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18-08-37... Cased  Dragoon size pepper....box Cased Allen and Thurber rare dragoon size pepperbox revolver. One of the unsung guns that really won the west, these large .36 caliber pepperboxes show up in early western photographs and are sometimes called “49ers” by collectors.   While belt model sizes are common,   these  long barrel “he man” dragoon sized pepperboxes almost never show up.   And finding one in an original casing with the accoutrements is a real find.   This is a Worcester made gun and has very nice, unmarred grips with good finish, elegant floral scroll engraving on the frame, and even some light traces of blue on the smooth metal barrels and hammer. The mechanism is good. The screw heads are not buggered up and the Allen & Thurber, Worcester, Patented, 1837, and “cast-steel” barrel stamps are all very legible. This comes cased in its’ original blue velvet lined dark-wood box still with its key. Cleaning rod, flask and mold are still present, as are some balls and a later tin of percussion caps. The mold is a rare two-cavity mold forming both round and elliptical bullets, but not Minie balls.  The elliptical cavity molds are almost never seen.  The velvet lining shows some dirt that  will clean. There is minor wear to the fabric, but there is an old tear across the upper lining of the lid. The case is solid and has good color. Two narrow cracks run across the top about 1/3 of the way down and an older glue repaired crack near the upper edge and one at the bottom. Very displayable and tough to find in a large caliber.  I paid just a few dollars less than I am asking for it when I found it, and I was excited to have found it.   $3,950.00. 

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18-08-38....MINTY SMITH AND WESSON ....Minty Smith and Wesson .32 rimfire Number 2 Army in original factory casing. These pistols were valued because of their sturdy frames and resilient copper-cased cartridges. Civil War officers often carried them, enlisted men often tried to (until officers decided bored soldiers and loose handguns did not mix,) and westerners liked them as back ups. Custer had a pair and so did Wild Bill Hickock. This one is numbered 31648, which gives it a Civil War date of manufacture- the current accepted Civil War cut-off is in the 35,000 range. The barrel and frame have most of the original factory blue.     There are some light wear spots but overall a very fine example.   The butt strap shows good color as well and the cylinder, too, which is often the first place for it to go from contact with other surfaces.  Mechanics are good and the lettering on the barrel, serial numbers, and cylinder patent stamp is very clear. There is some freckled brown coming up from underneath the color on the forepart and upper part of the frame, but no pitting. The box is a factory original casing in excellent condition.  Included in the box is an antique oiler and a reproduction cartridge Package.  A very classy cased example of a famous American made sidearm.   Very affordable for a high condition cased gun..... $3,650.00 Sold

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18-08-39...FACTORY ENGRAVED SHARPS PEPPERBOX WITH FAUX IVORY GRIPS; A beautiful little 22 caliber four-shot derringer. Marked "Sharps & Co. Philad'a PA." on the lower left side of the barrel assembly. Marked "C. Sharps Patent 1859" on the right side. The ingenious rotating firing pin in the hammer made these repeating derringers feasible and they were favorite vest pocket arms of gamblers, soldiers, saloon girls, etc... The frame is fully covered with the highest quality flowering scroll New York style engraving matching the original relief decorated faux ivory (aka Vegetable Ivory) grips made to appear to be carved elephant ivory. Serial number 1319. Mechanism is good and functions fine with just a little sloppiness. There is no finish remaining. There is a little powdery pitting on the left side. Some wear and small stains are present on the raised areas of the grips from handling and there is a slight gap at the butt strap from age. This is a very high class little pistol with the faux ivory or gutta percha grips colored to imitate real ivory. Factory engraved derringers with deluxe grips are darn rare in the gun collecting world. I believe this is a very good deal at... $1450.00 zzaajjxx

