the first model to have the slant-breech design. This has the long sling ring slide bar that connects to the brass barrel band and the frame, just like on the subsequent 1853 John Brown pattern. The wood is about fine, with the slightest hint of handling wear and an itty bitty chip on the bottom of the butt stock where it meets the brass buttplate. Steel is overall plum patina, with rumors of silvery case on parts of the frame. The breech block is original but likely a replacement as it has quite a bit of original finish present. The barrel is plum color with a touch of pitting near the muzzle. Overall VG+. A great early Sharps just as carried by the US Dragoons on the western frontier during the 1850s, and by both Union and Confederate cavalry in the Civil War. Perfect for display with US or CS cavalry effects. Sn#4885 $4350.00

 

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10-08-002 –Extra Fine Sharps New Model 1863 Carbine - This gun has a 22” rifled barrel in 52 Caliber. It has the improved straight breech design of the 1859 and 1863 models and is the standard mid Civil War production Sharps carbine. Serial number is C19037. The barrel legend is clear “SHARPS RIFLE / MANUFG. CO / HARTFORD, CONN” and “NEW MODEL 1863”. The breech bears “EAW” (sub inspector’s initials). The sling ring bar mount is stamped “EWB”, the buttplate and the lock have “S” stampings. The lock is marked “C. SHARPS’ PAT / OCT 5th 1852” and “R.S. LAWRENCE PAT. / APRIL 12th 1859”. The walnut stocks on this gun are Fine + with crisp edges, strong lines and sharp - clear cartouche. There is a generous amount of faded case color on the frame, hammer etc… very pretty. The balance of the steel is a uniform deep plum color with the barrel retaining most of the blue (thin) in a deep plum state. Truly a top notch Civil War Sharps. Far better than 95% of others you will find on the market. The gun is 100% original, 100% complete, and is mechanically perfect. Top drawer in all respects… $3,950.00

 

 

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10-08-003 - Klemm & Bros Rosewood Fife - This is the classic 14 1/2 inch rosewood fife with 6 finger holes and silvered end cap ferrules. This one is stamped by the famed maker ‘Klemm & Bro Philad”, known for producing bugles and fifes for the Union Army. It is rare for us to find a fife bearing this firm marking. I do not believe I have owned more than three in the past 35 years. We sometimes find the Cloos marked examples, but Klemm is a darn rare maker. Extra fine condition. $195.00

10-08-004 Same as above not signed with maker $139.00 not illustrated

 

 

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10-08-005 – Extra Scarce Maple Wood Fife – Though most fifes we find are made of rosewood, the regulations actually call for Maple. However, we do not see one maple example for every fifty in rosewood. This one is 14 1/2 inches long with 6 finger holes and brass end ferrules. Unsigned, excellent condition, scarce in maple… $159.00

 

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10-08-006 – Regulation Civil War Shoulder Scales - These are the light weight brass decorations worn by enlisted men on the shoulders of their frock coats and shell jackets, ostensibly for the purpose of warding off saber blows from mounted attackers. (Yeah right!) These proved to be just so much fluff and the common sense soldiers threw them away once they got in the field. When seen in photos they are on the uniforms of newly uniformed troops or those stationed in close proximity to bureaucratic authority. 6 1/2 inches in length. This pair came out of a recent buying trip in New England. $245.00

 

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10-08-007 Superbly Tooled Pre-Civil War Wallet - This is a great russet leather wallet in excellent condition, and with great eye appeal. One of the inside flaps is marked in ink and reads “Charles Day / ??nn??k / July 22 1837” The indecipherable word is undoubtedly Day’s town of residence. The exterior leather is beautifully embossed with floral designs and vines. When closed this measures 7 1/4 inches by 3 1/2 inches. Completely original and in extra fine shape except for loose stitching on the id’d flap. Perfect to display with Civil War, or Mexican War, or Battle of the Alamo era artifacts. $135.00

 

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10-08-008 – Early Civil War Cap Box - This is constructed utilizing only stitching… no rivets were used. This is generally an indication of pre Civil War or early Civil War production. Standard pattern, unmarked, in VG+ condition. The leather and stitching are very good showing very little wear. A nice early variant in solid condition… $175.00

 

 

