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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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13-10-41 ... An Absolutely Stellar and Incredibly Rare Civil War “Silver” Saxhorn by Klemm of Philadelphia. Freshly found by an antique dealer in eastern Ohio is this magnificent early german silver horn. It is an E-Flat Alto Sax Horn beautifully marked on the bell “Klemm & Bro. / Philad-a”. When discovered it was in very good condition but was in need of a little repair to bring it back to its full glory. The professional restorer executed the following repairs: “Free stuck parts, remove accessible dents, seal all tube leaks, patch bell cap, adapt and fit replacement 1st rotor, repair key links, replace bow bell, finger horn, & various screws. Clean- record & align valves, and add (functioning) receiver.” The only major repairs executed were patching the bell, and replacing the bow bell. The bell repair is clearly shown in the accompanying photos. You would be hard pressed to know the other piece was replaced. The other work is more in the line of a “tune up”. The only thing lacking is a mouthpiece, which can be obtained easily. The “Sax horn” was developed during the 1830s, and was eventually patented in Paris in 1845 by Adolfe Sax.  It was the most popular instrument in Union Army Civil War bands. For military bands, the over-the-shoulder design was used, as this is, so the backward-pointing bell allowed the music to waft back to the troops marching behind.  In the auction world these early horns command grand prices. This Klemm horn, executed in german silver as opposed to brass, is quite rare.  Klemm supplied many thousands of regulation copper bugles to the Union Army under government contract.  I do not know whether he had contracts for band instruments as well, but my guess is that he did. Whether this horn is government contract or commercial I cannot say for sure. But I believe that this horn was produced for use in the Union Army. The “over the shoulder” design died out after the Civil War, so we can surmise that this over the shoulder example was made so Klemm could sell it to the army. During the war, Klemm made instruments for the military and knew which side his bread was buttered on. My guess is that this is a government contract horn. A superb, and rare CW horn ... $5,950.00.

 

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13-10-42 ... Colt Musket With Ultra Desirable 1862 Date: Very Good to Fine Condition Special Model 1861 Colt Rifle Musket. This is a good solid collector’s gun: strong wood, good metal, crisp marks, mechanically perfect, and bearing an early date. Of most interest are the matched dates of 1862 on the lock and barrel. Sharp 1862 date behind the hammer, US/ Colt’s Pt. F. A. Mfg Co./ Hartford Ct.” forward. Sharp eagle on bolster. Matching 1862 barrel date, sharp V/P/eagle on left barrel flat with the early style V connected to P marking. Marked NJ for state of New Jersey ownership. Also marked “Steel” on side flat. Stock stamped with NJ cartouche which matches the barrel. Original rod, bands, swivels, sights, etc. ... all intact. Bands are correct screw tightened variety without band springs. A little bit of percussion cap firing corrosion on top flat near nipple partly hitting the date. Metal overall grey steel with good markings. Stock has strong edges showing expected handling age. Colt introduced a number of innovations in this “special model” rifle musket that the US government later adopted and his rifles are well sought-after not only because of the fame of the maker but as important steps in US arms development. Desirable early date. Excellent bore. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect ... and it is a Colt. ... $2,350.00 SOLD

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13-10-43 ... Early Whitney Navy Revolver 2nd Model Type-1: Very tight and solid example of the Whitney 36 caliber navy revolver with the early ball catch loading lever and matching serial numbers of 378. Overall very good plus condition. 100% original 100% complete, mechanically perfect. All markings crisp and legible. Metal edges and wood edges are sharp showing only expected where. Barrel legend is crisp and legible. Bore is very good. Cylinder retains hints of the engraved scene. These Whitney's with the ball catch lever are from the early days of the Civil War. Much better condition than most we encounter these days. Fine condition grips with good edges. A gun you can be proud to display with your Civil War Cavalry items, or CW Navy items, or CW Officer’s effects. ... $1,450.00 SOLD

