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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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17-12-01... FIRST MODEL MAYNARD SHOTGUN-CARBINE ...Serial number 1056 first model Maynard. About 5,000 of these were made in 1858-59 in both .35 and .50 caliber, with an unknown number supplied commercially with shotgun barrels. One of the great features of the Maynard carbines is that any barrel in any caliber or gauge can be affixed to the frame in a few moments by removing the hinge pin. If you have three different barrels you have three completely different guns, all using the same frame. Since the Rebs loved shotguns and had thousands of first model Maynards, this is perfect for display with Confederate cavalry. The barrel tips up to accept the brass Maynard cartridge that has a vent hole in the base for ignition by the Maynard tape priming system. This gun has been converted to rimfire ignition but could be returned to percussion with the simple removal of the firing pin mechanism and installation of a nipple. The US army bought about 400 of them for issue to elements of the 1st Cavalry and the Mounted Rifles. By the beginning of the war several Yankee cavalry regiments had them. Even more significantly, southern states bought them in both .35 and .50 caliber and troopers from Mississippi, Florida and Georgia had them, as well as militia groups in South Carolina and Louisiana. Ours has the folding rear sight that was installed by the factory early in production and does not have the later sling ring mounted on the triggerguard tang later in the production run. The barrel is a 26 inch Maynard factory 20 gauge shotgun barrel with a good bore. Wood is very good with a tight fit to the metal. Patch box functions. Buttplate shows spattering of brown and gray spots. Barrel is brown. Frame is a mix of brown and silver gray, stronger on left than right, which may the remains of tinning. Serial number is visible on primer door, other markings are light, but “Washington” is still crisp on the right frame. Primer door likes to flop open. The lever pin is an old replacement held firm with an improper nut. A great early war carbine with strong southern connections priced where anyone can afford it. agkierxz $1,795.00 Sold

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17-12-02... INSCRIBED 67TH NEW YORK OFFICER'S SWORD:  Attic Condition Ames foot officers sword with lovely inscription.  The regulation infantry officer’s combat sword made by the King of American sword makers.   Regulation sword and scabbard adopted by the US Army in 1850 for infantry line officers: captains and lieutenants, who served on foot with their companies in the regimental line of battle.  Very slightly curved blade with brass guard and wire-bound, sharkskin wrapped grip. The hilt has an untouched, mellow patina to the brass, all the sharkskin grip wrap is in place, as is the full twisted wire binding. An inconsequential separation is visible at the seam on the shagreen which is darn common and mentioned only for accuracy’s sake.  The grip is completely solid, tight, and stable. The Ames company address is present and visible on one side of the ricasso.   Interestingly this firm marking is die stamped, like on an enlisted sword or saber, not etched on the blade as is standard.  In fact the blade was never etched in any fashion.  One of you may know the story on these undecorated swords.  If so please let me know.  The blade is a pewter gray mixed with silver overall.  The point and edge are good, and the lower third shows somewhat more brightness, though with some dark spots mixed in.  The brass-mounted leather scabbard is complete with mounts, carrying rings, and drag in place. Nice and solid.  The upper mount shows the Ames company marking.   The hilt still preserves the pad on the underside of the guard, which served to seal the scabbard when sheathed.  Inscribed on the guard is "Capt. George W. Stilwell".  He was a captain in the 67th New York.  Enlisted 4/20/1861.  Discharged 12/29/62.  During this period the regiment went into action at Seven Pines where it got the snot knocked out of it with 27 killed 121 Wounded, also fought at Fair Oaks, Gaines Mill, Malvern Hill, and Fredericksburg... taking heavy casualties all the way.  The 67th, aka the 1st Long Island regiment, from Brooklyn, Allegany  and Wayne counties and Rochester, was mustered into the U. S.service at Brooklyn, June 20 and 24, 1861, for three years, and left Brooklyn Aug. 21, 1861, for Washington.  It was assigned to Graham's brigade, Buell's division, which became in March, 1862, the 2nd brigade, 1st division, 4th corps.  The regiment was posted near Washington during the winter of 1861-62 and joined the general advance under McClellan to the Peninsula in March. It took part in the siege of Yorktown; was present at Williamsburg and at Fair Oaks, where 164 were killed or wounded and 6 reported missing. During the Seven Days' battles the division was employed in guarding trains until the battle of Malvern hill, when it was in the thick of the fight. In the battle of Antietam the regiment was not in an exposed position and in the reorganization in Sept., 1862, Couch's division became the 3d division, 6th corps, the regiment being assigned to the 3d brigade, with which it served until December, when it became a part of the 1st brigade.  Nice early war sword with great battle history.  I priced it fairly last month at $2,450.00 ... but it's still here.  Merry Christmas Gift at $2,250.00 Sold

