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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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13-09-41 ... Regulation issue US 1858 pattern smooth-side canteen in truly excellent condition. This is the New York Depot pattern, which utilizes a chain instead of a string to secure the stopper to the strap guide. Complete brown cover with no tears or damage whatsoever, a nice full length original strap, and of course the stopper and chain. Very minor staining to the strap, some scattered dark spots on the wool cover. About the nicest I have seen in two years. See O’Donnell’s book on US military canteens for more information and for the many variations available to the collector. This is an essential piece of soldier field gear, issued to and carried by everyone in the army in every branch of service. Those we usually see on the market these days don’t hold a candle to this one. Here is a superior example looking very much as it did when first issued. A top notch example, like we used to find in the “old days.” ... $475.00 SOLD

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13-09-42 ... Rare Long Barrel W.W. Marston 3-barrel Pistol ... Manufactured from 1864 to 1872 with a total production of about 3,000, these odd pistols were produced in two barrel lengths ... 3 inch (common) and 4 inch (very scarce).  This is the ultra scarce 4 inch example. SN 916. About fine condition with much factory blue remaining.  The firing pins were removed at one time, otherwise complete and mechanically perfect. The pin situation is the only “wart” on this wonderful specimen.  We sure as heck aren’t going to shoot this thing, so the missing pins make little difference except that the price is much friendlier. Our illustration art shown above is from the recent movie The Lone Ranger showing Red Harrington (Helena Bonham Carter) brandishing an identical original model Marston Long Barrel.  Generally priced in the $2500 to $3000 with this much factory finish --- here is a dandy priced at ... $1,850.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-43 ... Cavalry Carbine Cartridge Box. U.S. Cavalrymen were issued separate cartridge boxes for their carbine and pistol ammunition. This is an example of the twenty-round box for the carbine. Nice Dingee and Lorigan, NY, maker’s mark on the inner cover. Latch tab firmly in place, secured by rivet and stitching. Implement pouch and tab also firmly in place on the front face of the box. Dingee and Lorigan had numerous government contracts for cavalry accoutrements: belts, slings, and cartridge boxes like this. The same box could be used for several different cartridges depending on the wood block on the interior, which was drilled to accept 20 separate cartridges. Different drill bit sizes were used depending on which cartridge the box was intended to accept. This box does not have the wooden block so you can display it with any carbine you desire. Heck you can make your own wood block if you feel the urge. Early and mid-war boxes were set up with belt loops for a waist belt and buckles and sling strap for use on a shoulder belt. This box shows a wonderful period alteration where the waist belt loops were removed so the box would be used exclusively on a shoulder sling. (See photo of the reverse side.) The cavalryman was burdened with the carbine box, pistol box, holster, at least one cap pouch, and the saber, all intended to be worn on the waist belt. Civil War photos show troopers tried all sorts of ways to carry the boxes on their belts, but they were always jammed up, and the pieces were difficult to remove because of the other boxes, the saber slings, etc. The carbine box sometimes ended up sliding around on the trooper’s carbine sling. In this case the soldier decided to use the shoulder sling the box was originally set up for and get it off the waist belt. An appealing field-modified variant showing how soldiers actually wore their gear ... $295.00

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Wonderful Examples of the Die-Sinker's Art! Again this month I am pleased to offer the last elements of a fine old collection of mid 19th century powder flasks. You can learn more on the subject in Riling's Powder Flask Book. In 19th century Europe hunting with firearms was largely the privilege of the nobility, whereas Americans all shot game to put food on the table. The Europeans went in for fancy carving and ivory inlays on their arms and flasks. We were satisfied with brass or German Silver inlays and felt fortunate when we could obtain a fine die-struck flask with a spring loaded measuring spout. Below are some examples of what we did allow ourselves to indulge in during the mid 19th century. I have included here a fine piece of 19th century Daguerrean photography showing an American hunter with his tools. For those of you who insist on mint condition, please note our subject's hunting flask... those dents were there in 1850!

13-09-44 ... 9.25" long ... diamond pattern main area with a leaf design along the sides ... leather strap measuring about 38" in total length. no major marks or dings to speak of ... $145.00 SOLD

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13-09-45 ... 1880s Shot Flask: This one is designed to carry shot instead of powder.  Note the charging spout.  11.5" long ... Ribbed body design with "Carewells patent Aug. 24, 1880" marked clearly on the neck. ... $145.00 SOLD

