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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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14-04-40 ... Near Fine Condition Moore Teat Fire Revolver: These.32 caliber pistols were designed by Daniel Moore and manufactured by Moore and his partner David Williamson. The Moore .32 Teat-fire, used a unique cartridge which circumvented the Rollin White patent owned by Smith and Wesson. These small revolvers proved very popular during the Civil War, with both soldiers and civilians. The "Teat-fire" cartridges did not have a rim at the back like conventional cartridges, but were rounded at the rear, with a small "teat" that would protrude through a tiny opening in the rear of the cylinder. The priming mixture was contained in the "teat" and when the hammer struck it, the cartridge would fire. Cosmetically this example is about FINE condition with much original factory blue still remaining. Mechanically the gun will go to "half cock" but not "full". Also the cylinder does not index. Not sure how much tune-up it needs. This is the early model marked by Moore as opposed to National Arms ... $595.00

 

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14-04-41 ... Another Moore Early Model Revolver ... same as the above revolver but with a lower serial number. This one is mechanically perfect, and overall bright steel. 3 1/4" barrel, 7" overall length ... sn 10860 ... cz ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-42 ... Model 1816 / 1832 Dated Waters Conversion Musket ... Standard 1816 conversion as used by North and South throughout the war. Overall VG condition and mechanically perfect. Early "cone in barrel" conversion. Lots of interesting marks in the wood ... letters, numbers, inspectors marks, soldier's initials. Well worn but nice. Note that there is a hunk of ramrod and a musket ball stuck in the barrel just below the muzzle. Solid early musket ... $695.00

 

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14-04-43 ... Ivory Gripped and Engraved Bacon Revolver: Some background ... Bacon left the Manhattan Firearms Company to start his own business and made revolvers from about 1857 to 1868, about 1,400 marked with the name of his own firm and another 1,900 marked for other firms. This one is a standard round barrel pocket pistol with fluted cylinder and is marked for the Union Arms Co. This revolver is complete, numbered 855 on the loading lever, and is in the bright, showing a faded silver gray overall mixed with darker gray spots, and hammer showing slightly darker faded case color. The rear of the frame is floral engraved, well worn but very visible, and the pistol sports a showy pair of ivory grips with a nice mellow patina, the left side a tad lighter with a number of lengthwise character lines, solid and not chipped. Shows a little rounding to the toe and slight separation from the metal that is typical from shrinkage in this type of grip. Missing just the wedge screw, this is a nice looking gun. A well worn example of a high quality gun ... $850.00 SOLD

