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Welcome to our Civil War Antiques web catalog.

Please send all Checks and Money orders to :

Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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14-05-01 ... The Real Deal - A Genuine Berdan Sharps ... What a great warhorse of a gun. Even and honest brown and grey patina on the barrel and other metal parts... all uniform. The bore is clean and the action is in perfect working condition. This is an ACTUAL Berdan double set trigger gun with all the proper bells and whistles. Proper features in all respects ... ie: made with no bayonet lug and no lever catch. Has factory double set triggers. Has proper JT cartouche at wrist. Has proper sub inspector's letters on the barrel. This gun shows plenty of wartime use, but no abuse. It is overall NRA “very good” condition. It is complete save for a missing swivel in the butt. The swivel base is present, this just needs the swivel and screw which are available through S&S Firearms. Mechanically perfect. Serial number is 55974 which is dead-on proper. Interestingly this rifle has the Sharps 800 yard rear sight as opposed to the 1000 yard type. The Sharps design proved that the breech-loading system was reliable, accurate and safe - and was 10 times faster than a muzzle-loading shoulder rifle. Hiram Berdan, using his political connections, which reached all the way to Lincoln, formed two regiments of Sharpshooters nearly all of which were armed with these "double set trigger" 1859 Sharps Rifles. This rifle's markings, both on metal and cartouches are clearly legible. These Sharpshooter rifles have always been highly sought and scarcely found. Here is your chance to buy the genuine article ... $8,950.00

 

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14-05-02 ... Extremely Scarce Kentucky Issued, Large Bore, Ballard Military Carbine in the rare .56-.56 caliber supplied by Merwin and Bray to Kentucky in 1864. The Ballard story is an interesting one. Anyone wishing to get the basic history should consult Flayderman’s Guide as a starting point. Merwin and Bray, New York firearms dealers, were awarded a US contract for a mere one thousand large bore Ballard carbines and rifles. This is an extremely small contract. Most gun contracts during the Civil War were for 10,000 to 30,000 guns and many contracts were larger still. This is one of those very scarce one thousand guns. This group of 1,000 carbines in .56-.56 Spencer caliber were marked only with Ballard Patent and Merwin and Bray Agents markings. This entire group was purchased by the state of Kentucky in April, 1864. Our gun is an extra nice example of that scarce contract. VG to near fine condition. Clear “Ballard’s Patent / Nov. 5, 1861” markings on right of receiver and “Merwin & Bray/ Agt’s N.Y.” over serial number “483” on the left, very legible, just a little light in the center of the stamp. Sights firmly in place, including the 500 yard graduated rear leaf sight. Both swivels in place- like many early war carbines this was intended to be carried on a more conventional style rifle sling rather than the wide and cumbersome brass mounted carbine sling. Very nice wood with good, even dark tone, and sharp edges. I see just one or two light rub marks. Nice smooth metal overall, mixed plum with darker smoky blue and a little gray here and there. A few expected handling dings on the receiver. Overall a very attractive carbine with homogenous patina on all the metal. Mechanically perfect. 100% original, 100% complete. A key weapon in a carbine collection and a very scarce one in this caliber and condition. Also a real nice piece of Kentucky history. Rates NRA Very Good +++ to near fine condition ... $2,450.00 SOLD

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14-05-03 ... "Don't Give Up The Ship" USN Embossed Shaving Soap Dish & Mirror: Used by Sailors Aboard US Navy Federal Ships during the Civil War, these patriotic hard rubber items have always been popular with collectors as they are so visually attractive. The mirror on the inside top cover lid of the shaving soap box is cracked, but still present. The metal eye ring used to hang the top inside cover for viewing is still intact. Sometimes referred to as Gutta Percha, it is simply another name for Goodyear's Hard Rubber which Goodyear patented in 1851. 3 1/8" in diameter - closed, it sits about 1 1/4" in height. Embossed on the underside of the lid as well as the bottom with "Under Goodyears Patent May 6, 1851 ... Manufactured by the Novelty Rubber Co. New Brunswick, New Jersey"   A very visual display relic ... $265.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-04 ...  Wonderful Photographic Study / Three Generations of Ladies - Framed Tintypes ... Grandaughter,  Mother, and Grand Mother...   These three sixth plate tintypes are in fine condition, are very striking, and were taken circa 1860, ... possibly English in origin based on the mats/preservers and subject's clothing.  Framed many years ago, - the rear of the frameis  still sealed shut with the fragments of the label present. The frame measures 5 1/2" x 10". Each lady is posed in fine clothing, two of them reading - to emphasize that they are three generations of educated, worthy, and well bred women of means ce ... $175.00

 