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13-10-44 ... Model 1861 Springfield Contract Rifle Musket. This old warrior is a composite of three separate 1861 muskets. The lock is obviously a true Springfield Arsenal lock with the ultra rare date of 1861. The barrel is a M-1861 contract barrel bearing the manufacture date of 1864. I have illustrated the VP and Eagle mark so those of you so inclined can try and match the stamping on this gun to the ones in “the book”. There is a medium chip of wood missing to the right of the barrel tang, not visible on display. Finally the stock is likely a product of Burton and Hodge of Trenton NJ based on the state “NJ” cartouche present on the left side of the stock opposite the lock. Condition is Very Good to near fine. 100% original parts, 100% complete and mechanically perfect. Bore is about fine. Sharp rifling. Stock is VG++ with sharp NJ cartouche and minimal edge wear. All metal stamps are crisp. As to whether these parts were assembled together in 1864 by a military armorer I cannot say. It is certainly possible. On the other hand ... Over the past century and a half more than a few collectors and gunsmiths have assembled muskets out of parts … not to mention Bannerman, H.K. White, and the other ancient surplus dealers of old who did the same thing. In any event --- totally original parts with an ultra rare ’61 Springfield lock. Most folks would replace the lock with a common Trenton or similar contract. I am leaving it as I got it. The aggregate value of the parts present on this musket is more than my price of ... $1,495.00 SOLD

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13-10-45 ...US Model 1836 Flintlock Pistol by Waters: The last flintlock pistol produced by the US Government. Produced from 1836 to 1844 this gun is appropriate for display with post Alamo Texas history, US Western Frontier, and Mexican War related displays. Overall about fine condition. 100% original and complete. Mechanically perfect. Sharp markings “Eagle, A. Waters, Millbury MS., 1844" Two good cartouches are legible in the wood opposite the lock. Barrel is stamped with inspector’s initials “JH” over an illegible letter. Tight, honest, solid, and very handsome. One of the few affordable martial flintlock pistols still available on the collector market. One of the few affordable martial flintlock weapons still available on the collector market. ... $1,850.00 SOLD

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13-10-46 ... Wonderful condition Virginia made Confederate cavalry saber by Boyle Gamble and McFee: A stellar example of a classic Virginia made cavalry saber. While this saber is unsigned it clearly exhibits all the earmarks of a Boyle Gamble and McFee saber from Richmond, Virginia.. Perfect leather grip, original single-strand wire, magnificent three branch guard and unblemished steel blade. This turned up last month at a northeastern Ohio flea market. The man that bought it paid less than the price of a World War II bayonet. It has never been on the Civil War collectors market previously. Stellar condition, priced fairly, no scabbard. ... $2950.00 SOLD

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13-10-47 ... Very good example of the Smith & Wesson number two Army revolver. Overall VG condition. 100% original 100% complete mechanically perfect. All steel surfaces are gunmetal gray. Mechanically perfect, good bore. Thousands of these 32 caliber rimfire revolvers were carried in the Civil War. It was the state of the art revolver during that time. It fired fixed metallic cartridges the same as we use today. A very affordable Smith & Wesson. Serial number indicates production in late 1860s. Barrel legend is crisp and legible. Rosewood grips are fine condition. A very affordable example ... $595.00 SOLD

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13-10-48 ... Sitting Woman Daguerreotype of a Louisa May Alcott look-a-like ... You can see from the ring on her finger, this striking woman is married, and her husband was likely serving in the Civil War. So, as any soldier would, the image of his loved one remains in high quality condition as does the tin surrounding it - and the case that is protecting the image takes the beating. Like with people, the quality here is on the inside. ... $49.00 SOLD

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13-10-49 ... Bayonet and scabbard for the 30/40 Krag rifle: Overall very good condition and complete with the original scabbard. Nicely dated 1898 and a boldly stamped US. The only defect is a crack in the muzzle ring on the guard. This does not affect displayability nor functionality. This standard state-of-the-art bayonet from the Spanish-American war. ... $115.00 SOLD

