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Dave Taylor
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Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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17-03-00...15-08-01 ... John Blanch & Son Cased Large Adams Revolver and Accoutrements ... Superb Cased Adams Revolver A top shelf cased Adams army revolver with great eye appeal and flash. In Britain the Adams revolver was a big competitor to Colt and in America the Adams revolvers have a strong association with the Confederacy. The south imported a bunch of them, and I have one in my collection in the original rebel holster on a Richmond CS sword belt with CS buckle. Many were carried by prominent Confederate officers. Ours is a superb high finish example, elegantly cased by John Blanch and Son of Gracechurch Street in London. Included in the casing is its cleaning rod, brass bullet mold, nipple wrench, powder flask and a couple of loose bullets. The flask is a magnificent period example but was not originally part of this casing. The previous owner added it to the empty flask compartment because the patina was PERFECT. The oak box preserves its original green lining and Blanch and Son paper label. All compartment dividers are present. The pistol exhibits excellent checkered wood grips and a beautiful, lustrous British blue on better than 90 percent of the barrel and frame. The hammer and sections of the loading lever assembly show bright. Crown view and proof marks are present as is the company name and address on the top strap of the pistol and the Adams patent and serial number on the lower frame and cylinder. Adding to the eye appeal is some very delicate floral engraving on the rear of the frame behind and below the cylinder. The powder flask is a high art two-compartment flask with raised floral scroll motifs and the thumbspring and spout in place. The nipple wrench has the typical flat-sided oval grip with brass ferrule and silver colored neck with square hole for the nipples. The brass mold has a serial number "12" on it, and a "54" next to an oval patent stamp and retains nice color on the sprue cutter. English 54 bore equates to US .45 caliber. Cased sets have a strong across-the-board appeal and these large frame British revolvers are especially impressive. A very fine example of this revolver in a very classy casing, perfect to display with a Confederate officer's effects ... noco ... $4,250.00

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17-03-01.. SLOCUM REVOLVER... A very nice looking example of the Brooklyn Arms Company Slocum revolver. In another attempt to avoid infringing the patents for bored-through cylinders, the Slocum used individual tubes within cutouts on the cylinder that slid forward for loading and ejecting cartridges. Looking a little like a Buck Rogers raygun from the rings on the base of the sliding cartridge tubes (am I dating myself too badly?) the Slocum carried five .32 caliber rimfire cartridges and was a pretty popular little gun. About 10,000 were made in 1863 and 1864. This one is pretty, with bright steel and sharp engraved scroll work on the brass frame. The front sight and base are missing, which would seem an easy fix, otherwise complete. There is a little gray around the muzzle and some scratches on the top from the sight mortise to the barrel address. The wood grips are tight to the metal and have good surfaces. Serial number 3156. Crisp barrel address patent stamp “April 14th 1863.” A cool looking Civil War pocket revolver, and affordable. $750.00 sold

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17-03-02...1862 DATED MODEL 1861 SPRINGFIELD RIFLE MUSKET... The classic Civil War rifle musket: an 1861 pattern Springfield, actually made at Springfield in 1862. Sharp lock markings with the Springfield eagle, and visible V/P/eaglehead barrel proofs. Barrel date not visible. Crisp action. Good bore with visible rifling. Early and desirable 1855- 1861 style rear leaf sight, front sight, swivels, bands, springs all original and in place. Ramrod is a replacement. Wood is good, with just slight rounding to edges from handling. Some dark staining here and there from use. Salt and pepper firing corrosion from the percussion caps at the breech, but not heavy. Metal is generally smooth and dull silver in color with some brown toward the muzzle. Nipple was replaced at some point and the clean-out screw was probably replaced at the same time. Some hints of original blue on the rear sight. Shallow pitting on the butt plate from standing upright for a long time. A real Springfield actually made at the National Armory. $1,175.00 sold

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17-03-03... SUPERB BRASS EAGLE HEAD SPURS... A very high grade set of officer’s eagle head spurs. These were popular as presentation pieces to respected officers who would serve mounted.  A number of different patterns were marketed by military outfitters such as Schuyler, Hartley and Graham, and Tiffany & Co.  This pair is exceptional, with very detailed eagle’s heads,  crest,  neck feathers and plumage leading back to the side bars that are fully rendered as eagle wings extended all the way back to the strap slots.  The rowels turn freely.  I see only one tip slightly bent.  There is an old set of leather straps on them that do not quite match, but these were often broken in use and replaced as needed.  A very nice, even mellow tone to the brass.  Eagle head spurs are, and always have been very rare and desirable.  The two sets I have here both came from a high-end New England collection that was auctioned near Boston.  I had to battle very hard to win them and do not anticipate seeing such high quality again any time soon.  Among the best available. $2,750.00

