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Dave Taylor
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11-04-001 - Exquisite Silver Cigar Case - This attractive solid silver cigar case has a hinged lid and is wonderfully inscribed “F.O. / d 28 Septb, 1844” being the owner’s initials and presentation date of Sept. 28th 1844. The date is written in the European style of day, month, year. The bottom of the case has multiple silver maker’s hallmarks that I will leave for you to research. The silver is embossed with horizontal stripes and floral band accents. It measures 4 3/4 inches tall and 2 1/4 inches wide. This would be a nice addition to a display of an officer’s effects from the Mexican War, Civil War, Crimean War, etc… or with tobacco related antiques. A very fine piece of antique silver in overall excellent condition. $265.00

 

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11-04-002 - Fine Cartridge Box, Sling, and Plates /Soldier Inscribed. This One Was Definitely Carried in the Civil War…: Extra nice cartridge box with sling, plates, and both tin liners. 100% complete and original. This was made by “HOOVER, CALHOUN & CO. / MAKERS / NEW YORK” and is so marked in a large oval cartouche on the inside flap. The inner surface of the front flap and the shoulder strap are both inscribed in faded brown ink with the owner’s information. The inscription on the flap appears to read “ ? Blake Co. A. ? Mo???” I obtained this from a Michigan auction so the inscription may pertain to a Michigan soldier… though it could also be Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, Missouri, Minnesota, etc etc etc… No way to know for sure. The interior of the front flap is stenciled in huge characters “O I I M” or “ O H M “… either designation being unfamiliar to me, though it could simply be another owner’s initials. The leather is in wonderful condition with good finish. It shows honest age and use but no abuse, and was absolutely carried just this way by Billy Yank during the Civil War. Both plates are secured with the original leather thongs. A complete infantryman’s rig in excellent condition… $1,175.00

 

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11-04-003 - Fine Civil War Military New Testament - This small pocket Testament is signed in pencil “John. N. Abel / Rome, NY”. Published in New York in 1864, very good condition, showing just gentle handling. Has a graphic patriotic presentation paper glued to the fly leaf with US Flag and NY Bible Society text. The front cover has a small wear spot on the bottom corner, and also has two small tobacco burns near the spine, otherwise excellent. There are a few soldiers named John Abel shown in the NY rosters, I will leave it to you to “divine” which one carried this Testament. Superb display item as carried by most of the Union soldiers during the Civil War. $225.00

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11-04-004 - German Percussion Conversion Pottsdam Style Musket - This is a nice example of the Pottsdam style musket which was imported by both the North and South early in the Civil War. These are about as big and heavy as a fence rail, and about as attractive. The lock is marked in front of the hammer with a Crown over “DANZIG” over “1823”. The barrel is stamped “1823:, Crown, “TW”, “P”, “6378”, and “A”. The trigger guard, nosecap, two barrel bands, and the tang screw are all marked “24”. This gun is a smoothbore in roughly 70 Caliber. The stock is in good condition, and has a cheek rest contoured into the left butt stock. There is a small crack near the trigger guard, and one near the buttplate. There is some wood shrinkage around the butt plate as well. This is attic found and looks like it was just pulled out of storage yesterday, having not been touched for a hundred years. A most affordable CW musket at $595.00

 

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11-04-005 - 5th Alabama Confederate Soldier’s Bowie Knife / Wounded Mortally at 7 Days Battles and Died in Service: One of the more exciting items I’ve found recently. This substantial 1850s Sheffield Bowie knife has an incredibly heavy blade and infinite appeal. You could chop off fingers with this knife lickity-split. It has a polished horn handle and etched spear point blade. It measures 11 ½ inches overall and is complete with the original sheath. The blade is beautifully etched “THE AMERICAN PRIDE, EQUAL LAWS, EQUAL RIGHTS AND JUSTICE TO ALL”. It is maker stamped “MOI???ET & GEM / SHEFFIELD” as well as “PROTOTYPE” on the ricasso. The blade has areas of mint luster and some spots of light pitting. The horn handle is excellent with a couple little areas of worm damage. Of great importance is the ancient paper note affixed to the face of the sheath. The family inscribed the note “Bowie Knife Worn by Edgar E. Hayden who was Pressed into the Rebel Army... Mrs. J. G. Hayden” Checking the Civil War rosters of Confederate soldiers we quickly find the owner of the knife. He was Edgar E. Hayden Co. A 5th Battalion Alabama Vols. The unit was a hard fighting Army of Northern Virginia regiment and saw action at all the big battles in the east… Bull Run, Seven Days Battles, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, etc… The standard Civil War data page shows Hayden’s name on the roster, but has no additional data. Additional research in Alabama records reveals that he enlisted in May of 1861, was wounded June 26th 1862, and then died of his wounds in the service of the Confederacy. He enlisted at the age of 29 in Capt. Van de Graaff’s Company. He died of his wounds sometime after July 5th 1862 when he apparently last signed for his pay, and before October 1862 when the muster roll reflects he was “since dead”. He must have been wounded at or between Seven Pines and Gaines Mill Virginia and then lingered for some time. Finding a documented Confederate Side Knife is a damn rare event. This is a quality Bowie Knife with an incredible Alabama Confederate History. $3,850.00