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14-04-44 ... Fabulous Tagged Confederate Belt Plate:  World class, Dead Real CSA buckle attributed to the Shiloh Battlefield and 53rd Ohio Regiment.  CSA plate mounted on ancient display board, which has in turn been mounted to an archival acid neutral card.  The absolutely fantastic manuscript note on the old card tells the story as recalled by a brother of the Union soldier who brought or sent the buckle home.  The stunningly visual tag reads…  “This Confederate belt plate was taken from a dead reb on the battlefield of Pittsburg Landing, Miss, April (?) 1862 by brother Lewis Wolfe member of Company B 53rd O.V.I.   He died in Athens O. May 24 1862  from the effects of exposure on the battlefield aged about 23 years. (missing text) ???t?r?d by ???r Wolfe.  … 1925 / Route 6 Athens O.”   I believe 1925 is the date the donor made the display tag, and “Route 6 Athens” is his Rural Farm Delivery (RFD) address.  I assume this display was made by  Wolfe’s brother, but it is possible that the word “brother” is being used in a fraternal brother context and perhaps both men were Oddfellows or something similar.  In any event the buckle is the classic Confederate enlistedman’s belt plate- the rectangular CSA, Atlanta or Minchemer pattern.  Absolutely genuine with a wonderful untouched age patina.  One hook broken off the reverse, the other two present, two glue spots on the reverse.  The old card mount is torn at the bottom two corners, and has a tape repaired break diagonally at the upper right.   About as exciting a visual relic as I have found this decade.  Lewis Wolfe or Woolf (the spelling of the last name in some of the records)  enlisted in Co. B 11/6/61 and is listed as dying of disease on 5/27/62.  The 53rd Ohio recruited in late 1861 and early 1862.  In February, 1862, it went to Paducah, KY, and was assigned to the 3rd Brigade in Sherman’s Division.  On the morning of April 6th the regiment, like most others in the Union army at Shiloh, was caught by surprise.  The colonel placed them in several different positions and they fought well, but eventually fell back in disorder until rallied by their officers.  It did not help that the colonel twice commanded them to “Fall back and save yourselves!”  before abandoning them.  After rallying they were deployed in support of a battery and later led forward as skirmishers and did some very good work, though this time a staff officer who had taken it upon himself to lead them forward also decided to twice command them to fall back.  They lost 9 killed and 51 wounded in the fighting,  but as the regimental historian noted, had maintained themselves “tolerably” and several of the companies had kept together “in almost perfect order all the time.”  Following the engagement, they took part in the siege of Corinth.  Wolf’s record indicates he died of disease, and the card mentions he suffered from the effects of exposure on the battlefield.  This would make perfect sense as the regiment was involved in burying the dead and policing the battlefield in the days following Shiloh.  It would also present Wolfe a perfect opportunity to pick up souvenirs, and an equal opportunity of contracting an illness from the unburied corpses.  Assuming the tag writer’s recollection  of the events of 60 years earlier is accurate,  this note adds some fire to recent debates.  It is believed that Atlanta arsenal began making CSA buckles around March 1862.  Some collectors believe the plates did not make it into the field until late 1862.  This theory is somewhat flawed in that there are over a dozen variants of the Atlanta style CSA buckle and each was made by a different contractor… most of which are still unknown,  and only one of which has any contract records surviving as far as I know (Minchemer).   The 1925 card clearly states “Pittsburg Landing” and “April 1862”. But then again we are relying on an elderly man’s recollections of a war that ended 60 years earlier. In any event, a beautiful and rare buckle, and  one of the most dramatic display items I have owned ... $3,650.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-45 ... Officer’s Eagle Belt Plate: Regulation 1851 pattern eagle belt plate for the sword belt. This is the commercial or private purchase style used by officers: the wreath is cast integrally to the plate and the die work is considerably better than those produced on contract to the government or at arsenals for issue to enlistedmen armed with swords and to NCOs. Bench number 220 on reverse. Slight distension of the side bar from actual wear on a belt. Some staining variation in tone on the reverse, nice even patina on the face. Classic CW belt plate worn by officers of all ranks and branches of service ... $295.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-45B ... Wonderful 98th Pennsylvania Soldier’s Silver 6th Corps Badge: The pictures tell the story. A superb example executed in silver. Nice large size (1.25” across each arm) regimental corps badge, inscribed to a soldier in a good regiment. The 98th was a solid Army of the Potomac unit that fought in all the big eastern battles losing 112 enlisted men to battle deaths and 9 officers to battle deaths. Our soldier was “lucky”. He was Presley Moore and is listed in the records as a “Substitute” ... meaning that a rich man who was drafted paid Presley Moore to join the service in his place. Yup, that was legal. Moore joined the regiment just in time to see the end of the Appomattox campaign and Lee’s surrender. Despite his limited affiliation with the 98th he obviously was proud of his service and bought himself a personalized silver corps badge to wear on his coat. Excellent save for missing pin on reverse. Top notch display item and very scarce ... $1,250.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-46 ... A Horse-Woman & Her Faithful Dog! Very nice Civil War period studio photo of a young woman plainly yet fashionably dressed, holding a long riding crop, with her faithful dog curled up at her feet. Painted studio backdrop of a river scene and sail boat in the background. The dog seems a bit bored by the whole process. She looks rather severe, especially with the crop and riding gloves in her hands. I will give her the benefit of the doubt and assume the accoutrements were used on her horse. Claflin photographer backmark. A wonderful 1860s portrait of a rarely encountered subject ... $125.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-47 ... CDV Bust of Enlisted Pennsylvanian in Kepi ... He Risked His Life For His Country: CDV card mounted oval albumen portrait of a young unidentified enlistedman wearing a military jacket or coat and forage cap. This is a wartime albumen copy of a tintype mounted on a preprinted hanging frame design on the card to imitate a portrait hanging on a wall. Tones are somewhat light as usual in such shots, but the detail is there: a nice bowtie showing for the camera, worn with a checked shirt, the edge of the photographer’s chair visible behind his arm. Typical of the millions of young men who risked their lives to preserve the Union. The fact that the family had to copy a tintype to get this portrait suggests that he may not have made it home. Slight abrasion and glue stain on reverse. No backmark. Most affordable ... $20.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-48 ... Tight and Crisp Martially Marked Colt Navy Revolver with belt, buckle and holster ... A great set that came together this way! All matching Colt Navy bears sn 73393; manufactured in 1857. Right grip mark WAT is William Anderson Thornton, US Capt. from 1840-1861. Left grip CGC is CG Chandler. Has US sub inspector's stamps on the various steel parts ... "S" on left grip - "S" on the cylinder & bbl.; "K" behind trigger guard and "L" on left side trigger guard. The roll engraved naval battle scene on the cylinder is 90% or better intact. All edges and markings are crisp. The action is perfect. The steel is clean steel/gray in color and tone. 100% original 100% complete and mechanically perfect. Also offered here is the belt, US buckle, and holster that housed the revolver for the last 160 years. Leather is complete but well worn.
Price for the revolver by itself is ... $2,495.00
Price for the leather by itself is ... $595.00
Or if you want the leather and holster the price is ... $2,995.00 SOLD