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13-09-46 ...  New Haven Connecticut Powder Flask: 9.5" long ... shiny copper ribbed design and signed  “J. Matthewman”  There is a minor seam opening in the bottom. Carrying rings intact. Overall VG condition.  Matthewman produced flasks in New Haven prior to and during the Civil War years ... $125.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-47  Smooth Side Powder Flask:  8" long ... smooth body flask, signed by famed maker Dixon & Sons ... minor dings and marks show character and there is a nice auburn patina to the copper body. ... a really nice flask with a semi-military flavor due to the smooth sides. ... $145.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-48 ... Silk New York Artillery Civil War Battle Carried Flag... 28" x 29" flag matted in a 38" x 40" frame. One of the great rarities in Civil War collecting are the silk flags, markers, guidons, and colors that were actually flown in battle. This is the actual marker flag of The 2nd NY State Volunteer Artillery which served as infantry in the 2nd Corps during Grant’s 1864 overland campaign against Lee. This is the real deal ... The original silk flank marker of the New York Second Heavy Artillery presented by the City of New York as part of a stand of colors when the regiment reenlisted as veterans. Boldly painted in crimson-shadowed gilt letters: “N.Y.S.V.V. ARTILLERY” for the New York State Veteran Volunteer Artillery, with the regimental number “2d” on red in a central cartouche with gilt rococo border with flourishes. Narrow blue sleeve for rod-mounting on a staff as is correct, gold edge fringe intact. The matching companion marker, (two were included as part of the presentation stand of colors), is in the New York State Military Museum. These flank markers were carried by sergeants acting as the “right and left general guides” when the regiment formed in line of battle. See Howard Madaus’s multi-part series, “Camp Colors, General Guide Flags and Flank Markers in the United States Army, 1861-1865” - Journal of the Company of Military Historians - part 3, pages 156-157. This example is among the most visual of all surviving markers as it is painted with full unit I.D. instead of just a simple numeral. It is professionally conserved with just some minor silk loss and loosening of the gold fringe border at the bottom right, mounted with some blue silk in the background and red at the center where the missing lower portion of the “2” and part of the period and the “d” have been professionally in painted. This was done wonderfully well. See the close-up photos I have provided. The losses are minor and this is a splendid looking flag worthy of the best collection. The Second NYHA was a hard-fought unit. Stationed in the forts around Washington and Alexandria early in the war, it was then called into the field in the Spring of 1864 to serve as infantry and assigned to “Tyler’s Artillery Division” of the 2nd Corps, which was actually just a brigade, but was of division strength due to the full rosters of the heavily manned artillery regiments brought into its folds. It was quickly thrown into some of the worst fighting of the war. At Spotsylvania the regiment lost 117 men; at the North Anna, 95; at Cold Harbor, 215; at the assault on Petersburg and the Weldon Railroad, more than 350, and the list goes on… Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Reams Station, the siege and fall of Petersburg, the Appomattox Campaign. In battle deaths alone the regiment the regiment lost 10 officers and 206 men, and more than 600 who were wounded and recovered. Their total of killed, wounded and missing was a staggering 1,140, the vast majority in the last bloody year of the war. Of some note is that a horrible fake version of this flag constructed of coarse material, came on the market several months ago through a major auction house. It was cataloged and sold as real, despite looking completely bogus in the on-line photos. The counterfeit flag was subsequently returned by the buyer and resold, this time being properly described as being from a “later period”. Whether that flag was made for reenactors or meant to deceive, I cannot say. I can say, however, that the one here offered is absolutely genuine and original and is one of the original pair of markers presented by the City of NY when the regiment “veteranized,”. The “veteran” designation coming after a sufficient number of men reenlisted to keep the regiment in service and retain its designation (late 1863 to early 1864). A top notch flag, very displayable size, great color and visual appeal, and from a real fighting regiment. They don’t get much better and I’m sure the new owner will enjoy looking at it on his wall as much as I have… One of my favorite pieces ... $24,500.00

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13-09-49  Wonderful Early Georgia Confederate Artillery Shadow Box Relic Display:   An honest, REAL, antique, Civil War Relics shadow box put together in the 1880s or 1890s … likely by a Confederate veteran. This surfaced at a Georgia flea market and was purchased by a Georgia friend of mine from a Georgia flea-marketeer.  Until I got it, I don’t think it had ever been outside the state of Georgia. My friend sold it to me on one of his trips “up North” to visit his daughter in Michigan. Inside the frame is an artillery horse hames, an iron artillery hammer, a military horse bit, a crude spur, and a crude and heavy picket pin that is designed to pound into a tree instead of the ground.  (I found a similar rebel picket pin on the following relic page  http://lookoutmountaincivilwarrelics.com/miscellaneous-items.html )   All the relics in this shadow box appear to be Confederate pieces.  Best part is the large, original ancient Brown Ink label which at one time read “Confederate Artillery Hames”… Worst part is that portions of the label are missing so we actually see  Conf------ Artillery H-mes”.   This is the real-deal.  A southern made relic display full of southern relics.   This item will require special shipping or arrangements for delivery or pick-up.  A wonderful early lot of Rebel Relics ... $1,650.00

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13-09-50 ... Veteran Reserve Corps Jacket ... Mint condition enlisted man’s coat for a private in the Veteran Reserve Corps. Created in April, 1863, as the “Invalid Corps,” the organization initially consisted of separate companies, but by very early in 1864, twenty-four regiments had been formed in addition to 188 independent companies. These were experienced soldiers, frequently wounded men, not deemed fit for extended campaigning, but who could still perform military service. When first organized the Corps was divided into “classes” based on level of disability, later these were designated as “battalions:” the “first battalion” men could carry a rifle and do some marching and were assigned to guard duty over installations, railroads, government buildings, etc., and over new draftees and prisoners of war. Members of the second battalion were less fit for service but still not disabled and served as clerks, nurses, etc., but might be called upon in emergencies to bear arms. During Early’s raid on Washington in 1864 some of the VRC troops saw action at the forts around the City. We see them in many wartime photographs on guard duty around Washington.