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14-05-05 ... 1907 Veteran Association Reunion Ribbon ...  A really attractive multi color ribbon... much prettier than most we see. A fine souvenir saved by a veteran who survived the war from the 19th N.Y. Volunteers or 3rd N.Y. Light Artillery and undoubtedly wore this proudly ... bj ... $55.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-06 ... Harpers Ferry, Virginia Musket Altered to “Musketoon”:Repair everything that will shoot and where the barrels are not too much impaired, cut them off and make carbines of them” Josiah Gorgas, CS Chief of Ordnance. The south was always hard-pressed for cavalry arms and altering old or damaged muskets to carbine and musketoon length was a good stop-gap measure. Here is as good a candidate for one of these guns as I have seen in a while: A highly appealing 1849 dated Harpers Ferry 1842 musket cut down to a musketoon. Murphy’s book  Confederate Carbines and Musketoons shows several similar alterations. This gun is cut down in fine aesthetic proportions, and retains the original forward most barrel band, and the original ramrod. The rear sling swivel is intact keeping with the military format. The shortened alterations do not at all seem an effort to “sporterize” a gun by lightening the weight as much as possible and making it a civilian arm ... but rather appears to be a quick and necessary modification to a military weapon to keep it in military service. Overall the condition as altered is VG to near fine. The Harpers Ferry and 1849 date at rear of lockplate are legible, as is the eagle/US forward of the hammer. The barrel has faint VP/eagle proofs and inspector initials just forward of them. The wood surrounding the lockplate (aka the lock table) has good edges. The buttstock shows minor marks, and blemishes. Metal is pretty much smooth brown overall and I would leave it as is. A neat old Virginia made musketoon that may well have been altered by the Rebs ... $795.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-07 ... Classic Attic Condition British Tower Enfield ... The quintessential Enfield as used by both Union and Confederate infantrymen. This one is 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, and very handsome. Lock is clearly marked “1862 TOWER” and bears the CROWN stamp. The barrel bears the proper 25*25* stamping showing the gun is .577 caliber and as such there are 25 bullets to the pound. This 25*25* mark and the lesser seen 24*24* stamp are the proper ones for Enfields sent over for use during our Civil War. (24*24* indicates .58 caliber.) Also present on this fine musket are the initials "? P A" carved into the stock. The "R&W Aston" stamp on the underside of the stock identifies the stock maker.  Interestingly a thread on the NSSA skirmish web page bears a comment where the contributor found reference to R & W Aston markings being most likely Confederate.  I am putting no value on this "blog entry" as it was not footnoted.  I am also giving it no credence, other than to advise researchers to continue researching this "possibility".   British-made P53 Enfield rifle-muskets were used in great numbers by both sides.  It was the South's second most heavily issued longarm.     R&W Aston is known to have supplied ramrods, barrel bands, lock assemblies, bayonets, tompions, triggers and screws to major arms makers from the Crimean war up to the Civil War. A fine example of an attic condition musket that certainly saw service in the Civil War and which also has a decidedly southern "flavor" in terms of condition.   aa - cho ... $1,875.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-08 ... Sheffield N.Y. Bowie with scabbard ... Alexander Sheffield Bowie Knife. 5" blade and 9" in overall length ... deep colored slab horn handle with the last 1/2" broken off of one side ... this knife certainly saw its share of use in its day ... blade marked NY with Alexander Sheffield stamp on the other side. Retains its owner-made original leather hand-made scabbard, which utilizes the German silver mounts from the original factory sheath. The knife and scabbard are clearly CW vintage pieces with numerous NY examples known to have been carried during the CW.  The original owner must have been proud of this item too, as the initials "W.E." are inscribed by hand on the side. icollector.com sold a very similar one recently for $750.00 - ours is modestly priced and doesn't have an auction premuim to add on either ... axz ... $375.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-09 ... Cool "Battelfield Found" Inscribed Cartridge Box Plate ... A fine solid dug-up relic with both iron wire loops firmly in place  on the back for securing to the flap of the cartridge box. This one is hand-engraved with the soldier's initials "PAE" and the date "1864".  Seldom do we find inscribed and dated plates, especially dug - up examples.  A great early relic ... aej - coch ... $265.00 SOLD

 

 

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14-05-10 ... Top Notch Cartridge Box Plate ... 1861-1865  Regulation ... Identical to the US oval buckles, but having two iron wire loops on the back for securing to the flap of the cartridge box. Fine non-dug condition with very attractive delicate "mustard" patina ... $235.00

 

 

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14-05-11 ... Pair of Civil War Artillery 1st Lieutenant's Shoulder Straps / Double Border Bullion ...  Artillery insignia is very scarce... it being the smallest branch of the service.  Red velvet centers, denoting Artillery and a single bar, denoting first lieutenant, in high quality "double row" gilt bullion embroidery.  Roughly 1 1/2" x 4 5/8" in size. Red has faded some over time, stitching is still in good condition.  Back sides have remnants of enamel paper coverings with some loss exposing the raw stiching.  Very scarce CW insignia   ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-12 ... Pettibone Bros. Engraved 1872 Pattern Knights of Pythias Fraternal Sword ... The Kights of Pythias fraternal order was founded in 1864 by Justus H. Rathbone, who had been inspired by a play about the legend of Damon and Pythias. This legend illustrates the ideals of loyalty, honor and friendship that are the center of the order. Our sword is an 1872-pattern, presentation grade Cavalry Officer’s saber made by Pettibone Mfg. Co. circa 1890 showing lion head pommel, fancy relief mounts, UR lettering ... also etched with knght wearing sword on top mount. The middle mount shows what may be a foresters symbol; the thumb piece on the guard shows a rose, the blade is etched “T.O. Capps”; the condition is good to fine with just minor aging of its finish; a fine 19th century saber and scabbard. with great eye appeal ... $295.00 SOLD

 

 