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17-03-04...VERY EARLY AND EXQUISITE SOLID SILVER EAGLE HEAD SPURS... Truly impressive, very early, heavy cast,  solid silver eagle head spurs.  The eagle heads are similar in form to the pommels on pre-1812 Philadelphia style eagle head swords.  The rowels are wonderfully designed as sunbursts that background and vignette the eagle’s head, much as the suns rays are used above and behind the American eagle on belt plates and hat insignia.  The neck and chest feathers are rendered fully and with great detail.  The wing feathers fade out and become lined panels, which extend back to hinges on the side bars, enabling them to be better tightened on the boot.   These certainly date at least as far back as the Mexican War and may well date significantly earlier.   A truly impressive set of officer’s spurs.  Eagle head spurs are, and always have been very rare and desirable.  The two sets I have here both came from a high-end New England collection that was auctioned near Boston.  I had to battle very hard to win them and do not anticipate seeing such high quality again any time soon.  Truly superb.  $3,250.00Sold

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17-03-05...1864 DATED AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY POCKET GOSPEL OF JOHN... One of the wartime religious tracts and soldiers’ aide society booklets I have to offer this time around.  Some staining and wear to the binding.  The interior shows some stains as well as highlights,  showing that our soldier was earnestly trying to study by underlining various passages.  Obvious wear from being carried and handled, which should be expected.  First blank fly leafs missing otherwise fine.  $89.00 sold

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17-03-06...INSCRIBED MASSACHUSETTS SOLDIER’S 1861 DATED POCKET BOOK OF PROVERBS... A touchingly inscribed 1861 edition of the Book of Proverbs by the American Bible Society in New York, owned and signed by Joseph H. Whitney of the 4th Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. Whitney had service in two other Massachusetts regiments before joining the 4th Mass. HA. On 5/22/61 he enlisted in the 4th Mass. Infantry, a three-month unit that in April had been the first Massachusetts regiment to leave the state. They served at Fortress Monroe and Newport News, where Whitney apparently joined them. Five of their companies took part in the Battle of Big Bethel on June 10, and the regiment returned home in July to be mustered out on 7/22/61. Whitney then reenlisted, mustering into Co. G of the 21st Mass on 8/23/61. That regiment took part in Burnside’s North Carolina expedition and saw action at Roanoke, New Bern, and Camden, losing 40 officers and men killed or mortally wounded. Whitney made Sergeant Major 7/21/62, shortly before the regiment sailed for Newport News and became part of the 9th Corps. It was present at Second Bull Run and heavily engaged at Chantilly, where it lost 38 men killed and mortally wounded. It then fought at South Mountain and Antietam, being heavily engaged. Whitney received a commission as 2nd Lieutenant 10/30/62, before the Battle of Fredericksburg, where the regiment was again in heavy fighting. In February, 1863, the regiment headed for Kentucky with the rest of the 9th Corps, but if Whitney went with them he did not remain long, resigning 2/23/63. He remained home for a little over a year. He enlisted one more time, mustering into the 4th Mass. H.A. 8/20/64 as a sergeant in Co. H, certainly on the basis of his previous army experience. He made Sergeant Major 12/15/64 (the estimated day) and mustered out 6/17/65 at Washington, D.C. Whitney inscribed the flyleaf of the book: Joseph H. Whitney / Ashburnham / Massachusetts / Compn’y H 4th Regt. / Mass. Hvy. Art’y” and then added a patriotic sentiment below that: “God save our Country- Strengthen the soldiers under all circumstances, forgive us our sins, and bless the dear ones at home. Jos. H. Whitney Nov. 30th 1864” Whitney then added an inscription a month later to reflect his promotion: Joseph H. Whitney / Sergt. Major 4th Regt. Mass. Hv’y Art’y. Dec. 27th 1864. The 4th Mass. Heavy Artillery was composed of various independent companies of Massachusetts Heavy Artillery and was enlisted for one year’s service. They spent most of their time in the fortifications around Washington. This is a nice memento of a man who served his country in three different regiments, even signing up for his last stint as an enlistedman though he had previously held a commission. An interesting service record and a great patriotic inscription. $250.00 sold

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17-03-07 ...REMINGTON NEW MODEL ARMY... Remington and Colt dominated the market in cavalry pistols and many ranked the Remington at the top because of its strong, solid frame. This six-shot, .44 caliber gun was a favorite north and south. This one retains a lot of original blue on the barrel, loading assembly, cylinder, and rear of frame, with the intervening, forward part of the frame showing more faded blue, pewter and dull silver tones with some light brown. Still, a pleasing combination and the frame. The screw heads still show a lot of color as well. Grips are good, with some dings and a couple of small notches on the left. A little bit of wear around the heel. Retains a clear inspector’s cartouche. Tight fit to the metal at the wrist, a hairline gap along the bottom of the butt. Crisp Remington maker and 1858 patent stamps on the top barrel flat. Low “New Model” serial number 83527. A very nice example that you’d be hard pressed to find anywhere at close to the money. $1,495.00 sold

