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17-11-00   INSCRIBED 67TH NEW YORK OFFICER'S SWORD:  Attic Condition Ames foot officers sword with lovely inscription.  The regulation infantry officer’s combat sword made by the King of American sword makers.   Regulation sword and scabbard adopted by the US Army in 1850 for infantry line officers: captains and lieutenants, who served on foot with their companies in the regimental line of battle.  Very slightly curved blade with brass guard and wire-bound, sharkskin wrapped grip. The hilt has an untouched, mellow patina to the brass, all the sharkskin grip wrap is in place, as is the full twisted wire binding. An inconsequential separation is visible at the seam on the shagreen which is darn common and mentioned only for accuracy’s sake.  The grip is completely solid, tight, and stable. The Ames company address is present and visible on one side of the ricasso.   Interestingly this firm marking is die stamped, like on an enlisted sword or saber, not etched on the blade as is standard.  In fact the blade was never etched in any fashion.  One of you may know the story on these undecorated swords.  If so please let me know.  The blade is a pewter gray mixed with silver overall.  The point and edge are good, and the lower third shows somewhat more brightness, though with some dark spots mixed in.  The brass-mounted leather scabbard is complete with mounts, carrying rings, and drag in place. Nice and solid.  The upper mount shows the Ames company marking.   The hilt still preserves the pad on the underside of the guard, which served to seal the scabbard when sheathed.  Inscribed on the guard is "Capt. George W. Stilwell".  He was a captain in the 67th New York.  Enlisted 4/20/1861.  Discharged 12/29/62.  During this period the regiment went into action at Seven Pines where it got the snot knocked out of it with 27 killed 121 Wounded, also fought at Fair Oaks, Gaines Mill, Malvern Hill, and Fredericksburg... taking heavy casualties all the way.  The 67th, aka the 1st Long Island regiment, from Brooklyn, Allegany  and Wayne counties and Rochester, was mustered into the U. S.service at Brooklyn, June 20 and 24, 1861, for three years, and left Brooklyn Aug. 21, 1861, for Washington.  It was assigned to Graham's brigade, Buell's division, which became in March, 1862, the 2nd brigade, 1st division, 4th corps.  The regiment was posted near Washington during the winter of 1861-62 and joined the general advance under McClellan to the Peninsula in March. It took part in the siege of Yorktown; was present at Williamsburg and at Fair Oaks, where 164 were killed or wounded and 6 reported missing. During the Seven Days' battles the division was employed in guarding trains until the battle of Malvern hill, when it was in the thick of the fight. In the battle of Antietam the regiment was not in an exposed position and in the reorganization in Sept., 1862, Couch's division became the 3d division, 6th corps, the regiment being assigned to the 3d brigade, with which it served until December, when it became a part of the 1st brigade.  Nice early war sword with great battle history...  $2,450.00

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17-11-01 ... INSCRIBED 133rd PENNSYLVANIA FIFTH CORPS BADGE...  A top notch jeweler made badge with beautiful engraving, measuring a little over an inch across.  In the Spring of 1863 the Army of the Potomac adopted a series of badges to better identify its different corps and divisions and to instill some esprit de corps. These were issued by the army in the form of die cut cloth patches, and then became available for private purchase in silver and gold.  Newspapers of the day are full of ads for such badges available by mail-order from various jewelers in the big cities.  The Maltese Cross was selected for the Fifth Army Corps and our example is one of the jeweler made varieties, made of silver in the shape of the corps insignia with the soldier’s name and unit engraved on its face: “J.M. Vanhorn / Co. C. /133rd / P.V.” The 133rd Pennsylvania was a nine-month unit that saw some hard fighting, losing 4 officers and 40 enlistedmen killed or mortally wounded. The regiment organized at Camp Curtin in August, 1862, and served in the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fifth Corps until mustered out in May, 1863, seeing action at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. Its largest loss was at Fredericksburg on Dec. 12, 1862, when it suffered some 28 killed and 136 wounded by one count. John M. Vanhorn (misspelled as VanCorn in CWData) enlisted and mustered into Co. C on 8/13/62 and served with the regiment throughout its service, mustering out 5/26/63. Vanhorn also had subsequent service as well, fortunately without the hard experiences of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. His pension card shows he enlisted and mustered into Co. G of the 186th PA on 8/5/64, which did provost guard duty in Philadelphia, serving with them until muster out on 8/15/65. (Men of the same name appear in two short term Pennsylvania emergency militia units as well: McKeage’s Infantry Battalion, a 30-day unit, and in the 2nd PA Battalion of Infantry, which served six months, but these may not be our man.) A dead-real inscribed corps badge that you can sleep at night owning. Correct T-bar pin still in place on the reverse.   $1,650.00