Needs review

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18-08-40...LEFAUCHEUX CAVALRY REVOLVER   These large bore 12mm pinfire cartridge revolvers were the most advanced large bore revolvers of the 1860s and THOUSANDS were issued to Union and Confederate cavalrymen.  The US govt apparently bought 13,000 with 2.2 million cartridges, and independent arms importers from New York likely imported at least that many more.  CS arsenal records show hundreds of them in inventory, and Nathan Bedford Forest's cavalrymen are known to have had some.    Pinfire cartridges were an early attempt to make ammunition that would be weather-resistant and not require a separate primer.  A small pin protruding from the base of each cartridge stuck up through a slot in the cylinder and when struck by the hammer would set off an internal primer and the main charge. Needless to say, they were the kind of thing that encouraged careful handling.   The wood grips are excellent and show nice graining. The metal is smooth, with some traces of color on the left frame. The Lefaucheux markings are clear, with the “brevete” mark stamped twice. The serial number, 42426, and inspection and proof marks are clear. The mechanism is good and the metal shows as a subdued gray with brown. A very good condition example. 100% original 100% complete and mechanically perfect.   $875.00  xxegevv

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17-11-05...title... description... price

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18-08-41...NEAR FINE CONDITION COLT NAVY REVOLVER:  A very crisp ’51 Navy. The most elegantly proportioned Colt pistol for my money.  Matching serial numbers, even on the wedge, 145227, making it a mid-war, 1863 made gun. Some traces of blue on the left barrel flats and some light case on the loading assembly and faint blue on the screwheads, and faint mottled case on the frame below the cylinder.   Barrel edges show modest wear and bumps.  All Colt markings and serial numbers are strong.  There is also some light visible cylinder scene.  There are vestiges of the safety pins on the back of the cylinder.   The overall color is an attractive plum brown mixed with a gray and some lighter grays along the raised edges of the barrel flats as should be expected.  The wood is tight to the metal and the brass has a mellow aged patina showing a few light traces of silver. A couple minor dings to the edge of the top barrel flat above the wedge.   Good action and bore.  A very nice example of a pistol that is always highly sought, and totally proper for display in Union or Confederate collections.    $2350.00 xxafzz

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18-08-42...EARLY WAR DATE COLT ARMY WITH MATCHED SERIALS... Very good example of the Colt 1860 Army Revolver. These .44 caliber revolvers are instantly recognizable to the Civil War and cavalry collector as the quintessential trooper’s sidearm. This is a crisp example made in 1862, serial number 74498, with even the wedge carrying its matching number (about the easiest piece for a soldier to lose and have to replace.) Smooth silvery gray metal with a shadow of faded blue overall on the barrel assembly, traces of case color on the frame and some visible cylinder scene. Even the cylinder numbers and patent stamps are crisp. A couple of small corrosion spots on the top of the barrel that do not obscure the barrel address, and visible cartouches on either side of the butt. Lightly carved into the wood on the bottom of the butt below the buttstrap are four initials: “A. [perhaps R?] H. LD” Whenever I see an “LD” on an inscription like this I think of one of the southern cavalry troop designations ending in “Light Dragoons.” This could be a captured piece with a southern troopers initials as the first two letters, or the abbreviation of a full unit designation. No matter what, this is a very, very nice example of a Colt Army that is priced right.   100% original 100% complete and mechanically perfect...$1,950.00 Sold

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18-08-43... SPRINGFIELD 1842 MUSKET DATE 1847 WITH BAYONET... Mexican War dated Springfield Model 1842 .69 caliber musket. An untouched brown example that has been sitting for decades with the bayonet fixed and the hammer resting on the nipple, as shown by the hidden areas of bright metal. This is crisp gun. The barrel is generally smooth metal with light surface crust and just salt and peppering on the breech, lockplate and bolster. The nipple shows that it was not used a lot and the edges to the wood are pretty sharp showing that it did not have much handling. The barrel proofs are legible, though the eaglehead is light. The wood overall is free from many dings or abrasions and a cartouche is visible on the left side, though the left butt flat shows some checks and a short narrow crack to the surface midway up the buttplate. The bayonet matches in condition, has crisp markings and has been with it forever. Correct rod, bands, swivels and springs are with it. A nice, un-messed with Mexican War veteran. ... mich auction $975.00 Sold

