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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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FedEx delivery drivers serve in two tiers. Top tier are Business Delivery drivers who deliver during business hours. These people are generally reliable and professional. The second tier drivers are not employees of Federal Express at all. They work for, or as, independent contractors. These drivers are referred to as “Residential” delivery drivers and they handle packages sent by lower priced FedEx so-called “residential delivery service”. They drive FedEx trucks but do not wear uniforms. Unfortunately more and more businesses are choosing to ship using the cheaper “residential” service not realizing that by saving a couple dollars they have sent their business package into a void in the system.

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Dave Taylor and Civil War Antiques

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13-04-38 - Extra Fine Condition Matched Pair of Uhlinger Cartridge Revolvers: A fine brace of pistols as would have been carried by a Civil War officer, a gambler, or even an outlaw during the 1860s. High Finish Uhlinger 32 Caliber cartridge Revolvers – These are the 6-shot revolvers with 5 inch octagonal barrels in exceptional condition. These Uhlingers are interesting as most show up unmarked and some show up stamped with “maker’s” names on them of people who had no connection with the production of the guns, the names added to create the illusion of coming from a known famous maker. This pair represents both forms. Revolver #2389 bears no barrel legend, revolver #1373 is stamped “D.D. Cone Washington DC”. Both are dripping with original factory blue on the cylinders and barrels. The rosewood grips are near perfect, and both are 100% original and complete. The steel frames have an attractive smoky grey patina. Gun 1373 has a small spot of pitting on the right side of the frame. The actions are crisp and tight, and both function perfectly.
Lots of finish, lots of appeal, very little money for a matched pair of century and a half old antique handguns.
A Matched Pair ... $2,250.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-39 - Civil War US Army Hospital Department Medical Pannier - Untouched Out of the Attic – Brought Home by a Maine Soldier! This is the way you like to find Civil War stuff and it still happens on occasion. Here is a Civil War “U.S. Army Medicine Pannier” manufactured for the US Army by Squibb, and then brought or sent home, and it even retains many of the original army issue contents. Gordon Dammann illustrates one in Volume 2 of his series on CW Medical material, but his lacks any contents and seems to lack the upper tray also. Dammann notes these were supplied by Squibb to the Army complete with contents for $110 each, no small sum in 1863, which made it quite worthwhile for a sticky fingered ambulance driver to send one home if opportunity presented itself. In the upper tray is a wartime Sanitary Commission envelope addressed to “SB Emery, Sanford, ME.” The Emery family was a large one in Sanford and it looks like one of them had connections with the Sanitary Commission, which picked up a lot of the slack left by inadequate army medical services in the war. It was likely sent home by Emery at some point for use by a doctor or pharmacist, or more likely for personal home use as a medicine chest. Home medical guides were widely available in the period and there was no sense in just turning a chest full of useful medicine back in to the Army for disposal! The antique dealer who found this kit believed Sanford B Emery served in the 10th Maine and was an ambulance driver. I will let you verify or disprove that information. The box opens by a small button spring latch to reveal an upper tray and lower compartment. On the floor of the upper tray is the original maker’s label- the upper portion dark and tough to make out, but the lower part very clear: “Hospital Department of the U.S. Army by Edward R. Squibb, M.D. Brooklyn New York.” The underside of the lid has a chalk marking reading something like “Carbon,” but originally would have had a contents label. The upper tray still contains several original paper wrapped packets, the envelope mentioned above, a small tin box with partial label, some circular pill boxes and a few broken glass tops to small pharmacy bottles. One of the packets reads “gum arabic,” another “Cam. Flowers,” which probably refers to the tea that was part of the pannier official contents. One of the pill boxes has half a dozen round pills left in it.

The lower section has wood dividers for medicine bottles: the back row holding seven larger bottles (seven in place), the three middle rows eight apiece (three in place), and the front row ten smaller bottles (three in place.) These all have their tops, mostly glass, a couple corked, and one still tied shut. Many also still have their small paper labels, either preprinted or handwritten. I see one marked “Ammonia,” one “quiniae sulph,” another “cuprum sulphas,” etc. Most are empty. A few have their contents or traces of it. One has an apothecary label from a druggist in Sanford, Me., and is probably a later addition when it was being used by the family.

This is a wonderful, untouched rarity and would add a lot to a camp, officer, or CW medical display. It will be a while before another turns up.
It’s the first I’ve had in over a decade ... $2,250.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-40 - Superb Condition Import Belgian Musket by Francotte: Wonderful condition Francotte made Musket. These are usually beat to heck, having been imported in 1861, issued early in the war and beat around through 1863, and then taken back in and fobbed off on western troops,… after which they spent a few decades blasting squirrels, rabbits, and rodents on farms. This one is fine++ condition! .69 caliber, nice- smooth metal with a pleasant aged patina, nice wood with no damage and fine sharp edges around the lock and on the off-side. Sling swivels securely in place, original ramrod. Cool, funky hammer extends high up to strike the tall cone and bolster. Bayonet stud in place. Bore good, mechanics fine. Several European crown marks, etc., but especially nice is a sharp “A. Francotte” stamp in the wood. He was one of the best Belgian gun makers who supplied arms to various European countries and whose products ended up over here when we could not manufacture arms fast enough to equip the new volunteers.
