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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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14-02-01 ... English Proofed Smith & Wesson Model 1 In Rare Fitted “Pipe Casing” ... Sn 33705. Finding these gems in “pipe casings” is darn rare. So-called because the case is made the same way the fancy meerschaum smoking pipe cases were made during the period. This Model 1 type II has a standard 3.25 inch barrel. Overall “fine+” condition as follows … Frame and barrel exhibit 70% to 80% original factory high luster blue. The cylinder bears English proof marks and the gold plate finish was restored many years ago. The rosewood grips are near perfect.  Mechanically perfect.  English proofed Smith & Wessons are a rarity in and of themselves.  This one is truly a gem ... $2,600.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-02 ... Extra Nice Mississippi Rifle: A much better than average example of the US Model 1841 Mississippi Rifle.  This rifle is 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect.  The most appealing aspect is that the lock table (wood around the lock) is still proud with good edges. This area us usually worn away on a Mississippi rifle. This has matched dates of 1850 on the lock and barrel tang.  Original .54 caliber bore.  Excellent rifling.  This model was adopted in 1841 and production began in 1843.  The rifle was not designed to accept a bayonet, as the tactics of the time called for riflemen to be deployed as skirmishers or to take long range shots at targets of opportunity. This example has a Colt screw-on bayonet adapter and numbered saber bayonet accompanying it, though the rifle is a standard Whitney contract “unaltered”. I do not know if the bayonet was added during the Civil War or by a collector in more recent times.  It adds greatly to the display impact, but is easily removed. This model acquired the nickname “Mississippi Rifle” in the hands of the 1st Mississippi Rifles regiment during the Mexican War under the command of Jefferson Davis, future president of the CSA.   The fixed notch rear sight was optimized for a point of aim of 50 yards, but proved to be effective at much greater distances.   Just prior to the war Secretary of War John B Floyd ordered that 10,000 .54 caliber M-1841 Rifles be delivered to the southern arsenals at Fayetteville, NC. , Charleston, SC.,  Augusta, GA., Mount Vernon, AL and Baton Rouge, LA, with each location receiving 2,000 of the rifles.  This is a top notch example of the early pattern Mississippi ... $2,750.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-03 ... Model 1847 US Artillery Musketoon: One of the 3,359 examples produced at Springfield Arsenal between 1848 and 1859. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Overall NRA "very good" condition. 69 caliber. 26 inch barrel. Bayonet lug on bottom near the muzzle. Steel trumpet head ramrod. A lovely attic brown example. Lock bears full Springfield markings and date of 1853. The barrel proofs are very worn, faintly visible. Barrel date not legible. The left side of the stock has the rumor of a cartouche when held in the light just-so. There is some burnout in the wood behind the bolster from wartime use. Overall very attractive with uniform, even, brown-bronze age patina overall ... and a warm brown hue on the walnut stock. These '47 musketoons are scarce, being produced in a very small quantity, far less than many Confederate longarms which cost many times more. They were becoming obsolete by US standards by 1862, but were state of the art by Confederate guidelines throughout the war. Of the cavalry, artillery, and sappers model musketoons roughly 10,000 were produced in total. In December of 1862, 947 musketoons of all patterns are recorded as in use by US troops, including the 5th, 12th & 13th Missouri State Militia Cavalry, the 5th Kansas Cavalry and the 4th Texas US Cavalry – which had 410. By September 1863 only 234 smoothbore “musketoons” were still in the field with US troops. Using these quantities as a balance on a scale would seem to indicate that the bulk of the 3,359 artillery model and 6000+ cavalry model musketoons were in use by state militias. Many more in southern hands than northern. Proper for early war display US or CS, and proper for rebel display early and late war ... $2,250.