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17-03-08... E. GAYLORD MARKED PISTOL CARTRIDGE BOX... Nice condition example of the mid-size cavalry pistol cartridge box. This is an early to mid-war box used for both .36 and .44 caliber pistol cartridge packs. The latch tab is secured by a single straight line of stitching. The belt loops are riveted and sewn. The Gaylord maker stamp is very clear between the belt loops. A very slight bit of abrasion to the inner edge of one belt loop. Both loops and tab are solid. The interior friction leathers to retain the packs are present.  A nice maker-marked example of a regulation cavalry accoutrement box. Priced well below other dealers...  $195.00 sold

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17-03-09... EARLY WAR CAVALRY PISTOL CARTRIDGE BOX WITH PLATE:...No question this box was actually issued and used.  Early war, mid-sized cavalry pistol cartridge box that uses stitching alone on the latch tab and the belt loops. These boxes were not required to have oval US box plates by regulation, but in this case a trooper fitted out his box with a standard oval US box plate: the leather tabs used to secure it show that it has been there forever.  The die strike is identical to the Boyd & Sons Boston marked examples, but I am not going to disturb the leather securing tabs to see if this plate is marked.  The box is in very good shape, showing actual use.  There is a bit of abrasion at the top edge of the body of the box, some vertical slits in the belt loops added by the trooper. A nice, untouched, field used example. A key piece of cavalry gear priced very friendly...   $395.00 sold

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17-03-10...1864 PATTERN US INFANTRY CARTRIDGE BOX WITH GUN TOOL AND BULLETS... Regulation US infantry .58 caliber cartridge box, marked on its inner flap by maker R. Nece and US ordnance sub-inspector Sniffen.  This pattern was an effort to reduce costs by embossing the cover with an oval US rather than requiring a separate brass cartridge box plate.  Otherwise the construction is the same as the earlier boxes.   Belt loops and buckles enable it to be worn on a shoulder sling or waist belt, two tin magazine inserts hold unopened ammunition packs in lower compartments and cartridges from open packs in the upper trays.  A separate pouch sewn to the front of the box was used for gun tools and cleaning implements.  This box comes with combination screwdriver/wrench tool, two Minnie balls three .69 round balls and two buckshot, along with the remnants of a paper cartridge, apparently a .69 buck and ball round.  What the .69 caliber ammunition was doing in a .58 caliber box, I can’t say, but it came that way so I am keeping it together.  $395.00 sold

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17-03-11... SMALL SIZED OVAL US 1839 PLATE... A very nice Mexican War era 1839 pattern oval US waist belt plate for infantry. These early infantry plates mirrored the narrow belts worn by infantry during the Mexican War and into the 1850s. This plate has lots of original gilt  on the face with just a few minor marks and dings and has a nice full solder-filled back.  The belt hook and single arrow-back fastener are fully intact and secure.  Interestingly, the army went to the stud back fasteners later and then reverted to the arrowhead style during the Civil War.  These have always been a bit scarce, but remain very affordable.  About fifty times rarer than the large size buckles but only a hundred dollars more money…   $350.00

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17-03-12... WONDERFUL CABINET PHOTO OF BLACK G.A.R. VETERAN WITH HIS MULATTO GRANDCHILDREN:...Clear and visually exciting 1890’s view of a seated black Civil War veteran wearing his G.A.R. uniform coat and cap, with a star badge pinned to his chest and sergeant’s stripes painted on his sleeves.  His watch fob is a running horse… likely indicating he served in the cavalry.  Next to him stand two really cute little mulatto children with bows in their hair, undoubtedly the veteran’s grandchildren. He reassuringly touches the hand of the younger child.  The mixed race of the lad and lass raise the question of whether the soldier’s son married a white woman or whether his daughter married a white man. I would guess the latter.  Grandpa looks proud and loving regardless of the race issue which certainly would have been scandalous in the white community at that time.   The photographer stamp on lower front is Goodman & Spanger of Mt. Pleasant, PA, which is in Westmoreland County in western Pennsylvania.  It might be possible to access membership rolls of some of the G.A.R. posts in the county and isolate soldiers with service in the USCT or find him in a town history.  The sergeant’s chevrons were added by the photographer and likely reflect his wartime rank:   He has a strong and confident presence. His story would certainly be an interesting one to learn.  A very scarce image and one with a lot of social history attached to it.  $1,150.00 sold

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17-03-13...HIGH FINISH SMITH AND WESSON NUMBER 2... A very pretty S&W Number 2, with a very low serial number: 1586. Excellent rosewood grips, and smooth metal with full coverage of a thin blue on barrel, frame and cylinder showing just some lighter metal on the edges. Crisp barrel address and cylinder patent stamps. These rimfire revolvers were very popular sidearms during the war because of their self-contained, resilient cartridges, and remained popular with western travelers and frontier types. This is one of the more attractive S&W No. 2 revolvers I have had in recent years and is priced significantly under guns in similar condition in other dealers’ hands. I don’t even need to go into what you might have to pay in a tourist mecca shop. A gift at $1,250.00