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14-04-49 ... 1848 Batty Flask ... Super Nice Batty Peace Flask: Called the “Peace Flask” because of the clasped hands motif amid the sunburst surrounded by stars that is embossed on each side over a trophy of arms. Truly a handsome piece of Americana. These are military flasks made on contract to the government for military shoulder arms. This one is made and marked by Batty in 1848. The tall adjustable spout, carrying rings, thumb piece and spring are all present. The body is solid and the seams are intact. The condition of the body of the flask is wonderful, with no dents or depressions and with an undisturbed patina makes this exceptional. The date is enough to qualify as Mexican War, but it is really an early frontier and western expansion piece. A beautiful piece of die work ... $595.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-50 ... Cincinnati Dealer Marked Remington Vest Pocket Pistol: This is one of many of the small derringer type pistols I like. Also known as the “Saw Handle Derringer” this was the Remington “Number 1” made in .22 caliber rimfire between 1865 and 1888. Single shot with walnut grips, the hammer also acts as a breechblock. A muted silver gray overall. Some scattered brown spots on the right side. The pistol still has its small front sight and shows a very legible Remington barrel legend “Remington’s Ilion NY Patent Oct. 1 ,1861” in two lines with just some rubbing on the beginning of the firm name. The left side shows the well known and highly sought Cincinnati dealer marking: “B. Kittredge & Co.” in an arc over “Cin O” with some rubbing in the center of the arc. Kittredge was a well known supplier of guns and equipment not only to military customers (his copper cartridge boxes are always sought after), but also to travelers going down the Ohio river through Cincinnati toward St. Louis and The West. These little gems are darn scarce. They are a small but effective weapon that was easily concealed in a vest pocket or garter, and while not intended for long distance work (unless you consider a yard long distance) it could save a man’s life in a tight spot at the card table. Funny that Remington bothered with a front sight at all... but who knows... with careful aim maybe you could hit a barn door at 10 paces. Perfect gambler or river boat or saloon girl display item ... zfjjp ... $850.00

 

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14-04-51 ... Confederate D-Guard Bowie: The real-deal ... Classic Confederate fighting knife, 18 inches overall with a 13 inch clipped point blade with iron D-guard and wood handle. Excellent in all respects. These knives were tremendously popular with early war Confederate volunteers headed to the front and exhibit a wide variety in style of blade, guard and grip. A very few have been identified by maker, but the vast majority were made in small batches by local makers to arm a company or less and most makers remain unknown. The result is a very interesting collecting field. This knife shows a classic flat blade forged with the clip point everyone associates with the Bowie knife. The guard is thick flat iron forged with a forward-curved quillon and secured at the pommel by peening over the blade tang. The grips are one-piece wood (Ash I believe) with no ferrules. Blade shows some light standing rust and stains with some slight delamination toward the tip as a result of the hasty forging. The grip shows a longitudinal crack from shrinkage but is stable. These knives were meant to intimidate as well as for business. They became so iconic of the South that they were popular souvenirs sent home by Yankees lucky enough to capture one. Place this next to a Cedar wood canteen and you have the beginnings of a great Confederate collection. A genuine Rebel Bowie knife ... $1,795.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-52 ... Soldier Marked Yankee Canteen Actually Issued: For a long time collectors ignored worn - real issued - and field-used gear in favor of mint unissued examples. I’ve always preferred artifacts that were carried by soldiers. Here is a standard 1858 pattern US canteen with a brown wool cover bearing the stenciled company letter “G” and a numeral “33.” While it is tempting to look around for a hard-fighting regiment with that number, the likelihood is that this is the soldier’s company letter and “rack” number, a number assigned to him within the company to identify government equipment issued to him. The cover is tight and complete, just showing dirt and staining from being carried in the field. The stopper is gone, but would have been a standard type secured to the body by a simple string looped through one bracket. The original sling is folded and sewn tan cotton drilling with an adjustment buckle affixed. My old friend and renowned collector John Henry Kurtz used to love canteens like this that show lots of variation in type, cover color and individual alteration and markings. This one would look great in any soldier display, but would look especially impressive grouped with other individualized examples ... $395.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-53 ... Solid Silver Cigar and Match Case 1861: Freshly found at a hoity toity estate auction in Detroit, with no connection to Civil War artifacts, is this solid silver European cigar and match case with monogram and 1861 date. I found it by web searching auction advertisements with the date “1861” in the text. I stumbled on this and went after it. Very nicely engraved two sectioned hinged top silver cigar and match case. A most ingenious design. The top opens to reveal an upper section that is shallow and holds matches crosswise. This whole section then hinges open from the other side to reveal the lower compartment for holding the cigars. This is a beautiful piece bearing Dutch hallmarks which also confirm the 1861 date. It would be appropriate for display with a well-heeled officer’s effects. The case has a serrated striking surface on the top section, and floral and geometric designs on the faces and sides of the case, with two open central panels. On one side the initials “FHK” have been professionally engraved. The other side bears the date “1861.” A high quality piece of antique silver&hellip ... $475.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-54 ... Colt Model 1849 Pocket Revolver w/ 4 Inch Barrel: These .31 caliber revolvers were extremely popular from the time of their introduction in 1850 during the gold rush, through the westward expansion, then the Civil War, and through the early Wild West period in the 1870s. They were a popular means of self defense for travelers, miners, and soldiers who needed something light and handy. They gained extreme popularity during the Civil War as an affordable and convenient side arm for all soldiers and especially officers who had to supply their own weapons. In addition many officers did not want to be lugging around large frame revolvers if they were marching on foot, as most of them were. Ours is a late war production bearing serial # 275,073. Flayderman gives 280,000 as the approximate cut-off for wartime production, so this gets in well under the wire as a potential side arm for an officer in the field as well as an early western gun. The metal is very good and shows some faint faded blue on the barrel, but mostly purplish gray overall with darker gray mixed in and just minor dings. Markings and mechanics good. No cylinder scene to speak of, but clear cylinder number and patent marking. Grips have minor handling dings, with nice tight fit to the straps and frame. All original with matched serial numbers except for the rammer assembly which bears number 8698 … Unquestionably replaced during the gun’s period of service. The model 1849 pocket revolver can be found with hundreds of variations and is arguably the most collectible of all 19th century Colts. There are several books devoted exclusively to this one model. A tight honest Colt Pocket that functions perfectly ... $750.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-55 ... Full Flap Holster for Pocket Revolver: Wonderful 1860 "all sewn" full flap holster with tooled edge lines and sewn-closed muzzle end. This fits a 4-inch Colt Pocket revolver perfectly. It also fits a Whitney Pocket, Bacon Pocket, and Union Arms Pocket revolver. Note the placement and angle of the belt loop on the back. This sets the holster and contents at a less acute angle presumably for quicker access by the wearer when he needed to draw his gun. One of the more appealing holsters I have found ... $325.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-56 ... Government Issued Drumstick Carriage: These clipped corner rectangular brass plates with two barrel shaped tubes were worn on the drummer’s drum sling which went across his chest. I am aware of one Civil War photograph where the drummer has one of these fastened to his waist belt. They were affixed to the sling by iron wire bent to form hooks and soldered to the reverse. The issue drumsticks were strongly tapered and slid into the tubes with the tops projected above the upper rims of the tubes. This one has a nice undisturbed age patina on the brass and the wire hooks on the reverse have been bent flat … Why? Because someone had used this as a wall mounted match-stick-holder during the late 1800s! Drummers were company musicians and remained in service as “field music” even after regimental bands were mustered out. These are a rather scarce piece of Union Army Issue equipment ... $495.00