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-04 ... Fine Condition Heavy Cavalry Saber with a Nice Blade - This is an unmarked m1840 heavy cavalry saber, a German import with the rivet securing the scabbard throat.  It is typical of the swords the north had to bring in to equip its cavalry early in the war before US manufacturers could tool up, and exactly what the Confederates ran through the blockade throughout the war. The blade retains much of the factory cross brushing still present above the ricasso. There are some dark finger print stains present as well. The guard and pommel are in Fine condition, the leather grip is super and the twisted wire wrap is equally as nice. The wire is ever so slightly loose. The original leather bumper-washer is present. The steel scabbard is smooth with a handsome age brown patina. Here is a top notch example and priced very affordably ... $595.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-05 ... Cartridge Box Plate: Attic condition US oval cartridge box plate with both loops. Solid, shows real wartime use. These were affixed to the front flaps of the infantry cartridge boxes. The practice was a continuation of a century old European custom, but these "modern" lead filled insignia also helped keep the flap held down when the closing tab was unlatched. Deep patina. Very handsome ... $195.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-06 ... American Arms Company Double Barrel Deringer. A neat little pocket gun for the western gambler or traveler. Superposed three inch barrels, one .22 rimfire and the other .32 rimfire if the first did not get the job done. Pretty rosewood grips with square butt, spur trigger, silvered brass receiver showing about 20 percent silver on one side and about 80 percent on the other. Nice color to the barrels, showing blue in the recessed center channel and even, dull purplish color throughout. Very good barrel markings with the American Arms Company markings on the larger bore barrel top and “Wheeler’s Pat. Oct. 31, 1865 – June, 19, 1866” marking on the other. Brass blade front sights in place on both barrels. Light silver, maybe 10 percent, remaining on the butt, strap, and lower frame. Mechanically good. Bores decent. Serial #624. A neat pocket gun that would go great with a western display.
... $550.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-07 ... British folding trigger percussion vest pocket or muff pistol with great color. Very simple larger bore single shot pistol for a gentleman traveling or walking out. Barrel is 2.75 inches. Caliber is about .50. Most of these are found not having been well cared for, this one is nice. It is possibly one of a cased pair ... note the number "2" stamped on the underside. Or the numeral may be a bench/batch number 2 ... Or possibly serial number "2". The "2" is stamped twice which would be unusual when cased guns are numbered 1 and 2. At any rate ... Simple bag shaped wood grip and silvered receiver deeply engraved with a floral spray on either side. Breech tang and underside of folding trigger have similar engraving. The color on the hammer is the most lustrous, an iridescent British blue. Barrel shows a deeper blue, better than 90% coverage, turning to plum brown in places, with just a few minor spots, that shows a minute damascus patterning, almost like a Greek-key pattern, over the entire barrel. Whoever owned this gun had some taste! Some scattered brown spots to the frame. Nice finish to the wood. Sharp nipple showing no battering. Folding triggers were handy in pocket pistols to prevent an accidental discharge in drawing the pistol. Frequently cased in pairs for traveling, they were simple, but effective weapons of self-defense. This one belonged to someone who liked a nice gun as well ... $450.00

