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17-09-01...” LETTERED” COLT NAVY REVOLVER / ONE OF THE 150 LOUISVILLE COLTS SENT TO NEWSPAPER EDITOR GEORGE D. PRENTICE, THE PERSONIFICATION OF FAMILY SPLIT BY CIVIL WAR... One of the rarest and most interesting of the various Colt historical Civil War arms is this M1851 Colt Navy revolver which “letters” from the factory as being one of the 150 Navies sold to Louisville newspaperman George D. Prentice. Prentice at various times purchased Colt revolvers and Henry Rifles in large numbers to sell to local Kentuckians. Despite Prentice advertising that he would only sell the Colts to loyal Union men, there is good evidence he also supplied Rebel Cavalry in Tennessee. George Dennison Prentice (1802-1870) was co-founder and editor of the Louisville Journal in Kentucky. A dedicated backer of Henry Clay and the Whig party in the 1830s, he became a prominent voice for the “Know-Nothing” party and its anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant nativist policies of the 1850s that in Louisville resulted in the Bloody Monday Riot of 1855 in which 22 people were killed. Prentice advocated pro-slavery positions, but did not favor secession and urged Kentucky to remain in the Union and adopt a neutral stance. Two of his sons joined the Confederates early on, one of whom may have also helped the CSA get some of his fathers Louisville Colts. Prentice got involved pretty early in bringing quality arms into the state and was even connected with C.B. Cotton, who was known to be supplying guns to the pro-southern factions and some of whose weapons were confiscated by Federal authorities. Prentice was accused by his rivals of turning the Journal office into a, “Lincoln magazine for the distribution of Colt’s pistols to Lincoln’s pets in Kentucky.” They also quoted one of his newspaper notices for, “Cheap Pistols. – Union men in want of Colt’s navy and 6-inch pistols can find them by inquiring at this office cheaper than they have ever been sold here.” Since Cotton was apparently paying around $15 apiece for his guns and selling them for over $100 to the Confederates, Prentice could still undercut his competition with plenty of profit left in the deal. It is notable that despite his targeting of Union men in his notice, his rival, southern-sympathizing editor at the Daily Courier accused him on Nov. 16, 1861, of making large profits on three shipments of guns sent south through his son, “a month or two since.” Ours lettered by the Colt archives dead-on to the shipment of 150 guns sent to Prentice by Colt on July 13, 1861. Whether this is one of the guns bought by a Union man or one of those shipped south via his son we can’t tell, but it is one of those shipped right into the middle of trouble in Louisville as the state teetered between the north and south and families like Prentice’s were split apart. Condition is near fine. Serial number 107584 matches on all parts, including the wedge. The metal is evenly colored overall a deep plum brown and the markings are crisp with significant portions of the cylinder scene sill visible. The brass has an untouched, medium patina and a tight fit to the wood and frame. The grips are very good, with just a few dings and scratches from use, but a tight fit to the backstrap. The wedge screw and one screw on the frame show slight signs of turning, but are not badly chewed up and the others show crisp notches and good blue-turned-brown color. You will be hard pressed to find another "lettered Colt" with such significant connection to the Civil War. The two lithographs shown above are included with the gun. $6500.00

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17-09-02 ... Extra Fine Cooper Double Action Revolver ...An extra nice Cooper third model pocket revolver showing lots of case color on the frame and hammer and lots of nice blue on the cylinder and barrel.  These double-action .31 revolvers were made in Pittsburgh and then in Philadelphia starting about 1864. This has matching serial number 11213, placing it early in the third model series that Flayderman says started about number 11,000.  Very nice even mellow patina to the brass. Practically unblemished varnished grips, just one or two fingernail size indentations. The best part is the color: luminescent blue on the cylinder, a thin blue on the barrel showing bright just at the high points of the ridges, and a swirl of those "gasoline on water" colors you want to see on a frame.  Full, correct three-line barrel markings for this model which omit the 1859 patent information and add 1863 dates, just a bit lightly stamped in the second and third lines toward the right (these were not as elegantly applied as Col. Colt's.)    A very nice gun that will make you want to upgrade most everything else in your collection ... vadcg-ej-16895 ... $1,595.00