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17-11-02.. 1862 DATED MANSFIELD AND LAMB CAVALRY SABER. A real scarce date for this maker. Regulation Yankee cavalry saber, the model 1860 “light cavalry.” Adopted in the late 1850s as a replacement for the 1840 pattern “wrist-breaker,” the so-called 1860 was the standard edged weapon of the Union cavalryman. This one is nicely marked by the maker, Mansfield and Lamb, of Forrestdale, RI, a major US contractor. It bears the manufacture date of 1862, along with the US acceptance mark and an “LD” inspector’s stamp. The grip has full, original black leather grip and twisted brass binding wire. The leather washer is present at blade shoulder. The maker marked is lightly struck at top left, but there is no doubt about it and date and inspector stamps are clear. The blade has a good edge and point. The blade is clean, smooth metal and silvery gray overall with a few darker gray areas. The scabbard is complete and shows overall freckling from use and exposure in the field and just two small, minor dings on the left side above the drag. Throat, rings and drag are in place. The brass hilt has a nice aged patina and the early war 1862 date makes this a great piece for a cavalry display focusing on just about any period of the war. You will look long and hard to find another ’62 dated example by Mansfield and Lamb. A few years back this saber would have been priced at $1,200. A darn good value…. Veejzx $795.00 sold

(PS Just in… superb condition rare 1862 Millard signed saber… Call … $975.00) sold

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17-11-03... M1860 SPENCER CARBINE ... The quintessential Union cavalry carbine: the 1860 Spencer.  Arriving mid-war,  the lever action Spencer repeating carbine provided a significant boost in Yankee firepower and was in immediate demand by troops and commanders in the field.  This is a very nice example with great patina: the barrel retains aged blue turned plum brown that is very pleasing to the eye and goes well with the color of the stocks.  The lock plate has some gray spots showing around the edges, as does the receiver on the top and offside. The wood is very good, with tight fit to the metal and nicely visible cartouches on the left side.  All markings are clear. Mechanics and bore are good. Magazine tube draws freely. Front and rear sights, sling bar and ring, and butt swivel all in place.  100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect.  The forend shows a tiny split at upper left front. The wrist has a slight crack along the top.   This bears serial number 44889,  made in 1864, in time for some of the big cavalry raids out west and Sheridan’s actions in support of Grant in the Petersburg campaign.  Springfield Research Services shows this serial range contains arms issued to the 3rd Iowa Cavalry and 2nd Wisconsin Cavalry.   A key Civil War longarm that remained popular into the Wild West days. (See illus.)   $2,450.00 Sold

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17-11-04... LARGE SOLDIER’S MEMORIAL FOR JOHN GILMER 192nd OHIO ... Impressive 30 x 22 inches in size G.A.R. service memorial rendered in the shape of a large public monument, but with the central plaque filled in with the details of the individual soldier’s service.  This one is made out for John Gilmer, who enlisted in the 192nd Ohio from Hancock County on 2/17/65 for one year at Mansfield and mustered into Co. I as a private on 3/9/65. The regiment served largely on guard and garrison duty in the Shenandoah, which was not likely to have been a friendly spot in 1865. These memorials are frequently found torn and tattered.  This one was mounted on a linen backing when the veteran received it and is consequently very solid and easy to handle.  Will look great framed on your den wall.  $125.00 Sold