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11-04-006 - Great Old French Percussion Conversion Pistol - I am not sure of the model designation of this neat old horse pistol, I will leave that for you to research. It was originally a flintlock, but was converted to percussion. The barrel is 7 and 3/4 inches long and is rifled. The gun has both 1822 and 1830 dates on it, as well as a cadre of other marks shown in the pictures including a lock that is marked “Mte. Rte. de Lt Etienne”. This gun is has a very attractive look and is in very good condition overall. The wood ram rod is a later replacement. The proper rod would be steel. An attractive weapon at an attractive price. $595.00

 

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11-04-007 - Manhattan 36 Caliber Navy Revolver - A very good example of this handsome Civil War sidearm. This has the desirable 6 1/2 inch barrel, with 5 shot cylinder. This is the Series III and has a serial number of 29783. The gun has a nice plum patina with touches of blue in the protected areas. The trigger guard and back strap still have about 50 percent of the silver plating remaining. The one piece walnut grip is in very good condition with the smallest of chips out of the bottom. A handsome pistol. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Rarer than the Colt navy and more affordable. $750.00

 

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11-04-008 - Inscribed 9th NY Heavy Artillery Soldier’s Colt Pocket Revolver- This pocket revolver was owned by Henry G. Wyckoff who enlisted in the NY 9th New York Heavy Artillery in August of 1862 and served through April 1864, at which time he transferred into the Veteran Reserve Corps. He and the rest of his company spent the early years of the war stationed in Washington D.C. and were responsible for the defense of the city. By 1864 Grant sent the heavy artillery boys to the front as infantry. Wyckoff lived until 1901 and was survived by his widow. The pistol has all matching early war serial numbers 213,380 and is 100% origina & complete and is mechanically perfect. The walnut grip is in very good condition with just some light handling wear. The frame, cylinder, and barrel all have a speckled grey steel patina. The brass backstrap has an attractive patina, and the engraving on the butt is executed in fine Spenserian script carrying Wyckoff’s name and home town. The 9th NYHA left the State September 12, 1862, and served as infantry and heavy artillery in the defenses of Washington, D. C., north of the Potomac, from September, 1862; in the 2d, and later 3d, Brigade, Haskins’ Division, 22d Corps, from February, 1863; the 1st and 3d Battalions in the 2d Brigade, 3d Division; the 2d Battalion in the Artillery Brigade, 6th Corps, Army of the Potomac, from May 25 and 31, 1864. This is a nice Colt with a solid inscription and history. $2450.00

 

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11-04-009 - Refinished 1849 Colt Pocket Revolver: A solid little Colt that is original and mechanically perfect. It was refinished back in the 1950s by the father of the man who sold this to me. It has a four inch barrel, has all original parts, has a freshened cylinder scene and restored blue and case hardened finishes. The grips are very good… and this would be perfect to use in living history or to display with officer’s effects. Where else can you buy a REAL Civil War Colt for so little money. The action works great and indexes properly. $475.00

 

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11-04-010 - Allen’s Patent Pepperbox - This 6 shot pepperbox was made by Allen Thurber & Co. in Worcester Mass. Circa 1840s to 1850s. It has a 4 inch barrels. The bar hammer is marked “ALLEN’S PATENT” on the side, and the barrel is marked “ALLEN THURBER & CO. WORCESTER”. This gun is a standard medium size and has the evenly curved bag shaped round handle, an engraved frame and nipple shield, and fluted barrels. Overall in VG condition, though the action is a touch temperamental. These pepperbox pistols are great conversation starters when a neighbor comes to view your collection… $450.00