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17-03-14...WOUNDED AT KENNESAW MOUNTAIN SOLDIER’S BULLSEYE CANTEEN WITH WONDERFUL FOLK ART PAINTED SCENE... One of the best canteens I have owned. Veterans cherished their canteens not only as basic survival tools during the war and frequently decorated them and hung them up at home as mementos of service. In this case the veteran decorated it, or had it decorated, with a well done wartime camp scene. The canteen is a regulation bullseye pattern with its original wartime cover. A leather shoulder strap was added at some point either to let the veteran actually wear it to a gathering or to hang it on his parlor wall. The back of the canteen was simply painted yellowish white. The face was decorated with a central camp scene of a soldier seated inside a tent reading a paper, with an American flag planted just to the left of the open tent flap. A small camp stool sits outside the tent. Trees surround the tent and the upper left shows a light blue sky. The central scene is surrounded by concentric circles of blue sky that follow the corrugated channels of the canteen. Below the scene on the lower right is the soldier’s name: “Simon Burger/ 102nd Regiment / Ill. Infantry.” Burger was 28 years old and a resident of North Henderson, Illinois, when he enlisted on 8/6/1862 and mustered in as a private on 9/2/62 in Co. A of the 102nd Illinois. On 6/14/64 he suffered a severe wound in the right shoulder. He was not discharged for wounds until 12/17/64, indicating he likely spent a full six months in hospitals before being judged well enough to go home. The regiment served in the Army of Ohio and Army of the Cumberland, seeing its first action during the Atlanta Campaign. The regiment took part in the battles of Dalton, Resaca, Cassville, Dallas, New Hope Church and Burnt Hickory before Kennesaw Mountain, losing 51 men killed and mortally wounded during their service. A very nice and very personal soldier’s relic and reminder of his service. $1650.00 sold

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17-03-15...MODEL 1860 COLT ARMY REVOLVER... Probably the most recognizable Civil War handgun, the Colt 1860 packed a .44 caliber punch and was the standard sidearm for US cavalry.   This is a darn nice example, with  pewter gray patina on the smooth metal and with sharp grips showing a faint inspector cartouche on the lower right.  Tight wood to metal fit. Serial number 81409, giving it an 1862 manufacture date, and making it a candidate for just about all the major cavalry actions of the war.  Crisp barrel address and visible cylinder patent stamps.  Some crustiness to the nipples from firing, but they are not battered down. Mechanically very good. A very pleasing uniform color overall mixing thin plum brown with pewter gray and even some faint mottled case color on the frame.  The lever catch has been repaired.  The front sight has been reshaped.  The wedge is a home made replacement.  The screwhead slots show some wear. Some minor scratches to the grips and a small check or two with a small chip to the forward right butt.  A very nice example at a very fair price in this day and age when a rusty brown barn find at an auction will bring a small fortune.   $1,295.00 sold

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17-03-16...CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH MINER’S SCALES... There seemed no better way to get rich quick in 1849 than to head for the diggings in California. And, of course, every prospector needed a set of scales to measure his new found wealth in gold dust. We see lots of pharmacy scales masquerading as gold scales, but here is a dead real set made and marketed for that dream. Two small brass trays are suspended from a balance bar by small chains. A small bar and hook at top enables the newly rich to hang the scales from a convenient branch, tent pole or beer tap. The painted iron case is the best part. Painted blue and trimmed out with a gold border and spread winged American eagle, the case has in large gold letters around the upper and lower edge of the lid: “MINERS IMPROVED GOLD SCALES / MANUFACTURED EXPRESSLY FOR CALIFORNIA” There is rubbing and paint loss to case, as should be expected, but the lettering is clear with just some wear to the letters at the very left. The scales are complete and functional, just lacking the small brass weights that would counterbalance all that heavy gold dust. A rare survivor that would top notch in a western display of Bowie knives, ’49 pocket revolvers and pepperboxes. $195.00 sold

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17-03-17... BUTTERFIELD ALTERED 1803 HARPERS FERRY 1803 RIFLE DATED 1814 ... Rifle shortages in the War of 1812 mandated the return to production of the 1803 pattern rifle in 1814. This is one of those first year of production rifles made in time for the end of the war with clear lock plate markings: Harpers Ferry 1814 behind the hammer and a Harpers Ferry eagle forward of the hammer. At the beginning of the Civil War the state of Pennsylvania contracted with various Philadelphia area arms makers to alter to percussion old military flintlock rifles in its hands. This 1814 dated Harpers Ferry rifle shows the typical Butterfield alteration, cutting off the breech and mounting a chambered percussion breech with a clean-out screw. In this case our rifle shows evidence of having been shot in the mid 20th century. The clean-out screw in the bolster requires an allen wrench and the nipple is a modern replacement. Otherwise all the parts are original. The lockplate show some roughness, but the Harpers Ferry 1814 stamp is clearly visible at rear, as it the US eagle at center. The 36 inch, 58 caliber barrel is generally smooth with a mix of gray and dark spots and scattered shallow pitting at the breech and muzzle. The ramrod is the all steel trumpet style. The stock is VG with nice butt flats and tight fit to the metal. Some handling marks opposite the lock and a hairline that extends back to the upper screw. The assembly number “2” is stamped on a number of parts- used to keep them together during the conversion process. An historic War of 1812 rifle altered for potential use at the beginning of the Civil War. One of the most handsome of all US martial shoulder arms. $1,950.00