 

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14-02-08 ... 3 Images of the 18th Infantry ca. Span-Am War / Phillipines ... The 18th US was formed in 1861 and survived the postwar consolidations of regiments. Many of its members served in the western theater and after the war were involved in early Indian fights under Col. Henry Carrington, most famously the Fetterman massacre. By 1898 they were stationed in Texas, from where they shipped out to the Philippines for the Spanish American War and the Philippine Insurrection. In these photos Krag rifles are in evidence, but I don’t see anything indicating post-1902 gear and one officer in the in the last photo seems to be wearing the 1895 regulation uniform. Two of the photos inform us they were taken May 28th 1905... just after their tour in the Phillipines. There are three photos, each about 7 ½ by 9 ½ inches mounted on 11 by 14 inch cardstock. All nicely identified on the backs. The first image shows a military rifle range with one group of about twenty soldiers lounging in the grass looking at the camera while another group are scattered along the firing line. The ground is open and slopes slightly upward in the distance to a line of numbered targets. The men facing the camera all wear light colored campaign hats and dark campaign shirts. Three hold their rifles upright for the camera. In the background a couple of the figures are seated, looking out at the range, others stand around, likely tallying up or awaiting scores from the shooting. The second images shows twenty-one soldiers seated and standing amid Sibley tents in camp. Two men hold rifles. All are dressed in a variety of shirts, undershirts, trousers with leggings, all with campaign hats, etc. At left one man wears an apron with a small cap, probably the one who drew K.P. duty that day. The third image is quite something. It shows a steam fire-pumper belching smoke in the right foreground as troops stand around on a parade ground watching the action as a fire is put out in one of the long two-story buildings running back along the right of the photo. Officers and men are watching what seems to be a smoking building closest to the camera and a bright spot over the top right of the fire pumper may even be flames. In the background chairs and other personal possessions have been removed from adjacent buildings and piled outside. A slight stain at upper right and browner tones overall, but an interesting candid photo. This is an interesting regiment, and the photos are wonderful, tangible "documents" of life at a US army post over a century ago... just at a time when cameras were becoming light enough that truly candid photos could be readily taken. I feel the fire engine / fire in progress image may be worth the price of admission all by itself. For the lot of three ... $250.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-09 ... Nice Example of the Austrian Lorenz Rifle: These great import rifles are currently one of the most sought of all Civil War rifles. Once considered second tier weapons of limited collector interest, we now know they were issued in large numbers to hard fighting Tennessee Confederates, the 6th Wwisconsin Iron Brigade, Yankee units from Michigan, the 5th New Jersey, 104th Pennsylvania, 23rd Penna., 26th Penna at Gettysburg had them, 61st Illinois, 106th Illinois and numerous others. In fact it was the third most heavily issued shoulder weapon of the Civil War, behind the Springfield and Enfield rifle muskets. This one is tight, solid, all original and mostly complete except for a missing ramrod, missing rear sight, and a half inch of barrel that was cut off, presumably to remove a burr in the original muzzle... thus insuring greater accuracy. With a bayonet affixed you cannot see the "circumcision". mechanically perfect --- Metal is gun metal grey with good edges and strong markings. Wood is likewise fine with sharp edges. These were HEAVILY used during the war and frequently turn up in a very dilapidated state --- this one is quite nice, and can be brought back to full splendor with a couple parts. Lock is unmarked. Most other metal parts bear batch numbers. Soldier incised a date of 186? into the bottom length of the butt stock ... $795.00 SOLD

P.S. I usually have a couple Lorenz bayonets on hand. Feel free to call about availability and price.

 

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14-02-10 ... James Reid Knuckle-Duster Revolver ... In contrast to the British gentleman’s coat pocket pistol above, the Reid knuckleduster seems more the weapon for a barroom brawl in a Gangs of New York low-life tavern or a poker game gone wrong. These .22 caliber brass frame revolvers carried seven shots and the solid frame and triggerguard made for a set of brass knuckles if it came to that. Made from 1868 to 1882 this one has the typical later production “My Friend” motto with “Patd. Dec. 26, 1865” over the cylinder and a 14913 serial number. Center pin finial shows matching last two digits. Cylinder smooth steel, medium bright, just one or two small gray spots, about 10% silver on one side of the brass frame and about 40% on the other, but much more top and bottom. Mechanically good. Lettering a bit rubbed here and there, but very legible. Deep scroll and floral engraving. Some case color on the hammer. Put this out on a green mat with a deck of period cards, a pocket watch wagered by a desperate poker player, and call for a shot of Rye ... $1,650.00

 