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18-08-44...ILLINOIS ARTILLERY OFFICER’S COMMISSION AND SHOULDER STRAPS.... Years ago an antique dealer from Texas sold me a trunk full of Illinois related Civil War artifacts and one uniform pertaining to one family. As I recall the material pertained to two brothers and brother-in-law. The brother in law was a high-ranking officer as I recall. At the time I broke the set up into three sections and kept one incredible CDV photograph for myself. I sold these straps and commission to a long-standing collector on the east coast, and this year he sold me his collection. Material from officers serving in field artillery batteries during the Civil War has always been hard to find. There simply were not very many of them compared with the infantry or even the cavalry. Here is a good set of Smith Patent artillery second lieutenant’s straps along with the officer’s commission signed by the Governor of Illinois on April 3, 1863, promoting him from sergeant and appointing him “Senior Second Lieutenant of Company B Second Regiment of Light Artillery” with rank from December 9, 1862. Illinois records indicate Ross originally mustered in as Quartermaster Sergeant 8/26/61, was promoted to Second Lieutenant, and resigned June 20, 1864. The battery organized at Springfield on 6/20/61 and was also known as "Chapman's battery.” At the battle of Corinth in Oct., 1862, it manned Battery Chapman and played an important part in repelling Confederate assaults. With Hurlbut's 16th corps it took part in the operations against Vicksburg and was then stationed at Fort Pickering, Memphis, Tenn., until the early part of 1864. In June 1864 it was part of Sturgis’s expedition into Mississippi, designed to keep Forrest and his cavalry away from Sherman’s supply lines in the Atlanta Campaign. Instead, Forrest defeated Sturgis at Brice’s Crossroads on June 10, 1864. It seems that Ross resigned just ten days after that defeat. A nicely identified commission and set of straps from an officer with some active western service. $550.00 sold

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18-08-45... 30th MICHIGAN PRESENTATION OFFICER’S SWORD WITH SILVER GRIPS .... A classy and high grade presentation sword given to a veteran officer. This officer’s sword has an eaglehead quillon and another eagle with a US shield on its chest amid the floral motifs cast in the counterguard. It has a hollow cast silver grip that has toned down and blends in to a degree with the brass hilt. The blade bears the regulation “U.S.” on one side and American eagle on the other with EPU ribband, both surrounded by floral etching, somewhat light, but visible. The blade is a mix of bright and silver gray overall and has a good edge and point. The spine is etched “Iron Proof,” a fairly standard phrase found on lots of swords imported into the US from foreign makers. The metal scabbard has four brass mounts. The middle mounts and drag are engraved with floral designs and interlocked oval eyes on both sides. The scabbard body has pretty much all its original blue, oxidizing slightly toward brown. Between the throat and upper mount the presentation is engraved on the face of the scabbard: 

“Chas. C. Lamb/ 1st Lieut. 30th Mich. Inf./ Presented / by his Company / Jan. 10th 1865.” 

Lamb, 36 years old, had enlisted at Mount Clemens, MI, in the 8th Michigan Cavalry on 4/23/63 and was commissioned Captain of Co. L the same day. That unit saw its first service against Morgan in Ohio and Kentucky in early and mid-1863, and then took part in the East Tennessee campaign, fighting Forrest and opposing Longstreet at Knoxville. During Lamb’s service with that unit they saw took part in many small unit actions. CW lists 47 instances of casualties while he was with them. The rigors of such active field service must have taken a toll, however, and he was discharged for disability June 4, 1864. Michigan was not restful, though. Concerns about the possibility of a raid into Michigan by Confederate sympathizers and refugees in Canada, led to the formation of the 30th Michigan to guard the border along the Detroit River and the lakes. The 30th the regiment was the last unit raised from Michigan during the Civil War. Lamb thus enlisted again, this time taking a commission as 1st Lieutenant of Co. B 30th Michigan Infantry. He was promoted to captain and transferred to Co. C on 3/16/65, and finally mustered out on 6/30/65 at Detroit.  This truly is a fine sword and comes with its original gold bullion sword knot as well.   A very high-quality civil war sword…. $6,500.00