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17-09-03.... ENLISTED CIVIL WAR NAVY BELT... This is the 1862 pattern of seaman’s belt that replaced the old brass hook and standing loop design with a Goodyear patent friction buckle. These belts are very simple and very, very scarce. They were made in buff and in bridle leather, as this one is. The belt has good color and is flexible, with some scattered wear spots from abrasion. There is one weak spot, shown in the photo, where the belt had been left in the buckle and partially cracked where the bar crossed it. This could be concealed pretty easily, but I have left it as found and it displays great in any case. Sailors wore these to carry cutlasses, pistols, cartridge pouches, etc. as part of landing parties, but also on gun crews in expectation of either boarding an enemy or being called upon to repel boarders. A scarce regulation Civil War navy accoutrement belt. About 100 times rarer than an army belt and buckle but priced about the same. $525.00

 

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17-09-04 ... INSCRIBED COLT POCKET REVOLVER CARRIED BY 1ST CONNECTICUT INFANTRY SOLDIER WHO DIED IN 1863: ... Grey brown patina Colt pocket revolver with four inch barrel and super inscription . All matching serial numbers 189268, including the wedge. Tight wood to metal fit. Pleasant, thin plum brown mixed with pewter gray on the left. On the right scattered shallow pitting on the barrel flat. Sharp barrel address and serial numbers. Pleasing patina on the frame: stronger on the left, but present on the right. Some traces of silver on the brass behind the hammer. Partial cylinder scene. Light salt and pepper surface pitting on most steel surfaces, quite uniform. Minor dings to the wood. Nicely engraved backstrap reading, “Wilbert H. Booth New Britain Ct. 1st Regt.” Booth was a New Haven resident when he enlisted in the 1st Connecticut on 4/20/61 and mustered in as a private on 4/23/61. The outfit was three-month unit and saw service guarding railroad lines, etc. and losing at least one man wounded in an ambush. They also fought at First Bull Run suffering six wounded and six MIA according to CWData. Booth survived and returned home with the regiment, mustering out 7/31/61 at New Haven. Booth signed up again on 11/22/61, where his experience got him the corporal’s post in Co. H of the 12th Connecticut. The regiment was sent as part of Butler’s expedition against New Orleans and was one of the first Union regiments to enter that city. It thereafter participated in numerous expeditions and actions at Bayou La Fourche, Bayou Teche, Pattersonville, Bisland, etc., as well as the famous siege of Port Hudson. During the latter campaign they suffered almost daily losses. The swampy southern climate was not conducive to good health among these New England troops and Booth died of disease 8/23/63, shortly after Port Hudson. To give an idea of the near constant activity of the unit, CWdata lists some 46 points at which they suffered some loss between the time of their enlistment and Booth’s death. This is a handsome and historic souvenir of the war and there is likely much more information to be uncovered on our brave soldier. This Colt was obtained by our soldier immediately after Lincoln's call for troops. It was present at the first major land battle in 1861 and carried by our soldier in Virginia and then Louisiana. A great historical weapon. $2,350.00 Sold

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17-09-05.... CIVIL WAR DATE SMITH AND WESSON No. 1 SECOND ISSUE REVOLVER....These little .22s were popular pocket pistols.  I personally own one presented to the Chaplain of the 10th Michigan Infantry.   It is one of my favorite guns.   Some 117,000 were made from 1860 to 1868. They fired a .22 short rimfire cartridge, which was not the most powerful perhaps, but it carried seven rounds so that at close range across a poker table you had a chance to make an impression on a card cheat, or during close combat you could certainly drive back a tenacious reb who might be inclined to try his bayonet on you.  This one is serial number 46837 which indicates mid-war production. It retains 30 to 40 percent of the original lustrous factory blue finish on the barrel assembly and cylinder and pretty much all the toned silver plating on the brass frame.  The rosewood grips are excellent. The barrel address is sharp and the patent stamp on the cylinder is legible, if a tad light in the middle. A very nice example of a classic early American pocket revolver. $495.00 Sold

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17-09-06 ... A Wonderful Top Shelf Patriotic Bowie Knife for the US Market by Bunting... Robert Bunting is recorded as early as 1837 as a Sheffield maker of knives and dirks, and American hunting knives. This is a great early example of his work. Alittle over 10 inches overall with 6 inch blade. Classic German-silver and mother of pearl paneled grip with an American eagle under an arc of stars perched on top of an American shield with oak and laurel branches underneath. Foliate upper and lower panels, separated by the mother of pearl sections. Great shape. No chipping to the mother of pearl and no bends to German-silver hilt. Double-edge spear point blade with good edges and point, “Bunting and Son” maker stamp at the ricasso. Complete with its original red leather and pasteboard scabbard showing some gilt blind-stamped decoration. Throat and tip still in place, complete with the small fastening button. Tip has a small dent that has pulled it a bit further from its proper seat, but it is still in place. Some minor wear to the red finish and edges of the scabbard. A very showy knife made expressly for the American market, probably between 1845 and 1861. Auctions Imperial sold a very similar patriotic Bowie at auction in 2009 for $7,000. Following is a link to that page.