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14-02-11 ... Colt first model Deringer ... In keeping with our offerings of historic pocket pistols this time round, here is a Colt First Model Deringer for the guy sitting opposite our man with the knuckleduster at the poker table. Colt made these guns with 2 ½ inch barrels from about 1870-90. They were single shot, but packed a punch, firing a .41 caliber round. These are sturdy pistols, all steel construction, with a side-pivoting barrel for reloading. Ours was made with a blued barrel that retains a lot of its original color with just some brown spots and scattered speckling, mostly midway on the right side and near the muzzle on the left, but blending into the original color pretty well. A trace of fingerprint swirls on the top edge. The steel grip and receiver is a mellow silvery tone, again with scattered spotting, and gray on the underside, but sharp engraving with checkered panels on the sides and back of the grip, and floral motifs on the side and top of the receiver that match the floral scrolls on either side of the barrel breech. Small rounded front sight in place and checkered release button. Sharp barrel markings: “Colt’s Pt. F.A. Mfg. Co/ Hartford CT USA” and “No 1” all between two crosses. This has an extremely low serial number of 165. These were numbered in sequence from 1 to about 6500, suggesting ours was made in plenty of time to make its way out to Kansas City, Deadwood, or one of the other up and coming towns of the time ... $1,050.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-12 ... 1861 Presentation Inscribed Pennsylvania Officer’s Horstmann Cavalry Officer’s Saber: Horstmann & Sons lightened version M1840 cavalry officer’s saber. This is inscribed to and was carried by Lt. F. W. Grugan of the 2nd Pennsylvania Artillery and later Aide de Camp to Gen. Rufus Ingalls. The inscription is beautifully executed by a professional, and as you can see in the illustration it was a Christmas gift to him in 1861. Grugan served the entire war, starting immediately after Fort Sumter as an artilleryman in Captain Montgomery’s Artillery, serving from April to August 1861 under Lincoln’s initial call for troops. In December he was commissioned into the 2nd Artillery. For a time in 1862 he was on special duty as instructor to the 17th Maine. Then he returned and was promoted regimental adjutant. He was well enough respected that in October 1864 he was appointed ADC to General Ingalls. Condition is overall VG. Shark skin grip shows only expected wear. Twisted wire wrap is gone. Blade is grey steel nicely etched and marked with the Horstmann legend. The plain steel scabbard is also VG with light age patina and a couple minor dents from wartime use. Very appealing. The guard has classic cast floral motifs. All cavalry officer’s sabers are scarce… presentation inscribed examples are even more so ... $2,950.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-13 ... Smith & Wesson 32 Safety Hammerless 1st Model ... SN 44734 revolver with 3" barrel nickel finish and hard rubber grips. the “Lemon Squeezer.” These .32 caliber five-shot revolvers were produced from 1888 to 1902.  Like some of our other offerings, this was truly a pocket revolver: the hammerless design meant that it could only be fired double action, but that it could be quickly pulled without hanging up on a pocket edge or coat flap. An extra safety precaution was incorporated by using a safety squeeze-bar on the back strap- hence the nickname since you had to squeeze it to fire. Ours has a three inch barrel and incorporates the typical first model break-open barrel release button on the top of the breech rather than the side. Standard black hard-rubber grips with the S&W impressed logo at top showing just minor wear, and standard nickel finish on frame, cylinder, barrel, grip straps and safety. Matching serial 44734 indicating mid-production run (they totaled about 91,000 by the end.) Very clear Smith and Wesson barrel markings with patent dates on the top rib. Sight in place, finish about 75-80 percent on the frame and barrel with gray spotting showing through, perhaps 50 percent on the cylinder, which always sees more wear. Most interestingly it bears the frame marking "W..F. & Co. / Nevada” stamping on the left rear of the receiver just above the S&W logo.  This Wells Fargo marking appears to have been on the frame for a great long time, but I cannot personally verify that the markings were placed there by Wells Fargo.   The gun came to me in a lot of eight little pistols and I am not an authority on Wells Fargo markings. I can make the following observation ... The Wells Fargo Company did not purchase guns in bulk from a central location and distribute them. Individual agents and regional offices seem to have had the responsibility, which would explain the Nevada state designation in the stamping. Smith and Wesson records show the gun first went to Powell & Clement of Cincinnatti in 1892.  If anyone has access to their sales records that would tell the tale. The turn-of-the-century west was maybe a bit safer from Indian raids, but outlaw gangs were still out there and express agents responsible for shipping cash and bullion still went armed. ... $750.00

 

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14-02-14 ... Remington .41 Caliber Derringer: The iconic American Wild West Derringer made famous by cowboys in real life and later on the silver screen.   This design was in production for some 69 years, testifying to its effectiveness, quality and popularity. Two .41 Caliber barrels superposed, with a firing pin that automatically shifts from one barrel to the other. The 3-inch round barrels tip up for easy reloading that flat contour of the gun made it easy to conceal. Ours is the late production Type 1, called the Model Number 2 by some collectors. The earlier variants numbered only about 2,200 and this pattern began about 1868 and totaled some 14,000 before being replaced about 1888 by the more numerous “Type 2” or “Model No. 3.” Ours is numbered a rather low 4091 and shows the characteristic two-line barrel marking with both Remington and Elliot patent information. Dark wood side panel grips with just minor dings. Nickel finish about 80% with scattered brown spots and some gray showing through at the muzzle, right side and the lower barrel mostly, but not providing a big contrast in color. Wear to the finish at the hinge and a few nicks on the top barrel flat around the Remington/ Elliot markings. Pivot key in place on right side, button on left with old replaced brass screw on the spring. A really decent example of an early model with a low enough number for real western use ... $1,050.00