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14-05-13 ... Indian Puzzle Pouch ... When I found this I thought it was a medicine bag or something along those lines. I could not figure out how to open it, and scratched my head for a time. Thanks to the world wide web ... we see that this is a Puzzle Pouch, probably Sioux. Late 19th to early 20th century ... and we further learn that the pouches were a mental mystery game. You put something inside and passed it around to others who tried to guess what was inside. And in addition to that, you had to figure out the secret of how to open the pouch.(Something I still have not done as I do not want to risk tearing the antique doeskin). Most puzzle pouches are made basically the same way (with thong/slats going through spaces in the flap). This examples measures about 5 1/4" long with 1/2" tassles around the sides and bottom. I will include instructions how to make and solve a puzzle pouch. A very interesting piece of Wild West Americana relating to the Sioux Indian Tribe ... $245.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-14 ... Handsome Relic Eagle Flask ... Long-neck Eagle over a 22-star shield design. Dings on the front and rear, and the seam has given way on part of each side. Lacks lever spring. Great patina. Measures about six inches long. A fine old patriotic relic, and really cool looking ... gj ... $125.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-15 ... Folk Art, Soldier-Decorated Burnside Carbine: A real veteran decorated by a veteran. Fifth model Burnside carbine with very folky and appealing carving on the outboard side consisting of an ambiguous crude eight-spoke wheel insignia that may be a stylized 5th corps badge, or it might be a Hancock's Veterans Insignia.  Next to the mystery insignia is a super patriotic panel of a US shield with stars and stripes flanked by US flags draped behind it. This shows right side up when the gun is on the wall barrel down. A carved set of initials on the offside wrist, "IN" or "NI" might be a clue to the soldier's identity, but I also make out a more worn "B.B.B." crosswise near the buttplate, and a thin "H A" elsewhere. The barrel is nice with a smooth deep purple-plum color as is the band. The receiver is more mottled with some bright spots amid smokey gray and purple from the case color. Wood is a warm brown and shows dings from being carried in the field. There is a very visible cartouche on the wrist. Swivel, sling bar and ring present, both sights in place. Needs a rear lock plate screw, otherwise very good. Breechblock number does not match, but has been with the gun since it's period of use. Obviously a gun valued by a trooper and kept as a memento of his service in the cavalry. Shows lots of war date use, but no abuse ... Interesting old war horse ... $1,295.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-16 ... Attic Condition Model 1816 / 1832 Dated Waters Conversion Musket ... Standard 1816 conversion as used by tens of thousands of soldiers both North and South throughout the war. Overall VG condition and mechanically perfect. Early "cone in barrel" conversion.  Lots of interesting marks in the wood ... letters, numbers, inspectors marks, soldier's initials. The number 10 is stamped in the wood forward of the butt plate tang, and also of the stock flat opposite the lock.  Rack or regimental number?   Well worn and nice. Note that there is a hunk of ramrod and a musket ball still stuck in the barrel just below the muzzle. The last shooter tried to pull his load from the gun but failed miserably... leaving us with an interesting conversation piece.  You could pull it and display the load next to the gun,  but I am leaving it as I found it.  Solid early musket, at a very fair price  ... $695.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-17 ... Sixth Plate Tintype of Cavalryman on horseback / Likely Michigan:  ... Here is a great sixth plate tintype of a cavalry soldier sitting on his horse. The soldier sits confidently, holding a sword in his hand. The horse is decked out in regulation cavalry leather including the M1859 McClellan Pattern saddle bags behind the seat. Overall VG and housed in a mat, frame, and glass. Tin has some light soiling but no damage whatsoever. This is from the ages old Ken Erwin estate of Michigan. Ken amassed one of the largest private collections of historical antiques in the state of Michigan, reportedly valued at around three million dollars at the time of his death. Most of his treasures were found in Michigan. This trooper has the look of a classic western theater soldier, fatigue blouse, well worn black slouch hat, hard lean features ... possibly 2nd Michigan Cavalry? ... fqq ... $955.00

 

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14-05-18 Absolutely Stunning Patriotic Scovill Maunfacturing Union Case ... A "screamer" sixth plate size thermoplastic Union case for daguerreotype, ambrotype, or tintype showing crossed cannons. lances, cannon balls, federal shields, etc... etc... etc... Darn near mint condition. One of the best I have owned. If you have a Top Shelf image that needs a premier case, here is your chance ... This would be perfect with an artillery image! ... $375.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-19 ... Philadelphia Style Derringer ... A wonderful and complete silver mounted percussion derringer similar in style and design to the one Booth used to kill Lincoln. This is roughly 41 caliber and smooth bore. The stock is a straight grain dark walnut with hand checkered bag style grip. The trigger guard is engraved steel, the inlaid escutcheons are German silver. The lock, hammer, and barrel tang are all hand engraved. It is a genuine, original, 1850s- 1860 period “derringer” but it wasn't made by Henry Deringer.   It is one of the thousands of derringers that plagued gun maker Henry Deringer of Philadelphia throughout his life.  He sued many of his imitators but his difficulty was establishing that a specific single shot small percussion back-action pistol was an infringement. His legal description of his gun was so generic that it fit thousands of similar pistols made around the world.   The imitators frequently marked their guns Derringer (two R's) while Henry spelled his name with one "R" DERINGER.  Those name stealing makers were the ones that vexed Deringer most.  The vast number of derringers produced in the 1800s (two "R"s) has resulted in the American lexicon to currently accept the spelling DERRINGER (two R's) as the proper spelling for any number of small pocket size pistols. Too bad for old Henry.   A very handsome and totally original and complete derringer which measures roughly 6 1/2 inches overall length. Birmingham proofed. I believe you will find this agreeably priced at ... xfej  .. $865.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-20 ... Dashing Armed Cavalry Trooper: Superb sixth plate image showing Union horse soldier sporting his M1840 heavy cavalry saber and scabbard as well as his saber belt with holstered Colt revolver, and cap box visible. Outstanding clarity and contrast. Look at our yank's nose ... it's either seriously sunburned from hours in the saddle or he's a damn heavy drinker. Top notch image housed in full leatherette case ... cjjvr ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-21 ... Winter Quarters Well Armed: Overall size is approximately 6 1/2" x 8 1/2". Superb image of 9 soldiers in the foreground with their Enfield Rifle Muskets propped in tripod formation in front of their winter quarters which they have named "Pine Cottage" on a sign over the door. Clearly some thought went into the positioning of guns and poses of the soldiers. I get the feeling these fellows may be from New York, but that is just a hunch on my part. There is an interesting note written on the back: "Miss Thomson's father in the group (Civil War). Refused bonus remuneration. Said he joined the Army because he loved the flag. He loved his country and volunteered." A very fine slice of Civil War daily life. Nine infantrymen, 9 muskets, one cottage. A great from-life albumen photo. ... cjjq ... $475.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-22 ... Unmarked Brass Revolver: I have no idea what this is, but I LOVE it. Brass frame, brass barrel, undisturbed patina... 2 1/2" barrel ... Belgian proof marks ... looks like a .32 cal. rimfire ... I have never seen another. Overall VG ... $895.00

 

 