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17-12-03... MODEL 1855 COLT ROOT REVOLVER MADE IN 1863:     I have always liked these elegant little guns, the form is appealing, the variations are interesting, and they are affordable. The side hammer, rear entry cylinder pin and spur trigger give them a handsome streamlined look. Interestingly, it is the only percussion Colt made with a solid frame, which puts it rather ahead of the game. Known also as Colt’s 1855 sidehammer Pocket Revolver.   This is one of the “Model 5” types, with 4 ½ inch round barrel and New York barrel address with a fluted cylinder in .31 caliber.  Serial number 6391 with all numbers matching.  Barrel and cylinder maker and patent marks are crisp.  Grips are very good, with nice color, and just two small old dings on the left and another on the bottom. Metal is smooth, with nice gun metal grey patina,  mixed with some brown.  A classic Colt in tight solid condition made in the middle of the Civil War.  100% original,  100% complete,  mechanically perfect.   $1,295.00 Sold

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17-12-04... SMALL SIZED OVAL US 1839 PLATE... A very nice Mexican War era 1839 pattern oval US waist belt plate for infantry. These early infantry plates mirrored the narrow belts worn by infantry during the Mexican War and into the 1850s. This plate has lots of original gilt on the face with just a few minor marks and dings and has a nice full solder-filled back. The belt hook and single arrow-back fastener are fully intact and secure.Interestingly, the army went to the stud back fasteners later and then reverted to the arrowhead style during the Civil War. These have always been a bit scarce, but remain very affordable. About fifty times rarer than the large size buckles but only a hundred dollars more money...$345.00 Sold

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17-12-05...” LETTERED" COLT NAVY REVOLVER / ONE OF THE 150 LOUISVILLE COLTS SENT TO NEWSPAPER EDITOR GEORGE D. PRENTICE, THE PERSONIFICATION OF FAMILY SPLIT BY CIVIL WAR... One of the rarest and most interesting of the various Colt historical Civil War arms is this M1851 Colt Navy revolver which “letters” from the factory as being one of the 150 Navies sold to Louisville newspaperman George D. Prentice. Prentice at various times purchased Colt revolvers and Henry Rifles in large numbers to sell to local Kentuckians. Despite Prentice advertising that he would only sell the Colts to loyal Union men, there is good evidence he also supplied Rebel Cavalry in Tennessee. George Dennison Prentice (1802-1870) was co-founder and editor of the Louisville Journal in Kentucky. A dedicated backer of Henry Clay and the Whig party in the 1830s, he became a prominent voice for the “Know-Nothing” party and its anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant nativist policies of the 1850s that in Louisville resulted in the Bloody Monday Riot of 1855 in which 22 people were killed. Prentice advocated pro-slavery positions, but did not favor secession and urged Kentucky to remain in the Union and adopt a neutral stance. Two of his sons joined the Confederates early on, one of whom may have also helped the CSA get some of his fathers Louisville Colts. Prentice got involved pretty early in bringing quality arms into the state and was even connected with C.B. Cotton, who was known to be supplying guns to the pro-southern factions and some of whose weapons were confiscated by Federal authorities. Prentice was accused by his rivals of turning the Journal office into a, “Lincoln magazine for the distribution of Colt’s pistols to Lincoln’s pets in Kentucky.” They also quoted one of his newspaper notices for, “Cheap Pistols. – Union men in want of Colt’s navy and 6-inch pistols can find them by inquiring at this office cheaper than they have ever been sold here.” Since Cotton was apparently paying around $15 apiece for his guns and selling them for over $100 to the Confederates, Prentice could still undercut his competition with plenty of profit left in the deal. It is notable that despite his targeting of Union men in his notice, his rival, southern-sympathizing editor at the Daily Courier accused him on Nov. 16, 1861, of making large profits on three shipments of guns sent south through his son, “a month or two since.” Ours lettered by the Colt archives dead-on to the shipment of 150 guns sent to Prentice by Colt on July 13, 1861. Whether this is one of the guns bought by a Union man or one of those shipped south via his son we can’t tell, but it is one of those shipped right into the middle of trouble in Louisville as the state teetered between the north and south and families like Prentice’s were split apart. Condition is near fine. Serial number 107584 matches on all parts, including the wedge. The metal is evenly colored overall a deep plum brown and the markings are crisp with significant portions of the cylinder scene sill visible. The brass has an untouched, medium patina and a tight fit to the wood and frame. The grips are very good, with just a few dings and scratches from use, but a tight fit to the backstrap. The wedge screw and one screw on the frame show slight signs of turning, but are not badly chewed up and the others show crisp notches and good blue-turned-brown color. You will be hard pressed to find another "lettered Colt" with such significant connection to the Civil War. The two lithographs shown above are included with the gun. $3950.00 Sold

