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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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Pictured above are our recent additions to Civil War Antiques only a few feet from the front door ... a mama robin and her 4 baby robins.
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14-06-41 ... Wonderful Mexican War Dated Springfield Model 1842 Musket with RARE crisp "ESA" Cartouche on the Stock: I have owned dozens of model '42 muskets over the years.  Many were not cartouched on the stocks in any fashion, some had faint cartouches that were indecipherable, and very few had legible cartouches .This is the first "ESA" cartouched '42 that I recall owning. This musket is quite RARE because we can clearly see an "ESA" in the wood. "ESA" is Erskine S. Allin, He was master armorer at the Springfield Armory from 1853 to 1878, the period of the 1855 patterns, 1861 patterns, 1863 patterns, and most famously his own inventions ... the Trapdoor Springfield rifles and carbines. His monogram cartouche on a gun stock is proof positive that the wood came out of the Springfield Arsenal during his tenure.   We almost NEVER see an "ESA" cartouche on a Model 1842 because that model was becoming obsolete by the time Allin took the position as Master Armorer.   What makes this '42 so intriguing is that the Civil War style "ESA" cartouche shows us the gun was restocked at the Springfield Arsenal. You can bet your bottom dollar it was stocked circa 1861 for use in the Civil War. The gun was made in 1847. "ESA" did not become Master Armorer until 1853. His cartouche does not become common until 1860. Thus we can be pretty darn sure this Mexican War era musket was refurbished at Springfield and sent out again in the early days of the Civil War. Overall V.G. condition. 100% original*, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. *Hammer screw appears to be replaced, but replaced screws do not constitute a replacement "part".  Lock markings are all legible including 1847 date, eagle, and US SPRINGFIELD. Barrel proofs are legible. Barrel tang date not so much. Initials "AC" carved into stock. Sub inspector's initials stamped near trigger guard tang SRC or SRG. Wood edges are quite strong. Original trumpet-head ramrod. Some dirt is in the rod channel. Shows use but not abuse. Both sling swivels intact. A key piece for a Springfield collection showing the Civil War restock. I will wager you cannot find another so marked currently on the market ... $1,450.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-42 ... Super Fine 1850 Foot Officer's Sword by Ames / Near Mint Blade: The regulation Civil War infantry officer’s sword and scabbard as carried by combat Lieutenants and Captains on the line. Blade 30½” long, 1” wide, and has a stopped wide fuller. Blade is near mint with 98% of the original factory frosty luster. Standard Ames etching  floral and vines, script “U S.” , panoply of arms, eagle, etc. Obverse signed “Ames Mfg. Co / Chicopee / Mass.”. No edge nicks. Excellent guard, excellent grip, excellent light patina with hints of gilt on all brass, intact bumper pad... all super. The only flaw with this superb sword is that a previous owner broke the leather scabbard in half through careless handling. I have had this professionally repaired. The result is excellent. The repair is visible, but not very noticeable. It is a solid repair so the leather can again be carefully held horizontally should anyone be foolish enough to want to hold it horizontally. (That's what got it damaged the first time!) If the previous owner had not broken the leather, this sword would fetch $3000 or more in a New York minute. I bought it from the last owner as he did not want to look at it any more due to the "accident". I bought it for less than he paid for it. Priced here at ... $1,850.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-43 ... Model 1881 Anson Mills Web Cartridge Belt with cast US "H" Buckle: Superb condition in all respects. Loops are for 45/70 Springfield cartridges. All markings are crisp and legible. Owner name ? unit ? stenciled inside belt. Perfect for Indian War or Spanish American War display ... $375.00 SOLD xbbez

 

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14-06-44 ... Indian Wars M1876 Linen Prairie Belt in Excellent+ Condition, w/ 1879 Upgrade - Watervliet Arsenal Markings & A.R. Smith Inspection Stamp: Very Scarce Indian Wars M1876 Linen Prairie Belt (un cut) with 1879 modification of addition of 3 brass loops.  Exc Cond. Watervliet Arsenal marked and A.R. Smith Inspected. Superb find for display with early Indian War US Springfield carbine before adoption of the Mills woven belt in 1880. Excellent Overall Condition. Full length, unaltered. Priced well below my competition ... $695.00  

 

