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18-02-00...IDENTIFIED 5th OHIO CAVALRY COLT ARMY REVOLVER: This is the Real Deal… a dead-on DIRECT HIT by serial number matching the US Army ordnance records. This Model 1860 Colt Army Revolver bears serial number 65,026. US ordnance records show this revolver was issued to Sergt. Stephen C. Conrey Co. “I” 5th Ohio Cavalry in July 1862. No doubt about it… a direct hit. Conrey served with the 5th OVC from October 1861 to November 1864. The revolver is a solid old War-Horse showing much age. Condition is good to very good. All serial numbers match except the cylinder. The condition of the cylinder matches the rest of the gun so we can bet it has been with the gun since the 1860s. Metal shows much use and age with moderate pitting on the right side of the barrel and numerous scratches and gouges on the cylinder. Some cylinder scene remains… but is largely obliterated with the scars. Firm name is visible on top of the barrel. Grips are good. Mechanically fine. 100% original and 100% complete. The 5th OVC was extremely active in the western theatre. CW data lists 67 data points where the regiment, or elements of it, were not only engaged but suffered some kind of loss, which gives an idea of how much campaigning they did. They also list one officer and twenty-six enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, which is significant for a cavalry regiment. Mostly serving as part of the armies and departments of Tennessee and Mississippi, the regiment recruited in late 1861 and took the field in February 1862, reporting to General Sherman in Kentucky. It moved down to Pittsburg Landing on March 15 and saw action the very next day on an expedition just five miles in front of Shiloh chapel, and then saw more action at Crumps Landing just two days before the Battle of Shiloh, where it also served under fire. The regiment then took part in the march on Corinth and parts of it fought at Metamora and Davis’s Mills. In April 1863 it saw action at Memphis and a month later at Coldwater, Miss. At Panola, outnumbered, it charged through a surrounding ring of Confederates and broke through. At Clear Creek, Alabama, Gen. Osterhaus complimented it after eight days of almost constant fighting. In 1864 it took part in the Sherman’s March to the Sea, adding to its list of numerous small unit actions and seeing its last significant fight at Fayetteville in March 1865, where it lost several killed and wounded, before it was finally mustered out in October. Truly “identified” firearms from the Civil War are extremely scarce and very desirable. Here is one with a good full war history in a tough Ohio Cavalry regiment. $3,650.00

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18-02-19...Remington Rifled & Sighted - Maynard Tape Primer Conversion M1816 Musket. VG condition.  Nicely marked "Remington Ilion NY 1857" on the rear of the lock.  Barrel tang is match dated “1857” - It is also stamped “? over 78" further back on the tang.   The patent breech is clearly marked with inspector’s initials “JT” this likely being John Taylor Arsenal Sub Inspector.  Faint conversion cartouche visible on stock opposite lock. Long range rear sight. Rifled bore is VG showing light wear.  Butt plate tang clearly stamped US.   The ramrod is of the period but has a slightly different style button head than we usually see.   Name "M. Stephens" is carved into the left face of the butt stock.  Initials of  "A.T." or "A. F." are incised on the right face of the butt.  There is a separation crack running through the lock table rearward into the butt stock. This is stable but is visible.  This gun surfaced in Centerville, Ohio last year.  That town is near Dayton.   Assuming the soldier's name is M. Stephens, and assuming further that he served from Ohio, there are seven men listed as soldiers from The Buckeye State that you can research.  Unfortunately, THAT is a lot of assuming to do.  Priced just as "a gun" with some added interest because of the carvings...    $995.00 sold

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18-02-20. Handsome Lancaster PA. Full Stock Kentucky Percussion Rifle:  30 caliber, 37 inch octagon barrel, 52 inches overall.  A really nice looking old time Daniel Boone type rifle gun. Very striking with an attractive circular brass patch box with a circular inlay which is joined by two sweeping silver tentacles running toward the wrist.  If you view the butt with the muzzle on the ground the patch box-tentacle inlay almost looks like an octopus.   There are numerous other decorative silver or German silver inlays in the wood. The left side of the butt has a raised cheek rest inlaid with a crescent moon with “man in the moon” silhouette.  Really cool.   Has a double-set trigger, but you will need to tune that up.  The rear “set” trigger needs to be adjusted.  The forward trigger functions just fine as a plain old trigger.  Has a brass trigger guard, and decorated muzzle face.  All original except for a replaced ram rod.  Wood is eye catching with a very well executed faux tiger stripe, and a light baste of shellac. The nose cap is pewter,  heavy on the lead content.  The barrel is unsigned.  The lock is marked H E Leman  Lancaster PA.  The lock is secured with a single screw.  Shows some light cleaning but no abuse.  I do not have a bore light small enough to drop in a .30 caliber bore.  I will assume the bore is rough.  Great looking full stock with great eye appeal.  A lot of bang for your buck….  $895.00 sold