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17-12-06...  MOST FAIRLY PRICED POTTS BOWIE KNIFE-BAYONET & SCABBARD CURRENTLY FOR SALE... These magnificent unmarked bowie bayonets are believed by some to have been made by T.A Potts in New Orleans on the basis of one specimen marked “T.A. Potts New Orleans 1840.” Unfortunately, while that knife is real, the maker’s stamp is spurious in my opinion, added years ago to make it unique and more saleable. Some now believe these “Potts” knives were actually made by Rees Fitzpatrick of Natchez, Mississippi. More recently, collectors and arms scholars have also come to realize that they were probably made as dual purpose weapons not as a side-knife and bayonet, but as a knife and as a polearm spearhead. The attaching rings are always unfinished on the inside and have no provision to actually fix it to a rifle barrel and keep it there, let alone in any one position. It has been rumored that an example surfaced with an old capture note indicating it had been used as a detachable spear point on the staff of a battleflag, but I have not seen the documentation. It does make sense that the loops would be better adapted for a friction fit to a pole, whether for use as a flag finial or pike, but the research is still ongoing. In any event,  it is a dead real Confederate sidearm in any case and a very stylish Bowie with swept back clip-point blade, and swept back brass attaching rings that accentuate the sleek profile.  The brass attaching rings are excellent, so is the grip, and the blade is factory bright, with excellent point and edge, no nicks, and just a few light scratches and some small gray spots near the guard.  The knife still has its scabbard, which is even rarer than the knife.  Brass throat and tip are in place.  The throat still has the fastening button and a small bottom piece of the belt loop that came up at an angle and fastened over it is still sewn to the scabbard edge lower down.  The leather scabbard is solid, but does have a seam opening on the back and overall shows finish loss and abrasions.  It has never been treated with any kind of leather dressing or preservative. Attic condition. A classic and handsome Confederate edged weapon, in excellent condition, with its rare original scabbard.  For comparison pricing one sold at Julia's Auction for $4,312.00 in the Spring of 2005.  A very nice one is currently for sale on J&J Military Antiques for $3,495.00.  Horse Soldier in Gettysburg has a dandy priced at $3,995.00.  I paid $2250 for mine in a large pile of stuff....    Gently marked up to....  $2,650.00

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17-12-07... RARE EARLY MILITARY 2-BLADED STRAIGHT RAZOR WITH 1863 SCRIMSHAW: SHADES OF MAJOR DUNDEE! THIS FRENCH PATRIOTIC RAZOR CELEBRATES THE CAPTURE OF PUEBLA, MEXICO IN 1863 BY GENERAL FOREY ON BEHALF OF THE EMPEROR MAXIMILIAN... The handle is scrimshawed with a standing officer with fore and aft chapeau, blue coat and red trousers, labeled “Forey” above and “Puebla” below. Elie Frederic Forey (1804-1872) was a French military officer who supported Napoleon III in his coup d’etat. He served in the Crimean War (1854-1856) and distinguished himself in the Franco-Austrian War of 1859. As part of the effort to legitimize French rule in Mexico, he was given command of an expeditionary force that landed in Mexico in 1862, which captured Puebla after a long siege and then took Mexico City itself. He established a triumvirate to govern Mexico for Maximilian, who declared himself Emperor of Mexico in 1864. Upon Forey's return to France he was given a marshal’s baton in gratitude and corps command until forced into retirement for medical reasons. Maximilian eventually consummated his love of things military in front of a Mexican firing squad in 1867. But at the time, Forey was the hero who made Maximillian the victor. This is a rare, early, patriotic razor, with two blades stamped “acier fondu” meaning “cast steel”. Etched on one side is a naval anchor and the other with “Newcastle.” The blades are contained in a bone handle that is plain on one side, but engraved with a standing officer with fore and aft chapeau, blue coat and red trousers, labeled “Forey” above and “Puebla” below. The lower portion of the grip is broken away with part of the name “Puebla,” but the colored military figure and his name above are plain. There was a wonderful Charlton Heston movie about this war when I was a kid. “Major Dundee” -- Union troops and Confederate prisoners under Charlton Heston fighting Apache Indians and French troops in Mexico. Ahhh, those were the days. A neat piece that gives us a much-needed chance to impress our wives with our knowledge of history and long forgotten world events—priceless, I’d say… $375.00 Sold