The distinctive uniform was prescribed in 1863. There are a number of variations and one type, called by collectors the Type I, that was apparently never issued. This is the standard issue “Type II” produced by the Schuylkill Arsenal and bears their “SA/2” stamp along with another size “2” mark in one upper sleeve and another “2” and a maltese cross stamp in the other, which is probably an arsenal acceptance mark since they farmed out the assembly of clothing to soldiers’ widows in the Philadelphia area. Sky blue wool body… Twelve button front, shoulder tabs edged in dark blue with single buttons. Collar edged with dark blue lace and single false button hole with one button and one double-row of lace centered on each side. Dark blue trim down front and along edges, and dark blue cuff chevrons. Waist cut-outs at the hips giving the jacket its chasseur appearance. The identical pattern is pictured in Time-Life Arms and Equipment of the Union. White lining in body and sleeves. Very minor stains under one armpit with a couple of wear spots showing it might have been issued and worn briefly, otherwise near mint condition inside and out. You won’t find a nicer regulation piece of Civil War uniform cloth anywhere. Eight years ago these VRC jackets sold in the $10,000 to $12,000 range. Here is a wonderful value at ... $6,750.00 SOLD

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13-09-51 ... Antique Photo Album: From the era of WW-1 is this 7 1/4" x 11" album with over 150 photographs. Included inside are great pics of old cars, some World War One soldiers, and a couple neat pictures of a Civil War vet modeling his old uniforms. A heck of a lot of bang for a very small amount of buck ... $45.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-52 Double Sixth Plate Thermoplastic Case With Fine Pair Of Tintypes: Obviously husband and wife, not certain which one is scarier looking… they remind me of characters from Dark Shadows. Very fine condition thermoplastic case. 3 1/4" x 3 3/4" ... $95.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-53 ... Rare Rare Rare Pre Civil War Quarter Plate Tintype African American Married Couple Portrait: Fresh from a local auction is this spectacular late 1850s era BLACK – AFRICAN/AMERICAN image. Very rich tones and great clarity set this quarter-plate tintype apart even in the rare category of African-American portraits. Making this even scarcer is the fact that it is a portrait of a married couple whose faces are a wonderful character study ... faces that show they have endured pain and struggle ... faces that show strength, faces that show they have overcome the obstacle ...(for the most part) ... BUT still, if you study the woman’s face, she emotes a tinge of fear or timidity that are obviously an inseparable element of her being and life’s history. Overtly the couple obviously has some wealth and likely some standing in their community ... possibly Oberlin Ohio??? Note the fine clothing and strong countenance of the subjects. Image has some solarization around the mat perimeter affecting only the man’s hands and left sleeve and coat breast and her right sleeve. She loops her hand through his elbow for the seated portrait. Both are middle-aged and are well-dressed and prosperous ... she in lace-collared dress with earrings and brooch, he with a buttoned double-breasted overcoat showing jacket, collar and tie beneath. Both bear serious expressions showing they have made their way in the world, but it has not been an easy road. African-American portraiture of the era is very rare and highly sought after. This is one of the nicest images I have come across both in terms of the quality of the image and the character of the subjects. “Leatherette” case with floral motifs, separated at the hinge, good condition. A very strong image. At the auction I made the decision that I would be the high bidder on this image against all comers. Great piece of early Photographic History… *If this was a daguerreotype instead of a tintype you could darn near add a decimal point to the cost. Great image at ... $850.00 SOLD

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13-09-54  Wonderful Ninth Plate Thermoplastic Case With Charming Portrait Of Young Lady dressed in her 1862 finest. posed in front of a photographer’s countryside backdrop.  2 1/2" x 3" ... $95.00

 

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13-09-55 ... 1"in diameter CSA BUTTON: Just like the ones made in England for the Confederacy … but this style “Superior Quality” back mark is much later than 1865. Likely made for Confederate Veteran’s in the late 1800s or early 1900s.  The face looks just like the 1864 vintage examples, the cost is a lot lower ... $35.00 SOLD