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14-06-45 ... Double Decker 45/70 Cartridge Belt: Rare Anson Mills Double Decker Web Cartridge Belt: Very few of these double decker belts with suspenders survive today. These can be found in 6mm and also 45/70 as we have here. These were issued with the Remington Lee rifles, and the 6mm types with the Lee Navy rifles. Condition is good showing wear. Some slight tearing where the heavy brass closure hooks attach to the web material. Some crackling to the thick leather reinforcement pieces designed to be the female receptacle to the male brass hook. Small Anson Mills makers plaque present on one belt. Rarest part is the suspenders. These are worn but solid. Back in 1909 Francis Bannerman had some of these in his catalogs. I will wager there isn't another of these belts on the market this year ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-46 ... Freshly Found Confederate Leech & Ridgon Navy Cutlass: I personally obtained this fresh out of a house in western Pennsylvania. What makes this weapon so wonderful is the presence of the original brass mounted leather scabbard. Solid cast brass handle. Ribbed brass guard. Nicely patinated steel blade. Brass mounted leather scabbard. Though all known specimens are unmarked, the cast grip and distinctive scabbard mount are quite obviously the product of Leech and Rigdon or Thomas Leech. Condition is attic fine. Quillon is severely bent (see photo). Drag on sheath is gone. Otherwise a superb specimen. 26.5 inches overall 21+ inch blade. I recently had a rare Leech & Rigdon Bowie knife incorporating the same handle and scabbard mount. A very desirable Confederate edged weapon priced well below my competition ... $3,975.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-47 ... Belt, Buckle and Cap box Set complete with caps!: We don’t find these nice harness leather sets much any more. The pictures will tell the story. Black harness leather regulation belt, US oval arrow hook buckle, and regulation cap box. The belt is complete with the brass adjuster and very legible Nece makers stamp and also a vivid Inspector’s cartouche. Some slight loss of finish on the outer flap of the cap box… very little loss on the belt… overall fine. Leather solid and flexible. Buckle is very attractive. All markings strong and legible. Neat part is that there are still original percussion caps in the cap box. About five times nicer than most we see on the market. Would bring more if I sold each item separately ... $650.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-48 ... HIGHLY DESIRABLE AND DISTINCTIVE SLOCUM SLIDING CHAMBER REVOLVER. These Slocom revolvers are among the most unusual designs from the Civil War. This revolver was manufactured circa 1863-4. .32 caliber, 5-shot cylinder, 3-inch barrel. Each chamber is an individual unit that manually slides forward for loading and ejecting the rim fire cartridge. Frame is made of brass with silver plating with a scroll design. Barrel is nicely marked on top “B.A. CO. PATENTED APRIL 14, 1863.”. Overall very good condition. 100% original 100% complete and mechanically perfect. The Slocum revolvers were a handy pocket-size pistol perfect for use as last-ditch self-defense weapons. The sliding chambers are an ingenious device. In the era of Smith & Wesson suing everyone for infringements on their Rollin White bored through cylinder, this design certainly circumvented the Smith & Wesson patent. NRA very good condition ... $765.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-49 ... Battlefield recovered eagle breastplate: an excellent circular eagle shoulder belt plate found in the late 20th century with a metal detector. fine untouched age patina on the face and both iron wire loops intact on the back. These were once common now you might spend 100 hours or more searching for one with your metal detector ... $185.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-50 ... Cavalry Insignia: Original Civil War enlisted cavalry insignia: A fine original set of stamped brass enlisted insignia. Complete with all four brass wire loops on the reverse side. Some slight bends to the brass otherwise fine. These are the real deal, not a set of restrikes so commonly seen on the market ... $235.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-51 ... ... Stamped brass engineers insignia. Non-dug, classic stamped brass castle as worn on the shako and model 1858 US Army dress hat. Ours measures 1 11/16 inches wide. According to The Encyclopedia of United States Army Insignia and Uniforms: QUOTE "Before the Civil War the width was 1 3/8" until a slight change during the Civil War made the insignia 1 1/2" wide. Such a slight change may have been the result of a change by the U.S. Quartermaster Department from one supplier to another (1 11/16" wide)" ... END QUOTE Retains one of the original attaching loops on the back. Believe it or not these trinkets cost the government an incredible 35 cents during the Civil War. Sounds like typical government waste to me. A combat soldier earned less than 50 cents a day, and here the government is spending nearly that much for a cracker jack toy ... 135.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-52 ... Original Civil War Union Army drinking cup. This is the so-called issue cup. Formed of heavy gauge tin with a rolled lip, the cup held 1 quart of liquid. The large handle is secured to the body with rivets as well as reinforcing wire loops which wrap around the lip of the cup. This example is about as nice as I've found in several years. The last user pierced a little hole in the back of the handle... Reason unknown to me ... $285.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-53 ... Fine CDV photograph cavalrymen and wife both darn short. Looking at the size of the saber in front of the trooper we realize just how diminutive in size husband-and-wife actually are. I would guess the little Mrs. is less than 5 feet tall. Soldier displays his forage Cap with crossed sabers insignia. His wife is dressed in her absolute best outfit. Fine condition overall. A previous owners price tag is penciled on the reverse. My price is better ... $85.00 SOLD