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18-02-21... Civil War Enfield Rifle Tool:  British sergeant’s combination tool for the p53 Enfield rifle, the rifle imported in the largest numbers by the north and the south. British sergeants were either expected or permitted to do more extensive work on weapons and their combination tools were able to be used as screwdrivers, vent picks, spring vises, worm, ball puller, etc. This one has all its components and is in good, clean shape, with no rust and a lot of its original blue now turned to a light gray.  I see these tools priced from $195 to $265 on other Civil War web sites.  Friends and Relatives price…  $175.00 sold

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18-02-22... Union Army Regulation Issue Cavalry Spurs:  A real solid pair of classic Civil War US cavalry spurs. Untouched, as-found patina. Iron rowels show some expected surface rust and grunge.  Both rowels turn freely and show expected wear at the tips.  These have the correct centered pins for the rowels. A key piece of cavalry equipment that would dress up a pair of period boots nicely.  Getting hard to find these days….    $235.00 sold

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18-02-23 ...Superb Ames Model 1850 Staff and Field Officer’s Sword... This is a top notch example of the Ames Civil War staff sword.There is beautiful etching with 95% bright original factory luster and icy frosting on the near pristine blade of this regulation 1850 pattern Staff and Field officer’s sword made by Ames. The company marking is etched just above the ricasso of the blade and stamped on the upper mount of the scabbard. This was the typical sword carried by officers with the rank of major and above, and officers assigned to staff duty.  Similar to the foot officer’s sword, but with a “US” inset into a larger guard,  and overall a tad longer than the foot pattern,  with a blued steel scabbard in expectation of doing duty on horseback. Ames was one of the prolific suppliers of edged weapons during the war. The brass guard and scabbard mounts show good amounts of the original gilt finish, mixed with some areas of rubbing that show as a darker brass patina. The scabbard has just about all of its original blue that is oxidizing toward a deep lustrous plum color. All the binding wire and sharkskin wrap is present on the grip, which shows only the very slightest of rubbing and has the typical Ames vertical separation line from age in the underlying wood base. The etched motifs “read” very clearly against the frosted background, something that is usually long gone on a high-end sword. In addition to the floral motifs, there is a nice script US, eagle and trophy of arms. Altogether a superior example of the staff pattern officer’s sword.  A decade ago these “minty” Ames staff swords jumped off tables at $3000 and $3500.  I can sell this one at... $2650.00 sold

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18-02-24 ...DESIRABLE FIRST MODEL SMITH CARBINE BEARING OWNER’S NAME /  22nd NEW YORK CAVALRY ?... Once referred to as “Artillery Models” by old time collectors, this pattern was designed and made with no sling ring or bar for attaching a cavalry carbine sling.  Instead it carries two standard sling swivels for a standard rifle sling. In truth, it has no connection with artillery and is actually the First Model Smith carbine.  Whereas the very common Second Models show up in near mint condition at every show we attend,  it is virtually impossible to find a First Model with any original finish remaining.  The first models were the ones actually issued to the cavalry, and they saw good service.  Ours bears serial number 2755.    This is one of the early Smiths made by the Mass. Arms Company, and it bears their stamp on the left side of the receiver, along with the Smith’s Patent markings and the Poultney and Trimble agent markings just aft of them.  So, if you are looking for a good, solid, early war Smith, here’s your chance. These carbines utilized a .50 caliber, foil cartridge or a special rubber-cased cartridge with an ignition hole in the base that would permit a percussion cap to set it off.  They operate like a modern shotgun, breaking open by depressing a button, to permit the insertion of a cartridge at the breech.  This one shows some dings and smaller scratches in the buttstock, and some small cracks at the forend where it meets the receiver, but has a good fit and matching color in butt and forestock.  The barrel shows lots of faded blue, as does the top bar and rear sight.  The bore is dark with decent rifling.   Stamped near the rear sight is “SAM DOBBIN 6.”   Assuming this is the trooper’s name… The only candidate I find in CWData is Samuel Dobbin of the 22nd NY Cavalry, who enlisted and mustered into Co. C at age 24 on 1/4/64 at Riga, NY, was promoted to sergeant, and served with them until mustering out on 8/1/65 at Winchester, Va.    I don’t find confirmation that the unit had Smiths, and this is an earlier war carbine, but that is about as far as I can take the research. If that is our man, the number 6 would then have been his “rack” number.  I will leave additional research for you.  We know the Smith saw service with the 10th NY Cavalry, 7th Illinois, 1st West Virginia, 1st Massachusetts and many others. It also saw service out west. Some of the soldiers killed in the massacre of the wagon train at the Platte Bridge Station in Wyoming were carrying Smiths. (There was even one used by a townsman in the Northfield, Minnesota raid during the Jesse James / Cole Younger Gang Bank Robbery.) This scarce First Model definitely saw service in the war, and there is a reasonable probability it was with the 22nd New York Cavalry.   $1,650.00 sold