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13-09-56 - Likely Confederate Used P-53 Enfield Rifle Musket:  Overall NRA “Very Good” condition Pattern 1853 Tower Enfield Rifle Musket.  100% original,  100% complete,  mechanically perfect.  The stock was lightly cleaned some years ago. 1863 date on the lock along with Tower crown etc. ...  The other markings are almost overwhelming ---   Barrel has standard “25 * 25 *”  Birmingham proof on a .577 caliber barrel.  Rear sight marked  “crown over JH”. The bottom of the barrel bears markings of …  "920    920     F J H      C.W. James       GUN BARREL Co. " ... The wood forward of the butt plate tang appears to have the remnants of a Sinclair Hamilton mark but is largely abraded from earlier cleaning.  The wood behind the trigger guard tang is clearly marked “crown over JH”.   C.W. James  (the name on the underside of the barrel) is known to be one of the five suppliers of muskets to the Sinclair Hamilton Co.  (An Exclusively Confederate Export Company). In 1861 C.W. James agreed to supply Sinclair Hamilton with 10,000 muskets for the Confederates.   He agreed to supply 3,000 guns by Dec. 31st 1861 and the balance of 7,000 additional guns by April 30th 1862. Referencing the new book  The Confederate Enfield  by Steven W. Knott we find that James may not have finished his contract. With this in mind,  the fact that his name is present on the underside of this barrel along with the marking “Gun Barrel Co.”  I wonder if C.W. James may not have changed roles and gone on to manufacture “barrels only” for some of the other  Confederate Enfield suppliers working with Sinclair Hamilton??? Or it is possible that James did indeed complete his Confederate contract but not until 1863?   Also in the Enfield Book is shown an unquestionable Confederate Enfield which bears a “J.H.” marking behind the trigger guard tang ( but has no Crown).   The meaning of the JH markings is unknown to me, but my gun has two of them with crowns. There is not much doubt this Tower Enfield is one of the Sinclair Hamilton muskets, but it is priced far friendlier than those with the JS Anchor marks and engraved export serials. A darn nice rebel musket ... $1,950.00 SOLD

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13-09-57 Superb Ninth Plate Patriotic Thermoplastic Case And Image:
Wonderful ninth plate patriotic case with fine civilian portrait inside. ... 3" x 2.5" ... $225.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-58 ... Special Model 1861 Colt Rifle Musket with Rare Amoskeag Lock: Colt made nearly 100,000 of these special models for the US government and various state contracts. He was ahead of US arsenal developments in several innovations: the contoured hammer profile, lack of bolster cleanout screw, and the use of split friction- bands with tension screws (eliminating band springs). Only Colt, Amoskeag, and Lamson, Goodnow and Yale produced this Special Model pattern and their parts are interchangeable as are most CW contract muskets. In this case at some point an Amoskeag lock was placed in the stock. Whether this occurred in 1864 or 1964 I do not know. I considered switching locks with a Colt pattern but it looks like the Amoskeag lock has been in there a long, long time. I will leave it to the next owner to decide whether to keep the current lock or to swap it out for a Colt lock. The 1863 date and Amoskeag marks are crisp, as is the eagle above on the bolster. The barrel shows an 1862 barrel date on top, Colt style VP proof on the left flat, and a New Jersey “NJ” barrel stamp on the left, along with the Colt marking of “Steel” on the barrel. These guns were finished “in the bright” and this one has just few small brown spots on the butt plate tang and inside of the hammer along with some very light flash peppering from firing on the hammer and around the nipple. Wood is very good, lightly cleaned at some point, partial NJ cartouche still visible in the wood. Mechanically excellent, great bore, original rod, swivels, type-II rear sight, etc.
A solid Special Model 1861 musket priced friendly at ... $1,950.00

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13-09-59 ... Superb Near Mint Smith Cavalry Carbine ... Investment Grade! If you want bragging rights to a truly great gun, here it is- a real stunner Smith Carbine. Great wood with mint edges. Crisp Smith’s Patent and Poultney and Trimble markings on the receiver, small “W” sub inspector markings, very clear “JH” inspector cartouche in the wood, “LFR” on the left barrel flat, matching serial number 7447 on the underside of the receiver and hinge. Wonderful barrel blue about 99.9% intact. Loads of Vivid, beautiful, case color on the receiver and hammer. Hammer screw also loads of blue. Lots of blue on the frame ferrule at rear of receiver at the wrist, which is the first place to lose finish with any handling. More muted case colors on the offside. “As New” mechanically and has a super bore. Both sights firmly in place. Superb color on them and on the top locking bar.

Many cavalrymen favored the Smith for durability, accuracy, and ease in loading on horseback. Pressing the brass latch-button inside the trigger guard raises the locking bar on top of the barrel and permits the shooter to break open the carbine like a single shot shotgun and load a fixed .50 caliber cartridge with a hole in the base that was ignited by a percussion cap on the nipple. This carbine was carried by many units, including the 1st Connecticut Cavalry, the 10th New York, 1st Mass., 3rd Indiana, 7th Pennsylvania, etc. This is one heck of a nice example priced very realistically at ... $2,850.00 SOLD