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11-04-011 - Cheapo Civil War Spencer Carbine - This is a mid-production range Civil War Spencer with SN#34751. It is the standard 1860 model in good condition but the butt stock is a well made replacement. The sling ring bar is also a replacement but is proper and also looks fine. The magazine tube is a model 1865. The top of the frame has a groove filed lengthwise, this done when the gun was still being used to allow better visibility for short range shooting. The front sight has been replaced and is made out of silver. This gun really displays well, and is priced with the warts taken into consideration. $1,495.00 tm

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11-04-012 - Fine Condition Model 1840 Musician’s Sword with Original Scabbard - Top drawer example of the standard Civil War musician’s sword. Clearly marked “US / G. W. C. / 1864” and “Ames Mfg Co. / CHICOPEE” on the blade. The brass has a very attractive and delicate age patina. The guard is stamped “JH” and the drag bears “G.W.C” (Inspector’s initials.) The leather scabbard is very good and solid. There is some age crinkling in the surface of the leather only. The blade is in extra fine condition with much factory luster and a couple minor age stains. An overall fine+ Union Army Musician’s sword. $495.00

 

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11-04-013 - German WW1 Style Sword by Jewish Sword Maker Hugo Baruch - I am not well versed on these weapons and bought this from a local man who brought me a Spencer rifle and this sword. This is a WW-1 or earlier weapon. It has a 31 inch blade. The blade has a rounded tip with some slight surface rust. The overall condition is excellent. The ricasso is marked “HUGO BARUCH / HO FLIEFERANT / BERLIN S.W. “ The “P” guard, pommel, backstrap, and scabbard all shiny steel. The grip is covered in leather and has a double twisted wire wrap. When researching the sword we found the following: From “Sword and Bayonet makers of Imperial Germany” by John Walter: c.1900-1935; Baruch registration date not known. Berlin, Alte Jacobstrasse 133 and Lindenstrasse 18-19: Baruch appeared in the Berlin commercial registers of 1927 and 1931, although no mention was made of the firm in the registers for 1937 and 1941 (the only records of the period to escape destruction in WW2); it is therefore assumed that the firm ceased to exist in the period 1931-7, probably on account of Jewish ownership. Prior to the abolition in 1918 of the Hohenzollern dynasty, Baruch was accorded the dignity of the title “Hoflieferant” - “purveyor to the Royal Household”. I guess that tells us this sword pre dates WW-1 That’s about what I can tell you. Interesting history on the manufacturer, and a fine solid old weapon… $195.00

 

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11-04-014 - High Finish Uhlinger 32 Caliber Revolver - This is a 6-shot revolver with a 5 inch octagonal barrel in exceptional condition. These Uhlingers are interesting as most show up unmarked as is this gun. Some show up stamped with “maker’s” names on them of people who had no connection to the production of the guns, the names added to create the illusion of coming from a known famous maker. This gun is a standard unmarked example except for the 3 matching serial numbers. This gun is dripping with original factory blue, the rosewood grips are near perfect, and the gun is 100% original and complete except for the missing loading gate on the right side. The steel frame has an attractive deep plum patina. There is some minimal and extremely light pitting in front of the cylinder. The action is crisp, the gun is tight, and if functions perfectly. Lots of finish, lots of appeal, very little money $775.00 g

 