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17-11-05... SUPERB CIVIL WAR PRODUCTION Model 1842 BAYONET AND SCABBARD:  Top notch condition bayonet and NEAR MINT scabbard for the 1842 musket. We often think of the 1842 as strictly an early war weapon, but a great many remained in service to the end of the war, both in their original smooth-bore configuration and also in the upgraded rifled incarnations.  (Note the number of 69 caliber cartridges boxes we find in the late 1864 embossed US pattern.)   The early production 1842 bayonets had squared shoulders and came in 2 rivet scabbards with stitched frogs.  This bayonet and scabbard is the 1860s WARTIME produced model…  much scarcer than the earlier patterns, and very desirable.  It has rounded shoulders like a model 1855-1861 bayonet,  and the 1860s pattern riveted scabbard/frog.   This bayonet is very, very fine- “in the bright” with crisp marks and only the lightest scattered gray spots that do not detract at all. The scabbard is truly superb! No bends or breaks. Lots of original finish, and crisp Metzger maker and Hartzell inspector stamps. ’42 bayonets and scabbards in this condition are seldom offered for sale.  I've priced this one gently...   $395.00 sold

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17-11-06... MODEL 1855 COLT ROOT REVOLVER MADE IN 1863:     I have always liked these elegant little guns, the form is appealing, the variations are interesting, and they are affordable. The side hammer, rear entry cylinder pin and spur trigger give them a handsome streamlined look. Interestingly, it is the only percussion Colt made with a solid frame, which puts it rather ahead of the game. Known also as Colt’s 1855 sidehammer Pocket Revolver.   This is one of the “Model 5” types, with 4 ½ inch round barrel and New York barrel address with a fluted cylinder in .31 caliber.  Serial number 6391 with all numbers matching.  Barrel and cylinder maker and patent marks are crisp.  Grips are very good, with nice color, and just two small old dings on the left and another on the bottom. Metal is smooth, with nice gun metal grey patina,  mixed with some brown.  A classic Colt in tight solid condition made in the middle of the Civil War.  100% original,  100% complete,  mechanically perfect.   $1,350.00

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17-11-07...ROGERS AND SPENCER REVOLVER ... Rogers and Spencer operated in Utica, NY, and had experience in making the double-action Pettengill revolver for the military, as well as the scarce Freeman revolvers.  In mid-1864 they developed this .44 caliber single action revolver and offered it to the military in September, but a contract was not accepted until November. The first 500 pistols arrived at the end of January, 1865, but arrived too late for issue in the field. Ours is overall NRA fine condition.  It has crisp grips with a sharp cartouche and just a very minor edge chips on either side at the very bottom edge and a corner out at lower right front. Inspector initials are visible on the bottom of the butt. The frame preserves lots of lustrous blue and has crisp maker stamps on the top on either side of the sighting groove. Barrel has thinning blue overall and the loading assembly has a subdued case hardened finish. The cylinder shows some very thin blue overall slightly fading to plum. Mechanics and bore excellent. Wood is a tight fit. Front sight in place. Darn close to how it looked coming out of the crate from the factory.  The government eventually sold the guns to Francis Bannerman and Company and sold by them as war surplus for a few dollars apiece well into the 20th century.  While in the posession of Bannerman's many (if not most) of the revolvers were disassembled and reassembled.  As a result we frequently see them with mismatched cylinders and/or loading levers.  Such is the case here.  All parts bear serial 3598 except the cylinder which bears 3942.  Super gun...    priced hundreds of dollars less than comparable examples sold at auction.  $2,450.00 Sold

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17-11-08   TOP SHELF AMES STAFF AND FIELD SWORD ...  Excellent,  near mint condtion.  Vivid blade etching with most of the factory luster.   Has full grip wrap, wire, and nice original blue finish on the scabbard making this a very impressive sword. The 1850 Staff and Field was the regulation sword for field officers (major and above) and members doing staff duty, such as adjutants, aides-de-camp, etc., all of whom were expected to serve mounted and needed both a slightly longer sword than officers serving on foot, but also one with a stronger, metal, scabbard that would not be easily damaged while on horseback.  This is a very fine example, with the scabbard showing just about all of its original blue now turned slightly plum color.  Retains much original gilt mixed with light age patina on the brass,  and the correct Ames makers stamp on the upper mount. The guard has a matching patina to the mounts, full sharkskin wrap on the grip, with just the usual separation line in the shagreen.   The blade pad is in place on the underside of the guard. The blade on this is super. The etching is bright and mostly vivid with its original background frosting. Etched swirling vines and floral motifs surround a U.S. on one side and an American eagle on the other with American shield across a cannon barrel etc. just below it. ae  $2,450.00 Sold