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18-08-46...U.S. COLT 1873 SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER ARTILLERY MODEL... The classic Indian Wars army revolver. A real martial .45 caliber pistol showing U.S. frame stamps and the remnants of cartouches on the grips. Starting in 1895 the army called in these cavalry revolvers for modification to 5-1/2 inch barrels. The guns were disassembled, cleaned, refurbished and then put back together.  The arsenal paid no attention to serial numbers during reassembly.   It was a tribute to the doctrine of interchangeable parts that they did not have to worry about serial numbers. This one shows the absolutely correct mixture of serial numbers. The forward frame is numbered 49793, the triggerguard is number 5172, the cylinder bears number 1384, and the butt strap, 32721. (The loading gate is numbered 1546.)   inspector and assembly markings A (Ainsworth) on the triggerguard and H.N. on the frame... Henry Nettleton a scarce US inspector.  “P D.F.C.”  (Proved David F Clark).  on the underside of the barrel.  The barrel and cylinder are smooth metal with a mix of gray and blue-turned-plum-brown. The frame shows darker with the case color even and a dull smoky blue. The screwhead slots are crisp, but show dull silver. Barrel stamping is good, just a tad light at either end, frame patent dates and U.S. ownership stamp are good. Mechanics are perfect. The grips show wear and visible, but not legible cartouches. Collectors still tend to call this the artillery model, though the army never designated it that way and the new barrel length was regulation for all entitled to wear it- artillery, infantry sergeants, and cavalry. I personally own one of these in mint condition carried by a Michigan officer in the Spanish American war. This is the revolver not only carried in the wild west, but up San Juan Hill by Roosevelt’s Rough Riders and in numerous other engagements in Cuba and the Philippines. A classic US martial pistol.... ah $2950.00 sold

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18-08-47... PRESCOTT RIMFIRE POCKET REVOLVER .....Prescott made several variations of this revolver from about 1862 to 1867, but not more than a few hundred of each. This is the short frame style with a flat butt. The metal is smooth, gray overall, but with areas of blue turned plum brown on the barrel. Some darker gray and brown speckling on the left frame. The barrel markings are crisp, and the pistol has matching serial number 70. The grips are very good, with a tight fit, but do have some dings on the right side and some scratches on the left. Good mechanics. As with most small caliber rimfire pistols this qualifies as a Civil War officer’s sidearm as well as an early westerner’s pistol. ....   $475.00 sold

 

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18-08-48... IDENTIFIED 17th OHIO ORDNANCE OFFICER'S INSTRUCTIONS ... Scarce 1863 dated government book of instruction for the use of ordnance officers in filling out quarterly returns. A key book in administering the army, where officers would be held personally liable for any shortcomings that seemed to appear from faulty record keeping. Very clean, clothbound copy, blindstamped in gold on the cover with the Ordnance Department insignia. On the flyleaf is the signature of Quartermaster Samuel Hurd of the 17th Ohio: "S.H. Hurd / Q.M. 17th Regt. / O.V.I./ May 23" 1863" Hurd enlisted in that outfit as the Quartermaster Sergeant at age 25 on 8/22/61. His CWData record shows he made Quartermaster 11/26/63, and was detailed Acting Assistant Quartermaster for the Army of Georgia 4/4/65, and mustered out 7/16/65. (The date of May in his inscription may simply indicate his posting to that department in the regiment rather than his rank, or could indicate he was serving in that capacity and merely received his commission in November.) The 17th Ohio served in the Army of the Ohio and the Army of the Cumberland, spending most of its time in the 14th Army Corps. They saw action at Stones River, Chickamauga, Resaca, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta and elsewhere, losing 6 officers and 71 enlisted men in killed and wounded. A key book in understanding how the army functioned owned by an officer in a fighting regiment ... ajj-con-kut ... $235.00