 

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14-02-15 ... Civil War Officer’s Epaulet Tin: Nice condition tin carrying and storage case for a pair of Civil War officer’s epaulets and accompanying insignia. Full dress uniform for officers called for epaulets with the diameter of the fringe and insignia showing rank as well as small roundels showing branch of service colors and regimental numerals, or oval pads reading “MS” for medical staff and the like. I often find epaulets on the loose, but the carrying and storage cases they came in practically never show up empty when you need one. This one is solid, with no dents and still has much of the exterior Japanning and the interior varnish on the metal. The hollow interior side columns kept the epaulets from shifting and the central raised compartment let the heavy bullion fringe hang down while supporting the strap and shoulder pad. The top of the inner compartment opens for storage of the epaulet fittings, but in undisturbed examples we sometimes find the officer had stored shoulder straps, hat insignia, or hatcord, etc., in the compartment as well. The case has its carrying handle in place on the hinged top and locks closed by a sliding bar that moved through narrow loops on the bottom edge of the top and the upper edge of the bottom of the case. The front and top exterior show lots of warm brown original Japan or lacquer finish with minor handling scratches. Some wear to the top front right of the top, and to the right rear of the case, showing the underlying thin gray tinned iron, but this is common on these cases from shifting about in traveling. This one would display a pair of epaulets like a million bucks and be a key part of an officer’s display next to that nice sword. ... $195.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-16 ... Civil War Officer’s 1851 Pattern Eagle Belt Plate: Rectangular brass plate with the arms of the US, the eagle with olive branch and arrows, ribband reading E Pluribus Unum, with sun rays and stars above, and a wreath below. Nice untouched plate, showing a little verdigris green in some of the recessed areas, and slight curving to the side bar from actual use on a belt. Officers had to buy their own gear of course, so there were a lot commercial suppliers and dealers selling a wide variety and quality. This one shows a nice cross-hatched background to the motif indicating it was a more expensive product and the detail of the design is quite good. When purchased, these had a thin gilding and silvering that quickly wore off. This one has a pleasant aged patina showing just some light color on the high points, as would be expected. Themedium width tongue on the reverse is sometimes taken as a mid-war sign, but in fact varies by maker and documented early war examples are found with exactly this width tongue. . This is a key plate for the Civil War collector and the type has enough variants to make it a collecting field of its own. ... $285.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-17 ... Civil War Union Infantry Belt Plate with Very Pleasing Color ... The unmistakable 1839 pattern oval US belt plate worn by the typical Billy Yank. These oval brass plates with solder filled backs were regulation for the waistbelts of the Yankee infantryman throughout the war. This has a nice undisturbed patina to the face and a full lead back that hasn’t been monkeyed with or repaired. The beveled fastening hook is present as are the two “arrow-back” or “snake-head” prongs that secured the plate to one end of the belt. Some think of the arrow-back plates as mid-war, but in fact they start showing up in 1862 (see Campbell and O’Donnell.) Here is a very nice example of perhaps the essential, basic plate in a Civil War collection ... 2 1/4" x 3 1/2" oval ... $235.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-18 ... Wartime gilt embossed pocket diary: “DIARY 1861” Characteristic Civil War green leather bound pocket diary printed in Rochester, NY, for use in 1861 with a calendar, space for daily entries, accounts, etc. This wartime diary kept by a Michigander,  would look great in a display of typical soldier effects and personal gear.  Closed up, with the gilt embossed lettering and 1861 date showing, it could be the diary of a private or a general.  Only you have to know the owner was not in the military and was somewhat lax about making entries.  Still, it comes with some entries filled out, a newspaper clipping, and even a letter of uncertain date recording a trip to Cleveland and a visit “with my uncle that was shot in the war.” With uninformative soldier diaries bringing $750 and up, this is bargain for display purposes among soldier personal items ... $165.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-19 ... Wonderful Clarity in this Armed Soldier Tintype! A sixth plate mid thighs-up view of a yankee infantryman so clear you can make out the tompion stuck in the muzzle of his 1842 musket. Our man wears a forage cap with a company letter, “E” or “F,” on the front, a waistbelt with oval US belt plate supporting a cap box and sheathed bayonet. He stands at attention with his musket at his side, rifle sling toward the camera and a tompion in the barrel to keep out moisture. He has probably borrowed it from one of his buddies who came to the photographer with him since it also sports a bayonet and he has one on his belt, but with that sling and tompion it is not some photographer’s prop. Our man’s cheeks are lightly tinted, very well done… and the brass has been gently touched by the photographer, but not enough to obscure the US on the belt plate, or the fact that his buttons are rimmed state seals of some sort.  That his fatigue blouse has five buttons and a stand-up collar showing some piping makes it clear we are looking at a state issue blouse, perhaps Wisconsin, or possibly Michigan, (both known to have issued 5-button blouses) and certainly early in the war, when states were still equipping the volunteers.  This is a very sharp and clear image with just a few marks around the outer rim from a mat that was once on it. Just the image, no case. Aij ... $275.