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17-11-09... MEDIUM SIZE US BUCKLE:   One of the rarest of the 1839 pattern US oval belt plates.  Extremely scarce.   Larger than the small US oval bearing one hook and one prong,  and much smaller than the standard large size US oval with two arrow or puppy paw hooks. Most collectors will not find one of these rare "medium" size buckles by hunting antique shows, tag sales, and flea markets.   All known specimens of this medium pattern are identical and were made by the same unknown maker.  All have identical puppy paw studs and heavy prong.  All are about a third smaller than the standard size plates.    Very appealing showing honest wartime use.   Scattered dings on the face and edge which add greatly to the appeal.  Nice even lead fill.   $495.00

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17-11-10  SLATER BROTHERS SHEFFIELD BOWIE... Warrington and Walter Slater started in the cutlery business in Sheffield in the 1850s. This double-edged spearpoint Bowie shows their beehive logo over Slater Brothers in two lines with Sheffield below.  This is their firm marking from the 1850s and 1860s.   The blade has a good edge and point, with no grinding or sharpening marks, and a smooth metal blade of mixed silver and gray color. The German silver crossguard is tight and not messed with and the staghorn grips with inset escutcheon bar are very good, with no chips. The knife still has its original pasteboard leatherette scabbard with German silver mounts and the throat still has the small fastening button that is usually broken off.   One edge of the sheath is a bit chewed near the throat, with a short hole as well. The blade is 6 inches long and overall length is 10.5 inches.  Overall VG+ condition.  Nice size    overall length. cej $595.00 Sold

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17-11-11... UNION PRISONER OF WAR ANDERSONVILLE MESS SET WITH ATTRIBUTION LETTER / LIKELY 101st PENNSYLVANIA VOLS.: One of my favorite finds in recent months... fresh from an auction in New York state. An excellent example of the ultra desirable commercially produced combination mess set by Naugatuck and marketed as the “Union Army Knife.” The manufacturer and trade name are stamped on the ricasso of knife and fork. These Union Army Knife marked examples are the ones most commonly found in CW camps with metal detectors. Wood handles, two pieces that slide together and apart- one a folding knife, the other a brass spoon and two-pronged iron fork. Excellent condition and a standard item marketed to soldiers. With this comes an intriguing note on its provenance dated 1913. The note is in three pieces and there may be some missing portions, but it records the soldier’s name as Jossiah (sic) and that he was captured and spent time in Confederate P.O.W. camps, being interned first in Libby, then being taken to another camp that appears to be a phonetic spelling of Tallahassee, Florida which was apparently full, and then finally transferred to Andersonville. The note reads: “ 1 Webster St. Newark, NJ Feb 23rd 1913 This set given to me by cousin Jossiah (sic), (Josiah). It was carried by him all through the Civil War and [?] through his imprisonment at Libby Prison 30 days, Andersonville four months … Libby prison Virginia to Talaoose Florader (sic)... then to Andersonville Ga. – was prisoner 6 mos 12 days. Was near when Lee surrendered and entered Richmond & was in the Grand Parade 21-22-23 May 1865 at the disbanding of the Army. ... paroled at Savanna (sic), reentered his regiment and was sent out with 27 others as sharpshooters [&] was near to Lincoln at Richmond.” In researching the online roster of Andersonville prisoners there are 87 men bearing first name Josiah. Of those only four were paroled at Savannah. Of those one served as POW for 1 year. One served as POW for three months. One escaped and boarded a ship. The last POW is likely our man. He is Josiah Clarke 101st Penna. Vols. captured 4/20/64 at Plymouth NC and paroled at Savannah on 11/30/64, and discharged June 15th 1865. Doing the math Clarke served as prisoner for just over 7 months. This is the closest time to the stated 6 mos 12 days on the cousin's note. Also, Clarke was back with the army in time to have seen Lincoln in Richmond and the Grand Review. A little more investigating should be done. The key will likely be his post POW service with 27 sharpshooters mentioned on the note. I wonder if he might have been in Hancock's Veteran Corps in 1865. Those men were given Sharps Rifles to keep personally. CivilWarData does not show any connection with Hancock... but National Archives records might shed more light. As it stands Josiah Clarke seems to be the logical candidate based on the clues in the note and the research done to this point. Thank goodness for all the online records. A real Andersonville survivor... $750.00 Sold