 

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14-04-57 ... Eagle Breastplate ... Eagle Plate for Cartridge Box Sling: Regulation circular stamped brass plate with iron loops set in the solder filled back and the arms of the US, an eagle with arrows and olive branch, embossed on the face.  These plates were introduced in the 1820s for use on the bayonet slings, and were adapted to the cartridge box sling as the bayonet was later not worn on a shoulder sling and shifted to wear on the waistbelt.   During the Civil War they were a regulation accoutrement plate and though experiments were made in abolishing them they remained in the field throughout the war.  This one has an unbelievably rich undisturbed age patina with just some rubbing on the high points and a couple edge dings.  Very attractive so-called “eagle breastplate”  Super patina. ... $225.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-58 ... Eagle Plate for Cartridge Box Sling: Regulation circular stamped brass plate with iron loops set in the solder filled back and the arms of the US, an eagle with arrows and olive branch, embossed on the face. These plates were introduced in the 1820s for use on the bayonet slings, and were adapted to the cartridge box sling as the bayonet was later not worn on a shoulder sling and shifted to wear on the waistbelt. During the Civil War they were a regulation accoutrement plate and though experiments were made in abolishing them they remained in the field throughout the war. This one has a nice mellow color on the brass. Very attractive so-called “eagle breastplate” ... $225.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-59 ... Outstanding Copper Powder Flask: Nice 31 to 36 caliber size copper flask in truly excellent condition. From tip of spout to the bottom of the flask measures 5 inches. Top end condition ... $165.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-60 ... “Before Any” Bowie Knife / Frontier Knife: In the same vein as the imported “I*XL” or “I Excel” knives is this “B4*Any” knife by F. Ward & Co. Cutlery of Sheffield, which is so marked on the inboard ricasso and has the motto deeply stamped in the blade. Made between 1856 and 1881 this knife has stag horn grips, 10 ¾ inches overall with a 6 ¾ inch blade with its original “dress” scabbard buttoned into its field leather scabbard with the belt loops folded down to make the knife ride higher on the wearer’s side. Spearpoint blade with a substantial false edge. German silver guard, small rectangular plaque in the inboard grip, uninscribed. Blade shows heavy polishing that has removed any nicks but left the cutting edge a tad uneven and rubbed the left of the “B” in the blade motto. Perfect for frontier or buffalo hunter display, and not incorrect for Civil War ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-61 ... "U.S." Patriotically Marked Folding Knife ca 1860: Horn handled with nicely embossed German silver mounts by Edward Barnes & Sons, this knife is a high quality Sheffield product, created for the American market. Five inches closed and 9 inches overall when open, the blade shows Barnes’ marking at the ricasso with a small U*S (a star between the U and S) and much larger starred US on the blade. Spear point blade with a substantial false edge. Good edge and point, rubbing to the left and top of blade motto, but still visible. Some light pitting and dark spots toward the ricasso. A nice addition to a display of soldier’s personal effects or accompaniment to a period western or gambler’s collection. The “U*S” blade motto leaves no doubt who it was made for. A great Civil War personal item. ... $395.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-62 ... Rare Photo Army of the Potomac on the Peninsula: A superb Matthew Brady Album Gallery Card (No. 402) showing the “Principal Landing and Road to Yorktown.” Copyright notice printed on bottom front card and applied label to reverse. Very Good condition, minor spots and foxing in sky otherwise super. McClellan took the sea route to attack Richmond by way of the peninsula in the Spring of 1862 and moved with a methodical and deliberate slowness that did his engineering background proud. Here is a view of a Federal steamer and a small sailing vessel at dock having delivered supplies at Yorktown, which McClellan seized after spending a long time preparing for a great siege and bombardment, which never needed to be implemented. Brady's camera was positioned in the middle of a road leading inland looking back toward the river, with Gloucester in the background. Wagons stand ready at the left to transport them to the front. At the right stand a couple of buildings likely housing offices and storerooms. Soldiers are seen milling about and one mounted figure seems to have spotted the camera and posed in the middle of the road. On the right two rails run along the front of the buildings down toward the dock, probably to support a small car to carry freight back and forth to the dock from the buildings. More supply ships are anchored in the river. The impressive display of organization and resources deployed for the campaign supplied a lot of material for the cameramen and they were determined to chronicle the campaign that seemed destined to end the war. There was rather less to photograph after Lee hit the Union right and sent McClellan back down the peninsula during the Seven Days Battles. One heck of a photograph ... $450.00