Top drawer condition in all respects … and a fraction the cost of a Springfield in the same condition ... $1,150.00

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13-04-41 - Extra Nice New York Military Goods Dealer Marked Officer’s Sword! This is the popular “Peterson-75” style officer’s sword- (so called because half a century ago, sword scholar Harold Peterson assigned this pattern sword the illustration number “75” in his well respected reference book The American Sword. It is known as the non-regulation officer’s sword as well.) This style was patterned on the earlier pattern British infantry officer’s sword and came in an array of minor variants from different German makers. The common element to all is the cut-out guard with a spread-winged American eagle with motto and a sturdy steel scabbard, which made it a favorite for field use by officers of all ranks. ( Gen. Phil Sheridan carried one which I owned years ago and foolishly sold.) This specimen is nicely marked on one side of the ricasso by W. Clauberg of Solingen, with his standing knight logo. It is etched on the other side “Tomes, Son, & Melvain New York” around the small inset brass “proved” panel. This company was only in business under this name from July 1859 to July 1864, so you have a nice tight window for purchase and use on this sword. This has a beautiful, classically etched blade with a very visible fancy US that is shaded and entwined and bordered with other floral motifs on one side, and a beautiful spread winged eagle clutching a ribband in its beak with the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM, backed by the rays of the sun and then likewise bordered with floral motifs on either side. Blade is slightly curved, single edged, slight back edge coming from the spear point. No nicks and mostly bright with just a trace of graying here and there. Nice sharkskin grip with officer’s wire, one strand just a tad raised at the pommel. The original bumper pad is in place at the guard. Original scabbard with carrying rings and throat in place in similar condition, no dings or bends, bright with just light graying overall.
A top notch example of a combat officer’s Civil War sword ... $950.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-42 - Super Ames Heavy Cavalry Saber - This is the U.S. Dragoon Saber of the “Old Army.”   Nice 1849 dated Ames 1840 pattern Heavy Cavalry saber, a true weapon of the prewar “Regulars.”  Very good bright blade with no nicks with good luster mixed with nice smoky grey patina.    Housed in its matching scabbard in equally fine condition.  Saber has full twisted wire on the grip, original leather, absolutely smooth peening of the tang at pommel showing this thing has never been apart.  Top shelf.   Marked at the ricasso:  “Ames Mfg. Co. /Cabotville/1849” on one side and “US over WD” (William Dickinson, the Assistant Sub-Inspector) on the other.  Matching WD mark on the pommel along with inspector J.W.R. (James Wolfe Ripley.) Scabbard shows identical condition, no dings or dents, smooth metal, nice muted patina.  The only fault I can find is a small “B” scratched unobtrusively between the throat and the upper ring mount, which is likely the troopers company letter.  Sometimes called the “old wristbreaker,” this was the pattern of sword issued to the US Dragoons for service in Mexico and against Indians on the plains, after the 1833 pattern had proved too light.  Plenty of troops still had them all through the Civil War. (Indeed, just about all the import enlisted sabers were made on this pattern.)  This one has the bonus of a nice early date for western service with the dragoons and even predates by several years the very introduction of “cavalry” regiments into the US army.  They don’t get a lot nicer.  I see nit-wits bid these things to nearly $2000 each at auction and I wonder who these buyers are.  I still price mine at what I believe is a very realistic figure.  A dandy saber ... $1,350.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-43 - Incredibly Rare Tintype Showing Large Volcanic Navy Model Pistol! Beyond scarce, beyond rare,…  this tintype is …..  Incredibly RARE...  it is Exceedingly Rare …  it is Damn Rare!  In the forty-plus years I have collected, and among the over ten thousand Civil War photos I have owned ---  this is THE FIRST and ONLY tintype I have owned showing a Volcanic Pistol in the image. Again ---  this is the ONLY one I have ever found. A Volcanic Yankee!  Someone tipped me that it was on eBay and I placed a proxy bid that I was sure no one would beat.  The best part is that I won the image for a fraction of my high bid. Good news for me and for you! This is a Sixth Plate Tintype clearly showing our Union Soldier with a Navy Pattern Volcanic pistol with six or eight inch barrel. This yank is shown from knees up wearing his forage cap and infantry frock with his oval US belt plate showing and a musket with bayonet. I get a kick out of the chair pushed aside in the studio under the assumption the photo mat would cover it.   But I get more of a kick out of the  Volcanic Navy  prominently tucked into his belt!  The photographer touched up the buttons, belt plate and musket mounts, but fortunately left the pistol alone.  The lever action Volcanic pistols were the forerunners of the famed Henry Rifles which were the forerunners of the World Famous Winchester Repeating Arms.  Pictures showing someone displaying a Henry Rifle are RARE (and very expensive) …  finding a picture of someone with a Volcanic pistol is nearly IMPOSSIBLE. Our Yankee either had money or his family did.   The Volcanic pistol was one of the most expensive sidearms of the era. The pistols are downright common compared to this tintype. If money were no object I could have two dozen Volcanics purchased by the close of business today. On the other hand no amount of money could find me two dozen photos showing Volcanics. I do not believe there are more than ten or twelve such images in existence.   If you have a Volcanic in your collection this is likely your ONLY chance to find a period image showing the weapon.   A great piece of Victorian engineering, the cartridge for it was an ingenious “rocket ball” worthy of study in its own right. Nice sixth plate tintype. No case… and I venture the rarest image you will see offered this year ... $2,250.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-44 - .44 Caliber Colt’s Patent bullet mold: For the .44 caliber Model 1860 Army Revolver is this nice Colt marked mold. These .44 molds are far scarcer than the .36 and .31 caliber Colt molds…  and they are sought by Civil War and Colt collectors alike. Colt accessories in and of themselves are a lively sub-category of gun collecting and .44 Army molds are tough to find since the gun was mostly intended for military use where fixed paper cartridges were issued by the army. This mold is in VG condition, even showing some traces of blue. The interior is a two-cavity design for casting one conical and one round ball. Some light surface rust inside that will clean off easily.  Functioning sprue cutter pivots on the top.  Some light dings on both exterior flats, but the “44H” is dead clear on the one side and the “Colt’s” on the other with the “Patent” just a tad obscured by small marks.  Not priced at $1500 for a minty example … this one totally affordable for anyone to display with a VG condition Colt Army ... $255.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-45 - Here’s a cool battle casualty letter with something of a puzzle in the content…  Probably 141st Penna Vols.