https://new.liveauctioneers.com/item/6221527

Compared to theirs, ours is a true bargain. (If you know the current owner of that auctioned knife please send him a link to ours.) A superb early patriotic American Bowie Knife with sheath… $2,350.00

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17-09-07... POTTS BOWIE KNIFE-BAYONET... These magnificent unmarked bowie bayonets are believed by some to have been made by T.A Potts in New Orleans on the basis of one specimen marked “T.A. Potts New Orleans 1840.” Unfortunately, while that knife is real, the maker’s stamp is spurious in my opinion, added years ago to make it unique and more saleable. Some now believe these “Potts” knives were actually made by Rees Fitzpatrick of Natchez, Mississippi. More recently, collectors and arms scholars have also come to realize that they were probably made as dual purpose weapons not as a side-knife and bayonet, but as a knife and as a polearm spearhead. The attaching rings are always unfinished on the inside and have no provision to actually fix it to a rifle barrel and keep it there, let alone in any one position. It has been rumored that an example surfaced with an old capture note indicating it had been used as a detachable spear point on the staff of a battleflag, but I have not seen the documentation. It does make sense that the loops would be better adapted for a friction fit to a pole, whether for use as a flag finial or pike, but the research is still ongoing. It is a dead real Confederate sidearm in any case and a very stylish Bowie with swept back clip-point blade, and swept back muzzle or staff rings that accentuate the sleek profile. The brass attaching rings are excellent, so is the grip, and the blade is factory bright, with excellent point and edge, no nicks, and just a few light scratches and some small gray spots near the guard. The knife still has its scabbard, which is even rarer than the knife. Brass throat and tip are in place. The throat still has the fastening button and a small bottom piece of the belt loop that came up at an angle and fastened over it is still sewn to the scabbard edge lower down. The leather scabbard is solid, but does show finish loss and abrasions. It has never been treated with any kind of leather dressing or preservative. Attic condition. A classic Confederate edged weapon, in excellent condition, with its rare original scabbard. Priced very gently at... $2,650.00

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17-09-08 ... ALLEN & WHEELOCK LIPFIRE ARMY WITH SCARCE FLARED GRIP...One of my favorite American pistols: the Allen and Wheelock Army Model Center Hammer Lipfire or “2nd Model” Lipfire revolver.   Only about 250 of these were manufactured in the early 1860’s until Smith and Wesson managed to infringe on the patent.   .44 caliber and six-shot, this revolver has the scarcer of two grip forms, with the grip flaring out noticeably toward the bottom and is the first pattern, with the loading gate hinged at the top.  A nice, thin, even faded gray patina on the steel.   Crisp patent stamps on the left flat of the octagon portion of the barrel. Very good grips with tight fit to the metal.  The trigger guard actuates the ejector.  The split cylinder pin is an old replacement for the original button-head pin.  Various parts bear a number “14,” which is an assembly batch number.  I know of no military contracts but it is usually classified as a secondary martial arm.  An extremely scarce Civil War cavalry weapon and still very affordable.  A grey metal example no better than ours sold at Cowan’s Auction for $2,070.00 on April 27th 2016.     our price  $1,350.00

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17-09-09... REGULATION 1850 FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD ... Regulation Model 1850 Foot Officer’s Sword and scabbard, with part of the original hanger strap from the officer’s belt. Mellow patina to the brass hilt, with a full sharkskin wrap showing just a few wear spots from wartime use. The wire binding is the style with a standard two strand twisted wire which is flanked by two thin single strands. The double twisted standard wire is perfect. The thin flanking wires are somewhat jumbled. The blade shows a mix of silver gray and darker gray, but with visible blade etchings showing the usual floral motifs, arms, national motto and large &;U.S.& The blade has a good edge and point. The scabbard is full length, black leather with brass mounts. The leather shows tooled border lines and lots of finish. There are a couple of flex marks and areas of abrasion that might be dressed up, but it has a nice untouched look as it stands. The blade shows a very legible “Horstmann / & Sons/ Philadelphia” firm name etched on one side just above the ricasso. A good solid example of the regulation sword carried by infantry lieutenants and captains in the front lines of combat during the war, and one sold by a famous military goods supplier… $750.00 Sold