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14-05-23 ... 1858 Remington New Model Army Revolver: Remington New Model Army Revolver First Year Production : A very solid example of the standard Remington New Model Army revolver and this one with a super low serial number of 20,152. This would indicate production in 1863 which is the first year this model was produced. This great old gun is missing its "blue" but is in VG condition being 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. The metal is lightly cleaned. The grips are solid, showing use, and a repair is clearly visible on the left grip. There are government sub inspectors’ initials on the proper various metal parts. The inspector’s cartouche on the left grip is still visible. These Remingtons were issued in about the same quantities as the Colts and were actually a stronger and more advanced design than the Colts with the Remingtons having solid frames with top straps just like present day modern revolvers. Also, the Remingtons could be easily reloaded with a fresh full cylinder without the need of tools, whereas the Colt could not. This is a good solid Civil War cavalry revolver that you will be well pleased with. ... A good solid gun ... kris-wag ... ... $1,050.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-24 ... Very Fine CW Musket Sling: Regulation issue sling for the Springfield and contract muskets, roughly 1" wide ... and about 45" in length. Complete with brass hook, sewn loop end, and sliding loop keeper. Fine to excellent condition with good life and superb finish. No maker's mark present. Just some storage dirt that will clean easily. A very nice example. These are always in demand and I can NEVER find them any more. I got lucky with an old timer at a recent gun show and picked up three dandy examples ... $325.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-25 ... CW Style 19th Century Rosewood Fife: Overall excellent condition. About 18 inches overall length. Has German silver ferrules (end caps). Perfect for display or actual use in living history ... $125.00 SOLD

 

 

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14-05-26 ... Extremely Rare Mounted Rifleman's Hat Insignia: An impossibly rare piece of regulation officer's embroidered headgear insignia. This oval trumpet insignia was adopted in 1850 and continued in service through the Civil War. It was worn vertically with the bell down, unlike infantry hunting horns which were worn horizontally. At the time of adoption there was only one regiment of Mounted Riflemen in the US Army. Rifle regiments whether foot or mounted were rarities throughout the 19th century. The trumpet is embroidered with gilt thread and sequins at the bell of the horn. This is a well worn example that undoubtedly saw service in the war. It is complete with the twisted wire border (jaceron). THIS example was “really there” ... it is not something that sat in a box at Schuyler, Hartley and Graham for twenty years. 2.5 x 3.5 inches ... agexx... $385.00 SOLD

 

 

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14-05-28 ... Classic Civil War Enfield Rifle Musket w/ Sling: The quintessential Enfield as used by both Union and Confederate infantrymen, this one made by Robert Hughes. NRA “very good+” condition. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, and very handsome. Still affixed is a VG+ original US made rifle sling with both loop adjusters still in place.  Lock is clearly marked “1862 TOWER” and bears the CROWN stamp. The barrel bears the proper 25*25* stamping showing the gun is .577 caliber and as such there are 25 bullets to the pound. This 25*25* mark and the lesser seen 24*24* stamp are the proper ones for Enfields sent over for use during our Civil War. (24*24* indicates .58 caliber.)  Numerous British stock markings present as shown, by Robert Hughes of Birmingham. RH & crown twice and full oval cartouche on right side of butt stock. Also marked on barrel “RH”. . Small crack near lock screw on left stock flat. Owner’s name “JOHN KORWIN” is scratched into the butt stock. I cannot find an infantryman with that name in the rosters, but do find a late war cavalryman from New York. You can research further. A top notch example that you can be proud to display. The sling is worth $250 or more ... $1,750.00

 

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14-05-29 ... Sixth Plate Tintype Yankee Soldier: Billy yank as he actually looked in 1863. He has neatly styled hair and a fully buttoned coat ... uniform complete with belt and cap box. Possibly an NCO as he sports a rectangular belt plate. Housed in mat, frame, and glass. Nice portrait ... geqq ... $135.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-30 ... Sixth Plate Union Soldier TT with kepi: A fine example of a soldier posing for an image he can share with a loved one , showing the home folks what he looks like in the army of Mr. Lincoln. He has the look of a mid-war veteran who has seen action. Lean features bordering on hard, cap with no brass insignia, and an infantry 9-button frock. Housed in mat, frame and glass ... zhj ... $165.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-31 ... Sixth Plate Tintype of two soldiers: Interesting view ... Left side subject is infantryman in company "C" of the 2nd regiment based on his hat insignia... his pard is a cavalryman wearing a 4-button fatigue blouse - arm in arm but with no familial similarities. Very appealing image with interesting patriotic backdrop. 2 1/2" x 3", no case or frame. ... zzaxx ... $195.00 SOLD

 

 