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17-12-08... MAGNIFICENT GOLD BULLION EMBROIDERED ARTILLERY OFFICER'S CROSSED CANNON HAT INSIGNIA ...  All Civil War embroidered hat insignia is scarce. Cavalry is much scarcer than infantry. Artillery is much scarcer than cavalry. This piece is top drawer in all respects. It is very large measuring over 3 inches across and 2 1/2 inches tall. The embroidery is executed on fine black velvet that has turned slightly brown with age. The wire edge border is intact. The velvet is sewn around an interior oval tin stiffener, and this stiffener is covered on the back with brown polished cotton. Inside the loop on the face are false embroidered stamped numerals 11. This could represent the 11th NY Artillery, the 11th US Colored Artillery, but more likely represents the 11th independent battery of "pick a state" as there were a lot more 11th independent batteries in the several states, than there were 11th regiments. Brass attaching wires are present on the back. Condition is extra fine ... among the best available. One of the best pieces I've come up with in recent memory ... $695.00 Sold

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17-12-09.... ALLEN & WHEELOCK LIPFIRE ARMY WITH SCARCE FLARED GRIP...One of my favorite American pistols: the Allen and Wheelock Army Model Center Hammer Lipfire or “2nd Model” Lipfire revolver.   Only about 250 of these were manufactured in the early 1860’s until Smith and Wesson managed to infringe on the patent.   .44 caliber and six-shot, this revolver has the scarcer of two grip forms, with the grip flaring out noticeably toward the bottom and is the first pattern, with the loading gate hinged at the top.  A nice, thin, even faded gray patina on the steel.   Crisp patent stamps on the left flat of the octagon portion of the barrel. Very good grips with tight fit to the metal.  The trigger guard actuates the ejector.  The split cylinder pin is an old replacement for the original button-head pin.  Various parts bear a number “14,” which is an assembly batch number.  I know of no military contracts but it is usually classified as a secondary martial arm.  An extremely scarce Civil War cavalry weapon and still very affordable.  A grey metal example no better than ours sold at Cowan’s Auction for $2,070.00 on April 27th 2016.     our price  $1,350.00

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17-12-10... LARGE BORE AUSTRIAN MARTIAL PISTOL ...   Roughly 72 caliber, this jumbo horse pistol is very similar to our US Model 1842 pistol but does not show near the quality of a US made gun.  The lock is marked 857 which represents a manufacture date of 1857.  The anchor behind the hammer may indicate navy use, but the gun is a cavalry pattern and void of any belt hook which is usually present on 19th Century European naval pistols.  I personally doubt the anchor represents navy issue. I will let you research further to uncover the meaning of the anchor.  Overall about VG condition. Has the original captured ramrod.  Mechanically good though only holds on half cock.  Full cock does not hold. I'll let you mess with filing the sear.  All original and complete except tang screw is an old replacement and the S shaped escutcheon is replaced.  Trigger guard has a lanyard loop at the rear.  The soldier would loop a cord of leather around his wrist and tie it through the brass loop on the back of the trigger guard so that the pistol would not fall to the ground should he drop it, or have it knocked from his hand.  A big old Yosemite Sam style pistol priced friendly ... zxbejll. ... $395.00 Sold