 

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17-09-10... 1860 COLT ARMY...   The quintessential cavalry trooper’s sidearm, the Colt .44 caliber, six-shot 1860 Army revolver.   This one shows wonderful honest use and wear,  and is a good solid Civil War veteran,  with mismatched serial numbers that were mixed during the war.  The age patina on all the parts is absolutely matching and honest.  It has a deep “rust brown” patina mixed with light pitting.  Serial numbers are 86,548 on frame, butt strap, and trigger guard,   made in 1863…  barrel number ends in 5565, cylinder bears 889?   I am positive the gun was carried this way during the war.     Overall plum brown metal.  Barrel address present but light.  Some shallow gouges to the top of the barrel near the cylinder and some firing corrosion on the sides.  Patent information is visible on the cylinder.    The nipples are not battered down and the action is good.  Grips show numerous scratches and wear, some rounding to the heel, and have a faint cartouche on left at bottom.   A real, field used example of a regulation pistol that was used in all theatres of war by both sides that would be a key part of a cavalry display.  You can make a strong case for Confederate usage based on the heavy patina and mixed numbers.  A good solid Colt priced very gently at…$1,150.00 Sold

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17-09-11 ... MAGNIFICENT GOLD BULLION EMBROIDERED ARTILLERY OFFICER'S CROSSED CANNON HAT INSIGNIA ...  All Civil War embroidered hat insignia is scarce. Cavalry is much scarcer than infantry. Artillery is much scarcer than cavalry. This piece is top drawer in all respects. It is very large measuring over 3 inches across and 2 1/2 inches tall. The embroidery is executed on fine black velvet that has turned slightly brown with age. The wire edge border is intact. The velvet is sewn around an interior oval tin stiffener, and this stiffener is covered on the back with brown polished cotton. Inside the loop on the face are false embroidered stamped numerals 11. This could represent the 11th NY Artillery, the 11th US Colored Artillery, but more likely represents the 11th independent battery of "pick a state" as there were a lot more 11th independent batteries in the several states, than there were 11th regiments. Brass attaching wires are present on the back. Condition is extra fine ... among the best available. One of the best pieces I've come up with in recent memory ... $775.00 Sold

 

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17-09-12 ...  INTRIGUING UNION OFFICER'S SWORD MODIFIED FOR A ONE ARMED MAN:  This sword mutely reveals an interesting history.   When I first found this it baffled me.  I had never seen a sword with such a guard.   I pondered on it for some time and finally realized it was the import officer's sword patterned after the British 1822 model,  and the odd appearance was because the three steel branches of the basket guard had been professionally removed during the period. It is almost impossible to tell.  This intrigued me.  The logical reason to remove the 3-branches on the guard (which are on the right side) would be to facilitate wearing the sword on the soldier’s right side.  This would prevent the branches from digging into his hip. And the logical reason for wearing a sword on the right side would be because the officer had no right arm and needed to draw his blade with his left hand.  I can’t empirically prove the owner was a “one armed man”,  but the logic of it personally convinces me that it was the reason for the alteration.  A weapon that tells a story all by itself.   Condition is overall good to VG. Blade is nicely etched with US and patriotic motifs. Shagreen grip wrap is worn but good. Twisted wire binding is fine. Scabbard is solid and has a medium age patina. Neat CW sword....$695.00

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17-09-13 ... U.S. ASTON PERCUSSION PISTOL... 1849 dated Model 1842 percussion pistol by Henry Aston. Lock markings are a bit light but legible: US over H. Aston forward of the hammer and Middtn/ Conn/ 1849 to the rear. Some rounding and slight chips to wood at rear of plate, other wood edges are good, with minor age dings here and there. Brass has mellow aged patina. Some dings to the butt cap. Some light pitting to the bolster. Barrel inspector marks light but visible. Barrel is mix of gray and brown spots. Sight, rammer assembly present and good. Action good. Nipple shows signs use but is not battered. A good example of the US regulation pistol for dragoons in the early Indian Wars. Many of these were in state arsenals at the beginning of the Civil War and are often recorded in early issues to southern volunteers. $695.00