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17-03-18... REVOLUTIONARY WAR FRENCH 1763 PATTERN FLINTLOCK PISTOL / AMERICAN STOCK ?:  ... French 1763 cavalry pistol. .75 caliber. The lock and barrel markings are hard to make out, but the flat lock plate and hammer date it to 1773 or earlier and I think the lock plate may read “Ste. Etienne,” one of the three large French arsenals. There is an indecipherable 2 character stamp on the left breech. These pistols were imported into the US for the Revolution, and many remained here. This one shows definite signs of seeing service here as the wood is a restock from the period of use, and utilizes a screw to retain the large double barrel band. I have a hard time believing the French would have re-stocked it with a retaining screw through the band instead of their standard spring. My bet is that it is an American restock. Another bit of evidence to support my conjecture is that an iron side escutcheon plate was used. The rest of the original French brass furniture was retained. Overall the steel is gun metal gray, with scattered dark spots and a small bit of rust near the breech and touch hole. This is original flintlock configuration and proper for Revolutionary War through 1812. $1,395.00 sold

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17-03-19...1827 PATTERN U.S. MARINE CORPS SERGEANT’S SWORD...Highly desirable and very handsome. This pattern remained unrecognized for many years until Norm Flayderman turned up some pattern books showing it along with two solid brass hilted shorter eagle pommels. The shorter ones were identified as USMC musician and “boy musician” swords and this one as the Sergeant’s sword. Identifying sergeants with a sword as badge of rank was an old tradition and this pattern seems to have been adopted in 1827 at the same time Mameluke hilt swords were specified for officers. They were still being issued as late as 1859. Widmann seems to have been the sole supplier until Horstmann absorbed Widmann’s business in 1848 and continued to produce them with just minor changes. This is a nice Horstmann marked example with a mellow patina to the brass hilt and full leather wrapped grip, though without wire. The Horstmann marking is the early raised lettering in a channel form. The blade is smooth with good point and edge, showing a dull silver in tone with gray areas mixed in. The engraved martial motifs on either side of the blade are visible, but the blades were not profusely etched. This is a scarce regulation US Marine Corps NCO sword dating to the pre-war USMC. $1,150.00

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17-01-20... ALLEN & WHEELOCK LIPFIRE ARMY WITH SCARCE FLARED GRIP...One of my favorite American pistols: the Allen and Wheelock Army Model Center Hammer Lipfire or “2nd Model” Lipfire revolver.   Only about 250 of these were manufactured in the early 1860’s until Smith and Wesson managed to infringe on the patent.   .44 caliber and six-shot, this revolver has the scarcer of two grip forms, with the grip flaring out noticeably toward the bottom and is the first pattern, with the loading gate hinged at the top.  A nice, thin, even faded gray patina on the steel.   Crisp patent stamps on the left flat of the octagon portion of the barrel. Very good grips with tight fit to the metal.  The trigger guard actuates the ejector.  The split cylinder pin is an old replacement for the original button-head pin.  Various parts bear a number “14,” which is an assembly batch number.  I know of no military contracts but it is usually classified as a secondary martial arm.  An extremely scarce Civil War cavalry weapon and still very affordable.  $1,395.00

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17-03-21...FULL PACK OF GALLAGHER CARBINE CARTRIDGES: ... Some 12,000 percussion Gallagher carbines made during the war and they were carried by several Ohio cavalry units, the 3rd West Virginia, 13th Tennessee and others. Here’s a nice condition cartridge pack that would display great alongside one of these carbines. Boldly printed in black is, “10 Poultney’s Metallic Cartridges Patented December 15th, 1862, 12 caps, for Gallagher’s breech-loading carbine 50/100 caliber.” The pack is solid, has string tie, and shows off wonderfully with fully legible printing.  $795.00 sold

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17-03-22...HIGH FINISH NATIONAL ARMS COMPANY REVOLVER IN SILVER FINISH:... These .32 caliber revolvers fired a teat-fire cartridge developed by David Moore and David Williamson in an effort to get around the White patents on bored through cylinders.   Silver plated overall.  80% on frame.  Vestiges of thin silver on the barrel and cylinder with some flaked areas.  Has nice floral engraving and most of the brass.   Birdshead grips with good finish and tight fit to the metal. Still some blue on the buttcap screw.   Hooked extractor mounted on the right side of the frame.  One of the more successful competitors to Smith and Wesson according to Flayderman, about 30,000 of these were made from 1864 to 1870.  This one is serial number 23901, making it a good early western pocket traveler’s and card-player’s gun that would look impressive on the green felt of a faro table.  Super condition.  $575.00 sold