18-08-49...JAMES A. GARFIELD’S 42nd OHIO ...A small group put together in honor of President Garfield. Garfield was serving in the Ohio state senate at the outbreak of the war and was given command of the 42nd Ohio. He led a brigade sized command in a successful effort against Confederates in eastern Kentucky in late 1861 and early 1862, which made him a brigadier general, leading to a brigade command in the Army of the Ohio and the post of chief of staff to Rosecrans.  He survived Chickamauga with his reputation intact, but Grant gave command of the Army of the Cumberland to Thomas and Garfield sought his future in the US congress. The grouping consists of a Civil War CDV bust view of Garfield as a brigadier general, a memorial ribbon commemorating his death in 1881, and two pieces of Civil War hat insignia. The insignia are the regulation badges for the officer’s dress or “Hardee” hat and are the scarce metal-backed variety with the bullion embroidered velvet stretched and sewn over a thin metal plate with fastening loops protruding through the polished cotton backing material. The oval hunting horn lacks one loop on the reverse, but still has its wire border and good color to the velvet with no tears. The gold bullion horn has toned down slightly, but has not gone to the zinc color often seen except on the very upper part of the mouthpiece of the horn. The backing is solid but has a separation line. The oval eagle and ribbon side piece likewise has its full border, bright sequined wings and good color to the velvet, though the stitching securing it to the edge of the backing has come undone. The memorial ribbon is printed black on white silk, now a light cream color with two very minor stains. The CDV is not backmarked.  Photographic views of Garfield are quite scarce.  Metal-backed bullion insignia have always been sought after by collectors even without a regimental association. This is a nice little group.... ijj.   $1,350.00

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18-09-50... DRAGOON SABER ... Super condition, regulation US 1833 pattern dragoon saber. (Until 1855 all US mounted troops were styled light dragoons.) Modeled on the British sabers of the 1820s with quill-backed blades, this was the regulation sword for US mounted troops in the Seminole Wars, the very early Indian Wars, and was even carried by some state units long after the introduction of the 1840 pattern. This one is in great shape. The brass hilt shows crisp “ORD / HKC” inspector marks and has no bends. The grip has its original full leather wrap with just minor wear and crackling, and the wire binding is still present as well. The blade has a good edge and point with no nicks and shows a mix of bright and steel gray, with the dry-point engraved “United States” over a branch very visible on one side and the Ames makers logo and date 1837 just a tad lighter, but very legible on the other side ricasso, along with a “JM” inspector stamp near the hilt. The leather pad is even still present at the blade shoulder. The iron scabbard is solid with throat, drag, and both carrying rings in place. The surface is a bit crusty and has some pitting and one dent near the drag, but the sword seats fine and it would likely clean up a bit with some TLC. The brass hilt has a nice, untouched patina. If you have been looking for an early US cavalry saber from the period of US expansion into the west, this is a good one- made just one year after the Alamo.   Xxdjjzz. $950.00

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18-08-51...GOLD MINER’S SCALE... I just bought a small collection of these scales and will be piecing them out over the next several lists. With the discovery of gold in California in 1849, they became an essential part of every fortune-hunter’s gear and show up in a number of different patterns and styles, making them a great display piece with early western pistols, daggers, and other essentials for the gold fields. They vary in quality of course, but I can hear the salesman: “don’t you want scales that reflect the quality of the life to which you aspire, indeed, to which, after your manly labors sorting gold from gravel, you are entitled?” Those selling shovels generally did a lot better than those digging for gold…This set has the two pans and balance beam in one fitted section of the velvet lined case and five round brass marked counterweights in the other section. The case itself is wood and pasteboard, much like the photographic cases of the period with a green “leatherette” surface embossed with a patriotic American eagle that was probably gilt when first made. A small pivoting flat hook serves to close the case, again like a period photographic case. The surface has some abrasions and small stains, but is very presentable.  Much nicer than most we see on the market.   $145.00 Sold

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18-08-52... GOLD MINER’S SCALE ....A similar example from the same collection. The same sort of green leatherette case with an embossed eagle. The interior has the same purple velvet lining with recessed areas for the balance beam and pans and for the counterweights, which this time are four square shaped brass pieces marked with their weights. The closure is the same flat hook. $145.00 Sold

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18-08-53...MASSACHUSETTS MINUTE MAN MEDALS ....The State of Massachusetts authorized medals for those rare first responders who had answered Lincoln’s “first call” for volunteer troops to serve three months in April 1861.  No other soldiers were authorized to have these.  The bronze suspension bar reads “Massachusetts Minute Men 1861” and the medallion has the state seal on one side and on the other the dedication, "The commonwealth of Massachusetts to the members of the Massachusetts Militia who were mustered into the United States service in response to President Lincoln's first call for troops-April 15, 1861." The medals were then struck along the rim with the soldier’s name and unit. Somewhere between 3,000 and 4,000 of these medals seem to have been made for those early war veterans.