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18-02-25 ... REGULATION WAR OF 1812 U.S. CHEESEBOX CANTEEN ... This pattern of canteen was produced under contracts from the US government in early 1812 to equip auxiliary detached militia from the various states who would serve under US command.  The single-rim form was a familiar one to New England makers and was supplied to the US government usually in black with a US painted on the front. The maker’s initials, “NR” are branded on the back of this one, and two of the original leather loops for the sling survive, as well as an old replacement for the third.  At some point many of these canteens were transferred from the US government to the state of Massachusetts and repainted in a bluish-green with a red “MS” on the front, over the original “US.”  In this case, the original “US” can be seen underneath. No one knows when the canteens made their way into state hands.  Some feel the state acquired them as surplus from the federal government, but there is equally strong opinion that it happened between 1812 and 1815. See O’Donnell’s book on canteens for the story.  This is a very nice example of a recognized US military canteen and displays really well with 1812-era material. I even include a cork- vintage unknown. I can sell this for the same price I was getting six years ago….    $595.00

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18-02-26 ... HIGHEST QUALITY CIVIL WAR FORAGE CAP MADE IN BALTIMORE:  Wonderful Civil War McDowell pattern forage cap made by McCormick and Brother, Baltimore.  Characterized by a very tall body, and distinctive downturned curved visor,  this style is called the “McDowell” cap from its wear by that undistinguished general.  Ours is a top notch commercially made officer’s quality and has a quilted, black silk lining that shows some tears (in the lining only) exposing its padding, but which preserves the gilt stamp of its maker: “McCormick & Brother, 149 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore.”  Thomas McCormick was a Baltimore tailor in the 1850s and by March 1864 was in business as McCormick and Brother.  The exterior of the cap is about perfect. The chinstrap and infantry officer’s eagle - “I" buttons” are in place.  The sweatband is present, and shows a partial tear on one side and a tear all the way through on the other, both at the point where the side buttons are sewn.  A previous collector used the trick of running some thread across the base of the cap from each side at the points of the visor to contract it slightly and show the curve and slope of the visor as it would appear when worn. I have left it that way, though it would be easy enough to snip the thread. This is a great piece of Civil War headgear that would fit perfectly with an officer’s grouping.  One of the rarest and most desirable pieces of Civil War headgear.  A very good value at... $2,850.00 sold