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17-03-23...Attic Condition 1863 Dated Enfield Rifle Musket:... This came in on behalf of a small town minister and has not been on the market previously.   It is the classic third model P-1853 Tower Enfield rifle musket as carried by Confederate and Union soldiers alike during the Civil War. This is NRA “very good”... 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect.  There is good rifling in the bore but the bore is dirty. A period regimental or rack number “33” is deeply stamped on the offside between the lockplate screws. The date of 1863 is important. This is a late date to find on an Enfield.  Most we see are 1861 and 1862.   By 1863 and 1864 the Union army was no longer importing them as northern factories were in full swing.  The Confederates kept trying to get them through the blockade.  In my opinion most 1863 dated examples are Confederate and all 1864 dated examples are CS intended. This hypothesis is not etched in granite, but I am personally convinced such is the case.   Light salt and pepper pitting.  Mechanically VG.   This is a really appealing Enfield that absolutely carried during the Civil War... quite possibly by a Confederate but equally possible by a Yankee. A very affordable Civil War Enfield... $1,295.00 sold

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17-03-24... FIRST MODEL MERRILL CARBINE... These breechloading, .54 caliber, Baltimore-made carbines were pretty popular, being issued to the 1st, 5th, 18th NY cavalry; the 11th, 17th, 18th Pennsylvania, and other units.   Flayderman says that some 14,495 were produced during the war.  Many were produced before the war and were used by Virginia confederates.  I have owned two 100% documented Merrill’s carried by Virginia Confederate troopers  A hinged loading arm raises up on top and draws back a plunger allowing insertion of a cartridge and rams it tightly home when closed.  This one is serial number 9942 and follows Merrill’s first type in having a brass patchbox and serial number at rear of lockplate,  but with a beveled lockplate and second-type button head latch on the breech lever.  Clear Merrill patent stamps on the lockplate; visible but slightly rubbed on top of the lever. The lockplate shows faded mottled case colors.  Some chips out of the forward edge of the lock platform and some handling dings on the offside under the sling ring bar and two dings just aft of the barrel band on the right. Wood has a tight fit to the metal. Barrel shows a dull, pewter gray.   The loading assembly shows some rubbing to the patent stamp and one small patch of shallow pitting, but muted, but visible, case colors. Nice mellow patina to the brass mounts. This has the first pattern brass patch box as well.  A classic Civil War cavalry carbine with nice, sleek lines and good looking brass mounts.  Perfect for display with US or CS effects.  $2,150.00

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17-03-51.. ... HIGHLY DESIRABLE BRASS MOUNTED PATCH BOX NEW MODEL 1859 SHARPS CARBINE... A strong condition example of a very scarce Sharps.  The brass mounted 1859 New Model Sharps is not only a very attractive carbine, but one with a strong Confederate association.  Numbering of the series started in the 30,000 range and used brass mounts for the first 6,000 or so, including a brass patch box.   Georgia bought some 1,600 of these directly from Sharps and another 400 on the commercial market,  giving this gun a “one-in-three chance”  of having been carried by a Georgia trooper during the war.   This shows use but no abuse.  It is much better than most we see.   The manufacture and patent markings are clear with just a tad of rubbing on the barrel model designation and maker address.  The sling bar and ring are firmly in place.  There are some generous hints of case on both sides of the frame,  and the barrel is a beautiful thin plum brown patina.  Both sights are in place.  The front sight has had a hood added and there is a drilled hole in the receiver tang for an added lolly pop tang sight, which is not present. The previous owner said he gave that away to another collector who really wanted it.   This one did some precision shooting during its lifetime.    The mechanism and bore are excellent. The wood is tightly fitted to the metal.  The forearm shows some damage at left rear next to the receiver,  some scattered wear marks on the butt flats,  and a couple of light gouges on the upper left next to the butt plate.  The hammer shows some remnants of case.   One of the best looking Civil War carbines, a classic Sharps, and one with strong southern associations as well.   $4,350.00

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17-03-52...16-11-37 ...1855 2-Band Harpers Ferry Rifle Dated 1859: THE YEAR OF JOHN BROWN’S RAID...Harpers Ferry always has a cachet as the “southern arsenal,” and the 1855 rifles produced there have always been highly sought, and always been very scarce. They are perhaps 50 times rarer than the scarce 1855 muskets produced at both national arsenals. These 2-band rifles were made only in Virginia at Harpers Ferry. Great numbers were seized by Confederates when they took the arsenal in 1861 and the machinery used to produce them was moved south to manufacture the Fayetteville rifle. This one has matching 1859 lock and barrel dates, with clear V/P/eagle barrel proofs, Harpers Ferry style eagle on the primer door, and a crisp “U.S. / Harpers Ferry stamp on the forward part of the plate. Needless to say, that’s a pretty historic year. This gun was probably in arsenal racks when John Brown tried to seize the arsenal and use its weaponry to arm a slave uprising. The iron patch box is present and opens crisply. The brass nose cap has a nice, undisturbed aged patina. There is a little bit of light salt-and-pepper firing corrosion at the breech, but the metal overall is a smooth brown. The correct short range rear sight with stepped base is present. The front sight and bayonet lug for the saber bayonet are in place. All bands, springs and swivels are there. The rod is the correct rod but is a modern made replacement. The relined bore is excellent. An NSSA skirmisher used this rare rifle in competition after having Hoyt or similar outfit line and re-rifle the bore for precision shooting. The barrel is totally original with original marks. The bore was simply lined and re-rifled thirty to fifty years ago. The wood is dark brown and very good, with just some slight rounding to the edges of the lock apron. The lock plate is a faded pewter gray with some lighter gray showing along the front edge next to the primer door. This is a very nice example of an incredibly scarce, good-looking, key U.S. military shoulder arm produced on the eve of the Civil War, and one that witnessed a key opening event of the conflict.... $5,500.00