Two brothers from California discovered this large cachet of medals In the rafters of their late fathers house which had previously been the residence of one of the commanders of the fifth Massachusetts. When they found these Medals they were still in the original cardboard boxes.  The little boxes had sustained significant water damage over the century and the brothers elected to discard them. Oh well.  The brothers kept a couple and I bought the remainder.  I had to pay dearly to get them but felt the find was significant. Feel free to call or email me if you have an interest in buying one or several. I even have a couple where the soldier was killed in action. I will be listing more in the coming weeks.

MASSACHUSETTS MINUTEMAN MEDAL FOR ANDREW F. STOWE 5th MASS, AT FIRST BULL RUN, AND 50th MASS., PORT HUDSON ....This example is complete, in “uncirculated” condition as a coin dealer might say—that is, it has great condition and detail with no worn spots, and a deep chocolate/bronze patina. Stowe was a 23 year-old upholsterer from Haverhill who enlisted as a private 4/16/61 and mustered into Co. D 5th Mass. on 5/1/61 and mustered out 7/31/61. He did a second tour of duty with the 50th Mass., mustering in to Co. G as their first sergeant 9/19/62, and being promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 10/6/62. He was discharged for disability on 5/19/63. He was a member of GAR Post 47 in Haverhill after the war. The 5th Mass entrained for Washington April 21, 1861, and mustered into Federal service there on May 1. In July it was part of Franklin’s Brigade of Heintzelman’s Division and fought at Bull Run, losing 9 killed, 2 wounded, and 23 captured. It returned to Washington and then to Boston, where it mustered out July 31. The 50th Mass was a nine-month unit that was sent to the deep south, arriving in Louisiana by detachments, Co. G arriving in New Orleans on Feb. 10, 1863. Assigned to the 19th Corps, it took part in the campaign against Port Hudson, taking part in the May assault, but suffering light losses. After the fall of that post the regiment did guard duty there until its return to Massachusetts and muster out in August. $350.00

I have medals for each of the following men... plus many more. These fellows are from Co. D 5th Mass. Vols. Thomas Keif Hiram S. Collin, Mathew N Greenleaf, Charles E. Mills, Charles W. Judge, Frank Dawson, Daniel J Haynes, Wiliam H Steele, Albert H Gould, and George M Waren, Prvt Co. B 4th reg. Call or email for prices on the above. I don't have the soldier records with me as I type this.

 

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18-08-54... MASSACHUSETTS MINUTEMAN MEDAL FOR DAVID G. HATCH 5th MASS, AT FIRST BULL RUN, AND 16th MASS., KILLED IN ACTION AT GETTYSBURG ....The condition and background of the medal is the same as Hatch’s comrade in the 5th Mass. Hatch was from Waltham and enlisted in the 5th at age 21 on 4/19/61 and mustered in as a private in Co. G on 5/1/61. He also was with the regiment during its service at Bull Run and returned home for muster out on 7/31/61 at Boston.

He was home less than a month, however, when he joined the 16th Mass., mustering in to Co. H on 8/30/61. The regiment became part of the 3rd Army Corps in the Army of the Potomac and saw some hard service. On the peninsula they were part of a reconnaissance to Fair Oaks that cost them 23 killed. At Oak Grove they lost two more killed in action and another two at Glendale on 6/30/62. At 2nd Bull Run 21 members of the regiment lost their lives and at Fredericksburg 2 more. At Chancellorsville they lost 12 killed outright and others mortally wounded. At Gettysburg they were part of Humphreys’ Division posted along the Emmitsburg Road and were hit hard by Longstreet’s assault on July 2 and Hatch was one of 16 men killed or mortally wounded in the regiment. A very telling medal given that he never knew of it or lived to receive it. $750.00

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