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10-08-009 – Civil War Sunglasses in 1860 Parker Patent Carrying Case - This is a real nice personal item, and pretty scarce to boot. I have only seen a handful of photos showing soldiers wearing dark lens glasses, and we don’t find the glasses that frequently either. The tin case has a Royal Blue felt lining, and the lip is stamped “PAT JAN 24 -1860- EXTd / C. PARKER” These famous cases are American made by the Charles Parker Company in Meriden CT. The glasses are nicely tinted and the glass is almost perfect. $95.00

 

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10-08-010 - Regulation Civil War Officers Eagle Sword Belt Plate - This is the sword belt plate worn by commissioned officers in the Union Army and also by more than a few Confederate officers. It is a mid war production plate with medium width tongue on the back. This is solid, handsome, and shows wear from actual war time service. The brass has been polished giving the plate a pretty gold color. A fine honest plate priced well below the tourist town dealers. $250.00

 

 

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10-08-011 – Battlefield Found Oval US Cartridge Box Plate - Overall excellent condition with both iron wire loops intact on the back (one more deteriorated than the other). This was dug back in the 1960s or 1970s but unfortunately the location of the find has been lost to time. There are no dents, bends, dings or anything else that detract from the appeal of this piece. I know some of you are trying to find one to fit your Cartridge Box, with that in mind… the distance from loop to loop on the back is 2 and 7/32nd inches. If this fits your box, be sure to call ASAP because this one is priced to go. $165.00

 

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10-08-012 – Ohio Civil War Veteran’s Gold Waltham Pocket Watch – I bought this watch at the family estate auction of descendants of Lieutenant Simon Waterstone of the 38th Ohio Volunteers several years ago (long before gold value jumped to $1100+ per ounce). I obtained several pieces Waterstone had saved including a CSA buckle and a captured rebel canteen … I believe this watch was likely his while a member of the GAR. This watch case was made in the early 1900’s at the Fahys Watch Case factory in Sag Harbor. They supplied cases to many Waltham makers. The cases are known for the high gold content with the factory using around $6000 worth of gold each day at the turn of the 20th century... and that’s a lot of gold in 1900 era dollars! An old factory foreman said that the floor sweepings alone were worth $80,000 a year. The case bears serial number 7479483, it is marked “Warranted To Wear Permanently” which was the highest rating for quality… meaning the case was gold --- not plated. I assume the gold is 14 karat but have not had it tested. The works for the watch were made by the American Waltham Watch Co., 17 Jewels, serial number 12866036. This SN places the manufacture date around 1903. This watch has an adjustment lever, that the owner can adjust, in case the watch ever runs fast or slow. The watch face is white porcelain with Roman Numerals for the hours and red Arabic numerals for the minutes. The watch also has a separate dial for seconds located at 6 o’clock on the dial. This watch is running on my desk right now. I believe the gold value in the case of this watch will surpass the price I want. $395.00

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10-08-013 - Volume Three of Casey’s 1862 Infantry Tactics - This book is in great condition, with only one small spot of damage halfway up the spine near the edge of the front cover. The book is 3 1/2 by 5 1/4 by 3/4 of an inch. The book has been compressed a bit on the side opposite the spine, likely due to having another book sitting on it for a long time. Just the third volume of this three volume set. $95.00

 

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10-08-014 – Fine Condition Civil War Canteen w/ shorter Cavalry Length Strap - This piece came from the St. Lawrence Museum per the previous owner and is in Excellent condition. We have the full wool cover with one small separation on the seam near the bottom, and a section of wear at one metal strap loop. The canteen is complete with the original cork stopper attached to the canteen with a chain, and the cotton shoulder strap which is shorter than when issued, typical of cavalry usage. The canteen has some cork or other detritus inside that rattles around when you shake it. The strap has been repaired in a couple locations, and is numbered 697 which was the Museums ID number for this item. Quite appealing in all regards. $375.00

 

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10-08-015 -Gaylord Made Pistol Cartridge Box - This is the standard size pistol cartridge box with a 6 inch wide front flap and is around 4 inches tall. This box is in VG+ condition with good leather overall. The straps and the flap both have a bit of crackling in the finish but solid The back of the box is marked “E. GAYLORD / CHICOPEE / MASS”. A good representative Civil War cavalry box. $195.00