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13-09-60 ... Secession Badge: A rare relic of a vanquished nation! About 3" in diameter, it is a Red, white and blue multilayer cockade with a silver bullion star at the center. Minor fraying at the edges. Light blue fabric back showing two slots from a missing fastening device, either a pin or two loops. These were all the rage in Southern states in 1860 and early 1861 as pro-secession meetings were announced in newspapers in larger cities and even small towns. Participants were encouraged to wear badges to show their support for Southern Rights whether as independent states in 1860 or as potential members of the Confederacy as the war loomed closer. Most of these were hidden away in the backs of drawers after the war as sad reminders of The Lost Cause. This specimen would be a great display piece with southern memorabilia as part of an exhibit showing the intense political activity that eventually split the nation. It is possible this was intended to be worn with ribbons hanging down from behind it, but I see no sign of them or points of attachment unless they were secured by the missing fastening device.
One of the great rarities on this list. This is the real deal ... $595.00 SOLD

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13-09-61 Goodyear’s Patent 1851 Hard Rubber Comb: Made and marked by the famed IRC (India Rubber Comb) company.  Excellent, mint condition with most of the original pasteboard box which also bears the Goodyear Patent info. ... comb folds to fit in the 2" x 4" box ... A great CW personal item. ... $125.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-62 ... GAR Hat Cords: Standard CW vets cords for use on the old time GAR hats that the old timers wore to their reunions. VG condition ... $50.00

 

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13-09-63 ... Model 1863 Type-1 Springfield Rifle Musket: A good solid example of the Standard ‘63 Springfield produced during the middle of the Civil War. This gun is the model with rounded barrel bands secured with friction screws under each band. It was made only during 1863. Condition is about good to near VG. Metal is overall grey steel, moderately pitted, showing some cleaning, but having good strong markings. Both the barrel and lock are match dated 1863. Cartouches are worn away. Ramrod is a modern replacement as are the sight leaves, otherwise all original and complete. (The rear sight is original, just the leaves are replaced.) Mechanically perfect. Bore is good but shows wear.
A very affordable CW musket ... $1,050.00

 

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13-09-64 ... Dental Key: Gruesome device for yanking teeth. Works just as you are envisioning… hook the puller onto the bad tooth, twist your wrist a little to gain purchase, and twist hard to pull that buggar out. Classic 1840 to 1860 era key ... $165.00 SOLD

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13-09-65 ... A Cavalry Company on Parade: Large format (8 x 10 inches) albumen photo on card mount of Company H 26th New York Cavalry, known as the “Frontier Cavalry” at Madison Barracks. This was an army post at Sackett’s Harbor, of war of 1812 fame. This is where our Civil War unit mustered out on July 7, 1865, quite possibly the occasion of this photo. The company is shown in a single line wearing regulation jackets, caps, and belts with sabers at parade rest, sheathed with point on the ground, hands on the hilt. Sergeants have been brought to the front, probably for greater visibility, their posts in line would officially be behind the men. The officers stand at the right of the line, the viewer’s left. At bottom of the photo in period ink is “Capt. Turner.” This would be Henry Turner, who enrolled at age 33 at Lowville, NY, to serve one year, mustered in as Second Lieutenant in Co. H and made Captain, Feb. 22, being mustered out with the company. The other officers are likely First Lieutenant Bester S. Safford and Second Lieutenant George M.D. Ryder. Both Safford and Ryder were from Watertown.

The regiment consisted of companies from New York, Massachusetts, and Vermont. New York supplied five of the companies. Company H recruited at Watertown and mustered in February, 1865. The regiment was formed to watch the Canadian border (Maybe so the MacKenzies could not sneak across - sorry, I couldn’t help it J). Not only had there been the Confederate raid on St. Albans, Vermont, but there were plots afoot to free Confederate prisoners of war at prison camps and Confederate agents were known to have slipped across the border. It was not glorious service for the regiment, but they were doing their part. Image is badly faded and worn, but still viewable and very significant. Priced friendly as I can make it at ... $145.00

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13-09-66 ... Blockade Run Enfield “Expense Pouch” or NCO Possibles Pouch: These Enfield accoutrement pouches were sent via Blockade Runner along with the P53 Enfield muskets intended for the south. These large pouches could be used to hold ten cartridges, gun tools, caps, etc. on the front of the belt. It is known that this pattern Expense Pouch was among the cargo captured from CS Blockade Runners which was taken to Boston, off loaded, and then issued to the 44th Mass Vols. Bears NO English War Dept markings whatsoever … definitely a Blockade Runner pouch which some collectors refer to as the NCO pouch ... $475.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-67 ... Original Complete package of Skin cartridges for the 31 Caliber Colt Pocket revolver. This package is 100% intact and is in excellent complete condition. Quite hard to find unopened packages these days. Great label with no damage… ... $425.00 SOLD

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13-09-68 ... Original Complete Colt Navy package of Skin cartridges: Full pack of ammo for the 36 Caliber Colt or Remington or any .36 caliber Navy revolver. This package is 100% intact and is in excellent complete condition. Quite hard to find unopened packages these days. Great label ... $475.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-69 Superb Sixth Plate Thermoplastic Case and fine Civilian tintype inside. Top notch case ... $95.00

 

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13-09-70 Another Very Nice Thermoplastic Case ... this one a ninth plate size with no photo or frame inside other than an old time car. Fine case ... $45.00 SOLD