 

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14-04-63 ... Officer in Full Dress ... Looks Like Someone Important. Dashing looking fellow in vignetted chest-up view showing him in a double-breasted field grade officer's coat with epaulets. Rookwood, New York, photographer back mark. The epaulets show some kind of insignia fore and aft on the pads, but I cannot make them out. His countenance is such that it gives the impression he is someone of note ... perhaps famous ... Maybe one of you recognize him. My recollection is that I acquired this carte in a large group of obscure generals and staff officers in one album. He looks like Regular Army. Neat portrait of this major or colonel ... $100.00

 

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14-04-64 ... General Birney by McLees of Philadelphia: Vignetted chest-up view of Birney as a Brigadier General, showing his single star on his shoulder strap closest to the camera and the top rows of his double-breasted coat with the buttons grouped by two. Card corners rounded for album insertion, probably by a proud Pennsylvania family. Birney was a Pennsylvania fighting general. Originally Lt. Colonel and Colonel of the 23rd PA, known as Birney’s Zouaves, he made Brigadier General in February, 1862, commanding a brigade under Kearny and then taking over the division after Kearny’s death. At Gettysburg he commanded the left of Sickles’ advanced line and was in charge of the sector from Little Round Top through the Rose Farm and up to the Peach Orchard. He took over the entire corps after a cannon ball took off Sickles’ leg. When the Third Corps was amalgamated with the Second, Birney followed as a Division commander, fought in Grant’s 1864 overland campaign and was slated to take over the 10th Corps when he fell ill. He returned to Philadelphia on leave and died in October, 1864. Nice view of a strong character likely taken soon after his promotion to general. Period pencil notations on reverse along with erased modern dealer’s pencil notes. A significant Union general ... $125.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-65 ... Identified Ohio Soldier: Krebs’ Gallery, Lima, Ohio, An oval albumen waist-up view mounted in a printed floral frame. The view shows a serious young soldier in a dark military frock coat or jacket with large brass buttons, buttoned at the throat. A period pencil identification on the upper reverse seems to read “James Vorass.” A quick search among Ohio soldiers shows a “James Vorhes” and a “James Vorhees,” both likely candidates for a phonetic spelling of “Vorhass.” Vorhes served in the 21st and 68th Ohio as an officer and was 34 years old and this fellow is certainly younger. The better candidate is James Vorhees, who served in the 57th Ohio. Vorhees enlisted at age 20 and mustered into Co. C as a private on 2/28/64. He made it to the field, but did not last long, dying of disease 5/12/64 at Chattanooga, where he is buried in the National Cemetery. It was not a glorious death on the battlefield, but he died just the same. It was a war where more men fell to illness and disease than to enemy bullets, and it does not lessen their sacrifice. A touching image ... $55.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-66 ... Exceedingly Rare Starr Revolver Flask ... These small pocket size eagle flasks with canted (angled) long spouts were sold with the Starr revolvers. They are damn scarce any day of the week. This is a fine example with E. Pluribus Unum, and Eagle and 13 Stars on each side. There are a couple gentle surface dings, otherwise outstanding. One of the rarest of the eagle motif flasks ... $950.00 SOLD
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COLT'S PATENT / ELEY BROS. PERCUSSION CAP TINS:
Each are about 1 1/2" in diameter.

14-04-67A ... Rare tin for 250 caps with most of the paper label. Perfect for a cased set ... $300.00 SOLD

14-04-67B ... 100 cap size with portions of the paper label. This one has about 30 caps still present, while the others have none ... $135.00 SOLD

14-04-67C ... 100 cap size with embossed tin lid ... $50.00 SOLD
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14-04-68 ... Cleaning Jag ... 4 1/2" in total length Perfect for display with any of the little 28 or 31 caliber small revolvers ... $50.00 SOLD

14-04-69 ... Colts Patent Bullet Mold ... Brass 31 caliber with conical and round ball cavities. Fine to excellent with strong Colt's Patent mark. This one is nice enough for a cased set ... $225.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-70 ... Regulation Civil War Cartridge Box Sling: Well worn but the real-deal. One end has full billet (narrow attaching strap) intact, other end billet torn off but easily restored. One tear in body, also easy to repair. Faint maker's mark visible. Measures approx 55 inches overall. A real infantry cartridge box sling, super cheap, ready for restoration ... $85.00 SOLD