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18-02-27... ALWAYS RARE ENLISTEDMAN’S INFANTRY FROCK COAT AND RELATED NCO MATERIAL: One of the Holy Grails of Civil War collecting is the enlisted 9-button infantry frock coat. As a kid I searched for one for years and when I finally found it in my early twenties I had to sell my second greatest treasure -- an identified Ohio soldier’s bummer cap with insignia, and also sell my best musket to raise enough money to buy the coat. I think it was around $1,200 give or take… and that was forty years ago at the late Karl Rommel’s first ever Michigan CW Show with George Lower (The Gettysburg Sutler) and renowned Confederate collector and scholar Lewis Leigh in attendance. In fact I bought the coat from Lewis and was glad to get it. This coat is also a very nice. A long time collector from Colorado sold me this entire lot when he retired and decided to downsize to a smaller home. Every piece is original, but the material was NOT owned by one soldier. This assembled group of original pieces makes a great display. The coat is a regulation enlisted infantry frock coat with the addition of a body lining. Most EM frocks have linings only in the breast area. We occasionally find higher quality examples with full linings. Years ago I had a beautifully lined example worn by a Vermont soldier with his name penned in the sleeve lining. This frock is entirely appropriate for wear by a sergeant as it shows now. It is completely regulation including the two-button cuffs and the regulation two-buttons at the rear waist, light blue piping, and standing collar. The piping is the early-war style cording rather than fabric welted into the seams. The collar piping is the standard arrangement. The cuffs show a variation often seen where the trim goes straight around the back of the cuff rather than running up into the cuff split. The lining and exterior show period wear and some professional late 20th century restoration to some light moth damage. The sleeve linings are intact. The body shows wear and abrasion spots and the upper portion around the right shoulder and back of the neck were repaired with a new piece of fabric to prevent further tearing. The exterior shows scattered repaired moth holes with the larger spots backed with a perfectly matching blue wool. This was a well-done job: the repairs blend in visually and the coat is stable and fine for display. Accompanying the coat is an original pair of Civil War infantry sergeant chevrons. Excellent condition sky blue worsted wool stitched to the dark wool backing. These are gently tacked in place. They look great and are a darn scarce commodity. Also included is a regulation worsted-wool First Sergeant’s sash which has good color and just some scattered small moth holes. Additionally included, is an original NCO belt and buckle. The belt is the regulation Civil War harness leather example with a flat brass adjusting hook and keeper that is stitched and riveted in place. The leather belt shows a legible A.D. Laidley US sub-inspector’s stamp. The belt plate is of course original and bench numbered 868. Keeper is not numbered. This pile of treasures makes an ultra attractive display that would take a lot of time to assemble piece by piece in this twenty first century. This lot would make a great centerpiece of a display of Civil War infantry gear. I am going to price this set very friendly. The coat is worth $4500 to $5000. The chevrons are easily worth $600. The sash is easily worth $600. The belt and buckle is easily worth $450 to $550. Total value is easily $6200 to $6700. I will sell the entire lot for a darn friendly…. $5,500.00 sold

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18-02-28... REGULATION LIGHT ARTILLERY SHELL JACKET WITH SCALES... Regulation Civil War mounted jacket for light artillery and horse artillery. One of the most colorful uniforms of the Civil War. Attractive high standing collar with two false button holes on either side, red trim top and bottom, trimmed likewise down the front lapel and around the base of the jacket, with piping on the cuffs, stripes on the back and trimmed bolsters (pillows) on the back to support a saber belt. This one is in spanking condition with virtually no moth damage and a full lining in the body and sleeves. Has full Cinti. Ohio inspector’s marking in the right sleeve and also size # 2. Dressing up the jacket further is a pair of regulation shoulder scales with their correct fasteners. One collar button is missing, but easily replaced. The colors of the jacket and piping are vibrant. During the Civil War the artillery was a professional branch of service that operated on the front lines in close combat. The federal light artillery was a force to be reckoned with. A Confederate officer remarked that with Confederate infantry and Yankee artillery he could “whip the world.” One of the nicest examples I have turned up in recent years. Coat reasonable at 1,850.00, scales 195.00… Both… $2,045.00 sold

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18-02-29 COLT STYLE POWDER FLASK: This pattern shows up in the Colt Wholesale Price List of 1860. Made by the American Flask and Cap, Co., this is the “Coat of Arms” pattern and came in a number of variations in suspension rings, finish, etc. This one preserves a lot of its original dark brown finish with just some minor rubbing to the high points on the face and a dent on reverse and rubbed areas, as is to be expected on the side worn against the body. The side loops and suspension rings are firmly in place. The top uses a conventional top mounted thumb-piece and spring, along with a marked, three-position charger. The brass shows an attractive untouched patina with some original gilt mixed with darker areas, particularly on the flat top. A nice Colt percussion accoutrement with infinite eye appeal. $595.00 sale pending