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10-08-016 - Signed CDV of Lt. Col Arthur Charles Ducat - A great clear and sharp image of Mr. Ducat taken in Chicago by Hesler. It is signed on the back “My Family And Friend Arthur C Ducat Lt. Col Inspector Genl / Stevenson? Tenn Aug 24th 1863.” He served with the 12th Illinois Infantry throughout most of the war, until he resigned February 1864. He later made Brigadier General by Brevet in March of 1865. They took part in the terrible battle of Shiloh, being engaged nearly all the time of the two days. They later saw heavy losses at Corinth MS. Ducat left the regiment before they headed down to Atlanta in the summer of ‘64. A great autographed Illinois CDV. $275.00

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10-08-017 - Matching Shoulder Belt Plate and Box Plate - These have such a cool patina. These are both in Excellent condition, with the US having two slight dings at the top of the oval. They have both aged together since the war, and have developed a rich reddish patina, with some verdigris in recessed areas. These would be great for anyone trying to finish up their leather set, or even just for display purposes. A Great matching set that came off the same cartridge box and sling for sure. Impossible to duplicate such a great matched set… $450.00

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10-08-018 - Wade & Butcher Razor and Case - This is “THE CELEBRATED Washington Razor” and is marked as such on the translucent horn ? handle which also carries an eagle motif. The blade is ever so faintly marked with a cherub and a portrait of George Washington. The blade is also marked “MANUFACTURED BY / WADE & BUTCHER / SHEFFIELD” with a “W” in a circle next to an Arrow. The case is marked in the same fashion and is very good condition, with a few slight worn marks but nothing worse than that. A nice example of a 19th century Razor, made around the time of the Civil War… Nice patriotic example $85.00

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10-08-019 – Civil War Cavalry Sword Belt Plate - This fine enlisted buckle has a pretty reddish patina, and the applied German silver wreath. The buckle is in Fine condition with hardly any wear. It has the standard narrow tongue, and a recessed area from the mold process. The buckle is batch numbered 421, and is paired with a keeper numbered (691) but fits perfectly. This is the buckle for the Union cavalryman. Nice to find with the keeper…. $350.00

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10-08-020 - Oval US Buckle - This is a standard US buckle worn by Civil War infantrymen. Measures just over 3 and 1/4 inches wide. It is lead filled and has the arrow hooks on the back. Overall fine condition showing just the right amount of age. $235.00

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10-08-021 - Puppy Paw US Oval Buckle - This early style stud back buckle with the full lead backing is much scarcer than the “arrow hook” examples. A nice early plate proper for Mexican War or Civil War display. Try finding one of these in an antique shop any more… A dandy… $350.00

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10-08-022- Civil War Bullseye Canteen - This is the standard bullseye canteen in Very good condition. The rings were believed to add strength to the canteen but such did not prove to be the case, so the government went back to all smooth side canteens for the remainder of the 19th century. The Philadelphia depot started issuing bullseye canteens in 1862. Overall fine condition with a touch of surface rust, and some bangs on the pewter spout. $185.00

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10-08-023 – Early War circa 1861 Cartridge Box with White Buff Sling - This is a superb US cartridge box with the original US plate, tin liners, box plate, white buff sling, and eagle plate. The strap is a nice supple white buff leather and it is stenciled “Co. H 1st Reg. / 56” … complete with the circular eagle breastplate. The box is made by “W.H HIPPLE / PHILADA.” and is in fine condition. The only notable exception is the flap, which has had a second hole added, likely just to make the flap easier to latch. Scarce, early war, fairly priced $995.00