“December 27th 1862
Our camp derives its name from rather a solemn source. When the fight was raging fearfully on Saturday a Preacher being on the Battle field came across a wounded soldier who was crying for water and said that he was dying. The Preacher knelt by his side and while offering up a prayer in behalf of the wounded soldier, a cannon Ball came “with all the velocity [of] Lightning” and passing through him carried away his lungs.   Hence the name of Our Camp. The soldier is fast recovering. — We have not drawed any money since we left Camp Curtin as Capt. Jackson carried the muster roll home with him consequently we did not draw any pay. But expect to have some before long. Write soon. I add no more Nick Your Brother Jim.”  End of letter.  

I can’t figure out what the camp name would be: “Luckless Preacher”? “Lungless Preacher” “Camp Lightning” ? Anyway, it makes an interesting puzzle. The curious thing is the matter of fact way the writer concludes the anecdote with the casual conclusion, after recounting the gruesome event, that “the soldier is fast recovering,” a sort of, “well, enough about those lungs being carried away, the really important thing is that the wounded soldier was wrong!” Weird in any event. The reference to Camp Curtin makes it clear we are dealing with a Pennsylvania soldier and the letter suggests that while pay was overdue it had not been all that long since they left the camp. The strongest candidate for the captain would be Capt. George W. Jackson of Company A, 141st PA. The regiment rendezvoused at Camp Curtin in the Fall and Jackson had resigned in October, so the letter is possibly by one of his men. They were at Fredericksburg in December and the date suggests the letter is written two weeks after the battle from their camp. There are a couple of soldiers named James in the company. I left the rest of the detective work to you. 
Very interesting content ... $165.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-46 - Ten Shilling Colonial Note from Pennsylvania. The graphics on these early notes are always fascinating. This one is a Ten Shilling note issued by Pennsylvania, numbered 1102 and signed by “S. Carmich” and “Sams. Fisher” on one side, with a great rococco style shield emblazoned with a ribbon reading “Mercy and Justice,” between two flanking columns, and on the other a sun rising over a farm field with the motto, “To counterfeit is death” and “printed by Hall and Sellers” at the bottom with a floral border.  With ever yone printing currency it was difficult to tell what was legitimate, what was not, and what it was worth even if it was good. “Not worth a Continental” became a catch phrase during the war, and in some cases it probably took longer for a soldier to be paid than to fight war, but it Colonial currency provides an interesting entry into the period for the collector. Absolutely cheap by comparison with anything else that gets you back to our Revolution ... $110.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-47 - Wartime North Carolina colonial currency. A twenty-five dollar bill numbered 2631 issued by North Carolina under the act of May 15, 1779. Signed by John Taylor and J. Henty on the face and printer’s identification on the reverse: “Wilmington: printed by Hugh Walker MDCCLXXIX. There is also a period ink inscription reading “from Raph Williams to,” with the name “S. Wilson” written in the margin. As is common there are warnings on the face that the death penalty applies to counterfeiting. Again, a relatively cheap entry to the world of our founding fathers ... $95.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-48 - Beautifully toned copper Powder Flask. Very attractive 1860 era flask.  All four carrying rings remain in place, as does the measuring spout on this copper flask with a raised shell motif on the body and curved floral motifs at the throat.  The measurer has the setting “dram” marked above one slot. These flasks were functional and decorative at the same time and make a great display around early hunting guns. The patterns are almost endless, and at their best they are works of art. Someone should update Riling’s “Flask Book” for a new generation.  I like them for their association with a quality hunting arm, but plenty of people collect them on their own merits.  Coil spring for lever return is broken ... $100.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-49 - GAR hat or cap badge. The Grand Army of the Republic was the largest and most politically powerful of the Union veterans’ organizations. With posts in just about every city or small town in the country a veteran might move far from men he had actually served with, but could find comrades just about wherever he went. The group reached its peak from about 1890 to 1920 with its own uniforms, ranks, etc., and its relics offer the collector an inexpensive entry in Civil War related material. This is the regulation insignia for the cap or hat: a gilt wreath surrounding the letters GAR in silver. Some slight tarnish and wear, but it displays very nicely and still has the attachment spring pin on the reverse ... $22.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-50 - 6th Regiment West Virginia Honorably Discharged Medal presented to “Oliver N. Koon Co. B  6th Reg Inf Vols.” and so stamped around the edge of the medal.  Upper pin portion of the medal with “HONORABLY DISCHARGED” on a ribbed background, the state initials “WV” below that, suspending a medal with a goddess figure of Liberty presenting a victor’s wreath to a soldier, the state seal underneath, the dates 1861 and 1865 on either side, and the motto Montani Semper Liberi in a ribband below.  On the reverse the words “Presented by the State of West Virginia” surrounded by a wreath.
Koon enlisted 8/12/61 as a private and mustered into service the same day in Company B of the 6th WV Infantry.  He was discharged 8/12/64 and after the war lived in Marion county, W.V.  The Sixth was enlisted primarily to do duty guarding the route of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad through the state and detachments from the regiment had a couple of sharp fights with bushwackers and raiders.  The outfit lost during their service 8 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, others wounded and recovered, and, as was common with Civil War regiments, scores more dead by disease.