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14-05-32 ... James Reid Knuckle-Duster Revolver WITH SAFETY ...  The Reid knuckleduster is just the right weapon for a barroom brawl or a poker game gone wrong.  These .22 caliber brass frame revolvers carry five shots and the solid frame and trigger guard form a set of brass knuckles. Pretty vicious little weapon. Made from 1868 to 1882 this one has the typical later production “My Friend” motto with “Patd. Dec. 26, 1865” over the cylinder and a 6857 serial number. Center pin finial shows matching last two digits. Cylinder smooth steel, medium bright, just one or two small gray spots - the floral engraving remains easy-to-see. Mechanically fine. Lettering a bit rubbed here and there, but very legible. Overall NRA  VG+ condition.  Another nifty addition on this model is a safety located just ahead of the trigger.  This feature is very scarce according to the Flayderman Guide,   of the 3,100 of these guns made, only 30 were given this valuable addition of a safety ... $2,250.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-33 ... Allen and Thurber Pepperbox Pistol:   A tribute to American mechanical invention. Before pistols with revolving cylinders carried the day these were the popular repeating firearms for frontiersmen, travelers, Forty-Niners,  and soldiers up through the Civil War. They provided some extra firepower in dangerous circumstances and you certainly did not have to worry about a cylinder dropping out. Mark Twain recounted the difficulty of keeping your aim steady with these double action guns while the hammer raised and the barrel assembly rotated, but remarked if it did not hit what you were aiming at it would likely “fetch something else.” Good grip and legible floral engraving on the frame and nipple shield. Overall gray metal mixed with dark spots, but very good for one of these, which often show hard use and little care. Sharp “Allen Thurber & Co. Worcester” markings in the barrel flute. Nipple shield has a small chip next to the hammer on the top. Does not affect it mechanically and is hardly noticeable.  Barrels are 3.5 inches long. A nice addition to a Western Gambler, Gold Rush, Military or early pistol display. One of the truly affordable antique arms still available to the collector ... ca 1845  ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-34 ... Rifled Hall Carbine: 1849 dated Model 1843 Hall Carbine - This gun has a 21 inch round rifled barrel. The breech block is stamped as follows; “U.S. / S. NORTH / MIDLTN / CONN / 1849”. The stock is in VG condition with minor handling wear and a clear inspector's cartouche. The gun is 100% original, 100% complete and mechanically perfect.  This model was carried by the 2nd Missouri Cavalry if my memory serves me.  Interestingly this is one of the 5000 Halls that were part of the scandal known as “The Hall Carbine Affair”, where General Fremont was involved in buying Halls for his western theater forces.  The guns had just been purchased from the government for $3.50 each as obsolete weapons.  The buyers were speculators with the main player being banker J. P. Morgan.  They then sent the carbines to a firm that simply rifled the barrels and chambered the blocks, and then resold them to General Fremont for $22.00 each!   Quite a tidy profit, showing American capitalism at its worst!. A good honest historic Hall with interesting western campaign connection and the scandal connection ... adxy ... $1,695.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-35 ... Scarce US Model 1835/40 Conversion Musket. “D. Nippes/ US” 1843. Nippes made 5600 contract muskets in the 1835/40 pattern, most of which were converted to percussion. This is one of those guns. Overall condition very good to attic fine. Has two clear cartouches on the stock opposite the lock. Wood is extra fine. A tight sharp musket and one of the scarcer patterns. 100% original and complete, except for replaced rod done during the period. Mechanically perfect. Some light rust on the metal that may clean. A scarce gun at a fair price ... $1,250.00

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14-05-36 ... Ulster County Gazette newspaper news of George Washington's death ... A wonderful piece of early American ephemera. Though dated 1800, in actuality this newspaper was printed in the 1830s. It is an early reprint of the original Ulster County Gazette. Even back in the 1830s George Washington souvenirs were darn rare. The original 1800 editions of this paper command tens of thousands of dollars. These 1830s reprints are not exactly, common. The graphics are wonderful. The paper has some minor separations and tears, but is in overall very good solid condition. in terms of displaying an artifact from the period of George Washington's life, this slightly post-period Item is absolutely spectacular for display. This so-called reprint is 175 years old. Unquestionably a rare and desirable antique in its own right. I challenge you to find another priced at ... $125.00

 

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14-05-37 ... GAR Photo Identified 6th US Cavalry Trooper: The Sixth US Cavalry was an interesting unit and there is a regimental history just recently released. Recruited in May, 1861, in Pennsylvania and Ohio, the regiment was a new addition to the US army and was originally designated the Third US Cavalry. When all mounted units were redesignated “cavalry” in August the Third changed its numerical designation to the “Sixth.” It was mounted and equipped in Maryland in September, though only two companies were issued carbines until early 1862, the regiment being considered “light cavalry” until then, most companies armed only with pistols and sabers. It then took the field and saw its first fighting with McClellan during the Peninsular Campaign that Spring.

Here is a photo of one of their veterans, wearing a GAR coat by the look of it, with a GAR lapel stud as well, taken about 1890. Obviously removed from a frame at some point. Irregularly trimmed along edge and some edge chipping, glue spots on reverse, but not affecting image itself and would look great matted again. Identified along lower edge in period ink: “H.E. Vick ‘B’ U.S. Cav.” and on reverse “No. 3 / Holend Vick/ B 6 US Cav.” in ink and pencil. Holland E. Vick enlisted as a private in Co. B of the 6th US Cavalry on August 5, 1861. He was discharged for disability Oct. 18, 1862, at Fortress Monroe, but this would have given him service during the Peninsular Campaign and through Antietam. A cursory online search shows a Holland Vick born in Ohio in 1834, and this may be our man, though the regiment also supposedly had a large number of recent Irish immigrants in it. It had a good wartime record though, and many of its officers were transfers from other regular army units when it was first organized ... $45.00

 