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13-10-50 ... Krag bayonet dated 1903. Somewhat better condition than the above listed example. Very crisp markings very nice scabbard. One tiny hole drilled through the handle apparently to facilitate hanging on a wire. These early Krag bayonets are getting harder and harder to buy at a fair price. I believe you will be pleased with this one at ... $135.00 SOLD

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13-10-51 ... Ulster County Gazette newspaper news of George Washington's death ... A wonderful piece of early American ephemera. Though dated 1800, in actuality this newspaper was printed in the 1830s. It is an early reprint of the original Ulster County Gazette. Even back in the 1830s George Washington souvenirs were darn rare. The original 1800 editions of this paper command tens of thousands of dollars. These 1830s reprints are not exactly, common. The graphics are wonderful. The paper has some minor separations and tears, but is in overall very good solid condition. in terms of displaying an artifact from the period of George Washington's life, this slightly post-period Item is absolutely spectacular for display. This so-called reprint is 175 years old. Unquestionably a rare and desirable antique in its own right. I challenge you to find another priced at ... $250.00

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13-10-52 ... Moore teat fire revolver: These small vest pocket size revolvers were very popular during the 1860s. They fired an unusual teat fire cartridge that is no longer available today. Advertisements for this gun can be found in Civil War editions of Harpers Weekly newspapers, and I have pasted one here. 100% original 100% complete mechanically perfect. This is the early model with barrel legend of “Moore’s Pat. Fire Arms Co. Brooklyn NY”.   (Hard to believe we actually had gun factories and stores in New York at one time!)  Totally appropriate for display with Civil War or early Wild West gambler or Saloon Girl items. Sn 4798. A darn nice example ... $475.00 SOLD

 

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13-10-53 ... Near mint Civil War Smith Carbine: a stellar example of the standard Civil War Smith Carbine. 100% original 100% complete mechanically perfect with a mint bore. This carbine exhibits 95 to 98% original factory blue. The case color on the frame is likewise very strong. The bore is mint condition. The stocks are nearly new with vivid sharp edges and crisp inspectors markings. All markings and inspector stamps are vivid, clear, and legible. These Smith carbines were state of the art weapons during the Civil War. While they still utilized the percussion cap, they fired a fixed cartridge and were breech loading. This design was the precursor of modern single shot weapons. A highly desirable Civil War firearm. And this one is nearly new and truly investment condition. ... $2,950.00 SOLD

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13-10-54 ... First Blood Drawn by John S. Mosby! Mosby’s own signed copy of the Acts of the Viriginia State Legislature for 1853-54 recording the passage of a bill rescinding his jail sentence and fine for shooting a bullying fellow student at the University of Virginia!

Mosby never mentions the incident in his memoirs and at least one biographer maintained it was because he was traumatized by the incident… to which I can only respond, “The Hell He Was!” He may have been embarrassed at spending some time in jail, hardly the place for a Virginia gentleman, but his letters and exploits make clear that few men delighted more in downing an enemy with a bullet than John S. Mosby. I personally own several Mosby letters that I obtained directly from his great granddaughter and two of them are truly bloodthirsty. Mosby was a gunfighter for sure. The one lasting impact of his first taste of blood was, ironically, to set him on the career path to become a lawyer, his profession before and after his military career. Mosby enrolled in the University of Virginia in 1850. Small of stature and appearing frail, he had been bullied throughout his school years and during his third year at UVA was the object of harassment by one George R. Turpin. Mosby demanded an explanation for Turpin’s insults and at a meeting in late March, 1853, when Turpin charged at him, Mosby drew a pepperbox pistol from his pocket and simply shot Turpin in the neck. Expelled from the University, Mosby was arrested, tried, found guilty of “unlawful shooting,” and sentenced to a year in jail and a $500 fine. Even the prosecutor, however, apparently liked Mosby and thought Turpin needed shooting: The prosecutor lent Mosby law books to study during his confinement. Indeed, after the Governor pardoned him several months later, Mosby continued to study law with the prosecutor, eventually passing the bar and opening his own practice.