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14-04-71 Very Fine CW Musket Sling 01: Regulation issue sling for the Springfield and contract muskets, roughly 1" wide ... 45 1/2" overall. Complete with brass hook, sewn loop end, and sliding loop keeper. Fine to excellent condition with good life and superb finish. Faint maker's stamp near hook end. Just some storage dirt that will clean easily. A very nice example ... $325.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-72 Very Fine CW Musket Sling 02: Regulation issue sling for the Springfield and contract muskets, roughly 1" wide ... just under 44" overall. Complete with brass hook, sewn loop end, and sliding loop keeper. Fine to excellent condition with good life and superb finish. No maker's mark present. Just some storage dirt that will clean easily. A very nice example. These are always in demand and I can NEVER find them any more. I got lucky with an old timer at a recent gun show and picked up three dandy examples ... $325.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-73 Very Fine CW Musket Sling 03: Regulation issue sling for the Springfield and contract muskets, roughly 1" wide ... just under 44" overall. Complete with brass hook, sewn loop end, and sliding loop keeper. Fine to excellent condition with good life and superb finish. Faint "C.S. Storms NY" maker's mark near hook end. Just some storage dirt that will clean easily and a small repair on the back. A very nice example. These are always in demand and I can NEVER find them any more. I got lucky with an old timer at a recent gun show and picked up three dandy examples ... $295.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-74 Nepperhan Pocket Revolver: Similar in design to the Bacon and Manhattan revolvers, only about 5,000 Nepperhan revolvers were manufactured in the early 1860s. Ours is a very nice, clean example of the five-shot revolver with a six-inch octagon barrel in .31 caliber, matching serial number 1982. Smooth metal, gray with mixed brown and plum spots, smoky plum in places on frame from faded case, no pitting, just some salt and peppering at the barrel cone next to the cylinder and front edge of cylinder from firing. Front sight is blade style. “Nepperhan / Fire Arms Co.” two-line barrel marking. Nice wood with good fit to the metal, one very slight fingernail width depression on the upper left shoulder. Mechanically perfect, nipples solid and not battered down. A very good example of the many styles of “pocket” revolvers that came to market in the period. Perfect not only for an American revolver collection but for a collection of the early west and Civil War officers’ side arms. Much rarer than a Colt pocket revolver, but costs less ... $795.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-75 ... Fine Patriotic Civil War Soldier's Testament: Classic pocket military testament given to soldiers by various Bible societies and commissions. Solid condition showing only light wear. The only name inside is that of a woman. Perhaps the wife of the soldier. Great display item ... $145.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-75B ... 1863 Revised US Army Regulations Identified to a 6th Corps Officer from the late Syd Kerksis Collection: The name Syd Kerksis should ring a bell for most collectors. Among other things, he wrote the first encyclopedic reference book on buckles and plates of the USA and CSA. Here’s a set of the 1863 army regulations printed in 1863 by the Government Printing Office in Washington from his library with his bookplate inside the front cover. Typical blue cloth binding with gilt stamping. A tad loose, with wear to the corners and edges, but actually used in the field by a Civil War officer. On the flyleaf is period ink officer’s inscription “Henry R. Dalton / Major & a.a.g /1 Div 6 Corps.” Henry Rogers Dalton (1838-1914) enlisted at age 22 in Boston as a Second Lieutenant in the First Mass Heavy Artillery on 2/10/62. He must have been talented and well connected for he was discharged for promotion on 5/28/62 and promoted Captain and Assistant Adjutant General, and then to Major 6/30/64. He resigned 11/25/64 and was discharged. The Sixth Corps was a hard-fighting Army of the Potomac organization that gained particular fame starting in the 1864 Overland Campaign under “Uncle John” Sedgwick. The 1861 and revised 1863 regulations are key to understanding the day-to-day functioning of the army. Everything from composition of the regiments, recruiting soldiers, duties of officers and non-commissioned officers, operations of the quartermaster, ordnance, medical and subsistence departments, engineers, etc., etc., to the forms of the myriad reports and documents they had to supply. This is the starting point for an understanding of the Civil War military. Note that we found a portrait of Dalton online ... $250.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-76 ... Civil War Chess Pieces ID'd to William Alford ... 1864 Dated Civil War Chess Set: Chess was one of the more socially acceptable pastimes in camp during the long periods of boredom between campaigns and battles. Here is a complete set of turned wood pieces (a couple w/ repairs) in their original wood box with sliding cover. In wonderful period pencil on the underside of the lid are some notes and the owner’s identification: “Wm. Alford / 1864.” A few abrasions to the wood box exterior from use, but overall very good condition. Fourteen entries for “William Alford” show up on CWData. The set might have belonged to one of them or to a civilian of the period. In either case, it is dead-on Civil War period and a perfect addition to a camp display.