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18-02-30... KLEMM BROTHERS CIVIL WAR ERA GUITAR ... Klemm and Brother will be familiar to Civil War collectors from their army contracts for drums and bugles.  From at least 1859 to 1879 the firm was in business at 705 Market Street as manufacturers and importers of musical instruments.  Here is one of their 1860s guitars with a full label inside clearly visible through the sound hole.  The edge of the body and sounding hole is bordered with inlaid floral motifs using mother of pearl and other materials. A few of these inlays have fallen out over the years, but the border shows their shape for replacement and a large majority remain, making it pretty showy as is.  The front of the body shows wear to the finish from use, but the back shows most of its finish and a rope border design, with just some separation lines visible running lengthwise.  The body also has an inlaid line running around its perimeter, midway between front and back.  No strings remain, but the frets and tuning pegs are present, though with some chipping and breaks on the heads.  The “bridge” that secures the strings to the body of the guitar is a replacement done many years after the Civil War.   Guitars were popular in smaller musical and minstrel groups.  Several show up in Civil War photos of sailors amusing themselves on deck or soldiers in camp and garrison.  With the maker identification and label, this is a “no doubt about it” period instrument and it looks great.  You will be hard pressed to find another genuine Civil War guitar for sale even if you attend the next hundred CW shows. A great Civil War camp item that is extremely rare. Could be restored to playing condition,$ 1,150.00 sold

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18-02-31 COMBINATION GUN TOOL ... British combination tool incorporating screwdrivers, cone wrench, punch and wiper, along with a square hole at center to allow it to be used as a lever for torque on a ramrod. This appears to be the pattern used by the British East India Company, who fielded large private armies in the interest of keeping the rest of the world British.   $100.00 sold

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18-02-32 ...T-Shaped Cone Wrench ... Steel T-handle cone wrench. Likely for a cased shotgun or rifle, the metal is smooth and shows faded original blue now turned deep gray, mixed with some lighter silver areas.   $65.00

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18-02-33 ... SIGNED CDV OF WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN ... From life vignette view of Sherman as Commanding General of the Army. After the war Sherman liked to stay away from Washington as much as possible and spent 1871-1872 on a tour of Europe and the Middle East. Here is a signed Carte de Visite portrait of “Uncle Billy,” taken during his stay in Paris in 1872. Stamped at the bottom with the photographer’s imprint: “C.H. Reutlinger… Photog,” the image is nicely signed in ink across the front by Sherman: “W.T. Sherman / Genl.” with the additional note “U.S.A.” in the bottom margin. Sherman is shown in the uniform of General of the Army as worn from 1868 to late 1872, with buttons grouped by fours and four stars on his shoulder straps, though only the first three are visible to the camera. His beard is showing some gray, but he wears that same look of determination that made him and effective wartime general. The signature is prominent, a little light on the upper edges of the middle letters of his last name, but very legible, and the card is nicely framed by a previous collector.   $895.00 sold

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18-02-37 ...INDIAN WAR CAVALRY OVERCOAT... Beautiful condition and colorful U18-02-37   INDIAN WAR CAVALRY OVERCOAT:   Beautiful condition and colorful US cavalry enlistedman’s overcoat with cape. This is the 1885/86 pattern with deeper blue body fastened by two rows of six buttons and the detachable cape lined in yellow for cavalry. The coat is lined fully in the body and still shows its Quartermaster Depot stamp in the shoulder of the white sleeve lining. All buttons, hooks and eyes are in place. There is virtually no moth damage. The color is vibrant. This is a stand-out example of a regulation US cavalry coat from the period of the Indian Wars that would be difficult to improve upon.   $1,250.00 sold

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18-02-38 ...U.S. BOX PLATE .. Regulation Civil War oval US plate of stamped brass with a solder-filled back and two loops to secure it to the flap of an infantry cartridge box. These served a practical function in keeping the box flap down if the soldier forgot to relatch it in the heat of battle, but were also decorative. Polishing them was a standard chore for soldiers before regimental inspections. This one shows dings on the face and edge from actual use and a darkish patina from age. The reverse shows some corrosion to the lead and rust to the iron loops indicating it might be an early battlefield pick-up. There is a bit of light carving in the center of the reverse that I have been unable to decipher, though one element seems to be a script “S.”    $195.00

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18-02-39...GENUINE, 2 VOLUME, UNCLE TOM’S CABIN FIRST YEAR PRINTING – 1852: Very scarce and highly sought original 1852 edition of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin or Life Among the Lowly in two volumes. Green cloth hardbound binding. Good condition showing wear and use but no abuse. The publication of this book certainly contributed to the anti slavery feeling in the North and had more than a little influence on people’s view of entering the Civil War. Volume One published in 95th Thousand / Boston John P. Jewett Cleveland Jewett Proctor & Worthington 1852. Volume Two same publishing data except 100th thousand printing. Edges of binding worn and scuffed. Interior contents tight and solid. This two volume set with this binding in this condition generally sells for $165 to $225 according to eBay completed auctions. Many on eBay have minimum starting bids of $250 and $300. I just got this set in a large lot of CW books at auction. $135.00 sold