Here is Mosby’s signed personal copy of the acts of the Virginia Assembly in which his sentence was rescinded: Acts of the General Assembly of Virginia, Passed in 1853-4, in the Seventy-Eighth Year of the Commonwealth. Richmond: William F. Ritchie, Public Printer 1853-4. Marbled paper covers, leather spine with black panel embossed in gilt: Acts of Assembly 1853-4. Chapter 225 records the passing of “An Act for the Relief of John S. Mosby,” on February 16, 1854, rescinding his jail sentence and fine for shooting Turpin. Mosby himself inscribed the book in ink inside the cover: “Jno. S. Mosby.”

Mosby material does not become available often, let alone something dealing with a life-changing event in his career. This book later passed through the hands of two Virginia lawyers, the first of whom likely knew Mosby personally. A bookplate pasted inside reads: “This book belongs to J. Irby Hurt Abingdon, Va. Purchased from the estate of Connally F. Trigg, Deceased.” Both Trigg and Hurt were lawyers in Abingdon. Trigg was a former Confederate soldier who died in 1907 and so obtained the book while Mosby was alive (Mosby died in 1916.) The two undoubtedly knew one another from military experience, or legal work in Virginia or Washington, where Trigg served in Congress for a time and Mosby held several U.S. government posts.

It would be too time consuming to recount all the wartime exploits of the “Gray Ghost of the Confederacy”, but a short recap is certainly in order. Enlisting in the Virginia cavalry as a private in 1861, Mosby rose to Lieutenant under JEB Stuart and so distinguished himself that Stuart got him appointed to command of the 43rd Battalion of Virginia Cavalry in early 1863, a unit of partisan rangers who tied up Federal forces for almost two and a half years in the Shenandoah and Northern Virginia by cutting supply lines and raiding Federal posts. He was close friends with Stuart. He kidnapped Union General Stoughton from his own headquarters behind Yankee lines. Mosby escaped numerous close calls, including three serious wounds. His area of operation became known as “Mosby’s Confederacy.” He made Colonel in 1864 and in 1865 disbanded his men at the end of the war rather than surrender them, but made his peace with Federal authorities when he saw the cause was lost and returned to the practice of law, supporting President Grant, defending the reputation of JEB Stuart, working for the Southern Pacific Railroad and the U.S. government until his death in 1916.

Mosby’s is a highly sought signature, especially on pre 1866 material. He is certainly one of the most colorful and romantic figures of the war. And here we have a superb bold autograph in a fine historical volume on Virginia law, recording a significant event in Mosby’s life. The condition of the book is VG with some wear. There is some chipping on the spine and a little looseness of the front cover and first two pages. This is one of the best pieces of paper history I have been able to come up with in recent months. If you have an interest in Mosby or Virginia Confederate History, here is one heck of a fine piece ... $1,950.00 SOLD

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13-10-55 ... Superb condition heavy cavalry saber: I purchased this wonderful saber last weekend as I type this. It is a stellar example of the model 1840 heavy cavalry saber. The blade is signed by Solingen sword maker Walsheid. These German made blades were imported by the boatload by both the Confederacy and the United States. Condition of this saber is top drawer. 100% original 100% complete and very fine condition. The leather grip and twisted wire are nearly perfect. The blade is overall shiny steel with Vivid Cross brushing still visible at the ricasso. This saber is complete with its original scabbard in likewise extra fine condition. If this were an American-made Ames Saber I would price it at $1600. This has every bit the quality and is priced at but a fraction of that cost.... A super deal at ... $650.00 SOLD

 