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11-04-015 - CDV of Union Army Brigadier General Jeff Davis - “At the age of eighteen, enlisted for service in the Mexican war. For bravery at Buena Vista he won a commission as 2nd lieutenant in the 1st artillery. In 1852 he was promoted 1st lieutenant. In 1858 he was placed in charge of the garrison at Fort Sumter, and, as an officer under Maj. Anderson, took part in the occupation and defense of that fort. In recognition of his bravery on this occasion, he was promoted captain and given leave of absence to recruit the 22nd Ind. volunteers, of which regiment he became colonel. Being assigned as acting brigadier-general to the Department of the Missouri, he distinguished himself by bravery at Milford, Mo., and won promotion to the rank of brigadier-general of volunteers. He commanded a division at the battle of Pea ridge, March 8, 1862, and took part in the battle of Shiloh, April 6 and 7. May 29th he was assigned to the Army of the Tennessee. On Sept. 29, 1862, he chanced to meet in Louisville Gen. William Nelson, his superior officer, from whom he claimed to have had harsh treatment, and, in a quarrel which ensued he shot and instantly killed Nelson. Gen. Davis was arrested, but was not tried, and was soon afterwards assigned to duty in Covington, Ky. He commanded a division forming a part of McCook’s right wing at the battle of Stone’s river, Dec. 31, 1862, where he so distinguished himself that Gen. Rosecrans recommended him for promotion to major-general. In 1864 he commanded the 14th corps of Sherman’s army in the Atlanta campaign and in the march through Georgia, and on March 13, 1865, he was brevetted major-general U. S. A. for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Jonesboro, Ga. He was promoted colonel of the 23d U. S. infantry, July 23, 1866, and served on the Pacific coast, in Alaska, and, after the murder of Gen. Canby by the Modoc Indians, in 1873, succeeded to the com­mand of the department and forced the tribe to surrender. Gen. Davis died in Chicago, Ill., Nov. 30, 1879.” (excerpt from CivilWarData.com) A cool CDV of an illustrious man. A fine from life view in excellent condition $225.00

 

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11-04-016 - CDV of Lieut. Thomas A. Nichols Adjutant 9th PA Cavalry. This man actually gave us a touch of trouble tracking him down. He easily shows up on the US Park Service Soldiers and Sailors database, but It took me a bit of work finding him on Civilwardata. He didn’t show up on a search of personnel, but when I looked at the regimental history of the 9th PA Cav, I found his name on a letter that he and Major E. G. Savage wrote to head quarters while they were posted near Dandridge, Tenn., January 17, 1864. They had just finished a skirmish with the enemy and had help from the 2nd Michigan Cav. A neat signed in ink CDV of a Pennsylvanian fighting in the west ... $175.00

 

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11-04-017 - Officer CDV - This CDV was in the same Album as the previous two images, but we don’t know who the man is, though the initials AG are penciled below his portrait. The image is a simple bust shot that shows the soldiers shoulder straps, and the top 3 buttons of his coat. The back mark is from Hoag & Quick’s in Cincinnati, Ohio. Might be a 9th Penna Cavalry officer… $45.00

 

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11-04-018 - CDV of a Mustached Fellow - This is another unknown man that came with the previous images. There is no back mark on the CDV and the image is on oval vignette affixed to the card. The image has good contrast and detail. $35.00

 

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11-04-019 - CDV of William Starke Rosecrans Id’d in Ink - He was born at Kingston, Ohio, Sept. 6, 1819, and was graduated fifth in the class of 1842, at West Point. He entered the service as colonel of the 23d regiment Ohio volunteer infantry. Within a month he was made brigadier-general in the U. S. regular army, and was ordered to accompany Gen. George B. McClellan to Western Virginia, where he commanded a provisional brigade of three-months’ volunteers until July 23, 1861, when he succeeded Gen. McClellan in command of the Department of the Ohio. In April, 1862, he received the command of Paine’s and Stanley’s divisions of the Mississippi army, and took part in the siege of Corinth. On Oct. 30 he assumed command of the Department of the Cumberland. and on Sept. 21 took and held possession of Chattanooga. On Jan. 27, 1864, he was placed in command of the Department of the Missouri and concluded a successful campaign against Confederate Gen. Price. He was brevetted major-general, U. S. A., on March 13, 1865, for gallant and distinguished services at the battle of Stone’s river, Tenn. Note how large his shoulder straps are on his uniform. Great view $175.00

 

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11-04-020 - Officer in Full Regalia - This CDV shows a long bearded officer wearing his frock coat, sash, sword belt, foot officer’s sword, hat with bugle insignia and plume, and in his hand is a rolled up military document. This com missioned officer had his portrait taken in Columbus Ohio by Warner and Elliott. This image is in VG condition and is a nice depiction of an Infantry officer. $195.00

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11-04-021 - CDV of a Very Young Sailor - Taken by R. M. Tudor’s of Philadelphia. The image is a full length image of the sailor boy posed in his uniform with his hand resting on the photographers prop. The CDV has a slight crease in the middle and bears a 2 cent blue washington revenue stamp on the rear. He may be a powder monkey or a deck hand --- you guess…. $69.00