 

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Package for 58 Caliber Musket and Package for Burnside Carbine Ammunition: Here are a couple of very affordable display packages. Just the wrappers, no cartridges. Left package is St. Louis Arsenal 1864.  Label has wood-cut showing sectioned minie bullet and wording. “Rifle,Musket and Rifle .58 / 65 Grains Powder / minie ball image / St. Louis Arsenal / 1864”. Four packages of these were issued to each infantryman so he could fill his cartridge box with the well known “40 rounds”. Background image shows an original St. Louis arsenal crate that once contained 100 packs of these cartridges. Next package is standard Burnside Carbine pack with crisp clear label and 1856 patent date. If you were a cavalryman armed with a Burnside you were well familiar with these packs. Perfect to display and only a fraction the cost of a full package. An interesting note regarding the St. Louis cartridges… my good friend Hayes Otoupalik in Montana turned up TWO full crates of St. Louis 1864 cartridges many years ago. That is 200 packages… 2000 paper cartridges. Thanks to Hayes we have a decent supply of these circulating among collectors.  Back then we could buy a full pack from Hayes for just a little more than the price of an empty wrapper today. 

14-06-54 - A ...
Musket wrapper ... $275.00

14-06-54 - B ...
Burnside wrapper ... $225.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-55 ... This .32 rimfire pocket revolver was made by E. A. Prescott circa 1863-4. This is the short frame style with a 3.25 inch octagon barrel stamped in two lines on the top “E. A. PRESCOTT, WORCESTER, MASS. PAT’D OCT. 2, 1860.” The stamping is clear and strong. Frame is all brass with contoured side plate. Cylinder is six shot with locking notches at rear. Latch for the arbor is on the front of the frame. Wood grips are in excellent condition and have a flat bottom. 100% original 100% complete mechanically perfect. Overall very good condition. Has a serial number or batch number of 80 stamped on the bottom barrel flat. A scarce little Civil War SideArm ... $850.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-56 ... Very early flintlock project pistol. Although needing quite a bit of tender loving care this is one heck of an interesting early antique pistol. It was manufactured prior to 1750 in my opinion. I do not know if it was made in France or Germany or ??? but my guess is that it is Western European. It needs parts, it needs wood repair, but it is about 70% complete. The barrel is held in place with a great wide rubber band. I will let the photos do the talking for this gun. If you are handy with tools or if you have a competent gunsmith this gun can be restored into a decent antique arm. I obtained this piece and a large quantity of antique guns from a 50-year-old collection right here in Toledo ... $465.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-57 ... American Officer’s Sword – HONOUR AND MY COUNTRY: A solid US sword fashioned along the lines of a French mounted officer’s saber but having a blade of only 26 inches in length.  That length is more in line with Infantry  swords.  Some wear to the leather grip.  Grip wire intact.  Three branch brass guard.  Blade is steel grey with American eagle, panoply of arms, E Pluribus Unum, and motto “HONOUR AND MY COUNTRY”.  This motto garnered favour around the War of 1812 and continued in use for a couple more decades.  I feel this weapon is likely after 1812 but well before the Seminole Indian War.  A great early American edged weapon ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-58 ... Inscribed Combat Hero's Bowie Knife 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry: Inscription "Jos. P. Brinton Phila" on escutcheon plate on the grip, he was the Lieut. Colonel of the 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry with a SUPERB war record. 7 1/2" blade, just under a foot in overall length. Made by George Wostenholm - "The Real I*XL Knife" above the firm name. Housed in the original sheath. Joseph P. Brinton has a wonderful history as an officer in the 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry serving throughout the war. Here is what civilwardata has to say about him ... Residence Philadelphia PA; 25 years old. Enlisted on 10/28/1861 at Philadelphia, PA as a Major. On 12/31/1861 he was commissioned into Field & Staff PA 2nd Cavalry He was discharged on 2/28/1862*** *This date is in error HE WAS DISCHARGED 1865. See below. Detailed 1/27/1864 Harrisburg, PA (Detail for recruiting service) Promotions: * Lt Colonel 3/1/1862 * Colonel 8/1/1864 by Brevet.