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18-02-45...CASED EPAULETS FOR A FIRST LIEUTENANT OF THE 6th INFANTRY ... Original fine condition Civil War epaulets for the dress uniform of a 1st Lieutenant assigned to a 6th regiment of infantry. He could have been with the regular army or any one of the state units. The case is the standard tinned and lacquered iron tole with a folding wire handle on top and simple latch on one side, with an interior hinged compartment that supports the epaulets when cased and could contain other insignia or fittings. The epaulets are regulation gold bullion with the medium width fringe indicating a line officer, and small silver bars indicating a first lieutenant on each. On the round pad section of each is a bullion rondel with medium blue center on which is embroidered a bullion “6.” There is some wear to the bullion and one little bit of mothing to the blue inside the loop of one numeral. One crescent has a slight dent and the other shows a small rectangular stain that might clean. The undersides are good, with the red and maroon silk lining largely intact and the “left” and “right” marked locking bars in place. The locking studs have staff officer button tops, so we might be looking at a pair of regimental adjutant (or other staff member) epaulets. A really fine set that could complete an officer’s uniform, or be displayed as a stand alone artifact. $595.00

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18-02-46...EXCEEDINGLY RARE MAJOR GENERAL’S TWO-STAR SHOULDER STRAPS... All embroidered insignia is rare and desirable. Shoulder straps for Generals are nearly impossible to find. In fact aside from a couple sets I had over the years on generals’ coats, I don’t believe I have owned a loose set of 2-star major general’s straps until now. Here is a wonderful pair in excellent condition. They are manufactured with classic 1860s alternating dull and bright gilt bullion thread covering all four sides. This bullion border is then edged by two rows of finely spun brass wire. The wool centers are black as is correct for generals and staff. The two star rank designation is executed in finely spun silver bullion, with a tiny silver sequin in the center of each star, and an ultra fine edge of twisted silver wire outlining each star. Superb quality and hand workmanship. Each strap measures 4 inches x 1.6 inches, which is standard size for straps with single edge borders. The backs of each are covered with an off white buckram or similar material. Aside from a couple small moth nips on the far edges of one strap they are in excellent condition. Completely original except for the brown thread shown across the back of each strap. When I found these that thread was largely gone and what remained was rotted, so I replaced it using properly twisted brown cotton thread. I think you will be hard pressed to find another set of major general shoulder straps anytime soon. $2,600.00

(PS If you are a serious insignia collector email me regarding the epaulets and hat insignia I own that were worn by The Surgeon General of the United States during the Civil War. I will be offering it for sale soon.)

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18-02-47.. VERY RARE WHITNEY 2 BAND ENFIELD STYLE INFANTRY RIFLE.. Among Eli Whitney’s array of products were long arms made from machinery and surplus parts acquired from the bankrupt firm of Robbins and Lawrence, who had been producing Enfield pattern arms.   Not willing to let anything go to waste,  Whitney produced his own versions of the Enfield rifle musket and the Enfield style two-band rifle, in several configurations.   Some were supplied with patch boxes and were passed off as 1841 pattern US rifles.  This is one of his so-called Type IV variants mounted with his “mid-range” rear sight with a window and v-notch at the 300 yard range mark. This is a VERY scarce gun in Very Good condition.  Very attractive wood with good edges.  The metal is smooth and in the bright with some minor salt and peppering around the nipple and breech.  Bands, slings, swivels, rod and side lug for a saber bayonet are all present.  Total production was only about 600 and the government bought 500 directly from Schuyler, Hartley and Graham in 1861.  That is a smaller production run than most $15,000-up Confederate rifles.   Needless to say … this is one RARE Civil War rifle but still affordable.  100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. $3,400.00 sold