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13-10-56 ...1795 Springfield Flintlock Musket: Copied from the 1766 model French Charleville musket, the 1795 Springfield was the very first official infantry longarm of the United States. Initially with the bayonet lug on the bottom of the barrel, this was rotated to the top of the barrel in 1797 and the look remained more or less the same to the end of the War of 1812. On this specimen the lug has been removed, it had been on the top and remnants of it are clearly present. Made too late for the Revolutionary War, these were the standard US Regular Army arms in the War of 1812. Whether defending Fort McHenry in Baltimore, or in the earthworks around New Orleans under the watchful eye of Andrew Jackson, these muskets were there. Its greatest test was with Winfield Scott at Lundy's Lane in 1814. Thousands of US troops stood face-to-face against British regiments exchanging volley after volley of musket fire well into the night. This specimen grades about NRA “good”. It appears to be in original flintlock configuration. Lock is nicely marked with US over Springfield and also 1809. The date on the butt plate is 1814. Stock is full length and has a rather large repair to a crack in the wrist. This repair also incorporates a patch in the top of the wrist which I am sure hides the head of a wood screw used in the repair. Someone added a crude V notch rear sight during the guns period of use. The barrel is stamped V eagle P as well as US. Trigger guard plate has two initials, PT. Stock is incised with initials LK, presumably the owner. The ramrod is of the period but not the original rod, and it is also too short for actual use with this musket. It stands as a suitable stand-in for display purposes. Here is a darn good deal on a piece from the early days of our Republic. ... $1,350.00

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13-10-57 ...Fine Condition Civil War Military Pocket Watch Signed Tobias-Liverpool: A classic Civil War watch. These Tobias marked watches are well known among Civil War collectors and watch collectors alike, as among the most commonly found in CW soldier effects. These watches were made for the American trade and heavily advertised to the military. The silver cover on this fine example is engraved with a bold U.S. federal shield, making it ideal for display with soldier effects. This is a classic silver hunting case watch. Runs perfectly. Perfect face, perfect crystal, hands, etc. ... Fully signed on the works. As is typical on the vast majority of European watches made for the American Civil War trade ... This “TOBIAS” watch is likely an 1861 Swiss watch that was marked with a Tobias firm marking. The “real” M. Tobias was famous in England in the early 1800s making fusee watches. The watch experts believe these patent lever examples were made in Switzerland for the American Civil War trade. As typical a Civil War soldier’s watch as can be found… and extra nice with the US Federal Shield motif ... $ 285.00 SOLD

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13-10-58 ... 1860 Vintage Powder Flask: A very fine attic condition flask for a shotgun or large bore rifle. Body is seven inches tall, overall height including spout is just over eight inches. 100% original and complete. Spring charger functions perfectly. Very attractive with a stylized clam-shell design on the body and foliate pattern at the neck. A dandy CW period flask ... $95.00 SOLD

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13-10-59 ... Unit marked 8th Massachusetts Musket: A very good example of the SN & WTC Made for Massachusetts rifle musket. The firm of S. Norris and W.T. Clement produced 11,000 of these 58 caliber guns exclusively for the state of Massachusetts, starting in 1863. The muskets precisely follow the pattern of the 1863 Springfield Rifle musket. What makes this gun even more interesting are the unit markings. The right side of the butt stock bears a large numeral 8 impressed into the wood. The left side of the butt stock shows a G and number 47. Taken together these markings represent eighth Regiment Company G soldier number, or rack number, 47. The gun is 100% original and 100% complete. Mechanically perfect with a very good bore. These made for Massachusetts muskets are quite scarce in their own right. Finding one with unit markings is actually quite rare. Interestingly this one has a CW musket sling I have not encountered previously.  The sling attaches to the trigger guard swivel using a brass button similar to the buttons on enlisted cavalry sabers.  The closing hook is standard as seen on most CW muskets.  The sliding keeper is not present.  My guess is that SN & WTC may have produced this improved pattern sling and supplied them to the state.  Perhaps one of you knows.  Anyway… Here is a brief history of the eighth Regiment Massachusetts volunteers taken from Mass Soldiers & Sailors… 