Here is a synopsis of the unit history: Regiment raised in the fall of 1861, many of the members coming from the city of Philadelphia. Seven companies left for Baltimore on April 5, 1862, followed by the remaining companies on the 14th. June 27, 1862 moved to Cloud's mills where it was assigned to Cooke's brigade, under Gen. Sturgis. Aug. 5, it joined Gen. Pope's army and was assigned to Buford's brigade. Brisk skirmish with the enemy on the 7th. one squadron engaged at the second battle of Bull Run attached to Gen. Kearny's command. On the night of the 30th it held the stone bridge on the Centerville road. Later it moved in pursuit of Stuart,'s cavalry as far as Warrenton, losing 2 killed and 10 wounded on the expedition. On the 10th of September 1862 it moved to the neighborhood of Fort Blenker. General Buford was now appointed on M'Clellan's Staff, and Colonel Price succeeded to the command of the brigade. On the 17th a detachment of the regiment, under command of Lieutenant Colonel Brinton, moved in search of General Ewell and his body-guard, one hundred strong, who were reported at Aldie. Passing along the Bull Bun Mountains, when near Aldie, dispositions were made to attack. Half of the force was dismounted, and a heavy advance guard thrown forward. Captain Brinton (brother of Joseph?) with a detachment was deployed to the left to intercept them on their retreat; but before the attack could be made, while groping in the darkness, Ewell heard of the approach and fled towards MIiddleburg. Two officers of his staff and three men of his guard were captured by Captain Brinton. The regiment next advanced with the entire corps, encountering the enemy at New Baltimore and Warrenton and was constantly engaged in scouting until Dec. 28, when it suffered a severe loss at the Occoquan, being surprised by a superior force under Wade Hampton. Its camp was captured and the regiment lost more than l00 killed, wounded and missing. It was actively engaged at Gettysburg in checking the great tide of stragglers to the rear and after the battle conducted 2,500 prisoners to Westminster. It moved in pursuit of Lee reaching Warrenton July 25, and in August and September was employed in frequent reconnoissances and as guard at Meade's headquarters. It was engaged at White Sulphur springs in October, was active at Beverly ford and Rappahannock crossing and again at Bealeton.

On October 24th 1863 Colonel Brinton received orders to draw in the regiment to the infantry line, as the enemy was advancing in force to flank the position. Word soon came that the Seventeenth Pennsylvania had been captured, and that the enemy was rapidly following, which served to quicken the speed. When arrived within four miles of Warrenton, the brigade was found in line of battle with guns in position, and every precaution made for a determined fight. From this time on during the campaign it was constantly engaged in skirmishing and scouting, On the 29th of November 1863 the regiment, under command of Lieutenant Colonel Brinton, encountered the enemy at Parker's Store, and fought with determined bravery, losing thirty-five men killed and wounded, but handsomely repulsing him and inflicting heavy loss. In December it shared in the raid on Luray, and then went into winter quarters at Warrenton. During the winter its ranks were swelled by many recruits and many of the men reenlisted and received a veteran furlough. On the opening of the spring campaign it moved with the army of the Potomac; was active at the Wilderness and at Todd's tavern, shared in Gen. Sheridan's raid to sever Lee's communications with Richmond.

On the 7th of June 1864, under command of Lieutenant Colonel Brinton, it was sent, with two divisions of cavalry, around Lee's left, to destroy the Virginia Central Railroad in his rear, which it successfully accomplished. It crossed the Pamunkey, and broke the Fredericksburg Road at Chesterfield, and again struck the Central at Trevilian, where a sanguinary engagement occurred, in which the rebel General Rosser and Colonel M'Allister were killed. It suffered some loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners; but inflicted equal, if not greater loss upon the enemy. It assisted in the effort to cut the enemy's lines at Gordonsville, was active at St. Mary's Church, where it was commended for its gallantry, and after the raid it rejoined the army in front of Petersburg. It was active at the engagements of Deep Bottom, Charles City Cross roads' and Malvern hill, suffering considerable loss; On the 28th of February 1865, Lieutenant Colonel Brinton was honorably discharged. The regiment served a few more weeks and was heavily engaged at Five Forks, and was present at Lee's surrender. It took part in the grand review at Washington in May, 1865.