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18-02-49...CIVIL WAR EAGLE SWORD BELT PLATE WITH APPLIED GERMAN SILVER WREATH... Mid to Late War Rectangular Eagle Belt Plate with one section applied German silver wreath surrounding the eagle and NOT extending above the wing tips. These buckles are slightly larger than the earlier plates. These are 2 1/8 inches tall whereas the early buckles are 2 inches tall. Both patterns have half inch tongues. We see these plates most frequently on the mid to late war buff leather cavalry / artillery saber belts and also on the infantry NCO belts. Excellent condition. From the same collection as the above this too shows the face was gently polished a few decades ago. The back of this one has never been polished and bears a batch number of “23” on the back. A real good low number, (but not a favorite number J ) … $275.00

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18-02-50..French Model 1859 Percussion Chasseur Rifle / Carabine a Tige....; This is the predecessor of the US Dahlgren Navy Rifle.  In fact Dahlgren copied this French rifle nearly exactly when he "designed" the US version.  It is a very scarce and desirable Civil War era shoulder weapon.   It is .69 caliber, with 34" round rifled barrel, octagonal at the breech, with Liege proof marks and date "S. 1866" at the right barrel breech near the nipple.  It has the correct long range rear sight, correct heavy duty ramrod, and the tang is correctly marked "Mle 1859."  Ramrod is about identical to the US Dahlgren rifle rod.  The back action lock is in perfect working order and is engraved "Mre Impale / de St. Etienne."  The two-band dark walnut stock has partially legible arsenal marking, iron furniture, and strong edges.  It has the Catholic "Pope Blessed" boxwood plug pounded into the right face of the butt stock.  These plugs were installed to comfort the Catholic soldiers with the assurance that God was on their side.  (...  like the Germans with their "Gott Mit Uns" belt buckles.)  100% original 100% complete and mechanically perfect. This is a superb example of a very scarce gun.  I wish the breech date was two years earlier, but we get what we get.    Another specimen in identical condition is listed on Cowan's auction site from the 2015 Ben Michel collection sale.  It was estimated at $2000 to $2500, and had a high reserve on it.  Here is the same great gun at a super friendly price.  It has never been on the collector market previously, I just bought it from a local family today.   $1,250.00 sold

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18-02-51....HONEST TO GOSH TEXAS WILD WEST CAVALRY AMMO CRATE... 1872 SPENCER CARBINE AMMUNITION CRATE FROM SAN ANTONIO ARSENAL:   The first one I have owned.   A real Custer era US Army cavalry ammo crate from Texas!   Standard grayish-olive drab army paint and white stenciling reading very clearly  on the the front: “SAN ANTONIO / ARSENAL / DEC. 9. 1872.  The lid is stenciled in white paint which is worn.  It appears to be the shipping information.  I can read "...KRISPEN"    One end of the box is stenciled “MODEL 1865 SPENCER CARBINE, MANUFACTURED BY SAGE AMMUNITION WORKS, MIDDLETOWN, CONN.”    Measures roughly 19 x 11 x 6 inches.  Neat early wild west artifact...   $1,125.00 sold

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18-02-52...ROGERS AND SPENCER GUN TOOL... Two branch screwdriver and an integral nipple wrench. About 40 percent original blue with some crusty brown on the edges of screwdriver blades and smoother brown on the stem. A scarce tool.   I offered it last month at what I felt was a fair $250.00 but no one ordered it....  SO....  how's  $125.00

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17-08-53....SMITH CARBINE ..Smith carbines were carried by cavalry units including the 1st Connecticut, 17th Pennsylvania, 6th Ohio, 7th Illinois and many others. .50 caliber, the carbine breaks open in the middle like a shotgun for insertion of the cartridge which is separately primed in the standard way with a percussion cap. This one is in nice condition, serial number 3844. Legible American Machine Works, Springfield, Mass., manufacturer’s stamp on forward left side of frame and the usual Poultney & Trimble agent markings. Barrel proof is visible at left breech flat and there is a visible "JH" inspector’s cartouche in the wood at the left wrist. The sling bar shows a slight bend from use, the ring is still present. Forearm and buttstock show just minor handling and use marks and have a good fit to the frame. Screw heads show some roughness and the front blade sight is an old replacement. The barrel shows lots of original faded blue and is generally smooth, with some shallow pitting and roughness right around the muzzle. The frame is smooth metal, mainly gray with some hints of faded blue on the bands adjoining wrist and forearm. Sights are present, action and mechanics are perfect. Bore is VG and could use a brushing. A key Civil War cavalry carbine that saw some use out west as well. Sergeant Custard’s men who were ambushed outside the Platt Bridge Station defended themselves to the last with Smith carbines as I recall... $1,550.00

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