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17-03-53 ...REMINGTON-RIDER POCKET REVOLVER ...These double-action .31 caliber percussion revolvers were made by Joseph Rider of Newark, Ohio, on contract with Remington before he moved to Ilion, NY, and became part of the company.  Total production was only about 2,000 guns between 1860 and 1873, and that number is split between the percussion and cartridge versions of the arm.  Ours is serial number 518.  The grips are the standard hard-rubber grips and are in excellent condition, which is a real plus.  The original blue finish has now turned plum brown overall, showing some case color on the frame and thinning out to mixed brown and pewter tone near the muzzle.  The top barrel flat has some heavy pitting at the beginning of the two-line barrel address, and smaller areas of pitting toward the cylinder, but the patent dates and most of the address are visible.  A few nicks in the barrel edges show the gun saw some use and there is some light pitting on the bottom flat as well.  That having been said, this is still a scarce gun and desirable as one of the first double action revolvers made in any quantity in the U.S.  Plus, you have to love those grips!  A nice, American made pocket pistol from the early days of such guns.  $550.00 sold

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17-03-54.... WHITNEYVILLE RIFLE MUSKET... A wonderful example of Yankee Ingenuity “Whitney Style”. Whitney had a sort of “spaghetti against the wall” approach to arms supplying. His muskets often used odd parts he gleaned from a variety of sources, including the US Arsenals. This musket is a Springfield M1863 which has been married to a Whitneyville M1861 lock, with the M1861 hammer severely canted to properly strike the nipple. I have no idea whether Whitney or another arms seller sold this “good and serviceable”… I will leave that bit of detective work for you. When Whitney obtained a second US contract in October, 1863, for 15,000 1861 pattern rifle muskets, his first guns had been sitting around from the earlier contract and the remainder, true to form, show a number of variations. This is a good example of the second pattern of lockplate markings he used, a more conventional eagle and US with “Whitneyville” forward of the hammer and a vertical 1864 date at the rear. The barrel, however, shows an 1863 type bolster with no clean-out screw and stamped with an eagle, and the bands are the round 1863 style. These parts appear to be ex Springfield Arsenal. Metal shows some light peppering near the breech and on the bolster from firing, but is generally smooth and light silver-gray in tone. The lockplate shows a mix of gray and pewter that are the remains of case. The lock markings are crisp, though the bolster eagle shows peppering and the tip of the hammer is a little crusty. Sights, bands, springs and swivels in place. No rod. Short range sight leaf is replaced.  Sharp V/P/eagle barrel proofs. Wood is very good. Very slight rounding and a few light wear marks. No significant dents or divots. A little crustiness to the buttplate heel from standing upright on a floor. A classic Civil War long arm and from a famous American gunmaker who is a collecting field unto himself... $1,050.00

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17-03-55 ...A TRUE MATCHED PAIR OF FINE CONDITION COLT POCKET REVOLVERS ...A genuine matching pair of Colt pocket revolvers. Serial numbers 312636 and 312811. Both manufactured within a day or two of each other in 1869, with matching fine condition and patina, and less than 200 numbers apart. Matching near perfect walnut grips on both rate excellent plus. Both grips have the desirable Henry rifle type varnished red-orange color and tone. Medium patina on the brass on each gun, a tad darker on 811. Matching faded blue on both 4 inch barrels and matching traces of case color on both frames. The cylinder on 811 shows a bit more brown and slightly less crisp scene and marks, but both are nicely visible. 636 also shows a slightly sharper barrel address, so it looks like 811 was the pistol the owner carried more. Probably the “right hand gun”. These would look great cased together if you happen to know where an empty 2-gun casing can be found, or if you want to make or buy a custom box, that would be neat. Or… if you have a pair of period holsters and a belt, (or buy same at the next antique arms show), that would really make a heck of a cowboy display with these great old matched Colts. A very handsome, true matched pair of very early western Colt pockets. $3,400.00