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17-12-11.... REGULATION CIVIL WAR COLT ARMY HOLSTER BY GAYLORD... Regulation Civil War cavalry holster for the Colt Army .44 caliber pistol.  These also fit a Colt navy revolver just fine.    Very nice condition example of the standard military flap holster carrying the pistol "butt forward".   Very clear “Gaylord/ Chicopee / Mass” stamp on the reverse of the holster on the belt loop.  Nice finish, holster is not crushed down. Toe plug is in place.  Latch tab is original and in place and has a small repair on the back side not visible when displayed.  Otherwise the holster is untouched. Just a few minor abrasion marks to the surface here and there. Tight and solid.  Getting very scarce in this condition.  $595.00 Sold

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17-12-12... US INSPECTED AND 1862 DATED AMES FOOT OFFICER’S SABER WITH SCARCE JOHN HANNIS INSPECTOR MARK ....  These dated and inspected officer's swords are Very Scarce.  In the prewar regular army officers might have to purchase their swords through the army, particularly if they were at some far-flung post with no military goods dealers nearby. The government purchased small quantities of regulation officers’ swords, which the officers in turn were required to pay for, since officers were required to purchase all their own weapons, uniforms and gear.   By 1862, however, officers had much better opportunity to purchase their weapons on the open market and only 575 foot officer’s swords were purchased by the government.   Hence this is one of but 575 government contracted swords.  Ours is a top notch example of the 1862 purchase with the added bonus of having the “JH” inspector mark of John Hannis, who is noted as inspecting swords in the 1861 purchase, but not in the 1862 purchase, as listed by Thillmann.   The blade remains "in the bright" with some graying but also much original frosty luster around the etching.  As is correct for the 1862 purchase, the Ames address is etched on one side of the ricasso, but there is no stamped company address on the other. The 1862 date is crisp, as is the “JH” inspector stamp. The brass guard and pommel have a medium patina that has some traces of the original gilding in the recesses. The scabbard mounts match. The upper mount has the correct stamped Ames maker mark. The drag shows some dents, but is solid. Rings are in place. Leather scabbard is solid, with finish cracks but very little finish loss and no bends or breaks. The leather pad is also in place on the underside of the guard. The grip is very good, with full wrap and wire binding, the usual shrinkage line on the left side, but very good, deep gray color and surface. A scarce Ames sword with a previously unrecorded inspector for that date.  Try and find another dated and inspected example for sale at this price...    $2,450.00 Sold

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17-12-13... GEORGE WOLSTENHOLM IXL BOWIE...  Wolstenholm is perhaps the best known of the English Bowie knife makers. This double-edged spearpoint blade has his name and trade name logo I*XL (I excel) stamped in the ricasso on each side. There are three small wear spots to the edge of the blade near the tip, along with some graying and a couple of patches of light pitting. The slab grips are very good, with four pins and an inset oval escutcheon plate and two low knobs on one side. The German silver mounts are very good and silver in color. The original scabbard has the I*XL logo blindstamped in gilt midway on one side and a gilt blindstamped border as well. The German silver tip is gone, as is the small fastening button at top, but the throat is in place. An affordable knife by a classic maker.  Measures about 11 inches overall.  Perfect for display with 1849 San Francisco Gold Rush or Civil War effects.   $650.00 Sold

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17-12-14... INSCRIBED 133rd PENNSYLVANIA FIFTH CORPS BADGE...  A top notch jeweler made badge with beautiful engraving, measuring a little over an inch across.  In the Spring of 1863 the Army of the Potomac adopted a series of badges to better identify its different corps and divisions and to instill some esprit de corps. These were issued by the army in the form of die cut cloth patches, and then became available for private purchase in silver and gold.  Newspapers of the day are full of ads for such badges available by mail-order from various jewelers in the big cities.  The Maltese Cross was selected for the Fifth Army Corps and our example is one of the jeweler made varieties, made of silver in the shape of the corps insignia with the soldier’s name and unit engraved on its face: “J.M. Vanhorn / Co. C. /133rd / P.V.” The 133rd Pennsylvania was a nine-month unit that saw some hard fighting, losing 4 officers and 40 enlistedmen killed or mortally wounded. The regiment organized at Camp Curtin in August, 1862, and served in the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fifth Corps until mustered out in May, 1863, seeing action at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. Its largest loss was at Fredericksburg on Dec. 12, 1862, when it suffered some 28 killed and 136 wounded by one count. John M. Vanhorn (misspelled as VanCorn in CWData) enlisted and mustered into Co. C on 8/13/62 and served with the regiment throughout its service, mustering out 5/26/63. Vanhorn also had subsequent service as well, fortunately without the hard experiences of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. His pension card shows he enlisted and mustered into Co. G of the 186th PA on 8/5/64, which did provost guard duty in Philadelphia, serving with them until muster out on 8/15/65. (Men of the same name appear in two short term Pennsylvania emergency militia units as well: McKeage’s Infantry Battalion, a 30-day unit, and in the 2nd PA Battalion of Infantry, which served six months, but these may not be our man.) A dead-real inscribed corps badge that you can sleep at night owning. Correct T-bar pin still in place on the reverse.   $1,595.00 Sold