These medals were authorized by the state in 1866 and produced by A. Demarest of New York, whose name appears on the medal below the wreath. They were issued in three classes: “Honorably Discharged,” “Killed in Battle,” and “For Liberty,” the last being for those who died of wounds or disease. These medals are extremely well designed and made and have great visual as well as historical appeal. This one lacks only its backing ribbon that hung from
the upper pin portion, otherwise perfect ... $275.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-51 - Civil War Era Key Wind Pocket Watch:  Though signed “Harlem” (& Harlem Watch Co.) this quality pocket watch was actually
made by Gallet in Switzerland.   The Gallet family began watch making in 1644 and continues to this present day.   Europe realized by the mid 19th century that Americans preferred to buy watches they “thought” were made in the US.  The Gallets recognized this and began making “American” watches in the form and design of the Waltham Company watches and signing the faces with fictitious American names… ie “HARLEM”.    When the American Civil War broke out the demand for sturdy watches with closed lid hunting cases exploded,  and European makers rushed to supply the demand.  The Gallet family was already on track and was so ambitious that in 1864 it sent brother Lucien Gallet to the United States to open sales offices in Chicago and New York with the help of his American cousin Jules Racine.  Together they sold thousands of watches to soldiers and citizens alike.  The presence of family in the USA eliminated the need to use American middle men as dealers and retail sellers and kept the Gallet profits high.  This watch is a large nickel-silver cased key-wind with sturdy hunting case.  The face is signed “HARLEM”.   The works are signed “Harlem Watch Co.” and are engraved with the serial number 51775.4 ---  It runs perfectly and comes with a sturdy silver (?) chain and key.  Researching this watch proved quite challenging.  I found advertisements for later Gallet made, Harlem marked, Stem-Wind pocket watches in 1880s American newspapers and journals.  They were much more modern in design and wound with the stem.   Our watch is the much earlier hunting case, key-wind model of the 1860s…  and is certainly the style sold to American soldiers during the war.  I could find no reference to dating by serial number but suffice it to say, this watch is absolutely proper for Civil War display or living history, though I cannot say in what year it was produced.   I simply could not find the data.  The case is marked in fine raised figure cartouches with a tiny crown, letters  “S W C”, and SILVERORE indicating nickel-silver.  I also see cleaning and repair dates from 1891 and 1875 delicately scratched into the inside of the back cover.  My research into the case reveals that the word SILVERORE is generally associated with the Fahy’s Watch Case Company which Mr. Fahy began in 1857 in New York and continued for many decades.  I could not determine how the letters “SWC” fit into the puzzle, though my guess is that is the S…. Watch Co. I also do not know if SILVERORE is exclusively used by Fahy’s.   
Runs perfectly and is in outstanding condition mechanically and cosmetically. A great old watch ... $265.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-52 - Wonderful Custom Altered 1841 Pattern U.S. Rifle- “Mississippi Rifle.” ... Named after Jefferson Davis’ famous Mexican War regiment who carried this pattern arm,  the gun became very popular and was produced not only at the Harpers Ferry Armory, but by several contractors from about 1846 to 1855. It is certainly one of the most handsome of U.S. military arms in an age when craftsmanship and beauty were valued even in a government arm.   This one is a product of the Remington company in Herkimer, NY, and is so marked on the lock plate. The company produced about 10,000 of these between 1850 and 1854 and many of the Remington examples went South.  This one has the production date of 1853 under a US at rear of the lock.  This gun bears wonderful embellishments that might indicate it was a prize gun in a militia company, or a captured war trophy, or something brought home from US military service in the 1850s???   There are three silver inlays along the forestock on each side,  about where keys would be on a wedged barrel gun.  On the underside between rear band and lock,  where a careful shooter might rest the gun,  a brass plate bearing a decorative border has been screwed in,  a decorative border has been added to the breechplug tang, and the name “J. A. Van Nortwick” is professionally engraved in script on the top of a barrel band.  A third (center) band has been added as well.   The brass patchbox has a well engraved image of a hare running past a rock with weeds above and below.  This suggests more a hunting intent for the gun,  which would agree with the removal of the sling swivels as well.  But if it is a privately owned militia gun it would have served both purposes.  The metal over all is very good, bright mixed with gray overall and some darker spots.  Some very minor corrosion from firing at the breech. The wood has that nice warm tone we like on a Mississippi and has only minor handling scratches, a check or two, and some minor wear from firing along the top rear edge of the lockplate.  Visible barrel proofs at breech.  Cartouches not readily visible on the wood.  Small US on butt plate tang along with an “A’ probably a company letter.  This is a very appealing gun and the decoration has a true prewar militia ring to it,  where independent companies might style themselves rifle companies and supply their own arms.   This rifle surfaced in Michigan and a Google search of the name J.H. Van Nortwick brings up a patent issued in 1868 to James H. Van Nortwick of Sturgis Michigan for a saw filing machine.  He may well have served in the militia or regulars in the 1850s.  I will leave that research to you. 