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14-05-38 ... Quarter Plate Tintype youthful federal wearing state issue dark greatcoat. A fine artistic pose housed in a full case (spine split). Excellent save for a rub which appears as a dark spot on the extreme right of the image and is of no consequence. A great image ... $175.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-40 ... Likely 21st Indiana Civil War Merrill Rifle: One of the scarcest Civil War breech loading rifles and one with a known history of use in the field is the Merrill rifle. Only 800 or so of these arms were made by James H. Merrill in Baltimore using the same system he patented for his carbines, and the U.S. government bought 770 of them, issuing them to the 21st Indiana, parts of the 7th and 10th Michigan, 4th Arkansas, and the 1st Massachusetts. See below for data on this guns’ markings and the 21st Indiana. These are brass mounted .54 caliber rifles equipped with a patch box and bayonet lug for a saber bayonet. Ours is serial numbered 6656 on the lock plate rear of the hammer and has the very legible Merrill patent information forward of the hammer with just very slight rubbing along the top edge. Bayonet lug, bands, swivels, sights are in place. Rod is an old replacement for the Merrill buttonhead rod. Brass is light but not bright and shows a good patina, some of the screw heads show original bluing, none have gouged slots. Barrel is bright mixed with toning silver and some gray spots. Receiver shows faint smoky purple hues of faded case colors we like to see. Hammer and lock plate more silvery. Matching serial number on loading plunger and Merrill patent marks on top flat of latch. ;Rear sight leaves in place and show some faded blue. Light colored walnut stock. Wood overall is good, patch box cut out is sharp, but the gun shows the common defect in these of a horizontal crack running straight back in the wrist from the rear lock screw to the base of the receiver tang, more evident on the off side, nevertheless stable and solid. Only a few dimples otherwise on the rear belly of the butt and some minor “pings” on the inside near the buttplate. As for the evidence that this rifle was carried in the 21st Indiana, I will quote the previous owner who was quite a serious student of Merrills. He references a letter “H” in the patch box of this rifle… I have (seen) or had a few others with company letters in the tool boxes. Such letters never appear in tool boxes where the rifles probably never made it south to the Hoosiers.”  (Note: many 21st Indiana Rifles have soldier’s names engraved on the trigger guards.) “The ones with the names engraved on the trigger guards were the ones purchased out of the soldier's own pay by Companies H and K.  Others were purchased by and for the regiment and it appears that only those going to companies “H” and “I” may have been held long enough to have company letters cut in the tool box.” End quote. In any event, a very scarce weapon, a rare breech loading infantry rifle. I have always liked the ingenious loading mechanism.  Priced super fair $1,995.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-41 ... 1861 Contract Rifle Musket With Springfield 1863 Lock: Well used regulation infantry rifle musket that has been together for a long time, but at some point a Springfield 1863 dated lockplate replaced the contractor marked plate that was on the gun originally. Other markings and cartouches not visible though butt plate tang shows clear US. Needs a replacement ramrod. Bands, springs and swivels in place. Divot of wood out below nose cap, wear to rammer channel, slight crack on underside below entry for ramrod, another tight crack at the wrist, but the gun is stable. Sights in place, rear sight and nipple showing corrosion from use. Clean out screw head flattened. Lock screws nice, probably replaced along with hammer when the plate was added. Clear 1863, US Springfield and Eagle marks. Fore and aft short line cracks from the plate. Metal generally smooth, gray with some darkening, not pitted. Good butt stock. A presentable Civil War rifle musket that would look good in a display and not break the bank ... $775.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-42 ... Very Rare French Officer’s Saber for an Officer of National Volunteers under the Constitutional Monarchy of 1789-1792. An extremely rare sword from the days of the French Revolution. Missing the elaborate guard that shows Athena and the triumph of the revolutionary ideology, but retaining the even scarcer original scabbard and worthy of restoration. Or if you need an original scabbard I dare say this is the only one on the market this year. Characteristic knights helmet pommel in place. Blade is bright mixed with gray and dark spots but showing very clearly the engraved martial motifs on both sides which retain most of their gilt fill. Good edge without nicks. Wire and some of the copper tape is present on the grip, wood is sturdy, but leather wrap should be redone. The scabbard is exceptionally rare: the leather is in very good condition, middle mount gone, but the drag and upper mount with carrying ring are present. This sword is a very scarce blade from the beginning of the French Revolution and the many wars and conflicts that followed, which threw Europe into turmoil. Swords with damaged or broken blades sometimes show up with good guards and this would be well worth acquiring to keep on hand to complete a restoration ... $850.00

 

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14-05-43 ... Millard Cavalry Saber ... New York Trooper's Dated and Inspected 1862 Light Cavalry Saber by Millard. Millards have always been sought after, being one of the smallest contracts. This is a nice one with bright blade and some minor scattered dark spots and graying on the top outboard side about six inches from the tip. Very clear Millard, Clayville, NY, maker marks, inspector initials and date at the ricasso, matching C.E.W. inspector marks on the pommel. Good scabbard, no dents, just some age darkening, very good grip with original leather and wire. Still has chain hangers attached to the carrying rings that were on it when it came out of the Mott-Morse estate auction in New York last winter. Fresh to the collector market. A nice example of a scarce and desirable 1860 light cavalry saber by a sought after maker ... $1,295.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-44 ... Plant “Front-Loading” Army Revolver: Serial number 1754, third model. Six inch barrel, six shot. These .42 caliber revolvers were another popular privately purchased handgun in the Civil War. They fired a cup primed cartridge that was loaded from the front of the cylinder, and were sometimes provided with a standard percussion cylinder as well. Nice clear Plant markings on the barrel and Merwin & Bray New York barrel markings as is correct (they backed Plant and acted as agents.) The revolver is an interesting invention in that some of the design was an attempt to bypass patents held by Smith and Wesson. Very nice wood grips, barrel gray with dark spots, but no pitting and clear marks. Cylinder shows salt and peppering. The brass frame still shows a lot of silver plating, some of which has turned black in places, giving it a mottled appearance but this could be lightened with some careful cleaning. zfjjx ... $795.00 SOLD

 

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14-05-45 ... Southern Letters w/ Slave Content. Three pre war four page letters circa 1856 and two 1870s receipts. All three pre war letters are interesting with news from Virginia and Alabama. The cream of the lot is a letter dated Dewberry Aug. 31st 1856 from Charles Cook to his cousin. It starts out with family news and then includes the following unabashed commentary ... “ ... I fear it will be out of my power to attend to the little matter of business mentioned in Sis’ Lucy’s letter,  not from want of inclination but I don’t think we have any woman who would suit for the purpose mentioned. Indeed, on examination, I have been unable to find amongst our servants any women or girls whom I think likely to suit ourselves. Our servants have been so long entirely under the management of poor overseers and so little subject to the influence of a master or mistress, I could not recommend them to anyone. I shall only take out with me two or three and will have them all of one family if possible, but it will be a mere piece of good fortune if they make us good house servants. We have been so long in the habit of selling our servants in the South as punishment for bad conduct that there is a general disinclination amongst all of them in this part of Va. to moving out of the state…” I believe that section of that one letter is worth triple the price of admission to this lot. One hell of a piece of manuscript slave history from the Southern point of view. For the lot ... $450.00