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11-04-022 - CDV General John Cochrane - Wonderful view showing the General in a 3/4 view in his uniform, wearing his saber belt and officer’s sword with his hand tucked in between the buttons. He commanded the 65th NY Vols. and was then brigadier in the Army of the Potomac. Battles include Fair Oaks , Malvern Hill, Antietam, Wil­liamsport, Fredericksburg. In 1864 he was nominated for vice-president of the United States, with Gen. John C. Fremont for president. Nice view, with great clarity- $150.00

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11-04-023 - Two Civilian Daguerreotypes in an outstanding thermoplastic case - These images are likely of a man and his wife. The case depicts a naked farmer holding a tankard of beer, and surrounded by his livestock, including a goat and chickens. The case is made by “A.P. Critchlow & Co.,” This case is near MINT but there is a small chip on one corner. $295.00

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11-04-024 - Casually posed Civilian 1/6th Plate Tintype in full case - This is a neat depiction of a well dressed black man in a seated pose. The image has some light spotting but is overall very good. $245.00

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11-04-025 - Fantastic 1/4 Plate Outdoor Tintype of a Man with his Horse - This 1860s image has stunning clarity and detail with a nice tight focus on the man’s face. These outdoor scenes are always a treat to find, as they offer a glimpse into life as it was in the 1800’s. Superb… housed in mat, frame, and glass $250.00

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11-04-026 - 1/6th Plate Tintype of Armed Infantry Sergeant - This is a nice image of a seated Sergeant holding his NCO sword with the elusive shoulder belt attached to the sword. He is wearing his kepi with regimental numbers, two digits. He is proudly showing his chevrons on his blouse, and looking calmly at the photographer. Great image with nice contrast. $325.00

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11-04-027 - CDV of General John Garland - This photo was taken during the twilight of Garlands career. He was promoted to Full Brigadier General for his service during the Mexican American war, and passed away in 1861. This CDV is a high quality print by E. Anthony from a Brady photographic negative. Rather a scarce subject to find. $195.00

 

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11-04-028 - CDV of a 13th Iowa Soldier - Having been a state for less than 20 years, Iowa sent large portions of it’s males to fight for the north during the civil war. Our soldier here is Elias G. Aurand, and he decided in the fall of 1864 to enlist and fight, and mustered into Co. A of the 13th Iowa Infantry. He fought for nearly a year, and was mus tered out in July of 1865 in Louisville, KY. Posed in civilian clothes so priced cheap $30.00

 

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11-04-029 - Great Nautical Image - This is a CDV which is adhered to an ink naval drawing which is great folk art in and of itself. Below his image it says “The Boatswain of the Fawn”. I researched the Fawn and found that The USS Fawn, and a few British ships named the H.M.S. Fawn at different points in time. Our gentleman here would have been the Boatswain on the HMS Fawn that was launched in 1856. The HMS Fawn was a 751 ton displacement, 17 gun Cruizer-class sloop launched on 30 September 1856 from the Deptford Dockyard.
She was commissioned at Sheerness on 30 October 1859 and until 1863 served on the Australia Station. She re fitted at Sheerness in 1863, and from 1864 to 1868 served on the North America and West Indies Station. After a second refit at Sheerness in 1869 she went to the Pacific Station, where she remained until 1875. In 1876 she was converted to a survey ship, and in this role she surveyed areas of the east coast of Africa, the Sea of Marmara and the Mediterranean. On 6 April 1883 she paid off, and she was broken up the next year.
This is a very good naval image… really striking… $100.00

 

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11-04-030 - CDV of Four Indian Fighter Soldiers taken in the Montana Territory - This 1870 era image shows four US soldiers posed for a photograph in Fort Assinaboine, M.T. These men wear kepis with insignia, but the focus is just soft enough that I cannot make out the unit designation on the caps. A neat piece of western US history. $125.00

 

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11-04-031- Signed CDV from 42nd OVI - This is a sharp CDV of Matthias D. Rodecker who was a 1st Lieutenant in Co. A of the 42nd Ohio Infantry. This regiment was organized at Camp Chase, in Sept., Oct., and Nov., 1861, to serve for three years. On Dec. 15 it moved by railroad to Cincinnati and thence by steamer up the Ohio river to Catlettsburg, Ky., where it arrived the morning of the 17th. It participated in the battle of Middle creek, Ky. , engaged in several expeditions against guerrillas; led the advance against the defenses of Vicksburg in Decem ber; also led the advance at Fort Hindman, where, soon after getting fairly under fire, the enemy surrendered. It participated in the charges on the works at Vicksburg, the division of which it was a part holding an advanced position in the 13th corps. In these assaults the regiment lost heavily, especially on May 22. After the surrender of Vicksburg the regiment marched to Jackson, participated in the reduction of that place and then returned to Vicksburg, where it remained until ordered to the Department of the Gulf. $125.00