A very appealing and truly handsome custom Mississippi rifle ... $2,250.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-53 - Model 1879 U.S. Cavalry Trapdoor Carbine. The classic Indian War U.S. Cavalry trooper’s carbine used from the Little Big Horn to Wounded Knee, from the northern plains to actions against Apaches and raiders in Arizona and Texas.  First adopted in 1873 and issued in several different models into the 1890s,  the carbine is single-shot and .45-70 caliber, though usually firing a 55 grain carbine charge.  Some faulted the military for adopting a single shot weapon so late, but weapons like the Spencer did not have the range and ballistics needed for open country long distance shooting.  This pattern was issued starting in 1877 and changed slightly in 1879. The main improvements over the earlier guns were a thicker and shorter wrist and a compartment in the butt stock for the cleaning rod, etc.  This has the correct 1879 pattern carbine sight,  with base graduated to 800 yards and marked with a “C,” and the barrel band without the stacking swivel,  done away with in late 1879.  Barrel is very pleasing with plenty of blue turning plum color, correct VP/eagle proofs with a small P at very rear.  Receiver has some smoky hints of case and hingepin blue, breechblock has the correct markings U.S./Model/1873.  A few dings on the top of the block. Lockplate is the early version: U.S./Springfield/1873 to the right of an eagle.  The bottom of the eagle and “S” of Springfield slightly rubbed.  Wood is nice with a pleasing tone overall, some dings, but no cracks, splits or chips.  Correct Circle/P firing and inspection cartouche on underside of wrist.  A visible dated cartouche on the wrist reading SWP/1881 agrees with date range for its serial number, 181846 followed by a small star, which indicates the gun had seen service in the regular army and was called in and refurbished for issue to a state unit.  A rack number “31” is stamped in the wood above the buttplate tang and a small “50” or “30” below the triggerguard tang above the firing proof.   This is a key piece in a US martial arms, Indian War, or cavalry weapons collection.  Most saw rough service on the northern plains and in the southwest against Apaches in harsh conditions. This is a nice honest example and one you won’t have to worry about being monkeyed with by someone trying to pass off a cut down rifle or something as a cavalry trooper’s carbine.  Priced very realistically ... $1,950.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-54 - Fine 1860 Military Motif Silver Hunting Case pocket watch intended for the military trade.  On one side of this key wind pocket watch is a soldier in frock coat and epaulets with a shoulder belt who seems to rise from a stylized bit of foliage on a swirled grid background.  On the reverse, on the same background,  is probably his beloved home.  Inside the case is the number 10497, with the last three digits stamped again above.  Inner works marked “Cooper, London” and “Lever 13 Jewels,” and the face is marked “Geneva Time Keeper.”  Watches were status symbols in nineteenth century America. During the Civil War watch trading even became a fad in some regiments.  For officers they were a necessity in promptly executing orders and in coordinating movements.  There is even testimony about Custer’s officers synchronizing watches before the Little Big Horn,  though it did not seem to do them much good!  This is as classic a Civil War watch as you can find.  English made for the US military market ... $225.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-55 - Fine Condition Smith and Wesson Number Two Army Revolver. I love these guns!  The rosewood grips are so well fitted and highly polished they give these guns an immediate look of quality.  This one retains 35% to 40% original factory blue and has the scarce five in barrel.   Good early Civil War serial number – 21,234.   Sharp markings on top barrel rib and, even better, the patent dates on the cylinder are extra crisp.   Metal is a beautiful mixture of factory blue mixing with plum patina.   These were a favorite of Civil War officers since they tip up to easily and quickly remove the cylinder and load .32 caliber rimfire fixed metallic cartridges that were waterproof and did not have to be handled gingerly lest you break a paper or fabric cartridge and lose the powder as with Colt and Remington cartridges .  Custer owned a pair of these and they also saw plenty of use in the early west. A nice looking gun and a lot of bang for the buck.  Much nicer condition than most we encounter ... $875.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-56 - 1858 Remington .44 Caliber Army (Cavalry) Revolver. Serial number 123,180. Nice grips with clear military cartouche. Smooth metal in the grey, with good edges. Good scattered gray and plum age toning overall but no pitting. Sharp Remington marks on the barrel and sub inspector’s assembly letters on parts. These .44 caliber revolvers were the main challenger to Colt and were regarded by many as the superior revolver because of the solid frame with a top strap. This a very clean gun and a great example for the collector. The gun is about VG condition being all original and complete EXCEPT for a missing hand spring and cylinder stop spring.  The gun will cock and index if you point the muzzle downward. If you can make the springs the gun will be 100%. Nice CW revolver with a visible cartouche showing it was a US military arm ... $1,050.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-57 - Transitional First-Second Model Merrill Carbine, serial number 11052. Manufactured in Baltimore, about 14,000 Merrill carbines were produced for the government and issued to cavalry units including the 5th New York, 17th Pennsylvania, 1st Wisconsin and 2nd Kentucky Cavalry regiments.(See below listing for a Merrill identified to the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry.)  Breechloading .54 caliber, the carbine is loaded by raising a latch on the top of the barrel breech that draws back a plunger from the barrel and admits the cartridge. A percussion cap was then placed on the nipple and the trooper was ready for business. This is a nice looking gun, totally original and totally complete. Stock has attractive hand rubbed luster that is nicely highlighted by the brass hardware. This carbine is a late first model with the patchbox, and has the improved lever catch as seen on the later second models with no patch boxes. Mechanically perfect, good sights, sling ring, etc. all in place. Slight stain on patch box lid. Barrel has some very nice faded plum patina. Wood is nice, showing little wear and retaining decent edges. There is a tiny hairline stress line on the right wrist only.  It does not extend through the wrist.   Some light salt-and-peppering on the lockplate and a little bit of wear to the patent information forward of the hammer and on the latch. These Merrills saw hard service in the Civil War and MANY were carried by Virginia Confederates as they were produced locally in the years preceding the Civil War as well as during the war years. A nice gun and great cavalry display piece ... $1,950.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-58 - Inscribed Second Kentucky Cavalry First Pattern Merrill Carbine. Very plainly scratched into the brass patchbox of this first model Merrill is “T. Davis / Co. ‘B’ 2 KY.” This scratched in by Davis himself during the war. Research finds our man easily enough… Thomas Davis enlisted on 8/27/61 at Muldrough’s Hill, KY, as a private and was mustered into Co. “B” of the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry on 9/9/61. He served throughout the war, being discharged on 5/29/65. The Second Kentucky was a very active regiment in the Army of Ohio, Department and Army of the Ohio and Cumberland, and the Military Division of the Mississippi. They saw serious combat service and had 5 officers and 51 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, which is a very heavy loss for a cavalry unit. CWData lists forty different occasions when the regiment took casualties. The regiment was actively engaged in scouting and skirmishing and was engaged at Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, the opening of the Atlanta campaign, and was with Sherman in Georgia and the Carolinas. There are extensive reports from the regiment in the Official Records that make great reading and offer the chance for a lot of further research. The gun itself is very nice. NRA V.G. The receiver and lock have good sharp markings. The serial number is 7574. Mechanically perfect. 100% original 100% complete. Barrel gray mixed with brown and some dark spots. Smooth overall, no pitting. Smoky color lock shows whispers of case color. Deep untouched patina on the brass barrel band. Has earliest type flat knurled breech latch, and the early lock markings without eagle. Slight rounding to the wood edges as would be expected, but no chips, splits, cracks, etc. The only fault I see is the cleanout screw on the bolster is missing its head. This is a nice gun with a dead-real identification to a unit that saw a lot of action.