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-20 ... The White House as Lincoln Knew it: North Portico of the White House Ca. 1860s Extremely scarce view… wonderfully clear and nicely toned cdv taken from the street showing the north portico of the executive mansion showing the sidewalk, fence, circular drive, etc. The edge of the dirt street is visible next to the paved sidewalk providing some contrast with the very urban streetlight at right. Three men pose along the exterior iron fence. In the middle ground the statue of Jefferson is still in place which Grant removed in 1874. Pencil inscription on reverse identifying it and the name “Emma,” probably the owner or recipient. This is Lincoln’s White House as thousands of soldiers saw it while heading to the front. One heck of a rare and desirable CW photo ... bdd ... $395.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-21 ... “Clubs are Trump!” Original Silver Second Army Corps Badge engraved with Soldier’s Initials. An excavated thumb nail size example found in Spotsylvania, County Virginia.  A dead-real original wartime badge of a hard-fighting organization. The Second Corps served with the Army of the Potomac throughout the war and was commanded by such well known generals as Sumner and Hancock. Its battle honors extend from Fair Oaks through Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Spotsylvania, all the way through Appomattox. The back is a little crusty, showing the base of a typical T-bar pin fastener, the pin and catch long gone, probably the reason the soldier lost it.  The face has a nice mellow patina with just a few dark spots and is delicately engraved in the center with a shaded “O” and “A,” certainly the initials of the owner. An incised line runs around the edge of the whole, while the three lobes of the trefoil are also outlined with delicate semicircular cuts, a style some call “chip carving,” from the furniture style. Like most real corps badges bought by soldiers from jewelers, sutlers, and by mail, this one is small, only about ¾ inch across- few soldiers could afford anything much bigger in silver- but these were worn proudly, showing quite literally “esprit de corps.” Probably not one in a hundred of the many badges showing up at online auctions is real. Here is one you can sleep at night owning. It’s real, and that is saying something these days ... $475.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-22 ... Dixon and Sons Bag Style Powder Flask: A very nice example of an essential “go-along” with percussion weapons. Copper body with no dents or split seams, nice mellow patina. Brass top with adjustable measuring spout for measuring powder in drams, grooved thumbpiece with concealed spring. Sharp markings:  James Dixon / & Sons / Sheffield” and “Improved / Patent.” About 7 inches overall. These are frequently found with cased Colt London Navy revolvers. A fine solid early flask ... $250.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-23 ... Beautiful US Regulation 1863 Cavalry Bit! This is one of the best I have owned… a pristine condition piece of cavalry gear: blued steel bit with all rings and chains in place, even the leather “safe” for the curb chain is present!  (It kept the chain from chafing the horse.) These were issued bright or blued. This one is excellent+, no pitting or rust. It has a smooth finish and shows much original bluing turning a nice faint plum brown color mixed with a purple/pewter hue that you’d want to see on a gun. Both brass US rosettes in place and showing lots of the original gilt in the recessed areas. The steel curb chain is firmly in place and remarkably the leather safe is still present. The stitching on one of the flat loops has given way, easily fixed. To add to the super condition, this one is also maker marked: “C&W” appears on the outboard side near the slot, probably for Condict and Wheeler of Newark, NJ, who had several contracts for cavalry gear. This is a great example if you are building a cavalry collection and you will have to look long and hard for another even close in condition to this outstanding example ... $450.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-24 ... Scholberg Double Barrel Percussion Belt Pistol: Paul Scholberg of Belgium is highly regarded by collectors of double-guns and earlier members of the family were gunmakers as well. Here is a nice example of an over-under double barrel pistol by Alphonse Scholberg, nicely marked “A. Scholberg / Brevete” on the left side of the lower barrel. Numerous Belgian proof and assembly marks are also present. This is an attractive percussion pistol. 6 ˝ inch barrels, about 50 caliber smooth bore. Smooth metal overall in the gray with some scattered salt-and-peppering and a few dark spots, particularly near the breach. Unmarked back action locks showing some cloudy remnants of case colors. European walnut stock with typical flared butt. Decent wood edges, and good “wood to metal” fit. Wood ramrod is likely a replacement. It is secured by two tubes on the right side between the barrels. German silver trigger guard with a floral spray engraved on the underside and German silver compartment in the butt closed by cover with a shell design. Double triggers. Mechanically fine. Nipples good, deep S-curved hammers show some tiny corrosion on tips near cups from firing. Screws show sharp slots and some color. This is a neat gun. You can envision it in the belt of a privateer or blockade runner on the high seas. A pile of gun for the money ... $595.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-25 ... Ohio Surgeon’s Effects / Sword, Belt, and Papers: This super lot surfaced right here in Toledo. One of our few “walk-ins” here at “Civil War Central”. The material was owned and carried by Surgeon Kersey G. Thomas of the 104th Ohio and later Starke County Ohio Medical Director. It starts with his Model 1840 Medical Staff sword and scabbard in fine condition with 50% luster remaining on the blade. Also present his high quality rectangular officer’s eagle buckle on the belt. No hanger straps are present.