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17-11-12...  1864 SPRINGFIELD RIFLE MUSKET ...  100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, and matched dates!  The 1864 (aka 1863 type-2) was the culmination of various experiments and changes in the 1861 pattern rifle musket, including the s-shaped beveled hammer, elimination of the clean-out screw on the bolster, solid bands  mounted with springs, etc. This one is a very nice example of that classic longarm produced at the US arsenal at Springfield.  Very clear lock markings, crisp eagle on the bolster flat, good nipple, not battered, all bands, springs, sights and swivels in place. There is even some blue still on the rear sight.  The wood is very good, with both cartouches faint, but legible.  One small divot on the stock flat, a little chipping at the left breech, otherwise just the usually handling marks. The barrel is smooth metal, in the bright, though with a bit of age darkening at the muzzle.  Crisply  visible V/P/eaglehead barrel proofs and a light, but visible matching 1864 barrel date. Bore is about MINT... you need sunglasses when you drop a bore light down the barrel.   The lockplate shows some light, mottled case color remaining.  The last pattern muzzle loading Springfield made by the US government.  Nice gun...  $1,550.00 Sold

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17-11-13...NON-REGULATION OFFICER’S SWORD .... Civil War import officer’s sword by Walscheid. This iron hilted sword was a popular sword with Civil War officers for field use. Based on the British 1822 pattern for cavalry officers, the blade is a bit straighter than cavalry sabers and a bit shorter, but they are seen in the hands of officers of all branches of service including mounted staff officers, etc. Like the Peterson-75 pattern, also a German import made on a British pattern, the iron guards and steel scabbards made them very practical and durable. This one has a clear W.Walscheid / Solingen stamp on one side of the ricasso and a characteristic inset brass disc on the other reading “Proved.” The blade is plain and unetched, with a double-edged spearpoint, no nicks, and in the bright with just a shade of graying. The grip has a full sharkskin or rayskin wrap with some few spots of light abrasion from handling and use. The coiled wire binding is still in place. This is a nice example of a very popular sword for officers serving in the field. Priced extra friendly at $450.00

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17-11-14...1822 PATTERN FRENCH ARTILLERY SABER.... Nice French 1822 Pattern light artillery saber that was the model for our 1840 version.  Similar broad single edged curved blade with brass guard and pommel with leather wrapped grip and twisted brass wire binding.  Very good condition with mellow patina to the brass, blade in the bright with just minor stains, and scabbard showing gray with some brown spots, both rings, drag and throat in place.  The guard and the scabbard show several sets of issue numbers, indicating the saber saw plenty of service.  The back of the blade has a Chatterault maker’s mark engraved and an August, 1836, date of manufacture.  Totally appropriate for Civil War display as we imported 300 of these in 1839, and they did form the basis for our US artillery saber.   Great condition, 180 years old,  and priced where anyone can afford it. (A dollar a day for one year!)   $365.00 Sold

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17-11-15 ... WINCHESTER CENTERFIRE BULLET MOLD .... Excellent Winchester made and marked bullet mold. The three-line Winchester company mark appears on one arm of the mold with a prominent caliber marking above it reading “44 W.C.F.” for the popular Winchester .44 centerfire round.  Wood grips and brass ferrules are in place and tight. Mold shows overall faded blue and smooth metal. Sprue-cutter is in place.  A really nice mold that would display well with Winchester rifle or carbine.  Out in the wilds and running low on ammunition, being able to cast one’s own bullets might come in handy.    I don't recall where or how I found this...  don't know what the value is....  So.....   $65.00 Sold