A real piece of history with much more research that can be done ... $3,500.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-59 - First Model Merrill w/ Real Saddle Wear – This One Was There! , serial number 5489, showing some cool saddle wear. First model carbine with patch box and flat knurled breech latch, and lock without eagle motif. Sights, barrel band, sling ring, etc. in place. 100% original and complete. Mechanically perfect. Metal very good, smooth, gray with dark areas, but no pitting. Markings fairly sharp. Wood shows honest wartime wear and handling but no abuse. There is a small stress line forward of the barrel band, but still very solid. The near side of the butt stock has three lines scratched in the wood- perhaps some trooper was thinking of adding his initials. More interesting is the unmistakable wartime saddle wear clearly shown by the vertical rubbed groove across the back side of the butt stock. These vertical rubbed areas were formed when the gun rubbed “up and down” in a continuous motion as it swung from the troopers carbine sling with the stock rubbing on the saddle every step of the way. When you see these wear marks on a carbine or Winchester --- you know FOR SURE you are looking at a gun that really did see service in the saddle. No bullshit - that is the straight story. Here is a Civil War carbine that was really there ... $2,150.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-60 - Rifled & Sighted Harpers Ferry Model 1842 Musket with Bayonet:  Dated 1847. A magic armory name with a Mexican War date, then rifled and sighted --- this ’42 has all the bells and whistles. Marked Harpers Ferry / 1847 at rear of lock, eagle over US at front. Typical small Harpers Ferry assembly numbers/letters on parts. Visible VP/eagle at barrel breech,  the eagle shows wear. A bit of corrosion on the butt plate from standing on a floor, nothing bad, and the US is clearly visible. Good wood with some rounding around the lock but fairly sharp edges on the reverse. Cartouche marks no longer visible. Sling swivels,  barrel bands, ramrod, bayonet stud, etc., original and in place. A nice gun that was made for service during the Mexican War then returned to the armory between 1856 and 1859, where it was rifled, and given a long range rear sight to enable it to compete with the 1855 series of arms. About 14,000 of these were rifled at Harpers Ferry and Springfield, about 2/3 of them also being given the improved rear sight. The bayonet was obviously on this gun for decades. When removed the exposed four inch section of barrel is bright steel whereas the balance of the gun and bayonet is the deep brown age patina shown in the pictures ... a patina that would take even the most dedicated family of nicotine addicts decades to reproduce. With this comes the aforementioned original 1842 bayonet, US marked on the blade, small C on the socket, brown overall and the socket. The fact that these Harpers Ferry guns were made in Virginia makes them many times more desirable from the standpoint of likelihood of use in the Confederacy. A top notch attic condition “rifled & sighted ‘42”…
100% original 100% complete and mechanically perfect ... $1,950.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-61 - Sharps and Hankins 1862 Pattern 19 Inch Cavalry Carbine, serial number 3117. With only about 1,000 of these carbines made w/ 19 inch barrels, this pattern is much rarer than its Navy counterpart, and far more appealing as we know that most were issued to the 11th N.Y. Cavalry (and also the 3rd New York Cavalry and 9th). As Flayderman notes, whereas the “Army” version used a longer barrel that differed from the “Navy” version in lacking screwholes which secured the navy leather cover, the “Cavalry” version often used shortened Navy barrels showing those holes and sometimes even bear Navy inspectors’ initials on the frames.   This gun is a very nice example of this scarce variant,  showing the typical navy barrel in the cavalry configuration of 19 inch length and no band at the muzzle. Metal is grey steel with no pitting,  rumors of finish,  and really, really nice wood- tight fit to the metal and smooth surface with great color.  Rear sight, sling swivel on belly and carbine sling ring at left side. Brass butt plate. This is a sharp gun and a key piece for the cavalry buff, or the Sharps collector.  Interestingly this gun is marked only with the serial number 3117. This number is in the known range of guns issued to the 3rd New York cavalry, being loosely bracketed by 3029, 3037, and 3242, 3337. This does NOT prove that our carbine was issued to the 3rd, it simply shows that it “might” have been so issued.   It does not bear the Sharps & Hankins legend on the frame.  Reason ? – unknown.  A good solid cavalry model ... $1,950.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-62 - Harpers Ferry Musket Altered to “Musketoon”:Repair everything that will shoot and where the barrels are not too much impaired, cut them off and make carbines of them” Josiah Gorgas, CS Chief of Ordnance.