The documents are most interesting. They include an interesting large folio size four page manuscript ink report on the surgeon’s opinions of how diseases in the regiment manifested themselves in climate change from Ohio to Kentucky, and how these changes impact the army. While undated it is from 1862 when he was with the 104th Ohio. It is written from Kentucky and is VERY interesting with detailed medical reports and well thought opinions on how the problems affect the army. Also present, a sad manuscript letter Dec 17th 1862 headed Hosp Dept from the Surgeon of the 115th Illinois Vols. to our surgeon Thomas 104th Ohio diagnosing him with spinal meningitis which he fears also involves the brain. Very detailed and serious stuff, though likely inaccurate as Thomas obviously survived.

Also included are receipts for blankets & equipment, a large vellum State of Ohio commission signed Governor John Brough dated June 8, 1865. A smaller printed state issued document relating to Thomas 1866 appointment as medical advisor to Travelers Insurance Company. A manuscript letter - General HQ State of Ohio June 13, 1865 issuing him his commission as military surgeon for Starke County Ohio. A very Rare 1855 Woman’s Medical School Diploma - Large vellum diploma for his wife or daughter from the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania. Signed by ten doctors and professors. Dated 1855. Some worm holes. I would presume a woman’s diploma as M.D. would be darn rare, and hopefully valuable. Also a small early war CDV of Isaac N. “Newt” Campbell captain in the 115th Ohio. I do not know the connection but the photo came with the surgeon’s papers. While Thomas was with the 104th the regiment was organized at Camp Massillon, Aug. 30, 1862, to serve for three years. It left for Cincinnati on Sept. 1 and on its arrival was taken across the Ohio river to Newport, Kentucky going into camp 3 miles out on the Alexandria turnpike. A few days later it was transferred to Covington and sent out to Fort Mitchel, at which point the advanced pickets of the Confederate forces were met and skirmished with, the 104th Ohio regiment losing 1 man killed and 5 wounded. It continued to operate in Kentucky, watching and checkmating the movements of the Confederate forces, until the following summer. This is a wonderful fresh lot ... $3,250.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-26 ... 36 Caliber Revolver Bullet Mold: Unmarked and proper for any of the 36 caliber revolvers of the period. About VG condition ... $85.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-27 ... Sharps 4-Barrel Derringer: The Sharps Four Barrel Pepperbox was manufactured in a number of variants from 1859 to 1874. Our example is a Model 2A, showing a straight standing breech and straight grip to frame juncture. Correct circular Sharps markings around the hammer screw on each side, one with the company address, the other with the 1859 patent. 3-inch barrels, .30 caliber rimfire. Mint condition checkered gutta percha grips. Even warm color to the brass and sharp markings. Barrels an even gray with some dark spots near the breech on the right and along the lower barrel on the left. Sight in place. Mechanically excellent. Matching serial number 4650 on butt strap and underside of barrel assembly. These cleverly designed guns loaded by sliding the four-barrel assembly forward. A rotating firing pin then discharged them in turn as the hammer was cocked. A small pocket sized pistol, this was perfect for self-defense. Some Civil War soldiers carried them into camp and created trouble when drunk or careless. They were also a favorite of travelers and gamblers. As I recall, there is a story that when they reburied Wild Bill Hickock in Deadwood, ... $650.