Eighth Regiment, Nine Months

Under the call of August 4, 1862, for 300,000 militia to serve nine months, 19,080 being assigned to the quota of Massachusetts, the 8th Regt. again volunteered for duty, thus helping to obviate the necessity of resorting to the draft. Its rendezvous was Camp Lander, Wenham, Mass., where it was recruited up to war strength. Most of its companies were mustered in between September 15 and October 1, but Company H was not ready for muster until October 30. On November 25, 1862, the regiment left the State for North Carolina, where it was assigned to the 2d Brigade of General Foster's Division, encamping on the Fair Grounds at Newbern. On the 9th of December the regiment was detached to do guard duty at Newbern while the rest of the brigade went on the Goldsboro expedition. Early in December two companies were detached from the regiment to do guard duty at Roanoke Island, and two months later (in 1863) two more companies were sent to the same place. Meanwhile two companies were assigned to duty at Fort Totten, one of the defenses of Newbern. The four remaining companies were in the expedition to relieve Washington, N. C., proceeding as far as Blount's Creek, where they were engaged with slight loss April 9.

On June 28 (1863) the regiment was ordered to Boston for muster out, but on reaching Baltimore, Md., July 1, it was detained, and on the 6th was sent to Maryland Heights near Harper's Ferry, arriving July 7, and occupying Fort Duncan. On July 13 it joined the Army of the Potomac in front of Williamsport, making a forced march of 25 miles in 16 hours. On the 26th, after Lee's army had retired across the Potomac into Virginia, the regiment was ordered to Massachusetts, reaching Boston July 29, 1863 and being mustered out of the service August 7.

Eighth Regiment, One Hundred Days

In July, 1864, the 8th Regt. began its third term of service, its companies being mustered into the service on various dates between the 13th and 21st of the month for one hundred days. Some of the nine months companies do not appear in the regiment as then organized, their places being filled by companies from the westerly part of the State. The regiment rendezvoused at Camp Meigs, Readville, Mass., proceeding from there to Baltimore, Md. In the vicinity of this city most of the service of the regiment was performed. Portions of the regiment did guard duty in Baltimore. Four companies were stationed at Camp Bradford, ;the draft rendezvous of Maryland and Delaware. One detachment guarded the line of the Northern Central railroad. The headquarters of the regiment were at Cockeysville about 15 miles north of Baltimore. Returning to Massachusetts early in November, 1864, on the 10th of the month the regiment was mustered out of the United States service for the last time. A very solid CW musket with tangible history ... $1,850.00 SOLD



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13-10-60 ... 11th Illinois Cavalry - Smith Breech Loading Carbine: A top notch Smith in all respects. NRA “very good++” condition. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. VG bore. VG++ stock and steel. Good markings. Matched serial numbers 19,186 ... which is where this gun gets more value. SN 19,186 is listed in the Springfield Arsenal Research Services files and shows that it was still on hand with a trooper in the field in 1865 in the 11th Illinois Cavalry. This number is a “direct hit” – not a so-called range match or anything lame like that. This specific gun is listed by its’specific serial number in the records.