 

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11-04-032 - CDV of Major General Ormsby M. Mitchel - This CDV is an Anthony print from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery and is one of the best of all the known Ormsby Mitchel images. The image is clear and vivid, and Mitchel has sharp and piercing eyes. When the American Civil War began in 1861, Mitchel worked to assist the Union. He gave several speeches in Cincin nati, encouraging men to enlist. He also briefly commanded the Department of Ohio and helped plan Ohio’s defense against invasion. On August 8, 1861, Mitchel received a commission as a brigadier-general of Ohio volunteers. He played an important role in training the unskilled men.
Mitchel participated in the Fort Donelson campaign in February 1862. He also assisted in the capture of Nashville, Tennessee, by the North on February 23, 1862. The mayor of Nashville surrendered the city to Mitchel. Upon securing Nashville, Mitchel advanced on Huntsville, Alabama. His goal was to destroy railroad tracks built from east to west across the Confederacy. Mitchel had limited success. He only had fifteen thousand troops under his command, and Southern guerrillas successfully attacked his men. While most white Southerners were unhappy with the presence of Northern soldiers among them, many of these people came to respect Mitchel for his kindness. He ordered his men not to steal from the civilians. Mitchel did grant some slaves freedom but only if the African Americans provided his men with information. Other slaves who ran away to Union lines were returned to their owners.
In July 1862, Mitchel was promoted to major general. At the same time, the Secretary of War removed Mitchel from his command. Mitchel was known for his difficulty in working with officers of the same or higher rank as himself. He especially came into conflict with General Don Carlos Buell. In July 1862, Mitchel was seriously debating whether or not to resign his commission because of his differences of opinion with Buell. Rather than allow a competent officer to resign, the Secretary of War transferred Mitchel to Washington, DC, and then reassigned him to South Carolina. Mitchel contracted yellow fever shortly after arriving in South Carolina and died on November 30, 1862. $150.00

 

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11-04-033 - CDV of General Charles Pomeroy Stone - Great sharp CDV. Just before the inauguration of President Lincoln, Mr. Holt, the secretary of war, called Lieut. Stone to Washington, appointed him a captain in the army and assigned him to the duty of inspector-general of all the militia in the District of Columbia then organizing for the protection of the national capital. On May 14, 1861, he was appointed colonel of the 14th U. S. infantry and three days later was made brigadier-general of volunteers. He served in the Shenandoah valley under Gen. Patterson during July, and when Gen. McClellan assumed command of the Army of the Potomac, after the battle of Bull Run, Gen. Stone was selected to command a division and directed to occupy the valley of the Potomac above Washington as a corps of observation. On Jan. 5, 1862, he appeared before the Congressional committee on the conduct of the war and was rigidly examined as to every detail of the battle of Ball’s bluff, which he had been accused of bringing on without due preparation and in February he was arrested and imprisoned in Fort Lafayette, N. Y. harbor, where he was kept in confinement for seven months without any charges having been preferred against him, despite his appeals to Sec. Stanton and President Lin­coln for such a hearing as the military code provided for every accused officer. After his release he served in the siege of Port Hudson and as chief of staff of Gen. Banks was engaged in the skirmish of Bayou Teche and the battles of Sabine crossroads and Pleasant Hill in April, 1864. He was mustered out of the volunteer service the same month and remained unemployed till August, when he was assigned to the command of a brigade in the Army of the Potomac, retaining it till after the surrender of Petersburg and then resigning from the army. He was engineer and superintendent of the Dover mining company of Virginia from 1865 to 1869, and in 1870 entered the service of the Khedive of Egypt, becoming chief of the general staff or practically commander-in-chief of the entire army. Early in 1883 Gen. Stone resigned his commission in the Egyptian service, returned to the United States and was appointed engineer-in-chief of the construction of the pedestal for Bartholdi’s statue of Liberty in the harbor of New York, which proved his last work. $125.00