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-28 ... Whitney Pocket Model Revolver: Whitney made these 5-shot .31 caliber pocket models from the late 1850s into the early 1860s. They are a solid and reliable arm. Condition is Good to VG ... The cylinder scene is not visible, the barrel markings are present and worn. It sports a 3-inch barrel with front sight in place and with its attached loading lever. The wing-nut that secures the arbor in place is long gone and was replaced with a plain steel pin. This done LONG ago. The serial number is 686 or 989, the first of which places it in the 3rd Type serial range, but the latter number gets it close to the approximate range of the 4th Type that introduced the safety notch in the cylinder. The two-piece walnut grips show good wood to metal fit, a few dings, and some abrasion near the butt. The toe is chipped on the right, and slightly nipped on the left. The metal is generally smooth, just some corrosion near the frame, and dark gray leading to brown overall with a nice aged patina to the brass. Mechanically good. Whitney was an important early US arms maker and rival to Colt in his production of solid frame pistols that gained a good reputation for their sturdiness. A most affordable Civil War revolver ... $465.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-29 ... Model 1863 Type-1 Springfield Rifle Musket: A good solid example of the Standard ‘63 Springfield produced during the middle of the Civil War. This gun is the model with rounded barrel bands secured with friction screws under each band. It was made only during 1863. Condition is about good to near VG. Metal is overall grey steel, moderately pitted, showing some cleaning, but having good strong markings. Both the barrel and lock are match dated 1863. Cartouches are worn away. Ramrod is a modern replacement as are the sight leaves, otherwise all original and complete. (The rear sight is original, just the leaves are replaced.) Mechanically perfect. Bore is good but shows wear.
A very affordable CW musket ... $1,050.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-30 ... Rebel Train Ticket: I’ve never had one of these previously which tells me they are certainly scarce in addition to being interesting. It is a Richmond to Danville Railroad soldier’s ticket. Worn and mounted on modern acid free card stock. It is about the size of a business card ... 2 " x 3 1/2 "... $125.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-31 ... Fine Condition Civil War Regulation Forage Cap (Bummer's Cap): Excellent, government issue forage cap of Union blue wool, with full lining, sweat band, visor, chin strap, side buttons, and remnants of the maker’s label still in the crown. The pictures show about all you need to know regarding this attractive kepi. It is in excellent condition with one significant moth hole on the left rear quadrant. A great piece of real Civil War headgear, and an item that is getting VERY difficult to find any more ... $2,750.00 SOLD

 

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14-02-32 ... Cavalry Flag Pole or Guidon Pole Boot: In the past forty years I have owned but a handful of wartime cavalry flag pole carriers. In fact I believe I have owned three, and all were different. This specimen came from an ages old Michigan collection. I have never seen another exactly like it, but it is clearly constructed exactly like the Civil War carbine sockets, and I bought it quickly when the price was quoted. It measures 4.5 inches tall and has an inner diameter of two inches. The pictures can tell the story better than I. I suppose there is a chance it could be a Custer era example, but if so that would still be darn rare. If anyone has more data please email to let me know ... $395.00 SOLD

 

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