From Dyer’s Compendium we take the following data on the regiment: Organized at Peoria, Ill., /mustered in December 20, 1861. Duty at Peoria until February, 1862. Moved to Benton Barracks, Mo., February 22-March 3, and duty there until March 28. Moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 25-April 1. SERVICE - Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7, 1862. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Purdy April 29. Pursuit to Booneville May 30-June 12. Coldwater Station, Miss., June 21 (3rd Battalion). Salisbury, Tenn., August 11. Bolivar, Tenn., August 30. Davis Bridge, Hatchie River, Tenn., September 25. Battle of Corinth, Miss., October 3-4. Pursuit to Hatchie River October 5-12. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862, to January, 1863. Lexington, Tenn., December 18, 1862. Salem Cemetery, near Jackson, Tenn., December 19. Huntington, Tenn., December 29-30. Parker's Cross Roads, Red Mound, December 30-31. Near Yorkville, Tenn., January 28, 1863. Dyersburg January 30. Operations in Northwest Mississippi June 15-25. Near Holly Springs, Miss., June 16-17. Hudsonville and on Helena Road, Miss., June 21, Bolivar, Tenn., July 10. Expedition from Memphis, Tenn., to Grenada, Miss., August 12-23. Grenada August 17. Expedition from LaGrange to Toone Station September 11-16. Ordered to Vicksburg, Miss., and duty in that District until December, 1864. Expedition from Big Black River to Yazoo City, Miss., September 27-October 1, 1863. Brownsville September 28. Morris Ford, near Benton, September 29. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Canton Road near Brownsville October 15-16. Near Clinton and Vernon Roads October 16. Bogue, Chitto Creek, October 17. Robinson's Mills, near Livingston, October 17. Livingston Road, near Clinton, October 18. Near Natchez, Miss, December 7. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2, 1864. Champion's Hill February 4. Jackson February 5. Hillsborough February 6. Brandon February 7. Morton February 8. Meridian February 9-13. Hillsborough February 10. Meridian February 13-14. Canton February 29 (Detachment). Brownsville March 3. Expedition from Vicksburg to Yazoo City May 4-21. (Detachment). Benton May 7 and 9. Expedition from Vicksburg to Pearl River July 2-10. Clinton July 5. Clinton and Jackson July 7. Expedition from Vicksburg to Rodney and Fayette September 29-October 3 (Detachment). Expedition from Natchez to Woodville October 4-11 (Detachment). Woodville October 5-6. Operations in Issaqueena and Washington Counties October 24-31. Expedition from Vicksburg to Gaines Landing, Ark., and Bayou Macon, La., November 6-8. Expedition from Vicksburg to Yazoo City November 23-December 4. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., December. Grierson's Raid on Mobile & Ohio R. R. December 21, 1864, to January 15, 1865. Franklin Creek December 21-22. Egypt Station December 28, 1864. Franklin January 2, 1865. Expedition from Memphis to Marion, Ark., January 19-22. Marion, Ark., January 20-21, 1865. Duty on Memphis & Charleston R. R. between Memphis and Grand Junction, Headquarters at LaGrange, Tenn., January to September, 1865. Expedition from Memphis to Brownsville, Miss., April 23-26. Mustered out September 30, 1865. Company "G" served detached as Headquarters Guard, 17th Army Corps, and participated in following: Movements on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30, 1863. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Messenger's Ferry, Big Black River, May 29-30 and July 4. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. In Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign June 8 to September 8, 1864. About Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Chattahoochie River July 3-17. Battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Little Ogeechee River December 4. Station No. 5, Georgia Central R. R., December 4. Siege of Savannah December 10-21.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 32 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 8 Officers and 237 Enlisted men by disease. Total 279. Here is a dead-on unit identified cavalry weapon to a fine Midwest mounted unit. I believe you can retrieve the soldier’s name that carried this serial from the Service Records for around a hundred dollars. ... $2,350.00 SOLD

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13-10-61 ... Civil War Crossed Sabers Enlisted Cavalry Insignia: Excellent non-dug specimen with all four loops on the reverse. These were worn on the enlisted cavalrymen’s forage caps, kepis, and Hardee hats. Once common now they are downright rare. An excellent original specimen 100% guaranteed genuine. (Be VERY cautious of some very convincing fakes currently on the market.) The Real McCoy ... $225.00 SOLD

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13-10-62 ... Ohio Volunteer Militia OVM Plate: A fine, solid battlefield dug-up example of the standard Gaylord pattern OVM cartridge box plate. Face has lovely uncleaned age patina and the normal expected nicks and dings. Lead filled back is solid with no flaking or damage. When this was found the iron attaching loops were rusted off. The previous owner replaced them so he could display this on a cartridge box. He did a darn good job. Plate is slightly dished but otherwise excellent. Solid, tight, attractive, and very very scarce.... $950.00 SOLD

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13-10-63 ...Scarce US Model 1835/40 Conversion Musket. “D. Nippes/ US” 1843. Nippes made 5600 contract muskets in the 1835/40 pattern, most of which were converted to percussion. This is one of those guns. Overall condition very good to attic fine. Has two clear cartouches on the stock opposite the lock. Wood is extra fine. A tight sharp musket and one of the scarcer patterns. 100% original and complete, except for replaced rod done during the period. Mechanically perfect. Some light rust on the metal that may clean. A scarce gun at a fair price ... $1,250.00