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11-04-034 - Signed CDV of Captain Levi M. Stephenson 36th and 91st Ohio Regiments. - This CDV is signed in ink on the front and has the “M. Reasoner, Photographer, JACKSON, OHIO.” on the back. The front has some light age spotting, otherwise fine. Stephenson started the war in the 36th OVI and then served the remainder with the 91st OVI. Lots of action in Virginia. $125.00

 

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11-04-035 - Revolutionary War Light Dragoon Saber- A very hefty horseman’s saber, 40 inches overall with a 33 inch blade about 1 1/8 to 1 1/16 inches wide, with the large olive shaped iron pommel, high capstan, iron ferruled wood grip and slotted guard that you love to see, in excellent condition! Light dragoons were tried out in the Seven Years War and proved so successful that the British introduced regiments of them before the American Revolution. American, Loyalist, and British cavalry serving on this continent were all of that type and vitally important, especially in the southern campaigns. This one sports a clipped point, and a grooved wood oval grip with squared sides that may originally have had a rayskin covering but has mellowed to a rich brown. The blade is bright mixed with gray, a few dark spots and negligible pitting. Tight construction. This is the quintessential light dragoon saber of the period. A great sword and the real-deal from the Revolutionary War. $2,750.00

 

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11-04-036 - Very nice condition 1850 pattern foot officers sword by well-known New Jersey maker Henry Sauerbier. This regulation sword carried by infantry lieutenants and captains is unmarked but shows the typical Sauerbier features: slightly downturned pommel, leather wrapped grip, knuckleguard screw at the pommel, unstopped fuller, X-pattern ricasso etching, brass screw on the scabbard throat, etc. Measuring 36 inches overall, 30 ½ inch blade, 1 inch wide at the guard, actually carried by an officer in the field, but is still very nice. Grip is excellent with complete leather and wire. Blade is bright with very visible etching and just some scattered gray or dark spots, perhaps a bit more evident on the obverse of the blade about 4 inches from the tip. The scabbard is also very good, with solid leather and nicely mellowed brass mounts that show floral engraving overall and punch decorated carrying ring bands. The upper mount is especially nice showing a cross with rounded ends amid the leaves that looks like the non-regulation early pattern 18th Corps badge, and mimics the X-pattern cross on one side of the blade ricasso and the foliate cross on the other. The snap-swivels from the original owner’s sword belt are still attached to the carrying rings. Sauerbier produced some of the most interesting CW officers’ swords and this is a very good example of his work. $1450.00

 

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11-04-037 - U.S. Cavalry Picket Pins. An essential piece of equipment for a cavalryman actually campaigning in the field to keep his horse in place while bivouacking, but give it enough room to move around and graze. They were simple, useful, and surprisingly few have survived. Being made of iron and in frequent contact with the ground did not help their survival rate. Most that you seen are pretty beat excavated examples. I have two non-dug ones. The first is the Civil War pattern with a simply figure-8 iron loop that rotates around the top to let the horse move around it. The second is the Indian War 1874 Dyer pattern with the more complicated swivelling top. The Civil War one has a bend near the bottom and is $350. The 1874 pattern has very clear RIA US 1904 markings and a slightly blunt tip. I’ll let that go for $250.

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11-04-038 - Scarce U.S. 1841 pattern eaglehead Naval Officer’s Sword in Impressive Condition. One of the most attractive US regulation swords, in use from 1841 to 1852, this pattern is rarely found, and then in bad condition from exposure to salt from use at sea and damage to the bone grip from careless handling. 33 ¼ inches overall with a 28 inch blade about 1 inch wide. Quill-back blade with false edge, etched with floral and military designs and “N.P. Ames/ Cutler/ Springfield” on one side, and “United States Navy” on the other. The etching on this one is not only legible, but visible from ten feet away, no frosting, but not something you have to squint through a patina or hold in the right light to see.
The brass hilt with a lot of gilt still on it has a backstrap that terminates in a wonderful eaglehead. The reverse-P knuckleguard connects with quillons with acorn tips and floral designs. Hinged oval counterguards function on both sides, the outside one bearing an acorn and leaves design. The carved bone grips with brass ferrule at the guard are intact and tight, just a couple or narrow hairlines on the obverse. An exceptional Mexican War sword and a key piece in history of American swords. The only fault I can find with this is that it lacks a scabbard, but it would cost twice as much with one, and who wants to hide this exceptional blade? $2250.00

 

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