Inscribed Civil War Bowie Knives are rare in any form, a fine Wolstenholm with a super history that was carried by a bona fide cavalry hero is a true treasure ... $4,500.00

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14-06-59 ... Sixth Plate Tintype Yankee wearing 4-Button Blouse: Excellent seated portrait showing the standard issue Union Army fatigue blouse issued to all branches of the service. Full case ... $95.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-60 ... Extra Nice US Issue Union Army Buckle:  Standard issue, arrow hook, US oval waist belt plate as worn by virtually all Union infantrymen. Superb non-dug condition ... just the way Billy Yank brought it home 150 years ago! Try to find another at your local antique shop in town ... $235.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-61 ... Rare 2" Barrel Peanut Size Derringer: Matching assembly #s 16 on butt and trigger guard tang. Crisp "J.Deringer Phildela" and "War’t (warranted) Steel" markings on the barrel.  Note that the maker signed the gun “J. Deringer” ... this shows us that the gun is actually a period knock-off of Henry Deringer’s guns… as are most we encounter. Deringer spent a lot of time suing gun makers using his last name on their products. Woodwork and engraving are excellent. Previous owner polished the screw heads trying to make the gun more visually exciting. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Overall VG++ condition ... $985.00 SOLD

 

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Three CW Officer’s Bullion Sword Knots: These are the knots that were secured to the foot officer’s and staff swords during the Civil War. All three have their slides. 
14-06-62 ... A) near perfect condition showing only light wear ... $200.00 SOLD

14-06-62 ... B)
Nice knot and much wear and fraying on the bullion strap.  Still solid and usable ... $115.00 SOLD

14-06-62 ... C)
Overall excellent except for loss of bullion rope above the knot section ... $125.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-63 ... Very Nice Colt Special Model 1861 Contract Musket: While most contractors were instructed to manufacture M1861 Springfield pattern muskets, Colt and two other firms were allowed to make this "Special Model 1861" which is virtually identical to the Type-1 Model 1863 Springfield. It has rounded barrel bands secured by friction tightening screws. It has a straight ramrod, a flat bolster, and a serpentine hammer --- all features later found on the 1863 Springfields. This fine rifle-musket is in NRA "very good++" condition ... near fine. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect. All markings crisp and legible. Lock and barrel both dated 1864. The "4" on the barrel is worn but legible. Two crisp federal inspectors' cartouches are present on the left stock flat showing this was made under US Army contract. Excellent bore. Tight and solid. Much cheaper than we see at the large gun auctions. Very desirable with the Colt markings. The world's most collectible guns are Colts ... $2,350.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-64 ... Harpers Ferry Virginia Musket: A well used but totally honest Model 1816 conversion musket by Harpers Ferry.  All markings are legible.  Lock is dated 1833, barrel dated 1834.  Conversion cartouche visible on left stock flat.  Lacks the ramrod and internal lock parts so the hammer flops forward and backward at will.  Perfect as a wall hanger the way it stands, or for a hundred dollars or so in parts you can make it function again.  These Harpers Ferry muskets are always more desirable than Springfield examples due to the strong connection to Virginia and the Confederacy.  Nice old musket, and darn affordable ... $595.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-65 ... 34th Indiana Zouave Tintype: A fine crisp sixth plate tintype showing this Hoosier Yank in his distinctive 34th Indiana Zouave jacket. He is Christopher B. Porter of Huntington, Indiana (near Fort Wayne just west of here). Image is extra fine condition in a full leatherette case. Here is a short history of the unit… Recruited at Anderson… mustered in Sept. 16, 1861. It was in the siege of New Madrid and then moved to St. Meriweather's landing, where two 32-pounder siege guns were placed in position. The regiment was attacked by seven gunboats on the 16th but compelled them to withdraw. This battery cut off the retreat from Island No. 10, and led to its subsequent capture. It aided in the capture of Fort Pillow… joined Col. Fitch's command for the White River campaign, enaged the enemy at Aberdeen, the clearing of Yazoo pass, and the Vicksburg campaign. Also Port Gibson, making a charge and capturing 2 field pieces and 49 prisoners, with a loss of 49 in killed and wounded; It was at Champion's hill, where it captured the 46th Ala., with its colors and field officers, losing 79 men in killed and wounded, also siege of Vicksburg, the Teche expedition as far as Opelousas, Carrion Crow bayou, and was at New Iberia until Dec. 19. This regiment fought the last battle of the war near Brownsville,Texas May 13, 1865, where 250 of the regiment fought 500 mounted men, equipped with a 6-gun battery, driving them for 3 miles, when the enemy got his battery in good position and compelled the regiment to fall back. Its original strength was 1,011; gain by recruits, 357; reenlistments, 438; total, 1,806. Loss by death, 236; desertion, 44; unaccounted for, 15. This fine historical image is from the ages old “Miller Collection”… the brothers Dave and Dan Miller have collected and displayed their zouave images for over 30 years. Dan sold me this image in the Spring of this year 2014. A great historical tintype ... $365.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-66 ... Inscribed Heckman’s Star Brigade, 23rd Massachusetts Eighteenth Corps Badge. When I saw this badge I had to have it. Stan Phillips used a very similar Eighteenth Corps badge for the cover of his classic book on Civil War Corps Badges and this one is every bit as nice- in fact, I think a notch or two better. Beautifully engraved “cross with foliate sides” with a double “ric-rac” border, numerous curling caterpillar flourishes, and shaded five-pointed star at top. Across the center in script is, “Lieut. Jos. H. Baker / Co. G 23rd Regt.” and in the lower area amidst flourishes, “Mass. Vols.”