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13-10-64 ... Spectacularly Mint Yankee Soldier / Father-daughter Tintype ... You can see right away that this father loves his daughter – and she is proud to be sitting next to Papa in his dashing Mr. Lincoln’s Army uniform. The only question is whether the daughter kept this image at home as a reminder of Papa, or whether dear old Dad carried the portraits while he was away fighting Johnny Reb. It doesn’t matter – it’s a truly touching image of the utmost quality and condition. Image is a superb sixth plate tintype. Mint. Plate bears Forneffs Patent mark. Leatherette case bears a superb patriotic design that I do not recall seeing previously. Spectacular design really. I am totally bummed out that the front cover of the case is not present, but at least we have the back half. The best quality, the best condition, a real piece of heartwarming Civil War history. I’m having a hard time keeping the price under three hundred fifty ... $295.00 SOLD

 

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13-10-65 ... Quarter Plate Wounded Infantryman and Wife in Winter: This Civil War soldier poses with his lovely bride wearing his newly issued government caped infantry greatcoat, over his government issued 9-button infantry frock coat. ;Mrs. Yankee is in her Sunday best. Initially I would have guessed that he was about to go to war, but looking closer our helper Art concluded that he has returned from it. Arthur points out that close examination of the soldier’s clasped hands certainly seems to show he is bandaged on his lower most hand. We have enlarged that portion of the image and it certainly appears to be a lump of cloth rather than articulated fingers. The wound - no doubt earned in military service. The case is worn and missing the lid. Image is good and clear with fine contrast. There is some emulsion crazing on Mrs. Yankee’s dress…just crazing --- no flaking! ... $235.00 SOLD

 

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13-10-66 (Above Left) ... Scarce Small Size M-1839 US Cartridge Box Plate: Excellent non-dug condition and the die strike is one of the scarcer and more attractive examples. These are about fifty times rarer than the standard size box plates, but only cost a fraction more. Great plate ... $295.00

13-10-67 (Above Center) ... Indian War Officer’s Eagle Buckle: These are the sword belt plates worn by the Indian Fighters on the western frontier. Very similar to Civil War officers’ buckles, these 1880 era plates have a drop-bar on the back for attaching to the belt, and a very wide tongue to engage a very wide keeper on the belt. Superb condition, and a fraction the price of pre 1866 officers’ buckles. ... $69.00 SOLD

13-10-68 (Above Right) “Boyd & Sons Boston” Eagle Shoulder belt plate: This is the regulation CW “breastplate” worn on the Civil War infantryman’s shoulder strap supporting his cartridge box. This is a beautiful non-dug example, with extra rich undisturbed age patina. Best of all it is boldly marked in the back by the maker “Boyd & Sons / Boston”. Rare to find marked plates in the 21st century … and very desirable ... $345.00 SOLD

 

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13-10-69 ... World War Two German “Russian Front” Medal: A real attractive award with a German Helmet and grenade as the surmounting motifs. Roughly the size of a half dollar coin (for those of us who remember what those look like.)  Just needs a ribbon to complete it.  The eastern front was without question the hardest fighting the Germans did during WW2.  This badge brought home by a local American vet. ... $49.00 SOLD

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13-10-70 ... 1940 User’s Manual for the Thompson Sub Machine Gun: I bought this at a local auction simply because I thought it was really cool and I had never owned one previously. I just kept my bidder’s card up until the bidding was over. Overall VG condition. Soft bound pamphlet. Tells you everything you need to know to operate and clean a good old Tommy Gun. This manual appears more geared for military use than civilian. Numerous photo illustrations and lots of interesting technical data, as well as parts listings and assembly data, magazine variations, extra accoutrements, etc. ... Now that the guns bring $15,000 (for a crappy, refinished, parts gun) to $80,000 for a nice example, this manual seems downright cheap ... $175.00 SOLD

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