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17-09-14 ... IDENTIFIED 17th OHIO ORDNANCE OFFICER'S INSTRUCTIONS ... Scarce 1863 dated government book of instruction for the use of ordnance officers in filling out quarterly returns. A key book in administering the army, where officers would be held personally liable for any shortcomings that seemed to appear from faulty record keeping. Very clean, clothbound copy, blindstamped in gold on the cover with the Ordnance Department insignia. On the flyleaf is the signature of Quartermaster Samuel Hurd of the 17th Ohio: "S.H. Hurd / Q.M. 17th Regt. / O.V.I./ May 23" 1863" Hurd enlisted in that outfit as the Quartermaster Sergeant at age 25 on 8/22/61. His CWData record shows he made Quartermaster 11/26/63, and was detailed Acting Assistant Quartermaster for the Army of Georgia 4/4/65, and mustered out 7/16/65. (The date of May in his inscription may simply indicate his posting to that department in the regiment rather than his rank, or could indicate he was serving in that capacity and merely received his commission in November.) The 17th Ohio served in the Army of the Ohio and the Army of the Cumberland, spending most of its time in the 14th Army Corps. They saw action at Stones River, Chickamauga, Resaca, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta and elsewhere, losing 6 officers and 71 enlisted men in killed and wounded. A key book in understanding how the army functioned owned by an officer in a fighting regiment ... ajj-con-kut ... $195.00

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17-09-15 ...UNDERHAMMER PISTOL BY CASE, WILLARD & CO. ... Eight inches overall length with a four inch barrel. Octagon to round barrel. About .41 caliber. Curly maple stock and grip. Front and rear sights, brass back strap, no trigger guard, as is typical for the type. Marked on the top strap: “CASE WILLARD & CO. / NEW HARTFORD CONN.” in two lines, along with a “CAST STEEL / PATENT” stamp in two lines on the left of the octagonal frame. Mechanically good, nipple not battered, a bit of rust on the cup of the hammer. Small chip of wood out next to the hammer at right. These pistols were simple, rugged, and popular for their streamlined design that made them easy to conceal in a boot top, waistband, or vest. The bottom-mounted hammer also gave them a clearer line of sight in aiming and the front and rear sights on this one shows accuracy was a consideration. A nice early American percussion pistol that would look great with a frontiersman or keel boat display as an example of a serious defense weapon. Very attractive with the brass trim and curly maple grip. Ca 1845. ... cbe ... $ 495.00 Sold

 

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17-09-16 ... IDENTIFIED SOLDIER’S POCKET BOOK... Small pocket book printed by the Presbyterian Board in Philadelphia. Pressed paper cover with blind stamped gilt title “The Soldier’s Pocket Book.” 1862 calendar on the inside. Contains advice, hymns, etc. for the new recruit. A soldier’s name in pencil, “Robert Greeley” on the title page. Troops from various states passed through Philadelphia on the way to war, but this may be Robert A. Greeley from Wayne County, Pa., who enlisted and mustered into Co. C of the 35th Pennsylvania on 5/13/61 and served with them until 5/31/64, when he transferred to the 191st Pa. Some minor staining and a little separation from the binding at the bottom. A nice piece of Civil War ephemera that was carried by many of the new recruits on their way into the field. $115.00 Sold

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17-09-17... 1827 PATTERN U.S. MARINE CORPS SERGEANT’S SWORD...Highly desirable and very handsome. This pattern remained unrecognized for many years until Norm Flayderman turned up some pattern books showing it along with two solid brass hilted shorter eagle pommels. The shorter ones were identified as USMC musician and “boy musician” swords and this one as the Sergeant’s sword. Identifying sergeants with a sword as badge of rank was an old tradition and this pattern seems to have been adopted in 1827 at the same time Mameluke hilt swords were specified for officers. They were still being issued as late as 1859. Widmann seems to have been the sole supplier until Horstmann absorbed Widmann’s business in 1848 and continued to produce them with just minor changes. This is a nice Horstmann marked example with a mellow patina to the brass hilt and full leather wrapped grip, though without wire. The Horstmann marking is the early raised lettering in a channel form. The blade is smooth with good point and edge, showing a dull silver in tone with gray areas mixed in. The engraved martial motifs on either side of the blade are visible, but the blades were not profusely etched. This is a scarce regulation US Marine Corps NCO sword dating to the pre-war USMC. $995.00 Sold