Baker was a 27 year-old cordwainer living in Beverly, Mass., when he enlisted at a private in the regiment on 8/2/1862. On 8/5/1862 he mustered into "G" Co. and re-enlisted on 12/2/1863. He made sergeant 11/9/64 and 2nd Lieutenant 6/2/65. Although not mustered in at that rank, he would have had the commission certainly been performing the duty. After the war he was a member of GAR Post # 89 (J. H. Chipman, Jr.) in Beverly, Mass., and died 1/7/1916.

The 23rd had been part of Burnside’s Coastal Expedition, fought in several engagements, and was stationed in New Bern, NC, when Baker joined it in the Fall of 1862. During the time Baker was with it they were in several expeditions and fights at Kingson, Whitehall, Little Washington, etc. At Whitehall they lost pretty heavily, 16 men were killed or mortally wounded. They moved up into Virginia in early 1864 and became part of the 18th Corps, which served in the Army of the James and the Army of the Potomac in Grant’s 1864 campaign, seeing action at Port Walthall Junction, Arrowfield Church, Drewry’s Bluff, and Cold Harbor, where they lost 10 killed and 39 wounded, and then in front of Petersburg before returning to North Carolina, where they fought their final engagement at Wise’s Forks in March, 1865, losing 3 killed and 10 wounded. They were musted out in Massachusetts in July, 1865.

This is a super badge. Very high quality, jeweler made, silver with a T-bar fastening pin on reverse. Many 18th Corps badges use triangles and stars in their designs along with the foliate cross. Some of these were because of various directives meant for restricted use to differentiate staff officers and the like, but which made their way into general use. In this case, I’d like to believe there is the possibility that Baker wanted the star motif used on his badge as a symbol of the 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 18th Corps, in which his regiment served. When they moved north into Virginia they were commanded by General Heckman, whose command was nicknamed “Heckman’s Star Brigade.” Whatever the reason for its use here, it helps make one world-class inscribed corps badge. It is the first corps badge I’ve obtained directly from the family in MANY years. $2,250.00

 