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17-11-16...BUTTON GROUP ... Civil War Union army officers’ buttons from the three main branches of service: artillery, infantry, and cavalry. These eagle buttons with inset shields and the initial of the service branch were the regulation uniform button for regimental line and field officers. I offer the three as a display set, one made by Scovill and two by Horstmann. There are scores of backmark and strike variations. These could show off as is, or be the beginning of a tremendous collection. They are a nice combination of history and art.  Priced about half compared with the specialty button dealers.  All three....   45.00 Sold

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17-11-17... CARVED BONE DICE ... Very primitive pair of bone dice. Perfect for a Civil War camp display. Even on the march soldiers were known to not waste a minute in breaking out cards or dice during a rest.   Many painted game boards on the insides of their rubber blankets to save time, and perhaps roll it up quickly if a nosy officer was headed their way.  $12.00 Sold

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17-11-18 ... J. LINGARD PEA CROFT SHEFFIELD BOWIE KNIFE IN FIELD SCABBARD... A classic 1860 Bowie Knife. Americans always put a lot of faith in British cutlers and Sheffield steel. Lingard was in business from 1849 to 1876 and this is a very good example of his work from the late 50s or early 60s. German silver mounted Bowie measuring ten inches overall, with a double edged six inch spearpoint blade. Dark horn grips with two mother of pearl (?) inset disks on one side and four pins. Deeply cast German silver pommel and guard with floral motifs. Three-line Lingard maker stamp in an oval at the ricasso, a little rubbed at the edges, but very legible. The knife is sheathed in its original scabbard, which was pasteboard and leatherette with German silver throat and tip. This sheath is covered by a real, period leather field scabbard that hunters, frontiersmen and soldiers often used as better protection for the knife and to provide a large belt loop. The small button on the throat of the manufacturer’s scabbard is missing, but the leather shows where it was buttoned into the outer scabbard. There is some deterioration to the leather and separation lines, but I would leave it exactly as is since it is a sign of real, period, field use and has been there forever. $450.00 Sold

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17-11-19   Fine Condition 1863 Springfield With Matched Dates... A wonderful example, in the bright, with case color on hammer and lock.  100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect...  super bore.  The 1863 pattern rifle musket introduced some innovations beyond the 1861 model.  The hammer was beveled and adopted the S-curve, the barrel bands were screw-clamp and the stock no longer incorporated band retaining springs, the ramrod omitted the swell, etc.  Within the year, however, the 1864 pattern reintroduced the retaining springs, etc.   This is a true 1863 Type-1 Springfield, with matching dates, no band springs, barrel with smooth metal and showing original finish in the bright.  Attractive case hardening still on the hammer and somewhat more muted on the lockplate. Crisp lock and bolster markings, V/P/eagle barrel proofs, matching 1863 date on the breach, and very legible ink cartouches in the wood on the left flat. Slightly faded blue on the rear sight, as is correct.  Sharp edges to the lock platform. A few minor dings to the offside and a scratch or two to the buttflats.   All bands, swivels, sights and rod in place. Tight wood to metal fit.  A superior example of a regulation longarm made at Springfield.  $2,450.00