The south was always hard-pressed for cavalry arms and altering old or damaged muskets to carbine and musketoon length was a good stop-gap measure. Here is as good a candidate for one of these guns as I have seen in a while:  a Mexican War dated 1848 Harpers Ferry 1842 musket cut down to a musketoon.  Murphy’s book  Confederate Carbines and Musketoons shows the same modification to a musket by S.C. Robinson on page 167.  In both cases the barrel is simply lopped off between the upper mounts,  no attempt is made to add a front sight, and the wood is taken back from the muzzle toward the middle mount and given a very straight cut.  On both this gun and the one Murphy shows there was no attempt to move down the upper mount or fit an end cap,  and the sling swivels are retained on the triggerguard and middle (now upper) mount.  These alterations do not at all seem an effort to “sporterize” a gun by lightening the weight as much as possible and making it a civilian arm …  but rather appears to be a quick and necessary modification to a military weapon to keep it in military service.

Overall the condition as altered is fine ++. The Harpers Ferry and 1848 date at rear of lockplate are crisp, as is the eagle/US forward of the hammer.  The barrel has very clear matching barrel date of 1848 and very clear VP/eagle proofs and inspector initials just forward of them.  The two Harpers Ferry cartouches on the offside flat are also crisp,  as are the edges of the flat,  though there are some dings and marks from resting against other guns,  one looks like it is from a screwhead.  The wood surrounding the lockplate (aka the lock table)  has fine sharp edges. The buttstock shows minor marks, but does have a small cross carved on one side and a “VA” on the other, which is hard to look at without thinking “Virginia.”  Metal is pretty much smooth brown overall that would clean up a bit with 4-0 steel wool and oil, but has a nice untouched look and I would leave it as is.  A neat old musketoon that may well have been altered by the Rebs ... $850.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-63 --- 12-11-20 - Extra Fine, High Finish, Springfield Refurbished 1860 Spencer Army rifle!   Only 1215 of these rifles were refurbished at our National Arsenal and this one not only has 80% of the arsenal reblue present,  but the serial number is just one number off a known Wilder’s Brigade gun!  Very scarce Civil War Model 1860 army rifle that was kept in the service and sent to Springfield Arsenal to have a Stabler Cut-Off added and be resleeved to .50 cal. rimfire with a three groove bore.  This retains very clear “Spencer Repeating Rifle Co. Boston. Mass. Pat’d March 6, 1860” marks at breech and the clear low serial number of 5380 on the wrist.  I don’t know whether I like this gun better because of the nice wood, excellent 80% barrel blue and visible case colors on the receiver, or because it is so close to a known Wilder’s gun.   Wilder’s Spencers all saw heavy saddle wear and those we find that went home with members of the Lightning Brigade show heavy use bordering on abuse.  The wood on those guns looks almost like an Indian carried gun.  Those rifles that were returned to the army and sent to Springfield are the few that now survive in fine condition.  This has fine wood and is  mechanically perfect.  100% original and 100% complete as refurbished ca 1867.  The history of the Spencer is too well known among collectors to need repeating and Wilder’s brigade is probably the unit most famous for carrying them  (I think he even edges out Custer’s Michigan Troopers.) Finding a Spencer with any sort of condition is very special. When these were sent to Springfield at the end of the war they were given new lined bores with three groove rifling,  they had the ejector port area of the frame filed to a rounded contour on the edges, were given new stocks,  and most were fit with a Stabler cut-off device.  The Stabler device was a simple mechanical turn key that prevented a fresh cartridge from loading into the chamber after the soldier fired and ejected a round.  This was not an option on the first guns.  The Stabler device let the soldier fire the gun as a single-shot and keep the magazine in reserve.  This is an exceedingly handsome example of a wartime Spencer rifle that was likely carried in the Lightning Brigade,
and that still retains its 1867 Arsenal finish ... $3,450.00 SOLD

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13-04-64 --- 12-10-22 - Civil War era bowie knife by James Westa, one of the best quality English makers from Sheffield supplying knives to the American market during the period of the California Gold Rush up to the Civil War era. Double edge spear point style with a nice blade and no sign of modern sharpening, mixed bright and gray blade. Very attractive silver or German silver top mount and slab grips secured by two pins. On one side the slab is bone, and the other side has a mother of pearl slab. The guard is a very attractive “upside down wing” with floral or shell raised motifs. The pommel matches with similar slightly flaring ridges. A tight knife. A handsome knife. No play in the handle. Comes with the original leather covered pasteboard sheath in good condition, one slight crosswise crease, but sturdy, the leather a dark greenish blue with stamped gilt border. Original German silver upper or throat mount. The scabbard tip is a replacement from a period knife, slightly darker than the throat, but a good match. A top notch Bowie knife from the early days…. 6.5” blade. Roughly 12” total length ... $875.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-65 --- 12-10-24 - Rare Pattern Staff or Infantry Militia Officer’s Sword Ca. 1830’s: Noted sword authority Harold Peterson recognized this pattern as interesting and unusual when he first wrote his book The American Sword over half a century ago. The photos can give you a better description than my written attempt, but I will fill in the technical notes. This sword can be considered quite scarce with only a few specimens coming on the market each year. This has a richly etched 30 inch straight, double edged, blade with beautiful floral sprays, military motifs, US eagle, E Pluribus Unum, Warranted, etc... acid etched into both sides of the blade. The etching is extremely well done... every bit as good as Ames. The blade is unsigned. The pommel, guard, languets, and scabbard are all finely decorated polished steel that was once likely silver plated. The metal color now is a most appealing, shiny black about like tarnished silver. The condition is excellent save for a tiny chip in one side of the grip where it meets the pommel. The languets are shell shaped, and the finials on each end of the cross guard are acorn motifs.