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17-03-56 ...ALLEN AND WHEELOCK LONG BARREL SIDE HAMMER REVOLVER ...Here’s our second A & W side hammer. This one has a 3 ¾ inch barrel and is 7 ½ inches overall. It is six shot and .32 rimfire as above. The 1858 two-line patent stamp on the left flat is crisp and the July 3, 1860 stamp on the left frame forward of the cylinder is light, but legible. As with our first one, the metal is a mix of dull silver and gray, though with more brown. The metal is smooth overall with a few light dots on the right frame forward of the cylinder. The cylinder is a bit dark, but the scene is visible. The brass front sight is mortised, and the cylinder pin has a cylindrical head and latch below as seen on the .22 caliber versions. The grips are excellent. The barrel shows number 452, but these are batch numbers rather than serial numbers for the whole manufacturing run. All original and mechanically fine. These are interesting pistols with lots of variations for the collector. $525.00

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17-03-57... SNY BUCKLE AND BELT ... Early war puppy-paw style stud back SNY plate. These were issued early in the war to some of the New York volunteer regiments when states still had charge of recruiting and did much of the equipping of their regiments. Medium patina with a little of the original gilt showing around the edges of the "Y." Nice bridle leather belt with flat C-clasp brass retainer or keeper. One small piece of the belt broke out above a fastening hole and was glued back in place by the previous owner. This could be more neatly done and better disguised, but does the trick and the belt is solid. These plates are fairly tough to find these days and should not be confused with the arrow-back versions that seem to date to 1863 and later and were for the most part restricted to national guard troops within the state. This is the classic early stud-back plate circa 1861. A good example of an early war volunteer plate ... noco ... $850.00 sold

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17-03-58 ... 1865 DATED AMES LIGHT CAVALRY SABER ... Good condition light cavalry saber by Ames. Light but legible Ames stamp at the ricasso with the US, date, and inspector stamp on the opposite side. Dull silver gray blade with some darker gray age spots, but a good edge and point. Grip has its original black leather wrap and original twisted brass binding wire. Nice mellow patina to the brass. Made in time for some of the large cavalry raids at the end of the war and also for the early Indian Wars on the plains, where cavalry played so large a part. Displays great. The scabbard with this is the 1906 pattern and I am knocking the price down accordingly. Many Civil War cavalry sabers were brought out of storage, cleaned and updated for issue when the army revived the 1860 style after the turn of the 20th century. The key point for the collector is to pay attention to the spacing of the carrying rings. Affordably priced at ... cjj ... $425.00 sold

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17-03-59 ... Artillery Officer's Saber Made for US Market Likely S&K ... An interesting artillery officer's saber that is unmarked but shares characteristics with Roby and S&K versions.  Artillery officer's sabers are scarce because of the small number of officers in that branch of service.  Examples made by Ames, if you can find one,  cost the price of a new Chrysler 200.  Interestingly the 1841 regulations recognized this pattern for use by ordnance officers and "mounted officers artillery and infantry," i.e., light artillery officers of all ranks and infantry officers holding field and staff rank.  This changed in the 1851 regulations where the pattern was designated exclusively for artillery commissioned officers.  This example conforms to the Thillman Type-2 with a conventional scabbard with articulated throat.  It is completely unmarked other than a small stamp on the ricasso.  The grip is leather wrapped with standard twisted wire binding.  The leaf design on the pommel and on the knuckle guard match up with those of Roby as well as Schnitzler and Kirschbaum  (S&K) products.  The blade is plain, unetched, with a good edge and light silver in color with some bright showing through overall.  The scabbard is a pewter gray with some darker gray areas, but no dings or dents.  The grip is formed by turned wood and the scabbard throat is soldered rather than riveted, both American characteristics. S&K supplied hilts to other makers according to Thillman... and it appears that this hilt is one of those.   This sword was likely assembled in the US by a military goods dealer utilizing imported and American elements.   It is a very scarce regulation sword in extremely good condition and suitable for any edged weapons collection, or an artillery display from the Mexican War through the Civil War.    Wonderful example ... noco ... $1,250.00 sold

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17-03-27...82nd INDIANA IDENTIFIED POCKET NEW TESTAMENT... Soldier inscribed, American Bible Society New Testament, dated, New York 1860. The flyleaf is inscribed in ink and the last name is difficult to decipher, but it seems to read: “James Eller / 82 Ind Vols / Bought at / Murfreesboro / Tenn/ Jan 13th /63 / Price 10” It is possible I have the last name wrong, but the regiment is clear enough. The likeliest candidate is James H. Eller from White Hall, Indiana, who enlisted and mustered into Co. I of the 82nd Indiana as a wagoner on 8/27/62 and was discharged 1/12/63 after being injured by a mule while the regiment was in Murfreesboro. A family association history says he was “an ardent Christian and hard worker in the Methodist Church,”.  Solid condition,  with some wear and fraying from actually being carried. The 82nd Indiana had a good combat record in the Army of the Ohio and Army of the Cumberland with 3 officers and 65 enlistedmen killed or mortally wounded during its service.   $235.00 sold

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