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13-09-71 ... Confederate Richmond Rifle Musket: The real deal --- a totally honest “Richmond” that is 100% “Richmond” from muzzle to butt plate… except for the crude ramrod which is either a CS replacement or a hillbilly replacement.  This old war horse shows plenty of wear and use… but no abuse and no modern repairs or cobbles.  Has proper brass butt plate, brass nose cap, straight ramrod channel, etc… etc… etc…   The lock is marked 1862 behind the hammer and CS Richmond Va. ahead of the hammer.  The rear sight is the proper Richmond version of the 1855 short range pattern and it has been slightly shortened along the front (forward) end.  The barrel proofs are visible but worn.  The barrel date is completely worn away.  All steel surfaces are a mixture of gun-metal grey and smoky patina with light rust pitting over 60%.  The stock shows plenty of handling and wear.  It is full length, unbroken, and unaltered.  Both sling swivels are present.  The bore is good with decent well-worn rifling.  I would judge this musket to have been produced late in 1862 due to the fact that ALL the parts are Richmond made, with no US “leftovers” in the recipe.  Early Richmonds utilized captured US parts from Harpers Ferry. Later war Richmonds utilized US parts  captured from prisoners guns or picked up off battlefields. It is the mid-war Richmonds that are most desirable as they are generally “purer” Richmond.  If you are looking for a REAL RICHMOND RIFLE MUSKET ... here she is ... $6,800.00

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13-09-72 ... Pistol Cartridge Box: Fine + condition. Stamped on the front H.W. Hayt … a marking I have never seen previously. Great example of standard CW cavalryman’s revolver cartridge box ... $150.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-73 ... Near Perfect 1863 Artillery Bit: The pictures tell the story. Superb condition, great markings, both US bosses are beautiful ... $165.00 SOLD

 

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13-09-74 ... Model 1808 Shoulder Belt Plate: Oval US Pattern 1808 shoulder belt plate for the bayonet belt. These cast brass oval plates were introduced with the US 1808 pattern accoutrements and remained regulation in the regular army until the introduction of the 1819 pattern that utilized a rolled brass plate with an embossed “US.” They were kept in store even after that, however, and issued for many years to various state forces. The soldier carried his cartridge box on a fixed shoulder belt crossing from the left shoulder to his right side, and his bayonet in a scabbard suspended from an adjustable belt running from his right shoulder to his left hip.

This plate is one of a group recovered at Sacket’s Harbor, NY twenty or more years ago. Sacket’s Harbor was the site of a battle in the War of 1812 and was an army depot for years thereafter. Military belt plates and buttons have been recovered from both land and water excavations in the area over the years. This seems to be one of the water finds. Generally well preserved though with some crustiness and one slight corrosion dimple on the face, more uneven surface to the back, with some form of preservative applied to the back. The fastening hook is in place and the two upright studs are present, but they lack the round washers which were originally affixed. This is one of the smaller pattern, measuring about 2.1 by 3.1 inches. Likely made 1815-1820. It was after 1819 when the bayonet belt was reduced in width, and these slightly smaller versions may be for that belt. A great early relic ... $295.00 SOLD

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13-09-75: Extra Fine Condition Remington Factory Cartridge Conversion Army Revolver w/ Ejector: (sn 139,544) One of the best examples I have encountered. This is the Remington New Model Army revolver with the exceedingly scarce Remington Factory conversion to metallic cartridge. Rates an NRA Fine++ to near Excellent condition.   Frame and cylinder retain 90%+ vivid factory blue. Barrel carries 40% blue, rammer 60%. Five shot cylinder bears the factory marking “Patented April 3d 1855”. The barrel legend is the standard three line ;“Patented Sept. 14, 1858 / E. Remington & Sons Ilion New York USA /  NEW MODEL”.  Grips are superb with vivid military cartouche on the left grip. Metal parts bear Civil War sub inspectors’ initials.   The barrel and frame bear a factory conversion serial or batch number “48”. This is Remington’s first venture into big guns for the cowboy and Indian Fighter market. While Colt was busy converting .44s via the Richards, and Richards-Mason alterations of their army model,  Remington was making this one.  The caliber is .46 rimfire.   Far rarer than the comparable Colts but far less expensive… especially in this high finish state. For the heck of it we’ve put up a picture of one of America’s favorite cowboys carrying one of these in his role as “Preacher” from the 1980s film Pale Rider. A truly outstanding early Cowboy Era six shooter ... $3,500.00

 

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13-09-76 ... Extremely Scarce, Highly Desirable, Dated Officer’s Spurs: As long as I have collected Civil War antiques, these 1861 dated spurs have been among the most popular of horse related Civil War items. Finely cast brass: Stippled and fluted designs: Floral scrolls at the base of the neck: One spur bears the marking “Patented Dec. 24, 1861”. Excellent condition on all fronts. One rowel slightly cruder than the other tells me it was replaced during the spurs’ period of use during the Civil War. If you have been looking for a set of these, here is your chance for this year. I only find a pair every other year or so ... $695.00 SOLD