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10-08-024 - Wonderful Ohio Civil War Forage Cap: An absolutely wonderful Civil War forage cap (aka bummer’s cap) being a high quality commercial cap bearing a Cincinnati, Ohio maker’s name embossed on the interior lining in the crown. This has the utmost appeal, showing just the right amount of age and handling to give it that magic feel of an item that you know was really worn during the Civil War. This cap was there --- absolutely not a war surplus item. The blue wool body is in excellent condition with no significant moth damage. There are a couple repaired moth nips on the front, but these are minor. The cap is constructed with the standard reeded welt around the crown and above the visor. But this one has the added quality of a double reeded welt down the back seam and a single reeded welt around the base. The side buttons are fine gilt small size eagle “I” buttons for an infantry officer. The interior shows some deterioration to the sweatband and lining, but still very good. The sweatband is very worn with numerous tears and a couple missing areas. The lining is quilted black silk with much of the body lining scrunched up near the crown. The quilted crown lining is fine with a nice embossed maker’s marking on which I can clearly read “Cincinnati”. It is very rare to find a cap made in Ohio. I have seen only a couple from Cleveland and Cincinnati over the 35+ years that I have collected Civil War antiques. This is complete with the tarred leather chin strap and tarred visor. An absolutely superb example of the Ohio Union Soldier’s forage cap. This came out of the collection of the late Dr. Joseph Schott which many of you other old timers will remember. He was a dentist from LaSalle, Illinois and was noted for the elegant displays he put on of his Civil War and Indian War uniforms, arms, and equipment. Joe passed away last January. I was fortunate to get a couple pieces from his collection, if only for “old times sake”. Here is one heck of a great Civil War cap priced very fairly. $2,850.00

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10-08-025 - Extra Nice M-1860 Colt Army Revolver - This is an early 3-screw production Colt Army made just after Colt stopped utilizing the 4th screw for the shoulder stocks. The serial # is 48494 and all parts match. The condition is overall very good +++ with sharp edges, strong markings, and a crisp action. The overall color is an attractive smoky grey patina. The gun is 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. The walnut grips are extra nice with cartouches on both sides. The initials JE have been carved into the butt of the grip, presumably the initials of the trooper who carried this. A really tight gun from the early days of the war. $1,795.00

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10-08-026 - Superb, On the Spot, Blood and Guts, Fighting and Firing 12 Page Battle Letter from George S Youngs 126th New York Vols. Captured at Harpers Ferry. Twelve historic pages in deep pencil written from the field as the events unfolded. Battle letters are rare and desirable, this one is better than 99% of surviving battle letters. This constitutes one of the great battle letters surviving from the Civil War. It was transcribed by Scott, our graphic design man who produces our web pages and printed catalogs. He retained the misspelled words as written by Private Young. (The transcription may contain a few minor errors, but is overall accurate.)
Quoting...