 

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14-05-46 ... US Hospital Library Marked - 37th Illinois Identified Tract Book: 1827 dated volume of Sir Walter Scott’s “Waverly or Tis Sixty Years Since” (one of four volumes that comprised that work), part of the “Pocket Library of English Classics.” Pasted to the cover is a printed paper label reading  “For the use of invalid U.S. Soldiers, at New Orleans,” with the handwritten addition in ink “library.” Given the publication date, this could have been a charitable donation to a Mexican War era military hospital in that city, but is more likely a Civil War contribution to the hospital service. This is backed up by the period pencil identification on the flyleaf reading:

“Mr. Daniel D. Cooper / Belvidere/ Illinois / Co I 37th Regt. Ill Vol.” Cooper is listed in CWData as a resident of Belvidere who enlisted at age 24 on 9/1/61 as a private and mustered into Co. I 37th Illinois on 9/18/61. He re-enlisted as a veteran on 2/10/64 and was wounded severely in the left arm at Fort Blakely, Alabama, on April 9, 1865. This resulted in the amputation of his arm and his discharge for wounds on 5/24/65. He died in 1897 and was buried in Garden Prairie, Illinois. Note the photo of him found on the internet. I wonder if he was blinded in one eye as well? The 37th is a very interesting unit and there is far too much recorded in their history to more than summarize here. The unit was nicknamed the “Fremont Rifles” and saw very active service in Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas and later Texas (after Cooper’s wounding.)  Under Fremont it took part in the capture of Springfield, Mo., and then served under Curtis and Herron, being part of the Army of the Frontier, Department of the Tennessee, the Army and Department of the Gulf, and the 13th and 19th Corps at different points.  They took part in major engagements such as Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove, and were involved in the siege of Vicksburg, but also took part in numerous skirmishes and expeditions against Confederate guerrillas in Missouri and raiding forces elsewhere, earning the second nickname of the “Illinois Greyhounds” for their numerous and rapid marches. By the end of their service they had covered more than 3,000 miles on foot and another 14,000 by ship and rail. They lost 4 officers and 60 enlistedmen killed in action or mortally wounded.

The book is in somewhat delicate condition, with some tears and separations, but it displays very well and is a good candidate for a medical display but also for someone interested in the 37th Illinois and the western campaigns. It is also a reminder that the war did not end with Appomattox and a telling memento of a soldier who almost made it through unscathed, but suffered a crippling wound the same day Gen. Lee was surrendering ... $175.00

 

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14-05-47 ... Rare Subject ; Brevet Brigadier General William Tecumseh Wilson 15th and 123rd Ohio Infantry: Vignetted oval bust view in a field-grade officer’s coat mounted on a cdv card with a printed hanging frame to mimic a portrait hung on a wall. Tones a tad light, but clear. Reverse shows glue marks from mounting in an album. Old ink identification bottom front: “Col. W. T. Wilson / 123 Regt O.V.I.” Wilson is a tough Ohio colonel and brigadier general to find in an original 1860s photo. Born in 1823 in Pennsylvania, he apprenticed as a printer and eventually rose to be newspaper publisher and editor. During the Mexican War in enlisted in the Pennsylvania volunteers and participated in the sieges at Vera Cruz and Puebla, and the capture of Mexico City, rocketing up to the rank of fourth corporal by the time of his discharge in 1848. Thereafter he published newspapers in Hollidaysburgh, Pennsylvania, and then in Blair County, Ohio. When war broke out, he enlisted at age 35 on 4/23/61 and was commissioned Captain of Co. C 15th Ohio Volunteer Militia on 4/27/61. This was one of the first Ohio regiments, enrolled for three-month’s service, and was sent to West Virginia. There they did guard duty, but also served on a number of expeditions and took part in the actions at Philippi, Laurel Hill and Carrick’s Ford. After the regiment was mustered out, Wilson was promoted on 8/6/61 to Lt. Colonel of the 15th Ohio Volunteers, a three-year outfit assigned to the Army of the Ohio, which first saw action at Shiloh in April, 1862, losing 6 killed and 62 wounded under command of the regiment’s major. Wilson must have been well regarded, however, he was discharged from the 15th OVI on 9/26/62 for promotion to Colonel of the 123rd Ohio on 9/26/62, which again placed him in western Virginia. The regiment’s first real action was during Lee’s advance north in the Gettysburg campaign when they fought General Early at Winchester, losing some 100 men before being compelled to surrender the next day, 6/15/63, with the rest of the brigade. Wilson was confined at Macon and at Columbia, before being paroled 3/18/64 and officially exchanged 5/28/64. The regiment saw more action at Lynchburg, Snicker’s Ferry, Winchester, Berryville and other locations, facing off against Early several more times. Only at Opequon, Fisher’s Hill and Cedar Creek did they begin to taste victory and thereafter went to Bermuda Hundred and the siege of Petersburg, where they eventually gained credit for capturing two enemy flags. It was irony that their last action was the Battle of High Bridge in the pursuit of Lee, where they were hit from the rear by Confederate cavalry and once again became prisoners of war. Wilson mustered out with the regiment on 6/12/65. During their service they had suffered heavily, losing 91 officers and men killed or mortally wounded. Wilson served as Comptroller of the Treasury in Ohio and also as mayor of Upper Sandusky. He died at Columbus, Ohio, in 1905. Extremely scarce subject ... $195.00

 