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17-11-20 ... BRASS MOUNTED CHARLEVILLE STYLE MUSKET ... The markings on the lockplate and left breech of the barrel cannot be made out clearly on this musket, but the overall configuration suggests French manufacture. The stock has the overall contours of 1763/68 Charleville, but the barrel bands, sideplate and buttpate are brass, which suggests either a marine musket or officer’s fusil. The lobed shape of the buttplate tang is suggestive of some French marine muskets, as is the long sideplate. (See Neumann, Battle Weapons, 49MM, 54MM, and others for parallels of both sorts.) If I were to guess, I would call it a French commercial marine musket of the sort that might be purchased by American privateers outfitting in French ports. The gun is in wonderful “out of the attic” condition, with old damage and primitive repairs. The wood has a good look and is solid, with nice color. There is an old crack just above the rear of the lockplate that was repaired with a simple nail. At left breech the stock shows a raised sliver that has not broken out. Various dings and scratches are evident, but purely consistent with its age and use. The barrel is full length, a tad under 42 inches, and still has its top mounted bayonet stud. The middle barrel band spring is long gone. There are no swivels. The hammer is correct for the period, but out of proportion and certainly a replacement at some point, and likely an old one- someone broke off the lower portion of the hammer screw in trying to get it off. The early form 3-screw sideplate currently has two screws, with a third screw missing and that hole filled. The buttplate is crudely affixed with nails and shows some wear at the angle from grounding arms also the main spring is damaged or missing, suggesting this musket had a long life in active service. The iron has an overall crusty surface from age, but not deep pitting from neglect. This is a great looking musket from the era of the American Revolution. $1,795.00 Sold

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17-11-21...COLT ARMY MADE IN 1862 ...  Classic Civil War cavalry sidearm, the Colt 1860 Army revolver, .44 caliber, six shots. Matching serial numbers 83838,  giving it an 1862 manufacture date.  Metal overall is smooth silver gray in color but with scattered small patches of darker gray, a few of which show tiny pin-prick pitting.  Barrel, cylinder and frame markings are crisp and there are visible elements of the cylinder scene.  Grips are good with tight fit, a few dings to the bottom, a few marks on the right side and one small chip at bottom right edge. Mechanics are good. Nipples are not battered.   A solid example of the Colt Army Revolver...  $1,495.00 Sold

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17-11-22 ... LEFAUCHEUX PINFIRE REVOLVER ... As awkward as these revolvers sometimes seem, tons of them were issued to Yankee cavalry in the western theatre early in the war, and Confederate records show they too had a boatload based on the cartridge inventories at various southern arsenals. The pinfire cartridge might pose some risks with its' exposed firing pin, but it was self-contained and resistant to water and dampness. This one shows clear Lefaucheux markings on the forward, left frame, serial number 16522 on the lower frame and a Liege “ELG” with star in an oval on the cylinder along with a proof mark. The grips are nice, fit tightly, and show typical checkering and raised fan carving, along with a military style lanyard ring in the buttcap. Metal is brown with some scattered gray. Mechanism functions. There is a light set of owner’s initials “A.M.” on the right grip showing someone thought enough of this revolver to want to keep track of it. Missing the front sight and does not index. A nice early war cavalry sidearm that you can fix . dn-kir $595.00

(I have several original boxes of Lefaucheaux cartridges. Call for details and price)

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17-11-23... WW2 GERMAN "GROUND ROHM" S.A. DAGGER BY E. PACK & SON ... Nice example of a World War Two G.I. “bring-back.” Nazi S.A. dagger by E. Pack, Solingen. Nice tight fit of grip to hilt mountings. Clean blade, unmessed with, showing the “Alles fur Deutchland” motto on one side and the other with a blank polished area where the Ernst Rohm inscription was removed after Hitler’s purge of the S.A.   This naturally removed part of the Pack maker’s mark as well, but the bottom portion of their logo still shows. The scabbard still shows much of its original brown, with some areas of light abrasion and wear from handling. The dagger still has its original clip carrying strap. A nice example of a popular souvenir sought by G.I.s and brought back by veterans as a recognizable emblem of the enemy they defeated.  $550.00 Sold

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17-11-24...WWII JAPANESE BAYONET ... Japanese bayonet for the Arisaka rifle. Very good wood grips, just a couple of minor dings near the pommel. Blade and hilt showing original blue, though with some rubbing to the blade from drawing and sheathing the blade. The scabbard is metal, throat band in place, and shows some traces of bluing, but mostly dark gray with some underlying silver toward the top. Good edge and point. Crisp arsenal stamps at the ricasso. A popular souvenir for soldiers who had seen them brandished on the ends of rifles in banzai charges. $89.00 Sold

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