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13-09-77: Extremely Scarce M-1855 Harpers Ferry “Patchbox” Rifle Musket: Among the Holy Grails of Civil War longarms are these Harpers Ferry ’55 rifle muskets with the Maynard tape primer system. The reason being ... this is the arm that was on hand when the Confederates captured the arsenal in 1861, and many, if not most of them, wound up in the hands of the Johnny Rebs. And those that were not captured by the rebs had likely been issued to US Regulars who were already in the field when the war broke out. The Springfield examples are very desirable, the Harpers Ferry examples are ultra desirable. This gun is totally original and complete and is also mechanically perfect. Metal is overall gun-metal grey with vivid sharp markings and some age staining and areas of light pitting. The lock date and barrel date are matched “1859 Stock edges are very good++ and “JS” cartouche is partially visible. The rear sight is the proper short range pattern found on the “patchbox models” of the ’55. The bore is about VG. This is a totally original and honest Harpers Ferry ’55. It is 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Proper in every way for an early war Confederate display. ... $3850.00

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13-09-78 ... 13-05-61 - 1812/1813 Pattern Starr contract dragoon saber and scabbard. Starr is one of the most famous early American arms makers. This is one of his War of 1812 period sabers produced on contract for the US government from the beginning of 1813 through 1817, sometimes called the 1813 pattern and differing from the 1812 in the size of the guard and iron scabbard, and from the 1818 in its flat, unfullered blade. This one has a nice smooth blade, no nicks, sharp markings: P/L.S./N.Starr/US near the guard indicating government inspection by Luther Sage, generally bright overall, mellow gray, but not dark. Very good wood grip, a light corrosion speckling on the iron guard and pommel, but not bad. Iron scabbard with carrying rings in place, very solid, brown mixing with gray. A nice example of a key weapon in the development of US edged weapons and regulation cavalry arms, carried in the very early Indian Campaigns and westward expansion, and still serviceable at the opening of the Civil War. Many were carried by Confederates.
Nearly 200 years old and still priced the same as a common 1860 Cavalry saber ... $895.00 SOLD

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13-09-79 ... Fine to Excellent Condition Example of the Ames 1850 Field and Staff Officer’s Sword:  Outstanding specimen of the the “50 Staff” signed on both the blade and scabbard mount by the world famous Ames Mfg Co. (N.P. Ames founder)  100% original 100% complete and super condition.  The wonderfully etched blade retains 90% mint frosty factory luster.  There are only a few minor wear spots.  Gilt brass mounts and guard retain 80% or more original gilt.  Grip-wrap and wire are about perfect.  Blued steel scabbard likewise outstanding.  If you are looking for a “smoker” condition staff & field officer’s sword here you go.  This pattern was carried by staff officers and officers carrying the rank of major and above.  You will find comparable swords for sale by the tourist town dealers for three thousand dollars and more…  Here is a wonderful specimen by Ames priced very fairly at ... $2,350.00 SOLD

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13-09-80-A ... Regulation Civil War 1858 Pattern Smooth Sided Canteen with Rare Sky Blue Cover and Original Strap. One of the most desirable artifacts is the Union canteen with blue cover. Most that I find lack the cover or the strap, or have ones that look suspiciously new! Here is an original and completely genuine untouched Civil War soldier’s example. Overall VG condition with some slight wear spots. Original cloth strap in place has one break that is easily repaired. It is full length, just a little abrasion at the tops of the brackets where the roughness of the metal wears the cloth or transfers rust. Complete withb the cork stopper. A very attractive Yankee canteen ... $450.00 SOLD

13-09-80-B ... A work of art in miniature. One of the most appealing Civil War badges I have ever owned or seen! Wonderful jeweler-made patriotic eagle pin fashioned from a US silver coin. Hollowed circle border decorated with a chiseled line to look like a vine and leaves. Hollow cut eagle with US shield on its breast in the center from the central motif of the coin clutches oak leaves and arrows. A graceful ribband floats overhead. T-bar pin and catch on reverse. We see not only civilians but also soldiers wearing patriotic pins in portaits. This is a great piece created when we still valued artistry and craftmanship. An absolutely stunning piece of patriotic Civil War jewelry perfect with display with soldier or citizen effects ... $375.00 SOLD

13-09-80-C ... Standard Yankee Soldier's Belt Buckle: Arrow-back oval US waist belt plate just as brought home by Billy Yank. Non-excavated, mellow aged patina. Regulation pattern for US infantry privates and corporals.  Introduced in 1839, this is the regulation Civil War pattern.  A few edge dings to show us this was really there ... $235.00 SOLD

 