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17-12-15... SPANISH AMERICAN WAR HELMET:   US 1880 pattern summer cork helmet. While not officially sanctioned, many enlistedmen outfitted their helmets with the plates and trimmings of their dress helmets, and some post commanders permitted the practice for men on certain duties. This one is in good shape, not broken by mishandling as so many are, and outfitted with a cavalry front plate and side buttons, as well as a hook and ring for helmet cords. I show it with an infantry spike and also with the correct cavalry style plume. Enlistedmen found these could be fitted by simply unscrewing the ventilators fitted to the tops of the helmets. A very flashy piece of early US military headgear, and affordable...  $285.00 Sold

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17-12-16... UlTRA RARE CIVIL WAR SIGNAL ROCKET CRATE:  14x15x8 inches.  Incredibly cool and incredibly rare Civil War navy signal rocket crate.  I have handled a number of Civil War naval cartridge crates similar to this, but never a crate for signal rockets and I have every reason to think this may be the only one there is (certainly one of a darn few.)   Like the cartridge crates, this has a reddish brown exterior with yellow stenciling, orange painted interior, and hinged top with lock requiring a two-pronged wrench. Stenciled clearly on the front is “NAVAL LABORATORY. / S. ROCKETS. /WASHINGTON” and on the top: “SIGNAL ROCKETS. / 50.” There are a few cracks to the wood, abrasions and chips, but the box is very solid and the stenciling is clear as day from your neighbor’s house. This is great display piece for either a naval or a signal corps collection, and I do not recall ever seeing another for sale.  $1,750.00 Sold

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17-12-17... METROPOLITAN NAVY REVOLVER WITH CYLINDER SCENE    Metropolitan Arms made about 6,000 of these pistols, copying the Colt navy and trying to get a share of the market when the Colt factory suffered fire damage in early 1864. They are considered secondary martials though there were no government contracts, but were available on the commercial market to officers. Six-shot and .36 caliber, with a 7 ½ inch octagonal barrel, this one has very good grips with lots of varnish left on them and a tight fit.   The metal is smooth, with crisp barrel and frame stamps, showing some light traces of blue, but is mostly an even mix of plum brown and dull silver, with a little more gray showing on the right side. Matching serial number 3124 crisply stamped and sharp on the cylinder as well, along with a very visible Battle of New Orleans cylinder scene. Period owner initials “MB” are scratched on the bottom of the grip strap. A very nice looking Civil War side arm with great color. $2,250.00

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17-06-18..SWORD KNOT...Regulation gold bullion officer’s sword knot. A very nice complete example. Most of the time these have shredded bullion straps from careless handling. This one shows some folds at the loop from having been mounted on a sword guard, but is in great shape and would dress up a nice 1850 foot or field and staff sword.  $275.00 Sold

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17-12-19...ROGERS AND SPENCER GUN TOOL... Two branch screwdriver and an integral nipple wrench. About 40 percent original blue with some crusty brown on the edges of screwdriver blades and smoother brown on the stem. A scarce tool.   $250.00

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17-12-20.... CIVIL WAR SQUARE TOED BOOTS ...Period pair of private purchase boots typical of those purchased by officers, who had to buy their own uniforms, weapons and gear, and even some privates who got tired of having their issue brogans sucked off their feet in a muddy Virginia road. Black leather, about size 9, square cut tops with and extra “graft” of nicer leather below the knee. Three of the leather pull tabs still in place on the inner edges. A very small tears and cuts here and there. The upper rear of one boot has bigger damage. This could be mended and disguised, but has such an untouched, out-of-the-attic look that I have left it alone. The heels are pegged and the soles are sewn. They are in good shape. The upper portions show more use. Reasonably priced.  $345.00 Sold

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