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14-06-67 ... Rarest of the Rare Hicks Rifleman’s Knife w/ Scabbard. Note: This knife is one of the elusive products manufactured by tool maker Andrew Hicks of Cleveland, Ohio during the first half of the 19th century. It is believed he made them for the U.S. Army in the 1840’s, and they are among the rarest of all American knives … less than 40 known to exist. This specimen surfaced in western New York and was carried during the Civil War. The knife has a 9 and 1/2 inch spear point blade with an oval brass guard, and rosewood grips bound with brass straps, one of which has “IXL” carved into it by the soldier who carried it (really cool). Our soldier no doubt liked the famed IXL markings he had seen on fancy English Bowie Knives and he decided to mark his Hicks knife the same way. The grips are fastened to the brass straps by twelve, flush ground, iron screws. The brass pommel cap was removed by the soldier who carried it. These pommel caps had big brass knuckle guard hooks on them which were bothersome as they caught on anything and everything, and owners of the Hicks knives frequently removed the pommel hooks at the first opportunity. Note the example shown in Flayderman’s Bowie Knife book likewise has the hook-pommel removed. The reverse side of the grip where the “A.G. HICKS/ MAKER/ CLEV’D O.” is stamped has a tiny chip of wood missing that obscures part of the marking. The original scabbard is made of black leather with half of the brass throat remaining. It lacks the original top mounted belt loop and two slits have been cut into the back of the body to fashion a belt loop. The scabbard has stitched seams that are in VG condition. The knife blade has a gray untouched original patina with scattered age discoloration and a few minor nicks in the edge. The ultra-rare leather scabbard is in good condition. The body shows age cracks and crazing but the stitching is intact. Of some interest is the note that came with this knife when it surfaced. This note reads “Officer in charge of the mess. See that priv. Bunch has his knife returned to him. J. H. Bassler 1st Lt. Comdg. Co. H, 10th VRC.” I surmise that Private Bunch might have gotten drunk one evening and drawn his big old Hicks knife on his pards who took the blade away from him. Then when he sobered up, the company commander ordered the boys to give old Bunch his knife back. Can’t prove it, but makes sense and also makes for a darn good story. Rare Knife ... $5,950.00

 

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14-06-68 ... Extremely Scarce General Grant Motif Identification Badge or Medal: This is the first of these planchets I have encountered in 45 years of collecting. Larger than a half dollar, and smaller than a silver dollar, holed at the top for wear or suspension. The pictures tell the story. It is made of Britannia metal. Finely detailed both sides. Stamped on the obverse with likeness of Grant and wording Lieut. General. Stamped on the reverse with John Lancaster Co. “I” 130th Indiana Vols. 23d Army Corps … Pretty much the whole ID right there. He is John Lancaster of Montpelier Indiana. Enlisted on March 1st 1864 as a Private. He mustered into Co.”I” 130th Indiana Infantry. He was Mustered Out on Dec. 2,1865 at Charlotte, NC. This regiment was organized at Kokomo during the winter of 1863-64, and was mustered in March 12th. It left the state on the 16th for Nashville, Tenn., where it was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 1st division, 23rd corps. It left Nashville April 5 and marched to Charleston, Tenn., reaching there on the 24th.