Sept 22nd (1862)
We have just arrived here from Harpers Ferry after a long and tedious march of over eighty (80) miles and you may well suppose that I do not feel greatly inclined to write, especialy as nearly all of the boys have received letters to day, some of them got three or four and i felt somewhat disappointed at not getting at least one myself, but I suppose your letter must have ?miscarried? and I must write again I thought at first I would not but concluded I must at least let you know that I was alive and well. I suppose you received my other letter in which I state that we were expecting a battle every day, I have forgotten the day of the month on which I wrote and indeed it is not half the time that I can tell the day of week, yesterday you know was Sunday but I did not know it until after noon. but to return to my subject ??as any other man.?? some three or four days after that just about five oclock we received orders to strike our tent and move up on another and still higher hill called Bolivar heights. we got up on there just at dusk and formed in line of battle, pitched our tents and lay down to sleep. the next afternoon we had to move our tents again in order to form them in company streets. that night we were ordered to load and sleep on our arms. the next morning was Sunday and we went out to discharge our peices and so we fired at a target two or three times, the next night we were ordered to sleep on our arms again and so for two or three nights, they would omit one night and then the next we would have to sleep on our arms again until a week ago Thursday we were ordered to ?pack? knapsacks and fall in for eighty rounds of cartridge and be prepared to march. that night after taps (that is at half past nine at which time all lights must be out) when we were nearly all asleep we were ordered to go down the quartermasters and draw rations for two days and cook them, our K company employs two or so that we did not have any thing to do but go down to the quartermas
ters and bring them up to them. the next morning about 8 oclock the regiment was formed and marched about 3/4 of a mile when what ever orders the colonel had were countermanded and we were marched back to camp. then we began to think that it was all intended to see how quick we could form and be ready to march. but in the afternoon at two oclock we fell in and marched down through the Ferry, Crossed the Pontoon bridge and up on to the Maryland Heights, ... the highest hill I ever climbed and I never want to climb it again. about half way up the Mountain there was a battery of three heavy seige guns ??charging over a hundred?? pound shells, beside some small peices. the larger part of our regiment,(all excepting Co. A, and some dozen men from each Co who were left behind as pickets), proceeded to the top of the mountain and back through the woods two or three miles where there was part of an ohio regiment deployed as skirmishers, it was then nearly dark we advanced nearly to the edge of the woods, the buttets began to whistle pretty loud and close. our officers ordered us to get behind the trees and lay low and we were not slow in availling ourselves of their advice, the fireing continued for about 1/4 of an hour when it grew so dark that that they ceased, I had often heard of the peculiar whistle of a bullet and that night I had an oppertunity of hearing it for myself. I did not have an oppertunity of fireing my gun that night as the skirmishers were in advance of us and we could not fire without danger of hitting our own men. as soon as the firing ceased the ohio boys fell back and left us in the advance, we were formed in aline as the extreme outpost and lay there all night with our guns in our hands expecting an attack from the rebels every moment but it did not come untill morning and I lay there and shivered in the cold for I had no overcoat or blanket with me, nothing but my light blouse as I did not want to carry anything more up the hill than i could help. we lay within within sight of the rebel campfires all night and in the morning we could hear their officers give orders to them to “fall in”. right. dress, forward march, and so forth. and about 6 or 7 oclock the rebel skirmishers opened fire on us which was instantly returned. there was a cleared space in the woods 15 or 20 yards wide the rebs fired from one side of the clearing and we from the other. again we were all ordered to lie low behind trees and stumps, and when we saw a gray back to fire on him. I with two other of our Co lay behind a tree, with one of a Co of Cavalry who had been ordered up to support us when he imprudently exposed himself . in a second he jumped up put his hand to his thigh staggered a few steps and fell over on his side and called for his comrades to cary him off, four of them came and took him off in a blanket, in about twenty minutes after that there was a fellow came up from the right of the line who belonged to one other regiment... he was telling us about having been so close to them that he could hear them cursing and swearing at each other about something when just as he sad the last word a bullet struck him wounding him in both legs pretty badly, he was carried in the same manner as the other. shortly after this we were ordered to fall back to a kind of breastwork made of small logs. the rebs were said to be five to one before this breastwork... there was another cleared space, and as they advanced to the edge of this we fired on them, we would lie down behind the breastwork and load then get up and take aim and fire. I fired 25 rounds when we were ordered to fall back to the batterys way down the hill. after we got down there the battery commenced shelling them. these guns are capable of throwing shells five miles.. when they were fired the men were ordered told to hold their guns up straight for fear they would cause them to explode. one of the guns got hot and the men who were working it forgot to stop the vent, the consequence was that when the shell was put in and while two men were raming it down it exploded blowing both the men in peices, soon after this were ordered to retreat over in to virginia. across the potomac I suppose you understand that virginia is on one side and maryland on the other. I forgot to say that while we were behind the breastworks three of our Co were wounded Frank Cole in the left arm, adrian Foster in the calf of the leg, and john alliger over the eye so that it is supposed that the sight of it is entirely destroyed. The Col, also was wounded in the lower jaw. we reached bolivar heights, our old camp about 7 o’clock we lay on our arms that night, and the next morning Sunday the regiment was all set to digging a trench along the west brow of the hill so that the trench runs with the hill north and sought, we built a breastwork of the dirt thrown out of the trench and logs. we even took down our tents and piled them in, on the Southwest about two miles from bolivar heights, is a ridge called louden heights. on the east are the maryland heights, both of which command bolivar heights, on louden heights the rebs had a battery of eight or ten guns, which commenced shelling us just after dinner, the first shell burst close by us struck a stack of guns and broke them all in peices, flew off and struck two boys in Co K next to us on the left wounding them slightly. we were immediately ordered to raise our guns and lay down in the trenches. we were intirely surrounded before night there was another battery playing on us, oh how
the shells flew it made duck and dodge you better beleive. that night they planted five or six batterys round us and the next morn we were obliged to surrender. I have said half i intended to but shall say more in regard to the shelling next time, don’t write until you hear from me again.
G. S. Y”
End quoted letter. If you can find a better battle letter at the price I will buy it from you. This piece of manuscript history is among the best available battle letters currently on the market… $1.150.00

 

 

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