13-09-80-D ... Indiana Cavalryman’s Stencil: Served with Grierson and fought against Forrest!
Stencils were a popular soldier purchase from sutlers to mark not only their personal possessions against loss or theft, but also issue gear they might be charged for if found missing. They are a key personal item in a soldier’s kit and provide a direct link to an individual soldier’s history. This one is a classic example with the letters punched through a sheet of brass that was folded over a thin metal frame. This one belonged to… “M.W. Stoner / Co. H. 7. Ind. CAV.” Marcus W. Stoner enlisted on 9/5/63 from Lagrange, Indiana, and mustered in the same day as a private in Co. H of the 7th Indiana Cavalry and served until 5/22/65. The regiment had a ton of interesting service, as most cavalry did in the western theatre, being assigned to the 16th Army Corps and Department of the Tennessee. It was attached initially to Benjamin Grierson’s brigade in late 1863. They saw action under William S. Smith against Nathan Bedford Forrest in the Meridian Campaign and were in sharp fights at Paris, Egypt Station, and Okolona, Mississippi. At the latter place, they destroyed the railroad bridge and depot and were involved in holding the enemy in check while the rest of the division fell back under Forrest’s attack.

Company H is mentioned as being sent out on the skirmish line at the beginning of the fight and later in the battle parts of the regiment were involved in a counter charge on the enemy. Smith lost the battle, but commanders thought the regiment had done well. They suffered 11 killed, 36 wounded and another 37 missing in the fight, which is a very heavy loss in any Civil War regiment, but especially so in a cavalry unit. They later spent time stationed in the Memphis area doing scouting duty, protecting railroads, and fighting Forrest and were in further serious fights at Guntown, La Mavoo, and Memphis during 1864, losing 7 men killed by guerrillas in one action at Memphis in October. From there they campaigned in Arkansas against Price, moved into Missouri, and then back to Mississippi for more action against Forrest. At Vernon, Miss., they were part of an expedition that surprised a Confederate camp, destroying Hood’s pontoon train and capturing 4,000 new British carbines. At Egypt Station, again, a short time later, they destroyed a Confederate train of 14 cars, and were subsequently involved in more scouting around Memphis. Trooper Stoner mustered out in May. The regiment went on to spend time in Louisiana and Texas. It lost during service 1 officer and 47 enlistedmen killed or mortally wounded. There are a good number of reports in the Official Records from their regimental and brigade commanders making some great reading. One added bit of interest: one of their officers was Major Joel H. Elliott, who later joined the Seventh US Cavalry and was killed at the Washita under Custer in 1868. A great CW stencil ... $575.00 SOLD

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13-09-81 ... 13-08-27 ... Regulation Civil War 1858 Pattern Smooth Sided Canteen with Original Cover and Strap. Most that I find lack the cover or the strap, or have ones that look suspiciously new! Here is an original and completely genuine untouched Civil War soldier’s example. Gray wool body cover, characteristic loose weave, some stains here and there, one slight wear spot, but no tears or mothing. Original linen strap in place, full length, just a little abrasion at the tops of the brackets where the roughness of the metal wears the cloth or transfers rust. Lightly scratched in initials on each bracket, “LH,” undoubtedly the soldier who carried it. Lacks the cork stopper, which on this pattern would be secured with a doubled string cord. Originals show up from time to time and it should not be difficult to find one if you want to. I like it as is, just the way “LH” brought it home ... $345.00

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13-09-82 ... 13-08-32 ... Early War Buff Infantryman’s Belt. Very nice condition early war US infantry belt in buff leather with the early war style standing loop keeper and early stud back US plate. Excellent condition, just two small lengthwise slits in the belt for some reason. This would look great with an early war pattern square flap cap box and bayonet scabbard. The standing loops was replaced by the stamped brass C-clasp because the loops would shrink and soldiers sometimes had a hard time feeding the belt plate through. Most that survive have had the leather loop removed. Buff was originally black, but as with most CW buff that used iron dyes it has oxidized to a lovely dark brown color. A very, very scarce pattern in unaltered fine condition ... $650.00

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13-09-83 ... 13-08-09 ... Very Good to Fine Condition Special Model 1861 Colt Rifle Musket. This is a gun collector’s gun: strong wood, good metal, crisp marks, mechanically perfect.   Sharp 1864 date to rear of hammer, US/ Colt’s Pt. F. A. Mfg Co./ Hartford Ct.” forward.  Sharp eagle on bolster.  Matching 1864 barrel date,  sharp V/P/eagle on left barrel flat, inspector initials and “Steel” on side flat.  Two visible cartouches in the wood opposite the lock. Sharp “lock table” edges around the lock.  Original rod, bands, swivels and sights all intact.  Bands are correct screw tightened variety without band springs. A little bit of percussion cap firing corrosion on top flat near nipple partly hitting the date. Metal overall smooth with mottled silver and pewter color. Small number “21” in old white paint on inboard side of butt shows the gun was in military racks at some point. It could be removed but I like it as part of its history.  Colt introduced a number of innovations in his “special model” rifle muskets that the US government adopted and his rifles are well sought-after not only because of the fame of the maker but as important steps in US arms development. Excellent bore. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect ... and it is a Colt ... $2,250.00 SOLD

 

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