On May 3 it moved to Georgia, engaging in the battle at Rocky Face Ridge and supporting the detachment that drove the enemy from his strong position on "Tater Hill." It was in the series of skirmishes that terminated in the battle of Resaca, in which the regiment received and repelled a charge, joining in the pursuit after the battle. It was engaged at Lost Mountain, and again at Pine Mountain, where the enemy was repulsed, and on June 27 fought at Kennesaw Mountain, driving the enemy into his works, holding the advanced position thus gained for several days, and joining in pursuit of the enemy on July 17, the regiment drove the enemy from Decatur and assisted in destroying the railroad.It was actively engaged at Atlanta; moved with its brigade Aug. 6, upon a battery which was annoying the Union flank, and participated in a charge that drove the enemy from the field. It was engaged at Jonesboro; moved thence to Lovejoy's Station, and from there to Decatur, where it went into camp. Joining the pursuit of Hood on Oct. 4, it proceeded to Gaylesville, Ala., at which point its corps was detached and ordered to join Gen. Thomas' command at Nashville. It fought there and joined in the pursuit after Hood's defeat. Thence to North Carolina. It was engaged at Wise's Forks, 4 miles from Kinston. Leaving Kinston on the 20th, it moved to Goldsboro, where it joined Sherman's army. On April 10 it moved with the army to Smithfield and Raleigh. At the conclusion of active operations it moved to Greensboro, thence to Charlotte, N. C., where it remained on guard duty during the summer and fall. This badge/medal is unique in my experience. I have never seen another. I believe it to be an 1864-1865 item purchased by or given to the soldiers as an ID badge or Dog Tag. There is always the chance that it is an extremely early veteran’s badge, but the style and markings tell me it is more likely war-date. If you know the definitive answer please let me know. In any event ... DAMN rare. If I haven’t seen one in 45 years, that pretty much tells the story ... $850.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-69 ... Wonderful 9th Iowa 15th Corps Ladder Badge: Top notch example of the Union Veteran's "Ladder Badge". Perfect condition with attachment pin firmly in place on reverse of top bar. This badge worn by Edwin Chapel of the 9th Iowa Infantry, wounded at Missionary Ridge. Unit history -> organized in July and Aug. 1861, assigned to railroad guard duty from Franklin to Rolla, in which it remained until Jan. 22, 1862. The regiment was engaged at Sugar creek where its division drove before it a force three times as strong in numbers as its own. Moved to Young's Point near Vicksburg. It took part in the battle of Jackson and on the 18th reached Vicksburg. The next day it lost a number of men in an assault on the enemy's works and on the 22nd lost nearly 100 in killed and wounded in a second assault. Immediately after the capitulation of the city the regiment moved on Jackson, and after the evacuation of that city went into camp near the Big Black River. On Nov. 23 the regiment reached Chattanooga, and took part in the "battle above the clouds" the following day. The regiment moved to Chattanooga and joined Sherman's army for the Atlanta movement. It was engaged at Resaca, Dallas, New Hope Church, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, the Chattahoochee River, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro and Lovejoy's Station. After the evacuation of Atlanta it went into camp, but was sent in pursuit of Hood in October. It participated in the capture of Columbia, SC and in various minor affairs, and was in the grand review at Washington. A wonderful veteran's badge, near mint condition, worn by a wounded soldier who fought Johnny Reb for many years ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-70 ... CDV New York State Militia Soldier w/ Enfield Musket: This shows EXACTLY what the NYSM looked like mid to late war. Soldier wears NY jacket, NY kepi with state seal device, SNY oval buckle, and brandishes an Enfield musket. Edges of card trimmed all the way to the image itself, but image is strong and clear. Back of card printed with an Eagle and artist's logo... but so faded I cannot read it. Not sure what faded the back so much. Very interesting subject and quite scarce ... $150.00 SOLD

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14-06-71 ... Identified Tintype Armed Cavalry Trooper, Edgar S. Eldridge 2nd NY Veteran Cavalry: Fine, sharp tintype. Measures 3 x 3.5 inches... trimmed quarter plate image. Inscribed (scratched) in the back with full name etc. Image shows Eldridge in front of patriotic backdrop in his cavalry uniform and brandishing his saber. Overall fine+ condition. Hole punched in upper right background of tintype undoubtedly for hanging on a nail 150 years ago. No case... just the tintype. A really striking image... Records show Edgar S. Eldridge 22 years old. Enlisted on 7/14/1863 at Glens Falls, NY as a Private. On 8/15/1863 he mustered into "A" Co. NY 2nd Vet Cavalry. He was discharged for disability on 2/2/1864. UNIT HISTORY... This regiment, known as the Empire Light Cavalry, was mustered into the U. S. service at Saratoga from Aug. 15 to Dec. 30, 1863, for three years, it took part in Banks' Red River campaign, in which it was 18 times in action and suffered a loss of 77 killed, wounded and missing. It was assigned to the 4th cavalry brigade on its return and through June, July and August was engaged in a number of raids and scouting expeditions, meeting with some losses. At McLeod's mills, La., it lost 11 killed and wounded. Its last active service was with the 1st brigade, cavalry division, in March and April, 1865, at College Hill, Pine Barren creek, Cotton creek and Bluff Springs, Fla.; Pollard, Fort Blakely, Mt. Pleasant and Whistler's station, Ala. A striking image with great history ... $450.00 SOLD

 

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14-06-72 ... General Grant's Death Commemorative Medal: Nice condition Grant memorial medal. Obverse high-relief bust facing right, IN MEMORIAM U.S. GRANT, SOLDIER-PRESIDENT-CITIZEN / THOUGH TO EARTH NO MORE / IN OUR HEARTS FOREVER, 1822-1885 below, MORGAN (Mint Engraver George T.) on truncation. Reverse mounted figures on horseback, around FORT DONELSON 1862 / VICKSBURG 1863 / RICHMOND 1865 / PRESIDENT 1869-1877. A good value at ... $150.00 SOLD

 

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