Very handsome and very solid ... $975.00

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13-04-66 --- 12-09-14 - Wonderful Folk Art Civil War Eagle Drum: Fresh from a family in California is this regulation Government Contract Union Army Eagle Drum with drum sticks affixed for display. Measures roughly 16” dia x 13” tall in size… the bottom edge of the shell was shortened during its period of use to change the pitch. Excellent paint with no flaking and only minimal wear. The riband in the eagle’s mouth was over-painted, obscuring the regimental designation originally painted there. I presume this was done when the GAR post or museum added the drum sticks to it. The word “INFANTRY” can still be faintly seen on the viewer’s right hand side. Perhaps a competent art restorer could remove the over-paint and reveal the unit. Makes a superb display piece with the four drum sticks affixed to the rims forming a sort of “table” affair. Ropes are original but broken in places. No label remains. Very cool Civil War drum. Looks fabulous on display
with other CW antiques as accents ... $3,250.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-67 --- 12-10-25 - Fine and Scarce Autographed CDV of Maj. Gen. John A. Dix. His most famous quote … “If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot.” There is even a Civil War penny token which utilizes this wonderful quote. Very sharp full-standing Matthew Brady view with Brady’s name in the negative at bottom right (the better to deter pirate copies!) Signed boldly in his own hand… “John A. Dix” in ink prominently at bottom center. Dix is shown with his hands folded on a beautiful 1832 General Officer’s sword with a knot, swordbelt with NY officer plate, and a major general’s frockcoat with epaulets. Dix had served in the War of 1812, but left the army in 1828 and settled in New York. He served briefly in the US Senate and after the war a term as Governor of the state. In 1861 Lincoln made him Major General of Volunteers 5/16/61 and that early date meant he outranked all other volunteer officers. As Secretary of the Treasury under Buchanan as the Civil War approached he sent his famous message to a Treasury official in New Orleans: “If anyone attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot.” Dix’s signature is very strong at the bottom center of the carte … A very collectible CW autograph and
even more desirable being autographed on the front of the photo ... $475.00

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13-04-68 - Regulation Cavalry Shell Jacket: Just like the old days (except for the price J ) is this size 3 cavalry jacket.   Near mint unissued condition. Well marked with maker (Lee), US Inspector, Size number “3”, and then again with later “Miller Costumer” stamps in both sleeve linings.  Has full and complete original muslin lining in body and sleeves.  Both pillows intact on the reverse.  No significant moth damage.  The only repair needed is to re-tack the right sleeve lining in place where it has pulled loose. Inconsequential.  These jackets were manufactured in four sizes with “1” being the smallest and “4” being the largest.  This is a desirable large size “3”. A top shelf example ... $2,850.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-69 - Superb Model 1858 US Army Hardee Hat: An absolutely stellar example of the army issue Hardee hat as issued to all branches of the service during the Civil War.  Complete with label in the crown and intact original sweatband. This one adorned for cavalry service with an original yellow cavalry hat cord in place.  The brass side eagle is a re-strike.  The crossed saber insignia and letter “C” may be originals as I can see loops extending into the interior of the hat body.  But I have not removed the insignia from the hat and do not feel it would be wise to force the issue.  Superb condition with one PROFESSIONAL repair to a crease in the brim (see photo).  Solid, very handsome, and getting very hard to find.  I have seen these hammer-down at over $5000 numerous times at auction ... $3,850.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-70 - ORIGINAL CIVIL WAR FORAGE CAP --- aka BUMMER’S CAP: Out of an ancient collection from the “old days” comes this wonderful Model 1858 Union soldier’s forage cap. It is totally original and complete with full lining, complete sweat band, and faint remnants of the label. (Most likely L.J. & I. Phillips based on the style of the cap.) , both side buttons,chinstrap, and original visor are in place. The cap is a very attractive deep midnight blue in excellent condition... just a few small moth nips in the body and a minor repair along the rear seam. The cap had once had the back “gathered in” and stitched so that it would fit a smaller head. My guess is that this was done circa 1950s so a young person could wear it. I had my wife undo the “gathering” and repair a small tear in the same area. A superb display item... and 100% original and complete ... $2,650.00 ... SOLD

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13-04-71 - Rare Sharps Model 1852 Slant Breech Carbine: Frequently confused with the similar 1853 “John Brown Sharps” these 1852 models are much scarcer and are seldom found in such fine condition as this specimen. This near fine condition Model 1852 carbine is one of an estimated 5,000 such pieces made. .52 caliber, breechloading, invented and patented by Christian Sharps. This is the first Sharps’ side-hammer lock which replaced the even rarer 1851 Sharps Box Lock carbines. The 1852 date on this model weapon signifies the patent year in which Sharps invented the pellet priming system and integrated it into the lock mechanism. This model was produced between 1853 and 1855. Breechblock bears serial 5151. Lockplate is stamped “C. SHARPS / PATENT / 1852”, tang is marked with “C. SHARPS / PATENT / 1848”. Barrel breech exhibits the maker’s name with a three-line address of “SHARP’S RIFLE / MANUF’G CO. / HARTFORD, CONN.” Interior of patchbox is stamped “10”. Condition is near fine. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, no damage, no defects, no replaced or repaired parts. TOP NOTCH. Metal is smooth plum. Wood looks like a great piece of hand rubbed furniture. Markings are all totally legible. One heck of a fine example of one of the scarcest Sharps carbines. Super Model 1852 … $4,700.00 ... SOLD

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