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14-05-48 ... Likely an Ohio Infantry Line Officer: A nice CDV of an infantry line officer with some character. Typical of the young men who led companies into battle. This officer wears a plumed slouch hat with an embroidered infantry officer’s hunting horn on the front and holds his foot officer’s sword in its scabbard to the front with his hands on the pommel at “parade rest.” His frock coat is single breasted, showing him to be a captain or lieutenant. I think I see a single bar on the forward part of his shoulder strap, which would make him First Lieutenant. In any case, he was one of the line officers who mixed with their men on a daily basis and led them on the firing line. He was proud of his officer’s sword, to show it off to the camera he had to unhook it from its sword slings, which hang from his officer’s waistbelt. Part of his belt plate shows above his clasped hands, and his officer’s sash hangs down, the tassels showing at the left knee of his light colored trousers. This is a studio shot with a plain backdrop, but the rug shows a pattern. I can’t help noticing that rather than a fancy pair of boots he has adopted a comfortable pair of shoes for the long marches trudging beside his men. No backmark, When I was a teenager I found a CDV album here in NW Ohio that contained another identical CDV to the one here shown. As I recall that one bore a poem... "Remember me when this you see Though a thousand miles between us be." I don't know who this man is but I'll bet he served from Ohio or Michigan. Neat view ... $75.00

 

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14-05-49 ... Special Aide to Lincoln / African American Related / Signed CDV of Colonel Le Grand Bouton Cannon, Aide-de-Camp to General Wool, influential in the Union Defense Committee in 1861, the sheltering of escaped slaves at Fortress Monroe, the enlisting of black troops in the army, and internal army politics. Crisp vignetted bust view of a field-grade officer with flashy sideburns! Cannon was from New York and had served as a volunteer on General Wool’s staff before the Civil War. When most of Wool’s staff resigned and went south, Cannon and a few other prominent New Yorkers joined his staff as volunteers, Cannon acting a volunteer ADC to Wool from April 23 to August 28, 1861. During this period he took an active part in the Union Defense Committee of New York in corresponding with and aiding various northern governors, like the Governor of Illinois, who were trying to obtain arms, etc., and organize without adequate leadership from Washington.
Cannon was officially appointed Major and AADC on Wool’s staff August 28; and Colonel on Feb. 1, 1862. He accompanied Wool to Fortress Monroe, Virginia, which they preserved for the Union. Cannon was involved in formulating the “contraband” policy about escaped slaves who had sought protection at Fortress Monroe and was intimately involved in some of the army’s political infighting. His reminiscences published after the war include a number of first hand accounts of the Monitor and the Merrimac, time spent as a special aide to Lincoln, and experiences with Secretary Stanton, etc. Cannon resigned June 11, 1862, but rejoined Wool’s staff as a volunteer for a time thereafter, until Wool’s retirement in 1863. Cannon’s accounts are a real insider’s view of the doings at various army headquarters. He had been offered the military command of Norfolk, before resigning.
The card is presented to Lt. Col. Whipple, who is probably William Dennison Whipple, West Point class of 1847, who served until 1890, was both ADC and AAG at different points in his career, served on Gen. Hunter’s staff, the staff of General Thomas, and after the war as ADC to Sherman from 1873 to 1878: “Lt. Col. Whipple USA / Asst Adjt Genl / With regards / Le GB Cannon Col / USA & ADC.” Their staff duties had probably brought them into connection at some point, though Whipple was a New Yorker like Cannon.
A significant subject involved in some important early war doings ... $225.00

 

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14-05-50 ... General William F. Smith—He spoke his mind! Wonderful half-length seated view of the outspoken general in his major-general’s frock coat. Couple minor abrasions to card edge, otherwise excellent. “Baldy Smith” was West Point class of 1845, an officer of engineers until the Civil War, and Colonel of the 3rd Vermont in 1861 serving on the staff of General McDowell at Bull Run. He became a Brigadier General of Volunteers in 1861 and led a division of the 6th Corps on the Peninsula and the Maryland Campaign, and commanded the corps at Fredericksburg. Critical of Burnside and a supporter of McClellan, he was shunted aside in 1863 and sent west, where he ended up feuding with Rosecrans but earning some praise from Grant, and made Major General in 1864. Brought east to command the 18th Corps under Butler, he criticized both Butler and eventually Meade. Accusations that he could have acted more aggressively at Petersburg led to his removal from command in July, 1864. He left the army in 1867, turning to civil engineering and acting as president of a telegraph company and the NY Board of Police Commissioners until his death in 1903. My favorite quote of his was his judgment on Butler: “as helpless as a child on the field of battle and as visionary as an opium eater in council.” He cerrtainly knew how to craft a criticism ... $125.00

 

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14-05-51 ... Mexican War 1st US Dragoons Letter / Fort Gibson Indian Territory Cancellation: This is the real deal – a real Indian Fighter’s letter written from the Indian Territory during the Mexican War in anticipation of being sent to Mexico ... "We are fully equipped. We got new Saddles, Carbines and Pistols and savors (sabers) ... Ready for action at a moments warning and I hope we will get to go to mexico as I should like to go at the risk of my life". Dated Dec. 14th 1847 our trooper with the 1st US Dragoons. His mention of being issued “pistols” makes one wonder whether he is referring to single shot horse pistols, or Walker Colts. The letter is three large pages in ink. Content includes ... “ ... things I have experienced would astonish you ... I could hardly believe it myself ... “ he then changes the subject and says “ ... tell cyrus I would like to see him with his little gun on his shoulder marching after the birds ... tell him to learn to shoot well then he can become a soldier and kill the Indians ... ” Regarding Indians he further says: “ ... I have seen some great movements among them.” ... He describes army life, asks questions of those at home, tells them he wants to come home and tell the stories of his adventures in the wilds with the Indians. He says regarding Christmas “ ... We are going to have a great ball and we will all be dressed in uniforms and the young indian squaws in white and we expect to have a great time of it. Our squad room is fixed up all ready for the ball with green ... pine and flags ... ” Signed DW Koller Co H 1st Dragoons. This letter bears a Fort Gibson cancellation dated December 19th. Accompanying this is an 1858 dated military document on War Department stationery being a letter regarding trooper Daniel Koller’s discharge from the dragoons in 1856. This is signed by E.D. Townsend. Two neat early frontier army letters ... US Dragoons with what I assume is a very rare cancellation ... $495.00 SOLD

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