5 1/4" x 2 3/4" x 4" box ... the black queen and one black pawn are missing the top nubs (see same piece in white for comparison) ... a pawn is about 1 1/4" tall, king is 3 1/8" tall ... $295.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-77 ... Minty 6-shot Pepperbox ... Beautiful, High Finish, Engraved English Pepperbox Revolver: Superb condition! This gun has beautifully contoured wood grips and wonderfully vivid case colors remaining on the steel. These early pepperboxes were case hardened on the frame, hammer, and barrels. The receiver and bar hammer are elaborately engraved with entwined floral sprays as are even the grip screw and escutcheon, the upper and lower backstrap, and both butt and butt cap, which opens to give access to a small compartment for caps or patches. The engraving is exquisite and of the highest English quality. Barrels are likewise engraved with lovely floral motifs at the very muzzle; the flutes are plain and preserve much case color. Receiver is beautifully engraved “Beal” and “Oundle” (a British town) on one side, and “Improved Revolving Pistol” on the other. This is quite a showy gun, suitable for a gentleman’s study, coach, or pocket as he visited the American frontier in the 1850s. It is certainly a cut above those likely carried by his companions as they bounced along in the stage coach keeping an eye out for hostile Indians and local bandits ... $1,875.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-78 ... Colt 1860 Army Revolver Made in 1863: A standard side arm of the US cavalry in the Civil War, the .44 caliber army delivered a solid punch. There were many .36 and .44 caliber revolvers issued and used in the war, but the .44 Colt was the most widely used and remains the most universally recognized trooper’s handgun.  This one is a real decent example that is getting hard to find at a reasonable price. Smooth metal, mottled gray with dark spots forward, but no pitting. Some rubbing to the center of the barrel address, but forward and aft sections are very legible. No cylinder scene to speak of, but some the cylinder patent markings and incised lines are visible. Smooth smoky gray to the receiver showing where case colors have faded. Screw slots decent, one at top rear frame showing some wear, clear caliber marking on triggerguard, very good wood to metal fit. Very good grips. Very slight chip at toe of butt. No cartouches visible, which is usual. Mechanism good, nipples not battered. Front sight a bit worn from holster use. Couple minor dings near wedge. All matching serial number 87175, which is an early to mid 1863 date: they started around number 85,000 that year and ended up around number 150,000. This puts it as a strong candidate for most of the hard fighting done by the Union cavalry, who really only came into their own that Spring. A very good gun for the money and a key piece in a Civil War firearms or cavalry display ... $1,450.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-79 ... Double Bordered Captain of Infantry Bullion Embroidered Shoulder Straps: Very nice condition large size set of infantry shoulder straps with some stray threads showing us that these were actually worn on a uniform coat. They are a cut above the standard fare, showing two outer borders of alternating dead and bright bullion and two doubled bars at each end as well to indicate the rank of captain. The centers are velvet, showing some wear, but retaining all the attractive original light blue color, indicating the officer served in the infantry. Interior and exterior jaceron wire borders in place, typical open back construction. Measure 4.75 inches by 1.75 inches. Insignia offers a lot of variation for the collector by rank, branch of service and, as here, in the type of construction. These would look great not just in an insignia collection, however, but with that foot officer’s sword and sash or as part of an infantry collection. This is the insignia of the typical company commander who marched on foot beside his men and fought beside them as well. I paid $400 and I want ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-80 ... Exquisite Miniature Embroidered Gilt Bullion Embroidered Captain of Staff Shoulder Straps: Staff straps are among the flashiest of officer’s insignia, the gold bullion embroidery standing in strong relief against the beautiful midnight blue ground. And what makes these EXTRA special is that they are a wonderful miniature pair which is about a hundred times rarer than the standard and large sizes. Here is a superb set for a Captain. Single border, inner and outer jaceron wire in place. Pairs of gilt bars set off from the borders at each end. Plush darkest blue velvet centers, typical open back construction. Staff officers served vital functions at all levels of command, from the regimental adjutants up to the brigade, division and corps aides who carried orders under fire to implement maneuvers on the battlefield. As with the other set offered in this list, they would go great in an insignia or officer’s collection, but also among the types that would be seen in combat as well as support roles. 2 7/8" by 1 1/4". Near mint and very attractive ... $575.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-81 ... 3rd Iowa ID'd Field Officers Photo ... 1863 Group Portrait: the Field Officers of the 3rd Iowa Infantry- two of them twice wounded in action with this hard-fighting unit: Nicely inscribed mount measures roughly 8 by 4.5 inches and is a flexible enameled card stock onto which is mounted the albumen photo of three officers posed seated waist-up in double-breasted field grade frock coats with shoulder straps. These guys meant business. It does not look like Col. Aaron Brown, on the left, ever had to give an order twice. Ancient ink id at top over an even older pencil id: “Field Officers 3rd Iowa Infantry” and at bottom the names of the individuals from left to right “Col. Aaron Brown, Lt. Col. Jas. Tullis, Major GW. Crosley.” Brown and Crosley have their home towns written below: Fayette and Webster City. The location of the photo is also given: “Memphis Tenn Sept. 1863.” Similar information in a slightly later blue ink is on the reverse. Mount has diagonal creases and cracks at corners not affecting the image. Brown enlisted at age 39 on 5/20/61 and mustered in as 2nd Lt in Co. F. He was wounded at Blue Mills Landing, MO on 9/17/61, made Captain 4/8/62 in the wake of Shiloh, and resigned for disability 8/31/62, but his promotion was in the works and he was commissioned Major 10/15/62 and Colonel 11/27/62. He was wounded again, severely in the right thigh, 7/12/63 at Jackson, Miss., and resigned 7/13/64. Tullis (1833-1887) was a 26 year-old clerk when he enlisted 6/1/61 and was commissioned 6/8/61 as 2nd Lt in Co. H. He made Captain 2/13/62 and Lt. Colonel 11/21/62, and mustered out 6/18/64. He was twice severely wounded: at Blue Mills Landing, MO, 9/17/61 and at Shiloh, 4/6/62. George W. Crosley enlisted at age 22 at First Sergeant on 5/21/61 and was mustered into Co. E 6/8/61. He made 1st Lt 6/26/62—he actually commanded the regiment as a second lieutenant on the second day of Shiloh; Major 3/8/63; He mustered out of the 3rd Iowa 6/9/64 and was commissioned into Hancock’s Veteran Corps 10/1/64 and mustered out from at organization 5/11/65. Lt. Col. and Col. by brevet to date March 13, 1865. The Third Iowa was hard fighting unit: 7 killed at Blue Mills Landing, 22 killed and about 150 wounded at Shiloh, service at Iuka, Corinth and Vicksburg, another 20 killed at Jackson. Under other officers they saw more service and losses at Atlanta, where the remnant of the regiment, consolidated into three companies, was essentially destroyed. They lost a total of 9 officers and 119 enlistedmen killed and mortally wounded, spending most of their time in the Department and the Army of Tennessee and West Tennessee, in the 17th and 16th Corps, briefly in the 13th. Brown and Crosley both filed regimental reports in the Official Records of various battles and expeditions that make very interesting reading. I personally collect Michigan photos and if I could find a similar image from one of my regiments I would do cartwheels. Great historical portrait ... $365.00 SOLD