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17-09-18 ... US M1840 Light Artillery Saber and Scabbard ... The light artillery saber was meant to offer the mounted drivers in light artillery batteries, and all personnel in horse artillery units, a weapon for personal defense. Here is a nice example, 1864 dated and inspected. It was certainly made by Ames, but the Ames mark is too light on the ricasso to make out readily. The date and inspector marks are sharp, but the Ames scroll maker marks can be extremely light as is the case here. The grip leather and wire are good and tight, just a slight bit of wood exposed at the guard with a rubbed patina from the leather shrinking. The brass is medium dark in tone. The blade washer is in place. The blade has a good tip and edge. Bright mixed with silver gray overall. Scabbard is in the bright, with darker color on the outboard side on the lower portions. The left side has a couple small dents. Carrying rings and throat are firmly in place... ejj-17067 ... $675.00 Sold

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17-09-19 ... WILLIAM ROSE 1812 CONTRACT CAVALRY SABER ... Relic condition, but very scarce War of 1812 US dragoon saber by William Rose. The Purveyor of Public Supplies contracted with Rose for 500 sabers in March, 1812. Ours follows the example pictured in The American Sword as number 27. The metal is pitted overall, but about 2/3 of the wood grip remains and the edge and point are good. If anything the missing wood enables you to see the underlying construction of the sword. Bird’s head pommel, with the blade tang secured by a nut. Iron backstrap, ferrule and P-shaped guard. The blade is curved with a single edge and clipped point. The strongest point of our example is not only the “W.Rose” marking stamped on the spine of the blade, but the legible “V” over “MW” stamped on the ricasso, which is the view mark of Marine Wickham the US inspector of arms in Philadelphia. His initials sometimes show up as a simple “W" and also as “MTW.” The example shown by Peterson has a small “W” over a large “V. No scabbard, of course (Rose’s contract specified iron scabbards,) but a very rare and hard-to-find saber intended for US light dragoons and thus a significant piece in a US edged weapons or War of 1812 collection. A wonderful and rare relic of the War of 1812 ... noco ... $995.00

needs new price

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17-09-20 ...   A DARING FIREMAN BECOMES A SOLDIER - 161st NEW YORK INSCRIBED OFFICER’S SWORD:   Solingen import US regulation 1850 foot officer’s sword nicely inscribed on the upper mount: “Geo. R. White / from / Watkins / Fire Department.”  A 100% dead-real inscription for George R. White, the First Lieutenant of Co. B, 161st New York, a unit recruited in the towns of Watkins, Elmira, Tyrone, Reading, Hector and Dix. The unit was authorized in the Fall of 1862, and organized at Elmira, where White had enrolled on August 28 at age 25 to serve three years.  He was commissioned on November 10, with rank from August 28, and served with the regiment until July,23, 1863, when he was mustered out for disability.  During this period the regiment saw service in the deep south, at Clinton Plank Road, Plain Store, the Siege of Port Hudson, and the Bayou La Fourche in Louisiana.  Both the fighting and the climate took a toll on these upstate NY boys.   The brass has an attractive medium patina and the sharkskin grip wrap is complete with just minor wear.  The three-strand brass wire binding is still firmly in place. The Solingen maker’s mark of an upright arrow over “Solingen” inside an oval is crisp.  The blade has a good point and edge with no nicks and shows a dull silver overall with just a couple of gray spots.  The etching is visible throughout, consisting of intertwined floral and military motifs, along with a U.S. etched on one side and an American eagle with an E Pluribus Unum ribband overhead on the other. The leather washer is in place on the underside of the guard and the scabbard is complete with all three brass mounts and carrying rings.  The black leather scabbard is in very good, very solid condition with just some expected age crinkles and very little, if any, loss of finish.  The presentation on this sword is especially nice.  Firemen were regarded as the bravest of the brave, rushing into burning buildings to rescue women and children.  The New York “Fire Zouaves” are perhaps the best example of that daring being converted to a martial spirit.  The Watkins Fire Department was authorized by the town in March, 1862, and consisted of a “fire patrol” and a hook and ladder company.  Our man White must have been recognized as a worthy local figure to have been presented with the sword and entrusted with the command of the local boys.  A very nice regulation sword with a rare connection to early fire fighters... bbznk  $2,495.00 Sold

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