 

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14-04-82 ... Hanged for his Role in the Minnesota Uprising! Sioux Indian Stereoview by a St. Paul, Minnesota, Photographer: Stereoview from Martin’s Gallery of St. Paul of “Te-na-ze-pa” or “Dandy” a member of the Dakota Sioux, identified in period 1862 pencil on reverse at bottom, with a photographer's label at upper left reverse: “From Martin’s Photographic Gallery, 315 Third St. Upper Town, St. Paul. – Minn.” Early form separately mounted "from life" stereo halves on a plain mount. Subject is shown ¾ length seated with Sioux headdress with feather, elaborately printed shirt and many necklaces, holding a magnificent tack-decorated gunstock war club in his lap. That club would be something to see in person! Te-na-ze-pa is recorded as one of the 38 Sioux executed for their roles in the Minnesota Uprising of 1862. The photograph certainly dates to the period of his captivity, when he and many others were the objects of great public attention. CDVs and stereoviews of him exist that are credited to Martin’s Gallery and also to Whitney and to Whitney and Zimmerman, who were also St. Paul photographers. This Martin stereoview can be considered VERY scarce. Crisp sepia tones, fine clarity ... Fantastic historical image ... $395.00 SOLD

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14-04-83 ... 14-01-35 ... CDV Classic Yankee Armed Infantryman:  This guy was not much for show in his choice of uniform or photographer’s studio.  Bare-headed, he wears a four-button fatigue blouse with his bayoneted rifle at his side, cartridge box sling crosses his chest, his waist belt showing his oval US plate is hitched high up forcing something he stuffed into his blouse pocket way down, creating a very odd bulge. Tip of his bayonet scabbard just visible below his left hand. Very plain backdrop hangs down to the wide-planked bare wood floor of the photographer’s studio or shack. Two minor tape stains reverse with tax stamp. This is the typical Yankee soldier posed with no pretense ... $85.00

 

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14-04-84 ... 14-01-44 ... CDV From-Life - Brigadier General Irvin McDowell ... Good full-standing view of the famous, but ill-starred, general. E. Anthony New York backmark made from the Matthew Brady negative that was part of his “National Portrait Gallery.” McDowell wears a brigadier general’s frock coat and straps, a rank he gained in May, 1861, holding his trademark cap down at his side and holding the hilt of a saber hanging from his belt. (The sword looks Austrian, and Austrian goods were all the craze at the time.) He was West Point Class of 1838 and served on Wool’s staff in the Mexican War. Forever tied to the defeat at First Bull Run, he is perhaps more famous for the extra tall forage cap he wore which collectors still refer to as a McDowell Pattern Cap. Later he was in command of the Department of the Pacific. He made major general in the regular army in 1872, and retired in 1882. Ironically, he taught tactics at West Point in the early 1840s, likely to some future high-ranking Confederate officers ... $79.00

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14-04-85 ... Log Cabin Syrup tins ca 1940s or 1950s - Lot of 2 - I bought ‘em ‘cuz I liked ‘em… Then I researched them this afternoon. An example of my frontier school tin sold on eBay for $175.00 way back on 9/27/98. This is likely the rarest of the Towle’s Log Cabin Syrup tins. (But then another sold this year for less than a hundred dollars.) An example of the pitcher pump and kids playing cowboys & indians sold for 62.99 on ebay in January 2014. So we have two neat Americana advertising tins with proven auction value of nearly two hundred dollars. Because I detest eBay’s crazy rules and restrictions, and I refuse to sell there ... I will sell you this pair of nostalgic advertising tins for ... $95.00 SOLD 

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